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View Full Version : Getting used to bass...




Blackberryroid
Oct 21, 2012, 08:33 AM
Don't you just get annoyed when your ears get used to bass? You buy headphones with strong bass, and in a few weeks, it sounds like it's an ordinary earphone. The bass isn't strong anymore.

How do I know that it's the ears that got used to bass? Because I stopped listening to music for a week, and when I listened again, the bass is strong, as if it was new. Then it looses again.

*Too long didn't read part, you may skip to the bottom*

But I found a solution. It's called the "Equalizer".

I boosted the bass. Weeks passed, my ears still got used to bass. So I went full insane over this. The midrange was dramatically lowered to the minimum, and the bass was a lot higher (but not to high to avoid distortion). Surprisingly, I still got used to the strong bass. It's as if I didn't set an equalizer at all. As if it was just flat. The equalizer was at it's limit. Any higher will distort the audio. So I found a solution.

Double pass equalizer.
An equalizer over an equalizer. So again, bass got boosted. It has a strong bass, and my ears didn't get used anymore. But there's a problem. On my iPhone, you can't have a double pass equalizer, only a single equalizer is possible.

Is it just me or does everyone get used to the bass too?



bwhli
Oct 21, 2012, 10:55 AM
It's just how our ears work. I don't really listen to bass-heavy music, but I know what you're getting at. Just curious, why do you insist of having large amounts of bass?

Julien
Oct 21, 2012, 11:22 AM
...But I found a solution. It's called the "Equalizer".
This is a poor solution. A much better solution is learning/conditioning yourself by listening to the most accurate reproduction possible. Also besides altering the frequency response the DSP EQ is notorious for adding distortion too.

It's just how our ears work...

...and actually all our senses.

paolo-
Oct 21, 2012, 01:04 PM
I did encounter a similar chalenge when going from tiny speakers to speakers that could actually pump out some bass. Think of it this way, when you went from bad headphones to good ones you went from not hearing enough bass to hearing the amount that was probably intended (not sure what headphones you have).

Not enough bass for you? Turn it up! http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fletcher%E2%80%93Munson_curves Basically, the frequency response of your ear changes with the volume. The louder the source, the less mid rangy it sounds. One of the reasons why turning the volume up sounds better. I'm not sure what your listening habits are but be mindful of not straining your hearing.

I guess the other way to get around your problem would be to listen to some ipod earbuds to convince you that you are indeed getting the proper amount of bass.

quasinormal
Oct 21, 2012, 02:14 PM
Is it just me or does everyone get used to the bass too?

I believe I have a solution.

Subwoofer vest. (http://www.gizmodo.com.au/2011/12/be-a-vibrating-party-dude-with-this-subwoofer-vest/)

Destroysall
Oct 21, 2012, 09:00 PM
Don't you just get annoyed when your ears get used to bass? You buy headphones with strong bass, and in a few weeks, it sounds like it's an ordinary earphone. The bass isn't strong anymore.

How do I know that it's the ears that got used to bass? Because I stopped listening to music for a week, and when I listened again, the bass is strong, as if it was new. Then it looses again.

*Too long didn't read part, you may skip to the bottom*

But I found a solution. It's called the "Equalizer".

I boosted the bass. Weeks passed, my ears still got used to bass. So I went full insane over this. The midrange was dramatically lowered to the minimum, and the bass was a lot higher (but not to high to avoid distortion). Surprisingly, I still got used to the strong bass. It's as if I didn't set an equalizer at all. As if it was just flat. The equalizer was at it's limit. Any higher will distort the audio. So I found a solution.

Double pass equalizer.
An equalizer over an equalizer. So again, bass got boosted. It has a strong bass, and my ears didn't get used anymore. But there's a problem. On my iPhone, you can't have a double pass equalizer, only a single equalizer is possible.

Is it just me or does everyone get used to the bass too?

Are you only using earphones? If so, just an FYI, earphones are not the best of the audio world by any means. I would recommend headphones. Something like the Audio Technica M50 or the Sennheiser HD 25-1 II, and pair it with the FiiO E10, which has 'bass boost' as a feature.

Julien
Oct 22, 2012, 06:21 AM
Are you only using earphones? If so, just an FYI, earphones are not the best of the audio world by any means. I would recommend headphones. Something like the Audio Technica M50 or the Sennheiser HD 25-1 II, and pair it with the FiiO E10, which has 'bass boost' as a feature.

There are some very competent IEM's that will produce low frequencies accurately. I use UE Pro 11's and there are other makes like JH Audio. You can also get good results with some universal fit IEM's. Of course "cans" can :D offer the best overall experience. However on the move IEM's are a much better choice.

Destroysall
Oct 23, 2012, 01:03 AM
There are some very competent IEM's that will produce low frequencies accurately. I use UE Pro 11's and there are other makes like JH Audio. You can also get good results with some universal fit IEM's. Of course "cans" can :D offer the best overall experience. However on the move IEM's are a much better choice.
Exactly. JH Audio's are nice, but they are expensive in the long run. I'd personally would just stick with headphones though. The Audio Technica ESW-9 is a great headphone and it is perfectly portable as well. If the OP has an issue with his earphones having a lack bass, spending more money on earphones won't help him in the long run.

TMRaven
Oct 23, 2012, 08:16 AM
No there's something wrong with that. Yes our (brains) get used to the sound, and over time something becomes our neutral, but you shouldn't be having to continuously up the bass. There comes a point where it eventually muddies out the mids and highs, and then the audio experience is ruined. Also simply changing songs or taking breaks from the audio should solve your problem as well.

For what it's worth, I've never had this problem. I use a PSB speaker rig and Hifiman headphones.

bwhli
Oct 24, 2012, 04:10 PM
There are some very competent IEM's that will produce low frequencies accurately. I use UE Pro 11's and there are other makes like JH Audio. You can also get good results with some universal fit IEM's. Of course "cans" can :D offer the best overall experience. However on the move IEM's are a much better choice.

Agreed. I have a pair of Shure SE535's, and I absolutely love them! Plenty of bass, in my opinion. I'm looking to get a pair of JH16's someday. I play out a lot and having a custom set of IEM's would be wonderful.

sim667
Oct 25, 2012, 08:42 AM
Don't you just get annoyed when your ears get used to bass? You buy headphones with strong bass, and in a few weeks, it sounds like it's an ordinary earphone. The bass isn't strong anymore.

How do I know that it's the ears that got used to bass? Because I stopped listening to music for a week, and when I listened again, the bass is strong, as if it was new. Then it looses again.

*Too long didn't read part, you may skip to the bottom*

But I found a solution. It's called the "Equalizer".

I boosted the bass. Weeks passed, my ears still got used to bass. So I went full insane over this. The midrange was dramatically lowered to the minimum, and the bass was a lot higher (but not to high to avoid distortion). Surprisingly, I still got used to the strong bass. It's as if I didn't set an equalizer at all. As if it was just flat. The equalizer was at it's limit. Any higher will distort the audio. So I found a solution.

Double pass equalizer.
An equalizer over an equalizer. So again, bass got boosted. It has a strong bass, and my ears didn't get used anymore. But there's a problem. On my iPhone, you can't have a double pass equalizer, only a single equalizer is possible.

Is it just me or does everyone get used to the bass too?

Its called attenuation, and the only real solutions are things like these

http://i41.tinypic.com/tz87c.jpg

http://www.speakerplans.com/photos/021funktion1.jpg