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MacRumors
Oct 25, 2012, 02:58 PM
http://images.macrumors.com/im/macrumorsthreadlogo.gif (http://www.macrumors.com/2012/10/25/which-tests-phil-schillers-ipad-mini-weight-comparison-claims/)


'Which?', a UK-based consumer advocacy organization, has performed some research (http://blogs.which.co.uk/technology/tablets-ebooks/is-the-ipad-mini-really-as-light-as-a-pad-of-paper/) and determined that Apple's claims about the lightness of the iPad Mini appear to be accurate. The device is roughly the same weight as some heavier notepads, and is lighter than a can of Coke or a loaf of bread:

http://images.macrumors.com/article-new/2012/10/NewImage41.pngSo there it is; the iPad mini isn't quite as light as a pad of paper - at least our non-spiraled softback pad. There are certainly pads of paper that are heavier so Phil Schiller's claim that it's as light as a pad of paper is about right.

It'll certainly feel lighter than a can of coke in your hands, making it easier to hold in a single hand while you browse the web for long periods or read ebooks on the move.

While lighter than the Kindle Fire (395g) and the Google Nexus (334g), the difference is probably too insubstantial to influence your buying choice.

Article Link: 'Which?' Tests Phil Schiller's iPad Mini Weight Comparison Claims (http://www.macrumors.com/2012/10/25/which-tests-phil-schillers-ipad-mini-weight-comparison-claims/)



asd789789
Oct 25, 2012, 03:03 PM
What the *** is going on here :confused:

Battlefield Fan
Oct 25, 2012, 03:04 PM
yawn

alexander25
Oct 25, 2012, 03:04 PM
but we don't know how many pages of paper apple's pad of paper had..

pubwvj
Oct 25, 2012, 03:05 PM
I want an iPad Maxi. A MaxiPad. Larger screen. And pen sensitivity for drawing and painting.

ziggyonice
Oct 25, 2012, 03:05 PM
Read this as, "Which Tests Phil Schiller's Weight."

:rolleyes:

shanmugam
Oct 25, 2012, 03:06 PM
the one Phil had has more paper :D

hopefully another couple of years APPLE bring down the weight even more.

carbon fiber on the back of the iPad mini? any one? ;)

50548
Oct 25, 2012, 03:06 PM
What the *** is going on here :confused:

So let me understand this:

- The pad of paper used in the example weighs 226g;

- the irrelevant iPad Mini weighs 312g;

- therefore, the iPad Mini is "lighter" than a pad of paper?

These guys need some lessons in logic, really...what a pathetic article.

iMikeT
Oct 25, 2012, 03:11 PM
But will it blend?

tann
Oct 25, 2012, 03:11 PM
The iPad 3 is only 50g or so heavier than the iPad 2 but I really could feel that, so I'm assuming it'll be similar for me at least on the mini vs competition.

Icaras
Oct 25, 2012, 03:16 PM
I am so happy to finally know that my soon to be iPad mini will be lighter than a loaf of bread.

pnoyblazed
Oct 25, 2012, 03:17 PM
Read this as, "Which Tests Phil Schiller's Weight."

:rolleyes:

yup.. definitely weighs more than a loaf of bread

TMar
Oct 25, 2012, 03:18 PM
It's news that a device is it's stated weight?

Virtualball
Oct 25, 2012, 03:18 PM
So let me understand this:

- The pad of paper used in the example weighs 226g;

- the irrelevant iPad Mini weighs 312g;

- therefore, the iPad Mini is "lighter" than a pad of paper?

These guys need some lessons in logic, really...what a pathetic article.


the iPad mini isn't quite as light as a pad of paper - at least our non-spiraled softback pad. There are certainly pads of paper that are heavier so Phil Schiller's claim that it's as light as a pad of paper is about right.

Its weight is very close to the pad they had on hand, but it was a little heavier. Apple didn't say it was lighter than that specific pad of paper, and since there are heavier pads out there and the iPad Mini's weight is so close to this one, they say that his claim is most likely correct. God, is it so hard to read??

asd789789
Oct 25, 2012, 03:19 PM
So let me understand this:

- The pad of paper used in the example weighs 226g;

- the irrelevant iPad Mini weighs 312g;

- therefore, the iPad Mini is "lighter" than a pad of paper?

These guys need some lessons in logic, really...what a pathetic article.

Don't forget about the coke and the break ;)

SVTVenom
Oct 25, 2012, 03:22 PM
So let me understand this:

- The pad of paper used in the example weighs 226g;

- the irrelevant iPad Mini weighs 312g;

- therefore, the iPad Mini is "lighter" than a pad of paper?

These guys need some lessons in logic, really...what a pathetic article.

"So there it is; the iPad mini isn't quite as light as a pad of paper - at least our non-spiraled softback pad. There are certainly pads of paper that are heavier so Phil Schiller's claim that it's as light as a pad of paper is about right."

Some lessons in reading, too.

OtherJesus
Oct 25, 2012, 03:23 PM
Seeing this on the front page is going to cause my eyes to bleed.

50548
Oct 25, 2012, 03:23 PM
Its weight is very close to the pad they had on hand, but it was a little heavier. Apple didn't say it was lighter than that specific pad of paper, and since there are heavier pads out there and the iPad Mini's weight is so close to this one, they say that his claim is most likely correct. God, is it so hard to read??

Of course not; I was talking about logic and consistency with what was shown in the article. After all, anyone can come up with a 1kg pad of paper, right? ;)

CGagnon
Oct 25, 2012, 03:24 PM
totally

KeepCalmPeople
Oct 25, 2012, 03:31 PM
In other news, another website that has jumped on the Apple bandwagon to draw eyeballs and thus ad revenue, has tested Phil Schiller's assertion that the iPad mini is 'amazing'. The summary on page 5 is that the iPad mini is indeed 'amazing'... to those that are amazed by it, but not so amazing to those who don't care.

Incidentlly, when is Apple going to trademark the words 'amazing' and 'thin', and possibly 'fantastic' and of course 'amazingly thin'?

ajvizzgamer101
Oct 25, 2012, 03:34 PM
What the *** is going on here :confused:

Based on technicalities, Apple had a big pad of notebook paper which weighted more than the iPad Mini. You can also find pad of paper that weighs less.

aristotle
Oct 25, 2012, 03:38 PM
Wow, that is amazing. Some site is able to find a pad of paper that weighs less than the iPad mini. Congrats. :rolleyes:

Apple did not claim that the iPad mini was lighter than any pad of paper.

What they were probably comparing against was the typical pad of paper used in "America" in offices which would be a soft cardboard backed lined US Letter sized pad of paper with tear off sheets that is either yellow with blue stripes or white with blue stripes.

I'm sure there are smaller/lighter pads of paper available and heavier ones as well.

The UK advocacy group probably did not take page size into consideration or what type of pads of paper are used in the US.
:rolleyes:

Torrijos
Oct 25, 2012, 03:39 PM
GRAVE NEWS everyone the last EVER pad of paper weights 226gr...

Insanity ensues!

Westside guy
Oct 25, 2012, 03:43 PM
My third-generation Kindle ("Kindle Keyboard") weighs 247 grams, according to teh Googlez.

Pared
Oct 25, 2012, 03:51 PM
Do people REALLY get paid to do this?

miknos
Oct 25, 2012, 03:56 PM
In the Keynote he was "hiding" the iMac showing only the corner and not the full side view. I guess Schiller is not only a fat, it's a fat liar.

BSben
Oct 25, 2012, 03:58 PM
Is it possible that some people here are taking things a bit serious?

Surreal
Oct 25, 2012, 04:13 PM
Grams is a funny unit to deliver weight in, in my opinion. I know it works with a little finesse, it is just funny.

macs4nw
Oct 25, 2012, 04:37 PM
It must be tiresome to be drinking Coke and eating bread, while I'm on my iPad Mini! ;)

On a serious note, notebooks and especially tablets can't be TOO light; anyone who's ever been leisurely on their iPad for a couple of hours, can attest to that.

50548
Oct 25, 2012, 04:42 PM
Grams is a funny unit to deliver weight in, in my opinion. I know it works with a little finesse, it is just funny.

It's an international standard, as opposed to the obsolete imperial system (itself based on the metric system), nowadays officially used only by the US, Burma and...Liberia.

WildCowboy
Oct 25, 2012, 04:48 PM
Seeing this on the front page is going to cause my eyes to bleed.
Yeah, we totally should have put this story on the blog.

Oh, wait...

SuperCachetes
Oct 25, 2012, 05:16 PM
It's news that a device is it's stated weight?

Sounds like they were fishing for "Weightgate..." :rolleyes:

sofila
Oct 25, 2012, 05:19 PM
...by the end of the day both bread and coke can will be lighter than the iPad mini :D

janderson0719
Oct 25, 2012, 05:22 PM
Definitely gotta get an iPad mini now. I've been waiting for these results.

TimTheEnchanter
Oct 25, 2012, 05:22 PM
The graphic in the story got cut-off. Here's the full image...
;)

tdream
Oct 25, 2012, 06:02 PM
The graphic in the story got cut-off. Here's the full image...

That's a healthy movement.

topmounter
Oct 25, 2012, 06:27 PM
It's hard to believe that the iPad Jr will be lighter than my Nexus7.

portishead
Oct 25, 2012, 07:03 PM
So let me understand this:

- The pad of paper used in the example weighs 226g;

- the irrelevant iPad Mini weighs 312g;

- therefore, the iPad Mini is "lighter" than a pad of paper?

These guys need some lessons in logic, really...what a pathetic article.

You need a lesson in "calm down it's just the internet".

thefourthpope
Oct 25, 2012, 07:10 PM
Some grouches are posting here today! I liked this--I tend to compare stuff like this myself, and the visual makes it straightforward. Really puts the kindle in perspective, too. I'm always stunned how light that little gadget is.

ArtOfWarfare
Oct 25, 2012, 07:29 PM
Do people REALLY get paid to do this?

No, but lots of people think you need a college degree to do it.

MattInOz
Oct 25, 2012, 07:30 PM
Maybe the pad in the article was A4 while Apple used US legal pad.
:D

the8thark
Oct 25, 2012, 07:35 PM
What the *** is going on here :confused:
I second this. I think this new box is way more interesting and deserves to be on the front page. But no we get this as an article. WTF???

And here is the box I am talking about:

http://static2.businessinsider.com/image/50883006ecad046d49000004-400-340/imac-box.jpg

----------

Grams is a funny unit to deliver weight in, in my opinion. I know it works with a little finesse, it is just funny.
Only funny to the few non metric countries.

Mystic386
Oct 25, 2012, 08:46 PM
I think we can all agree that Phil was right and this has been nothing but a which hunt.

Perhaps Which can change their name to Why or even Who cares.

ThunderSkunk
Oct 25, 2012, 09:35 PM
The iPod touch and the iPad mini are two products where there should be one.

Halfway between the size of both to fit in a back/cargo pocket, soft round edge that doesn't dig into your hand, a retina display, cellular option, and max out the remaining space with battery.

inscrewtable
Oct 25, 2012, 09:39 PM
I used to wonder what ipad 321g and coke 412g meant. But thanks to the infographic I can finally understand these abstruse mathematical constructs.

MagnumOP
Oct 25, 2012, 09:54 PM
Is this something that has to be tested? I am pretty sure that any pad of paper you can buy online will list its dimensions and weight.

HoopTrundler
Oct 25, 2012, 10:41 PM
So let me understand this:

- The pad of paper used in the example weighs 226g;

- the irrelevant iPad Mini weighs 312g;

- therefore, the iPad Mini is "lighter" than a pad of paper?

These guys need some lessons in logic, really...what a pathetic article.

This is why we need the downvote button back. The fact that one of the top-rated comments comes from somebody who clearly didn't even read the article is just sad.

JAT
Oct 25, 2012, 11:43 PM
Grams is a funny unit to deliver weight in, in my opinion. I know it works with a little finesse, it is just funny.

You mean, because it should be mass? Not weight? Otherwise, I don't get it.

Swift
Oct 26, 2012, 12:31 AM
So let me understand this:

- The pad of paper used in the example weighs 226g;

- the irrelevant iPad Mini weighs 312g;

- therefore, the iPad Mini is "lighter" than a pad of paper?

These guys need some lessons in logic, really...what a pathetic article.

He didn't say "lighter than," and neither did the article. He said "as light as." Given that there is no "official weight" of a pad of paper, all you can say is, it's a reasonable idea of how much it weighs. Pick up a pad of paper. Now pick up one on a ring binder. Now a thicker one. Now a thinner one. There. It about the same weight as one of those. Jeez.

urbanlung
Oct 26, 2012, 01:42 AM
Grams is a funny unit to deliver weight in, in my opinion. I know it works with a little finesse, it is just funny.


Yeah, I always weigh things in either US Dollars or Cubits.

tatonka
Oct 26, 2012, 02:14 AM
Grams is a funny unit to deliver weight in, in my opinion. I know it works with a little finesse, it is just funny.

As opposed to what? Stones and ounces?

mnemonix
Oct 26, 2012, 02:23 AM
Do people REALLY get paid to do this?

They do at Which, whose only reason for existence is to state the obvious in the guise of consumer advise for the old & terminally stupid.

ansinkhh
Oct 26, 2012, 02:54 AM
So, Phil should've said "the iPad mini weighs about $312 bucks":D

prowlmedia
Oct 26, 2012, 03:50 AM
US Letter = 216 ◊ 279

UK / EU = A4 257 ◊ 364

Therefore: a UK pad is heavier than a US one...

Therefore: Who am I kidding, I don't care.... !?!?!

What I do like is they have put in a loaf of bread at 800g..... What if you have a Bread roll... Then Bread is lighter than a mini.

Most pointless article ever.

sagnier
Oct 26, 2012, 04:28 AM
But wait! If i drink from the coke can it gets lighter! And if i toast the bread it gets lighter. Mind you, if i then spread butter on the toast it gets heavier again, so...

Which scientician carried out these tests? They didn't take into account real-world usage.

:confused:

inscrewtable
Oct 26, 2012, 06:31 AM
If a single sheet of paper were folded in half 50 times, (assuming it was large enough) then it would be about a hundred million miles thick. I find this to be a more interesting fact than whether a pad of paper weighs more or less than a mac mini. But that's the kinda guy I am.

----------

But wait! If i drink from the coke can it gets lighter! And if i toast the bread it gets lighter. Mind you, if i then spread butter on the toast it gets heavier again, so...

Which scientician carried out these tests? They didn't take into account real-world usage.

:confused:

Also if you get a packet of cigarettes and take one out and throw it away, then the pack magically becomes a cigarette lighter.

needfx
Oct 26, 2012, 08:34 AM
the only reason they chose pad of paper is because it close to ipad

Michael73
Oct 26, 2012, 08:44 AM
Am I the only one who picked up on the fact that the graphic is highly misleading?

Look at where the Kindle needle is and how far down the scale is and then look at where the needle is for the loaf of bread and how low the scale is for that. By my calculations the scale should be 4.76x lower and the need that much farther rotated.

To really show how light the iPad Mini is compared to it's big brother, the iPad 4 should be much farther down...not just an incremental step.

whooleytoo
Oct 26, 2012, 08:59 AM
I don't know... I kind of like it when people are held to account for what they say. If they claim it's a certain weight, it should be that weight. If not, then they should get - at least - a gentle ridiculing.

In this case, it seems they're pretty close.

woodbine
Oct 26, 2012, 09:27 AM
simples really, it's the old Imperial vs Metric confusion.

You see in dear 'ol USofA, we are still stuck using Foolscap pads of paper, whereas in Blighty and the Union of Europe they use A4 pads. Now any dumb cluck will know that a nice Foolscap pad weighs a lot more than an A4 pad.

Job done, now "Which"....go back to testing fridges and toasters, that's where you shine.:D

msandersen
Oct 26, 2012, 10:03 AM
I want an iPad Maxi. A MaxiPad. Larger screen. And pen sensitivity for drawing and painting.
MaxiPad. Now with Extra Absorbency. Not sure women would appreciate the pen sensitivity for drawing and painting. And if it did, it would be with red ink.
http://uncyclopedia.wikia.com/wiki/Maxipad

Kissaragi
Oct 26, 2012, 10:55 AM
The only way to this properly is weigh every pad of paper they can, 3000-5000 different ones should do, then take the average weight to compare to the mini.

Ive just realised this still wouldn't be good enough as paper is much more sensitive to environmental conditions. They would need to take the pads round the world, weighing them in many different countries and take the average from that too.

honestly the way which have gone about this is terrible, anyone would think its completely unimportant and pointless! Clearly this is a very important issue that needs proper testing.

stevers
Oct 26, 2012, 11:06 AM
Do people REALLY get paid to do this?

Yep. People also get paid to do something else, and instead complain on the internet about the weight of a pad of paper while probably being paid to do that something else.

50548
Oct 26, 2012, 11:47 AM
This is why we need the downvote button back. The fact that one of the top-rated comments comes from somebody who clearly didn't even read the article is just sad.

Of course I did; but this is irrelevant, as you can't seem to understand my strictly-logical point anyway.

tbrinkma
Oct 26, 2012, 11:54 AM
US Letter = 216 ◊ 279

UK / EU = A4 257 ◊ 364

Therefore: a UK pad is heavier than a US one...

Therefore: Who am I kidding, I don't care.... !?!?!

What I do like is they have put in a loaf of bread at 800g..... What if you have a Bread roll... Then Bread is lighter than a mini.

Most pointless article ever.

Well, actually... No. According to http://www.papersizes.org/a-paper-sizes.htm

US Letter: 216mm ◊ 279mm (60,2640 square mm)
A4: 210mm x 297mm (62,370 square mm)

Now, on a page-for-page basis, all else being equal, that would still make the A4 page heavier. But, the simple fact is that pads come in varying page counts, with 80, 100, 120, 150, and 200 being some of the more common sizes available.

As they said in their review, they weren't using the thickest pad they could find, and their pad didn't have the (metal) spiral binding pictured against the iPad mini for the comparative weight comment. Given the options there, simply going one common page count up and using a spiral-bound pad would more than cover the weight difference.

litmag01
Oct 26, 2012, 12:04 PM
What the *** is going on here :confused:

Funniest thing in my day! Thanks!

paulcdb
Oct 26, 2012, 01:53 PM
2013 headlines forecast: Phil Schiller, now lighter and thinner than last years model!

Gasu E.
Oct 26, 2012, 03:46 PM
Do people REALLY get paid to do this?

I'm currently at work. So, yes.

HoopTrundler
Oct 26, 2012, 06:56 PM
Of course I did; but this is irrelevant, as you can't seem to understand my strictly-logical point anyway.

To quote the article...

"So there it is; the iPad mini isn't quite as light as a pad of paper - at least our non-spiraled softback pad. There are certainly pads of paper that are heavier so Phil Schiller's claim that it's as light as a pad of paper is about right."

Nowhere in there does it say the iPad is "lighter" than a pad of paper. There's nothing logical about misquoting your sources.

Merlin1999
Oct 26, 2012, 07:56 PM
So let me understand this:

- The pad of paper used in the example weighs 226g;

- the irrelevant iPad Mini weighs 312g;

- therefore, the iPad Mini is "lighter" than a pad of paper?

These guys need some lessons in logic, really...what a pathetic article.

Did you read the article? It clearly states "So there it is; the iPad mini isnít quite as light as a pad of paper Ė at least our non-spiraled softback pad."

It is the MacRumors forum that has incorrectly labelled the article as saying 312g is lighter than 226g.

Perhaps the lesson here is read the article before commenting on it.

alphaod
Oct 27, 2012, 12:04 AM
Wow, that Kindle is pretty light!

ksgant
Oct 27, 2012, 02:26 AM
OMG, what is wrong with everyone? Seriously...I saw it more as an offhand remark and people are actually going around analyzing all this?

You know what, he also said it was beautiful. Why not get a chart of beautiful items and compare them also. "Oh he CLAIMS this is beautiful! Well, here are several items that are much more beautiful than the iPad mini! How DARE he say this!"

Come on...

Chupa Chupa
Oct 27, 2012, 07:11 AM
Ooooh. That's some hard hitting research. Thank you Which! EU cops will take it from here. :rolleyes:

lilgto64
Oct 27, 2012, 07:39 AM
But wait! If i drink from the coke can it gets lighter! And if i toast the bread it gets lighter. Mind you, if i then spread butter on the toast it gets heavier again, so...

Which scientician carried out these tests? They didn't take into account real-world usage.

:confused:

Add to that whether or not a dropped iPad always lands screen-side down and you've got some serious scientifical testing to carry out.

50548
Oct 27, 2012, 08:01 AM
Did you read the article? It clearly states "So there it is; the iPad mini isn’t quite as light as a pad of paper – at least our non-spiraled softback pad."

It is the MacRumors forum that has incorrectly labelled the article as saying 312g is lighter than 226g.

Perhaps the lesson here is read the article before commenting on it.

The article was posted by MacRumors (commenting on someone else's already-flawed considerations) and my logical conclusions were drawn on the basis of the whole thing...is this so hard to understand?

Merlin1999
Oct 27, 2012, 12:11 PM
The article was posted by MacRumors (commenting on someone else's already-flawed considerations) and my logical conclusions were drawn on the basis of the whole thing...is this so hard to understand?

I understand perfectly thank you.

I understand that you made light of the article on the basis that the article claimed a 312g iPad was lighter than a 226g pad of paper. If you had read the article you would have seen your claim was inaccurate.

So let me understand this:

- The pad of paper used in the example weighs 226g;

- the irrelevant iPad Mini weighs 312g;

- therefore, the iPad Mini is "lighter" than a pad of paper?

These guys need some lessons in logic, really...what a pathetic article.

Your original posting above started with "So let me understand this" - well clearly you didn't as you hadn't read the article. Your posting was inaccurate as several others have pointed out. Why you don't understand that I can only put down to a need to back track and pretend you said something else.

Your posting is very clear with it's intention and it is also very clear to anyone who read the article that your posting is wrong. However, you are right with your closing line - some guys really do need lessons in logic!

Sora
Oct 27, 2012, 03:58 PM
You mean, because it should be mass? Not weight? Otherwise, I don't get it.

It's an american thing when they see metric system - they think in lb's, oz, inches and feet - antiquated measure system imho.

As a Canadian living in the US - after going through college you get used to converting on the fly between systems.

What's even funnier, as soon enter a post-grad/terminal degree program (science/medicine) everything is metric.

StrudelTurnover
Oct 27, 2012, 07:36 PM
It's news that a device is it's stated weight?
The news is that people compare things to other things and make pretty infographics.
Don't ask the internet to not be the internet. :D

----------

What's even funnier, as soon enter a post-grad/terminal degree program (science/medicine) everything is metric.

But when you get back into a real job...
http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn17350-nasa-criticised-for-sticking-to-imperial-units.html

cclloyd
Oct 27, 2012, 11:20 PM
Is this weight with or without the weight of iCloud?

wingsabre
Oct 28, 2012, 05:24 AM
I'd like to add that there are some discrepancies in the weight. The can of coke used is actually a UK size can of coke, which carries 330mL of liquids. In the US there's 350mL of liquids. There's at least a 20 gram difference in weight, and that's not accounting the extra amount of aluminum in the can. Uncertain if the amount used in Europe is less than the US due to recycling standards, etc... So the iPad4 might be lighter than a can of coke or still heavier, and for sure it's heavier than the iPad mini. It goes to show, that the US is the fattest nation it the world because we got there 20 grams at a time.

prowlmedia
Oct 28, 2012, 06:42 AM
Well, actually... No. According to http://www.papersizes.org/a-paper-sizes.htm

US Letter: 216mm ◊ 279mm (60,2640 square mm)
A4: 210mm x 297mm (62,370 square mm)

Now, on a page-for-page basis, all else being equal, that would still make the A4 page heavier. But, the simple fact is that pads come in varying page counts, with 80, 100, 120, 150, and 200 being some of the more common sizes available.

As they said in their review, they weren't using the thickest pad they could find, and their pad didn't have the (metal) spiral binding pictured against the iPad mini for the comparative weight comment. Given the options there, simply going one common page count up and using a spiral-bound pad would more than cover the weight difference.


Doh - bad copy and pasting skills. I knew it was 210x297 too!

And as I pointed out... it's a stupid argument!

Should have said....
1/1,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 th the weight of the Sun...
or 1.5 x the weight of a hamster.

http://www.bluebulbprojects.com/MeasureOfThings/doShowResults.asp?comp=weight&unit=lbs&amt=0.68&sort=pr&p= (http://www.bluebulbprojects.com/MeasureOfThings/doShowResults.asp?comp=weight&unit=lbs&amt=0.68&sort=pr&p=http://www.bluebulbprojects.com/MeasureOfThings/doShowResults.asp?comp=weight&unit=lbs&amt=0.68&sort=pr&p=)1

mrbrown
Oct 28, 2012, 02:44 PM
Who is defining the pad of paper? What kind of paper? Too many unanswered questions... very stupid article.

tbrinkma
Oct 28, 2012, 11:24 PM
Doh - bad copy and pasting skills. I knew it was 210x297 too!

And as I pointed out... it's a stupid argument!

Should have said....
1/1,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 th the weight of the Sun...
or 1.5 x the weight of a hamster.

http://www.bluebulbprojects.com/MeasureOfThings/doShowResults.asp?comp=weight&unit=lbs&amt=0.68&sort=pr&p= (http://www.bluebulbprojects.com/MeasureOfThings/doShowResults.asp?comp=weight&unit=lbs&amt=0.68&sort=pr&p=http://www.bluebulbprojects.com/MeasureOfThings/doShowResults.asp?comp=weight&unit=lbs&amt=0.68&sort=pr&p=)1

It's not actually a stupid argument. Most people don't actually know what N lbs actually *feels* like. Much less XXXg (especially in the US, where we don't normally use metric. :( ) Giving comparisons to objects that they deal with regularly helps people put that into perspective. While fractions of a sun is an interesting bit of trivia, it doesn't actually tell anybody, in any meaningful way, how much something weighs. Likewise with hamster-masses.

You may be an exception to the rule, but if you've got a scale handy, give it a shot some time. Grab some random items around your house (that *aren't* marked with their weight), and give it your best guess. Then weigh the item. You'll probably be surprised more often than not.

In fact, fairly often, even when you find two objects that have the same (or very nearly the same) weight, your body will perceive their weights differently because of how the weight is balanced, or the size of the object. For example, I've got a printer which *feels* heavier than a 20 lb bag of cat food. It's actually not, since it weighed in at about 15 lbs still inside it's box. It's just denser, and has relatively sharp corners that dig into your hands.

RobertMartens
Oct 29, 2012, 02:16 AM
Incidentlly, when is Apple going to trademark the words 'amazing' and 'thin', and possibly 'fantastic' and of course 'amazingly thin'?

They already have.

Your quote should be written


Incidentlly, when is Apple going to trademark the words 'amazing TM' and 'thin TM', and possibly 'fantastic TM' and of course 'amazingly thin TM'?

JGRE
Oct 29, 2012, 10:26 AM
Its weight is very close to the pad they had on hand, but it was a little heavier. Apple didn't say it was lighter than that specific pad of paper, and since there are heavier pads out there and the iPad Mini's weight is so close to this one, they say that his claim is most likely correct. God, is it so hard to read??

If this crap makes you happy, I am happy for you........ (will not use the down-button for you) for the rest this articel is a total wast of time, can you really call this research??

BTW Any Kindle would be between 14.6 and 20 ounces, so were do the mentioned 168 gram come from?
14.6 ounce = 14.6 x 28,3495231 = 413.9 grams............

50548
Oct 29, 2012, 01:57 PM
I understand perfectly thank you.

I understand that you made light of the article on the basis that the article claimed a 312g iPad was lighter than a 226g pad of paper. If you had read the article you would have seen your claim was inaccurate.



Your original posting above started with "So let me understand this" - well clearly you didn't as you hadn't read the article. Your posting was inaccurate as several others have pointed out. Why you don't understand that I can only put down to a need to back track and pretend you said something else.

Your posting is very clear with it's intention and it is also very clear to anyone who read the article that your posting is wrong. However, you are right with your closing line - some guys really do need lessons in logic!

You probably don't even understand what logic is as far as my post is concerned...but nevermind.

Surreal
Oct 29, 2012, 04:50 PM
It's an international standard, as opposed to the obsolete imperial system (itself based on the metric system), nowadays officially used only by the US, Burma and...Liberia.

Ah, not funny in that regard. Metric makes more sense regardless of who uses it.

I still think of grams as representative of mass. We conflate mass with weight because it is easy, but Newtons are the unit of weight in measurement.

In summary, it is funny because we have a unit--in metric--better suited to represent weight, but it just won't take.

PeterQVenkman
Oct 31, 2012, 12:00 PM
The butt hurt is strong in this thread.