PDA

View Full Version : MBA 128 SSD, 8 GB RAM. How long should it last?




coldjeanzzz
Nov 4, 2012, 03:06 PM
I have been looking into buying a Mac lately and for my needs a MBA seems to be perfect. However, I want this laptop to last a very long time (4 years+) and I am concerned the 4 GB of RAM will be obsolete soon so I feel 8 GB would be better.

The total cost after a student discount and tax comes out to $1300+ which is a lot since I usually never spend more than $600. With that said I only want to make this purchase if people can verify the lifespan of these items. Like at what point will I start to notice a slow down in the performance (I do take pretty good care of my electronics)? For a $1300 laptop I would like for it to be solid for a decent amount of time rather than start to get bogged down after only 1.5-2 years.



Beanoir
Nov 4, 2012, 03:08 PM
I have been looking into buying a Mac lately and for my needs a MBA seems to be perfect. However, I want this laptop to last a very long time (4 years+) and I am concerned the 4 GB of RAM will be obsolete soon so I feel 8 GB would be better.

The total cost after a student discount and tax comes out to $1300+ which is a lot since I usually never spend more than $600. With that said I only want to make this purchase if people can verify the lifespan of these items. Like at what point will I start to notice a slow down in the performance (I do take pretty good care of my electronics)? For a $1300 laptop I would like for it to be solid for a decent amount of time rather than start to get bogged down after only 1.5-2 years.

Easy last 4 years...unless you plan on dropping it off a cliff, then it won't.

My MacMini (albeit slightly upgraded) has lasted me nearly 7 years now...

Crazy Badger
Nov 4, 2012, 04:30 PM
My girlfriend is still running my old 2007 MBA with 2GB RAM and aftermarket SSD for standard OSX (10.7.5) and Office apps.

Can't see why you wouldn't get 5+ years for a current MBA.

coldjeanzzz
Nov 4, 2012, 04:38 PM
My girlfriend is still running my old 2007 MBA with 2GB RAM and aftermarket SSD for standard OSX (10.7.5) and Office apps.

Can't see why you wouldn't get 5+ years for a current MBA.

How is the bootup/shut down time and battery life on it compared to when you first got it?

Mrbobb
Nov 4, 2012, 04:46 PM
A expensive Mac doesn't last longer than a budget pc. Apple has no magic.

The propensity for a long lasting laptop depends on whether u tend to always want run the latest, but more power consuming, software.

Lukewarmwinner
Nov 4, 2012, 04:53 PM
How is the bootup/shut down time and battery life on it compared to when you first got it?

It should be the same but compared to today's standard it would be slower. Also, if I remember correct that model used the normal HDD, and not SSD - making it a lot slower. Please correct me if I'm wrong

Point being; it's really up to you how long it'll last. It will get slower compared to new models, but still usable for a long time. I've got Macs from '07 still going strong. So if you won't upgrade in 4 years, then it'll last 4 years (of course depending on treatment and forth)

coldjeanzzz
Nov 4, 2012, 04:58 PM
A expensive Mac doesn't last longer than a budget pc. Apple has no magic.

The propensity for a long lasting laptop depends on whether u tend to always want run the latest, but more power consuming, software.

A budget PC I purchased 3 years ago experienced huge drops in speed in just a span of 1 year, battery life chopped from 3 hours to 1 hour in about 1.5 years, and the bootup time went from about 1 minute to damn near 3 minutes. In fact it got so bad I had to switch to Linux because Windows was just functioning like a piece of crap. I'm not an idiot when it comes to computers either. I never had any problems with viruses/malware and always managed applications properly so that unnecessary ones wouldn't be slowing down the system. I never tried to run the latest or greatest software either, just a simple task like opening google chrome was a pain in the ass. I'm just convinced these crappy laptops that get shelved out for a cheaper price are not worth it anymore.

Beanoir
Nov 4, 2012, 05:10 PM
A expensive Mac doesn't last longer than a budget pc. Apple has no magic.

The propensity for a long lasting laptop depends on whether u tend to always want run the latest, but more power consuming, software.

I beg to differ, a PC slows down to a snails pace after 12 months, and it requires so much maintenance to keep it going, which some argue is part and parcel of the experience. I on the other hand don't expect that kind of requirement in a modern computer and thats why an Apple will last for far longer.

This isn't about what is best (Apple vs. PC) but from my experience of running windows PCs for work and Mac's at home for so many years, i've been through so much more grief with the PCs.

GrandPhrase
Nov 4, 2012, 05:17 PM
I can't give you an exact estimate, but I know any current Macs do last a long time easily 5+ years. I've had to purchase a new PC about every 3-4 years, but Macs can last twice as long easily. Although this is my current and first Mac (2010 Mid Macbook Pro 13"), it hasn't experienced any slowdowns. In fact, it has gotten smoother and a bit faster after going through Snow Leopard >> Lion >> Mountain Lion. If I had a PC this long, it would probably be struggling twice as much.

So generally speaking, no worries on how current Macs will last.

With that said, I know many get new Macs before they can get the most out of their current Macs, but to each their own..

MacPat333
Nov 4, 2012, 09:04 PM
Well, I'd like to know how long the battery will last?

I'm thinking about getting the 13" MBA with 128GB SSD and 8GB as well and my plan is to use it as well for the next 4-5 years. My concern is the battery life, as well as the loss in capacity and running time on a full charge over time.

Currently I'm using my net book daily for approx. 3-6 hours and sometimes if I upload stuff it runs through the night. With a removable battery it's not a problem as the battery is in the drawer and the net book is plugged in to the power socket. With the Air this won't be possible.

How long will the battery last?

A Hebrew
Nov 4, 2012, 10:03 PM
Well, I'd like to know how long the battery will last?

I'm thinking about getting the 13" MBA with 128GB SSD and 8GB as well and my plan is to use it as well for the next 4-5 years. My concern is the battery life, as well as the loss in capacity and running time on a full charge over time.

Currently I'm using my net book daily for approx. 3-6 hours and sometimes if I upload stuff it runs through the night. With a removable battery it's not a problem as the battery is in the drawer and the net book is plugged in to the power socket. With the Air this won't be possible.

How long will the battery last?
It will last with a decent charge size for 5 years, of course it will start to drop slightly in 3.

MacPat333
Nov 4, 2012, 10:54 PM
What means decent I this case?

If I run it 7 hours a day (full discharge), that's 2555 hours a year an 12,775 hour in 5 years.

How long does it take to fully an empty Air battery when...

1) the Air is shut down
2) the Air is still running

Thanks.

thekev
Nov 4, 2012, 11:13 PM
A budget PC I purchased 3 years ago experienced huge drops in speed in just a span of 1 year, battery life chopped from 3 hours to 1 hour in about 1.5 years, and the bootup time went from about 1 minute to damn near 3 minutes. In fact it got so bad I had to switch to Linux because Windows was just functioning like a piece of crap. I'm not an idiot when it comes to computers either. I never had any problems with viruses/malware and always managed applications properly so that unnecessary ones wouldn't be slowing down the system. I never tried to run the latest or greatest software either, just a simple task like opening google chrome was a pain in the ass. I'm just convinced these crappy laptops that get shelved out for a cheaper price are not worth it anymore.

This is way too anecdotal. I've had problems with the Macs I've owned too. Personal computers are not made perfectly. OSX can encounter problems too. Note that when someone has problems, a common suggestion is a clean OS installation. You still need backups. The HFS+ file system isn't even close to perfect, and there are plenty of random problems and quirks at times.

coldjeanzzz
Nov 4, 2012, 11:48 PM
Well I never made the claim that Macs or any other computer was perfect. But notice many of the problems I mentioned about that specific computer weren't related to the OS itself, but more so the hardware. That's why I made this thread so I could get a better idea of people's personal experiences with their MBA.

Yebubbleman
Nov 5, 2012, 12:14 AM
I have been looking into buying a Mac lately and for my needs a MBA seems to be perfect. However, I want this laptop to last a very long time (4 years+) and I am concerned the 4 GB of RAM will be obsolete soon so I feel 8 GB would be better.

The total cost after a student discount and tax comes out to $1300+ which is a lot since I usually never spend more than $600. With that said I only want to make this purchase if people can verify the lifespan of these items. Like at what point will I start to notice a slow down in the performance (I do take pretty good care of my electronics)? For a $1300 laptop I would like for it to be solid for a decent amount of time rather than start to get bogged down after only 1.5-2 years.

I'd opt for at least 256GB of storage; though, 512GB will realy future-proof it; though it highly depends on what you do. Definitely go for 8GB of RAM though as you can't make that change later. Assuming you pick the right sized SSD, an 8GB RAM-based MacBook Air ought to last you at least four years, if not five, before you are unable to run the latest version of OS X.

Lukewarmwinner
Nov 5, 2012, 02:24 AM
The 512gb SSD is really pricey! I'd just get a external harddrive if you run out of space.

coldjeanzzz
Nov 5, 2012, 02:30 AM
Yeah I'm not worried about hard drive space very much. On one of my laptops I'm dual booting Windows with Ubuntu 12.04 and when I made the partition for Ubuntu I only allocated 75 GB of hard drive space which I didn't think would be enough but I still have half left. The only large files I keep directly on my drives is music and one or two movies that I haven't got around to watching. Anything else I just stick on an external. Upgrading to a larger SSD just runs me too much. I'm already apprehensive about buying a Mac because of the price lol.

Lukewarmwinner
Nov 5, 2012, 02:49 AM
Yeah I'm not worried about hard drive space very much. On one of my laptops I'm dual booting Windows with Ubuntu 12.04 and when I made the partition for Ubuntu I only allocated 75 GB of hard drive space which I didn't think would be enough but I still have half left. The only large files I keep directly on my drives is music and one or two movies that I haven't got around to watching. Anything else I just stick on an external. Upgrading to a larger SSD just runs me too much. I'm already apprehensive about buying a Mac because of the price lol.

You could consider using iTunes Match and save some internal space

silver8ack
Nov 5, 2012, 07:20 AM
A expensive Mac doesn't last longer than a budget pc. Apple has no magic.

The propensity for a long lasting laptop depends on whether u tend to always want run the latest, but more power consuming, software.

Either you have no experience with a budget pc, or no experience with a Mac.

gnasher729
Nov 5, 2012, 07:39 AM
How is the bootup/shut down time and battery life on it compared to when you first got it?

Can't compare 2007 with new models. The battery has totally changed around 2010 or so. Before that, they were designed to last 300 charges, now they are designed for 1000 charges.

With all new MacBooks: Don't worry about it, just don't use the battery without need (so working at your desk without plugging in is just stupid because every day you waste one of your 1000 charges, but it's plenty to not worry when you are away from your desk). Boot times are quite irrelevant; you just close the lid, it goes to sleep, you open the lid, it wakes up. And boot times don't tend to grow on a Mac anyway.

----------

Yeah I'm not worried about hard drive space very much. On one of my laptops I'm dual booting Windows with Ubuntu 12.04 and when I made the partition for Ubuntu I only allocated 75 GB of hard drive space which I didn't think would be enough but I still have half left. The only large files I keep directly on my drives is music and one or two movies that I haven't got around to watching. Anything else I just stick on an external. Upgrading to a larger SSD just runs me too much. I'm already apprehensive about buying a Mac because of the price lol.

Kingston SE9 flash drive 32 GB = 19, 16 GB = 7.50. (Highly recommended because you cannot possibly lose it from your key ring). iTunes works just fine with your music library on a flash drive.

----------

What means decent I this case?

If I run it 7 hours a day (full discharge), that's 2555 hours a year an 12,775 hour in 5 years.

How long does it take to fully an empty Air battery when...

1) the Air is shut down
2) the Air is still running

Thanks.

You are using it 7 hours every saturday, every sunday, during holidays? And you never, ever, have a charger that you can use?


Currently I'm using my net book daily for approx. 3-6 hours and sometimes if I upload stuff it runs through the night. With a removable battery it's not a problem as the battery is in the drawer and the net book is plugged in to the power socket. With the Air this won't be possible.

How long will the battery last?

Excuse me, but removing the battery is about the worst thing you can do (on a MBP where it is removable). Never, ever remove the battery from a MBP. It sounds you are actually at your desk? Running on battery with a charger nearby is stupid. That's like leaving your car engine running when you are at home and complaining that it uses too much fuel.

Crazy Badger
Nov 5, 2012, 09:50 AM
How is the bootup/shut down time and battery life on it compared to when you first got it?

Bootup/shutdown times are faster thanks to the SSD, although it very rarely gets shutdown and just suspends so it's ready to use as soon as you pick it up and open the lid! That was the main selling point when convincing my girlfriend to move away from a Windows laptop.

Battery life is still good for around 3-4 hours but it doesn't really travel so is never very far from a charge

Beanoir
Nov 5, 2012, 10:14 AM
The 512gb SSD is really pricey! I'd just get a external harddrive if you run out of space.

I think the way online storage is going, the future will not be in needing physical storage space but in needing better connectivity to the web/cloud etc.

I wouldn't worry too much about getting the 512gb SSD.

Worst case scenario its upgradable in the future anyway if it really becomes an issue.

CoMoMacUser
Nov 5, 2012, 10:38 AM
I want this laptop to last a very long time (4 years+) and I am concerned the 4 GB of RAM will be obsolete soon so I feel 8 GB would be better.


I bought a 2012 MBA and went with 8 GB for the same reason. My 2008 iMac is still going strong, so I'm confident that my MBA will last at least four years. The extra RAM is insurance against OS and software bloat.

On the HD side, I went with 128 GB because with so many free and inexpensive cloud-storage services out there (e.g., Dropbox), I don't think HD space will ever be a problem. Of course, if you need to store a bunch of videos and music locally, that's a different story.

Hope that helps.

53x12
Nov 5, 2012, 10:43 AM
I think the way online storage is going, the future will not be in needing physical storage space but in needing better connectivity to the web/cloud etc.

I wouldn't worry too much about getting the 512gb SSD.

Worst case scenario its upgradable in the future anyway if it really becomes an issue.


This is just my opinion, I don't mind cloud storage for some things. Like documents, music, videos, pictures I don't use frequently. However I am skeptical to have all of my files in the cloud. Partly due to the reason of what happens when the Cloud is down.

There will always be a set number of documents/files/media I will want with me. But I will agree that isn't 3TB of stuff. Probably much less than 1TB, maybe around 500GB of material. :)

MacPat333
Nov 5, 2012, 11:08 AM
Can't compare 2007 with new models. The battery has totally changed around 2010 or so. Before that, they were designed to last 300 charges, now they are designed for 1000 charges.

With all new MacBooks: Don't worry about it, just don't use the battery without need (so working at your desk without plugging in is just stupid because every day you waste one of your 1000 charges, but it's plenty to not worry when you are away from your desk). Boot times are quite irrelevant; you just close the lid, it goes to sleep, you open the lid, it wakes up. And boot times don't tend to grow on a Mac anyway.

----------



Kingston SE9 flash drive 32 GB = 19, 16 GB = 7.50. (Highly recommended because you cannot possibly lose it from your key ring). iTunes works just fine with your music library on a flash drive.

----------



You are using it 7 hours every saturday, every sunday, during holidays? And you never, ever, have a charger that you can use?




Excuse me, but removing the battery is about the worst thing you can do (on a MBP where it is removable). Never, ever remove the battery from a MBP. It sounds you are actually at your desk? Running on battery with a charger nearby is stupid. That's like leaving your car engine running when you are at home and complaining that it uses too much fuel.


I am actually working on my living room table (daily for 3-6 hours) every day. The only time when I am not using my computer that long a day is when I am on vacation for 2-4 weeks a year. But even then I use it for 1-2 hours a day if I get the time to.


Why should you not remove the battery if possible? This is what has been preached for years as the battery gets overcharged! I hae been told by hundreds of people over the years that if you don't need to run your laptop on battery, take it out and run it with the power cable to save the battery and increase the life of the same!

Did something change over the years? Or is this an Apple thing?


Let me get this straight, if I am at home I should keep it plugged in all the time?

gnasher729
Nov 5, 2012, 11:29 AM
I am actually working on my living room table (daily for 3-6 hours) every day. The only time when I am not using my computer that long a day is when I am on vacation for 2-4 weeks a year. But even then I use it for 1-2 hours a day if I get the time to.


Why should you not remove the battery if possible? This is what has been preached for years as the battery gets overcharged! I hae been told by hundreds of people over the years that if you don't need to run your laptop on battery, take it out and run it with the power cable to save the battery and increase the life of the same!

Did something change over the years? Or is this an Apple thing?


Let me get this straight, if I am at home I should keep it plugged in all the time?

Yes, when at home you should be plugged in all the time with one exception - you should use a MacBook on batteries once a month. Most people do that naturally so they have nothing to worry about, but if your MacBook is on your desk all the time, you should unplug it once a month.

Removing the battery on a MacBook has many disadvantages. One, the battery is part of the case, so your case is open and dirt and dust can come in. Second, if you are in an area where electricity is problematic, the battery nicely fixes this. Third, it is possible that for a short time (say half a second when the hard drive or DVD drive starts up), power usage exceeds what the power supply will supply. No problem when you have a battery. And because of that, Apple reduces the speed and therefore power usage of any MacBook when the battery is removed.

On a MacBook, the batteries will definitely not overcharge. Charging a battery is very carefully controlled by some chip that's in the battery; it will charge quickly when the battery is empty, slow down when it's 80% full, and stops when it is full.

So if a MacBook is on the living room table, you should plug it in if you can; it is not a big deal if you don't sometimes, but you should try to do it most of the time. Six hours on battery means one of the 1000 charges is gone. So you run out of charges in close to 3 years if you do this daily, but it takes 10 years if you forget to plug in twice a week.

Lukewarmwinner
Nov 5, 2012, 11:39 AM
I bought a 2012 MBA and went with 8 GB for the same reason. My 2008 iMac is still going strong, so I'm confident that my MBA will last at least four years. The extra RAM is insurance against OS and software bloat.

On the HD side, I went with 128 GB because with so many free and inexpensive cloud-storage services out there (e.g., Dropbox), I don't think HD space will ever be a problem. Of course, if you need to store a bunch of videos and music locally, that's a different story.

Hope that helps.

Keep in mind that Dropbox actually use internal space to store in the cloud.

Penn Jennings
Nov 5, 2012, 12:46 PM
A expensive Mac doesn't last longer than a budget pc. Apple has no magic.

The propensity for a long lasting laptop depends on whether u tend to always want run the latest, but more power consuming, software.

Seriously?

I don't think that could further from the truth. A budget PC, like a $300 unit, is built with the cheapest components. They may use components that others have rejected, displays are a good example. They are often put together without the quality control of more expensive units as well. I honestly don't know how you could think this to be true.

Lukewarmwinner
Nov 5, 2012, 01:37 PM
Yes, when at home you should be plugged in all the time with one exception - you should use a MacBook on batteries once a month. Most people do that naturally so they have nothing to worry about, but if your MacBook is on your desk all the time, you should unplug it once a month.

Removing the battery on a MacBook has many disadvantages. One, the battery is part of the case, so your case is open and dirt and dust can come in. Second, if you are in an area where electricity is problematic, the battery nicely fixes this. Third, it is possible that for a short time (say half a second when the hard drive or DVD drive starts up), power usage exceeds what the power supply will supply. No problem when you have a battery. And because of that, Apple reduces the speed and therefore power usage of any MacBook when the battery is removed.

On a MacBook, the batteries will definitely not overcharge. Charging a battery is very carefully controlled by some chip that's in the battery; it will charge quickly when the battery is empty, slow down when it's 80% full, and stops when it is full.

So if a MacBook is on the living room table, you should plug it in if you can; it is not a big deal if you don't sometimes, but you should try to do it most of the time. Six hours on battery means one of the 1000 charges is gone. So you run out of charges in close to 3 years if you do this daily, but it takes 10 years if you forget to plug in twice a week.

So even when it's fully charged (green light) I should just keep it in, when I'm at home? I take it with me 2 times a week, but I'm also home a lot. Is the best thing just to let it show the green light constantly when being home, and run on battery when actually needed?

dazey
Nov 5, 2012, 02:25 PM
I bought a 2012 128GB 8GB air. I expect it to last around 5 years. I have a 2006 macbook pro which is still going but very tired and no longer works as a laptop due to dead keyboard and tired battery (its on its 3rd battery I think, as well as burning through one power supply, one fan and it had a new disk drive (didn't fail, just upgrade).
I expect to change the air battery at least once in the 5 years, probably change it around the 2-3year mark. I expect the SSD to wear out as well but these are replaceable. I hope there will be some competition on the aftermarket SSD front when it comes to it.

----------

A expensive Mac doesn't last longer than a budget pc. Apple has no magic.

There is nothing special about the components that go into them, although sometimes they are at the higher quality end of the spectrum. An SSD or hard disk is just as liable to fail in a mac as a PC. However, and its a big however, the design and quality of construction make a huge difference to the lifespan. My 2006 laptop is still going (ok its not perfect) but its been dropped, drowned and abused. At work, we haven't had a single PC laptop last longer than 2 years, most last just over one. They just aren't as well put together in general. Even things like thermal design impact on how long the machine lasts.

PC batteries also used to be much more prone to failure, no significant difference in the parts but perhaps apple pay more for quality?

jrasero
Nov 5, 2012, 03:30 PM
when you say last 4 years, what do you mean?

Physically MBA will last since the uni-body design is very solid. Technology wise it will last too but it depends on what you use your computer for.

Do you play game?
How much do you store on your computer?
What will you do?

an i5 will be fast enough for at least 4 years unless you game or do heavy editing. I think the 8GB is a must. The 128GB could be fine but really depends on what your doing. Will your store massive amounts of music and video on it? If your asking whether your should take 8GB Ram or 128GB HD take the Ram.

To be honest if your looking for the computer to last 4 years which is a huge amount of time when it comes to technology I'd do with the MBP.

it seems your budget is $1300? Maybe try going refurbished

Refurbished MacBook Pro 2.9GHz Dual-core Intel i7
13.3-inch (diagonal) LED-backlit glossy widescreen display, 1280-by-800 r
8GB (
750GB Serial ATA @ 5400 rpm
SuperDrive
Intel HD Graphics 4000
$1270

or get the 128SSD version for $1360

or

if you really want a MBA you could get this refurbished

Refurbished MacBook Air 2.0GHz dual-core Intel Core i7
13.3-inch (diagonal) LED-backlit glossy widescreen display, 1440-by-900
8GB memory
256GB flash storage
720p FaceTime HD camera
Intel HD Graphics 4000
$1450

coldjeanzzz
Nov 5, 2012, 08:53 PM
when you say last 4 years, what do you mean?

Physically MBA will last since the uni-body design is very solid. Technology wise it will last too but it depends on what you use your computer for.

Do you play game?
How much do you store on your computer?
What will you do?

an i5 will be fast enough for at least 4 years unless you game or do heavy editing. I think the 8GB is a must. The 128GB could be fine but really depends on what your doing. Will your store massive amounts of music and video on it? If your asking whether your should take 8GB Ram or 128GB HD take the Ram.

To be honest if your looking for the computer to last 4 years which is a huge amount of time when it comes to technology I'd do with the MBP.

it seems your budget is $1300? Maybe try going refurbished

Refurbished MacBook Pro 2.9GHz Dual-core Intel i7
13.3-inch (diagonal) LED-backlit glossy widescreen display, 1280-by-800 r
8GB (
750GB Serial ATA @ 5400 rpm
SuperDrive
Intel HD Graphics 4000
$1270

or get the 128SSD version for $1360

or

if you really want a MBA you could get this refurbished

Refurbished MacBook Air 2.0GHz dual-core Intel Core i7
13.3-inch (diagonal) LED-backlit glossy widescreen display, 1440-by-900
8GB memory
256GB flash storage
720p FaceTime HD camera
Intel HD Graphics 4000
$1450

I don't game anymore, I don't store that much stuff on my system except music which I don't expect to exceed 30 GB so I think the 128 GB should be enough. I've read that you can upgrade the SSD on the new MBAs right?

The only thing I don't like about the MBP is the weight and the thickness. I take my laptop to school every day and have to walk A LOT around campus. My current laptop is damn near 7 lbs and the MBP, while lighter, is still 4.5 lbs. Combined with my books and everything it's a pain lugging my background around all day. I think the MBA is less than 3 lbs and is really thin so it would be nice not having that burden.

Also are you sure about that refurbished MBA you mentioned? The one I'm looking at on the website is like $1900 but it comes with a 512 GB SSD. I don't see the specific one you are talking about.

Beanoir
Nov 6, 2012, 02:48 AM
I've read that you can upgrade the SSD on the new MBAs right?

Correct, you can upgrade them.

in2tech
Nov 6, 2012, 05:07 AM
For a $1300 laptop I would like for it to be solid for a decent amount of time rather than start to get bogged down after only 1.5-2 years.

Is it mainly for internet use, email, school or work papers, etc... Do you have other Apple products that you could connect it too, iPads, iPhone, iPod Touches, that make iCloud appealing to you.

I just bought a MBA 13" 128 GB SSD 4 GB RAM about 10 days ago, make sure you get the screen you are comfortable with, I got the 13" as the 11" was just too small for my personal use, and it looks like you are smart going with the 8 GB RAM. And it is so light it is unbelievable. As far as the storage I have a 500 GB external drive, iCloud accounts, and got 25 GB free of Microsoft Skydrive when they had an upgrade promotion when they first launched the product! I also like the fact that the more I can purchase in the Mac App store, for one it should have been tested and therefore just work on the MBA or the App should state it won't if it's for a MBP, etc... and I can delete whatever app I don't use often and redownload anytime I want to use it, thus saving even more space (I also do this for my iPad's, iPhones, and soon iPad Mini Cellular model.

If say for instance you only needed the programs that came with it, Safari, Email, iMovies, iPhoto, Messages, Garage Band, etc... If you did a clean install in the future it would be as fast or close to it as when you bought it brand new. But I reload all my systems about every 6 month's to a clean state. But I am just weird that way and actually enjoy the restore to factory or clean install to get rid of weird files from things I download and then trash. Just remember in the end all of them are electronic components, and like a car there is no 100% guarantee!

And you also pay for the Apple Customer service at that price, which should be worth a lot, or it was for me! And I think you can purchase the Apple Care sometime before your year warranty is up. I have to check on this myself!

Good luck future MBA owner! It's a fantastic device! And I love the backlight keyboard too!

jmgregory1
Nov 6, 2012, 05:31 AM
I don't game anymore, I don't store that much stuff on my system except music which I don't expect to exceed 30 GB so I think the 128 GB should be enough. I've read that you can upgrade the SSD on the new MBAs right?

The only thing I don't like about the MBP is the weight and the thickness. I take my laptop to school every day and have to walk A LOT around campus. My current laptop is damn near 7 lbs and the MBP, while lighter, is still 4.5 lbs. Combined with my books and everything it's a pain lugging my background around all day. I think the MBA is less than 3 lbs and is really thin so it would be nice not having that burden.

Also are you sure about that refurbished MBA you mentioned? The one I'm looking at on the website is like $1900 but it comes with a 512 GB SSD. I don't see the specific one you are talking about.

You'll be quite happy with a base model 13" air. Spring for the extra 4gb's of ram is probably a smart move for some future-proofing. Going for a bigger ssd is probably not even the best way to spend your money, given your current needs. If you have an external drive, you can just keep little used files stored on that. I even split out my iTunes music collection, so that I only keep those songs I'm listening to on a regular basis - same for iPhoto, where I continually push older images off to my external drive.

I think most people who carry around their computer life on their computer don't really need to do so (and probably shouldn't). It's like the junk drawer everyone has. Sure, there are things in there that aren't junk, but that doesn't mean you shouldn't clean it out regularly.

When I switched from my 240 gb (with 230mb's of files) MBP last year, I was able to dump all but about 50gb's of content onto my external drive and I'm now at just over 70gb's used of my 128gb ssd. When I hit 80, I dump older stuff, whether I need to or not, just as a habit of keeping up with cleaning out older files.

jrasero
Nov 6, 2012, 12:38 PM
I don't game anymore, I don't store that much stuff on my system except music which I don't expect to exceed 30 GB so I think the 128 GB should be enough. I've read that you can upgrade the SSD on the new MBAs right?

The only thing I don't like about the MBP is the weight and the thickness. I take my laptop to school every day and have to walk A LOT around campus. My current laptop is damn near 7 lbs and the MBP, while lighter, is still 4.5 lbs. Combined with my books and everything it's a pain lugging my background around all day. I think the MBA is less than 3 lbs and is really thin so it would be nice not having that burden.

Also are you sure about that refurbished MBA you mentioned? The one I'm looking at on the website is like $1900 but it comes with a 512 GB SSD. I don't see the specific one you are talking about.

The MBA i7, 8GB, 256GB is gone, they move fast. I would keep going back to the site each day, it's worth the wait.

TheRichboy247
Nov 7, 2012, 01:34 AM
I have an iMac from 2007, about to have its 5th or 6th (Can't really remember. Thats how long it lasts) birthday this December. Its still running smooth and surprisingly, upgrading to ML made it a tad bit faster. I purchased a MBA just to keep it company so I can have another machine to rely on and a portable.

SenorVvangIstMoi
Nov 7, 2012, 07:26 AM
I would say minimum 3 years .. after that maybe in 2015 there will be some huge advancement in chips, battery and a retina display for Air. Then many will consider the upgrade for all those faster and sharper stuff.

coldjeanzzz
Nov 7, 2012, 07:55 PM
MBAs should have good resale value right? How much do you guys think this thing would go for in 3 years?