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killerbee79
Nov 11, 2012, 07:57 PM
Be prepared to be amazed. Be prepared for the controversy. Be prepared for the Apple fanboys to start crying and defending their precious to the end.

But Android is better. This little bit of research sealed the deal for me on why I just became an ex-Apple iOS device user.

Even if you love Apple and iOS, watch the videos. Learn what you could have. Learn what you are missing. Open your eyes to what you lack.

Take a moment to watch these 5 videos for proof on just how far behind Apple is and how much better Android is. I highly recommend parts 2, 3, and 4.

Part 1: http://youtu.be/NMiY1kSTHZw
Part 2: http://youtu.be/Ayx4XsBaJBI
Part 3: http://youtu.be/fsGQ_xts_Gw
Part 4: http://youtu.be/jlPKVWv1WxU
Part 5: http://youtu.be/Ayx4XsBaJBI



viperGTS
Nov 11, 2012, 08:05 PM
Already saw those videos. The guy is horribly biased. I've used Android and still prefer iOS over it.

There comes a point when customization is just for the sake of it. This guy likes to repeat how "customizable" Android is, but I think he misses the point of what an OS should be: a platform for apps. Honestly, if I was given too many options to customize, I would go crazy over how I would want the phone to look. I'm perfectly happy with iOS's appearance.

fertilized-egg
Nov 11, 2012, 08:08 PM
Isn't this basically trolling? :confused:

I have Android, Windows Phone, RIM and a few iOS devices as well as even Symbian and Windows Mobile thingies somewhere in my attic. I can many any of them look good by picking out specific scenarios they are good at.

killerbee79
Nov 11, 2012, 08:08 PM
Already saw those videos. The guy is horribly biased. I've used Android and still prefer iOS over it.

Is he horribly biased, or are you for having eyes on the Apple side? A "bias" is in the eye of the beholder.

Just because he's not calling iOS the "Jesus" OS doesn't mean he is biased.

Anti-Lucifer
Nov 11, 2012, 08:16 PM
I use to use a Samsung gs2. 90% of the time I don't even bother using any of the features listed in the videos. What I do use now on my iPhone 5 with ios6 I use 100% of the time.

Do you know why I got rid of my android device? It isn't because it can't do anything ios can, it's because the things it can do not many care for and the things people do care for android does it in a hack style way. It's definitely jack of all trades and master of nothing. Ios looks and feels solid but you can argue it's getting so efficiently boring.

I dont care how good android is or how bad ios is. I care about how I can use my apps and how long the battery lasts and how infrequent my phone crashes. Everything else is just extra fluff no one really cares for except to look good on a spec sheet.

I spend 99.9% of my time in an app. Period. I don't care for live tiles, clocks, nor widgets because I use my apps 100% of the time.

lunaoso
Nov 11, 2012, 08:17 PM
Is he horribly biased, or are you for having eyes on the Apple side? A "bias" is in the eye of the beholder.

Just because he's not calling iOS the "Jesus" OS doesn't mean he is biased.

Or just because he didn't point out all of the advantages iOS has over Android. I just stopped watching after he listed different screen sizes, which creates fragmentation as an advantage. And you seem to have your eyes on the Android side. He is undisputedly biased towards Android.

marc11
Nov 11, 2012, 08:19 PM
Already saw those videos. The guy is horribly biased. I've used Android and still prefer iOS over it.

There comes a point when customization is just for the sake of it. This guy likes to repeat how "customizable" Android is, but I think he misses the point of what an OS should be: a platform for apps. Honestly, if I was given too many options to customize, I would go crazy over how I would want the phone to look. I'm perfectly happy with iOS's appearance.

Well there are thought leaders and thought followers I suppose. I for one can't stand some of the restrictions Apple imposes...just because. For example, why can't I, the owner of the device decide which icons I can and cannot see on various pages? Why can't I, the owner of the device, decide the widgets I get on the screen and what I can do with them? Things Apple does sometimes drives me nuts, like on the Apple TV, Apple decides which apps and content is on there, not me. And they just change things or push or take away things as they see fit, of the fact that I cannot get rid of the #$%$^$& stupid Newstand app that I never use, no I have to put it on its own page and ignore it....so its my device, but Apple tells me whats best....somehow they know my needs, which must be the same as everyone elses.

I respectfully disagree with the comment about an OS being only a platform for apps. While it should be a platform for apps, it should also allow me to manage my information and present it in such a way, and allow access to it in such away that it makes me as productive as I can be within my WF. My devices should conform to me, not the other way around.

It just drives me nuts that on iOS I have to open an app for every single little thing I want to do. Shouldn't be that way IMHO.

MozMan68
Nov 11, 2012, 08:22 PM
I stopped watching when I realised he was flat out wrong...can't share a website on Facebook? Uhhhh...yeah you can....

It seems like he just hasn't figured out how to use iOS as well as he has figured out how to use Android...was painful to watch as much as I did.

3bs
Nov 11, 2012, 08:25 PM
I stopped watching when I realised he was flat out wrong...can't share a website on Facebook? Uhhhh...yeah you can....

It seems like he just hasn't figured out how to use iOS as well as he has figured out how to use Android...was painful to watch as much as I did.

I didn't watch them and probably won't but the videos are from March/April and that was before iOS 6 and Facebook integration.

lunaoso
Nov 11, 2012, 08:28 PM
I stopped watching when I realised he was flat out wrong...can't share a website on Facebook? Uhhhh...yeah you can....

It seems like he just hasn't figured out how to use iOS as well as he has figured out how to use Android...was painful to watch as much as I did.

I can't agree more. And he said that the iPad 3 has a quad core processor, which it doesn't. Even the A6X isn't quad core lol. I just can't respect the guy when he has no idea what he's talking about.:cool:

Android is a pretty good OS, I just don't like the fragmentation and I like the Apple ecosystem and attention to detail much more. Plus, I don't really know why you need to customize it to the point of not having it be useful anymore though. I care about productivity, not about having it be "my device" and being "controlled by Apple".

marc11
Nov 11, 2012, 08:48 PM
I can't agree more. And he said that the iPad 3 has a quad core processor, which it doesn't. Even the A6X isn't quad core lol. I just can't respect the guy when he has no idea what he's talking about.:cool:

Android is a pretty good OS, I just don't like the fragmentation and I like the Apple ecosystem and attention to detail much more. Plus, I don't really know why you need to customize it to the point of not having it be useful anymore though. I care about productivity, not about having it be "my device" and being "controlled by Apple".

Let me ask you a few questions about your post, if you do not mind:

1) Fragmentation - If you buy a new Nexus 4, 7 or 10 sold directly from and supported directly by Google where you get the latest OS updates directly from Google, how does fragmentation effect you?

2) If you customize any OS to the point of it not being useful, how is that the OS's fault? Isn't that the users fault for not knowing exactly what they want? Why would anyone customize to the point that its useless? Wouldn't you stop once you reached the point of satisfaction?

3) So, its more productive to say, open the cal app to see your appointments next week, open your reminders app to see your to do list, then open your mail app to see your recent emails, then open your Podcast app to listen to a pod cast, then open your music app to listen to music, of then open Pages to look at a document...of and you want to know the weather, then go to notification center, and press the date to OPEN THE WEATHER APP...

Isn't it nicer to have all that information, assuming that is important to you, on a screen or two, nicely summarized and then, if needed open the related app to work with the data, instead of opening apps only to decide if you need to do something?

The above are just examples; but you get the idea; I could go on and on how widgets make the OS far more productive over opening apps over and over again.

Stuntman06
Nov 11, 2012, 08:52 PM
I don't really know why you need to customize it to the point of not having it be useful anymore though. I care about productivity, not about having it be "my device" and being "controlled by Apple".

I customise my Android phone to improve on productivity. As far as I am aware, some of the customisations I do are not possible on iOS.

The videos do highlight the capabilities of Android. Not everyone will take advantage of all of the capabilities of Android. I certainly do not. There is a lot of detailed information in those videos.

lunaoso
Nov 11, 2012, 08:54 PM
I customise my Android phone to improve on productivity. As far as I am aware, some of the customisations I do are not possible on iOS.

The videos do highlight the capabilities of Android. Not everyone will take advantage of all of the capabilities of Android. I certainly do not. There is a lot of detailed information in those videos.

What customizations do you have to improve productivity other then widgets? I never understood the point of the whole themes thing on jailbroken iOS either.

marc11
Nov 11, 2012, 08:57 PM
What customizations do you have to improve productivity other then widgets? I never understood the point of the whole themes thing on jailbroken iOS either.

A widget is not a theme. For example, think desktops in OSX, that is a widget. Android has 4 or 5 desktops, each desktop can have one or more widgets. So for me as an example I have my email on one and my calendar on another. So I can swipe between and easily see my emails (and read the first few lines) and events for the week or weeks coming up. I can even scroll within the widget. All without opening an app. Then I can swipe to another desktop and see other data or other widgets all without opening apps. I can swipe between desktops and see so much information so much faster than opening and switching between apps.

hyteckit
Nov 11, 2012, 09:09 PM
Very bias review.

Complains about iPhone apps having to be repurchase for iPad.

No different from having to buy an app on Android phone and then buy the HD version for Android tablet.

Even worst is that some of the Android app I bought on Android phone won't run on my Android tablet. My Android tablet running ICS can't run a bunch of android apps I've already purchased.


You can share using Facebook on iOS, not that I have any interest.

What about iOS advantages? AirPrint, Airplay. Seems that more important to me than say share on Facebook.

----------

Look at splashtop on the android for example. How many version are there?

Splashtop 2 - Remote Desktop
Splashtop Remote Desktop
Splashtop Remote Desktop HD
Splashtop GamePad THD
Splashtop Remote-SonyTablet S
Splashtop Remote-SonyTablet P


He complains about Angry Birds space cost 99 cents on iOS and Free on Android.

Um...

iOS
Angry Birds space Free - Free
Angry Birds space - 99 cents (no ads version)

Android
Angry Birds space - Free
Angry Birds Space Premium - 99 cents (no ads version)

vistadude
Nov 11, 2012, 09:35 PM
Watched the first video and laughed a lot. Having hardly ever used an android device and spent several years with iphone, his video makes sense about the inefficiencies of iphones/iOS. I'm sure there are a few counter examples on the other side, but the mapping and ringtone problems are a big fail on iphone.

On the other hand, his android iphones looks like a pure google nexus phone. HTC and other manufacturers tend to screw up what google designed as an experience.

Edit: I take that back, in part 2 he start using a galaxy fascinate with android 2.2.

lunaoso
Nov 11, 2012, 10:01 PM
A widget is not a theme. For example, think desktops in OSX, that is a widget. Android has 4 or 5 desktops, each desktop can have one or more widgets. So for me as an example I have my email on one and my calendar on another. So I can swipe between and easily see my emails (and read the first few lines) and events for the week or weeks coming up. I can even scroll within the widget. All without opening an app. Then I can swipe to another desktop and see other data or other widgets all without opening apps. I can swipe between desktops and see so much information so much faster than opening and switching between apps.

I understand what a widget is. I may have written my last post in a kinda of confusing way. My quest was more like this: What customizations do you use to improve productivity other then widgets? And then I threw themes out there as another form of customization, but I don't think themes really improve productivity. Hopefully that cleared it up.

As a side note, I have used Android before, not extensively, but enough to get around. And coming from a heavy iOS user, I found that Android was kind of "everywhere", and not very organized for certain things.

SomeDudeAsking
Nov 11, 2012, 10:23 PM
Or just because he didn't point out all of the advantages iOS has over Android. I just stopped watching after he listed different screen sizes, which creates fragmentation as an advantage. And you seem to have your eyes on the Android side. He is undisputedly biased towards Android.

Oh, yeah, different screen sizes are so bad or is it that you don't realize people have different size hands and eyesight levels. Apple loyalists seem to think a 3.5 inch screen is the perfect size whether you are a 12 year old petite girl or Lebron James.

Zwhaler
Nov 11, 2012, 10:37 PM
Already saw those videos. The guy is horribly biased. I've used Android and still prefer iOS over it.

There comes a point when customization is just for the sake of it. This guy likes to repeat how "customizable" Android is, but I think he misses the point of what an OS should be: a platform for apps.

Not trying to bash, but one thing I snapped out of quick by switching to Android is the mentality that an OS should only be a platform for apps. I love installing widgets in my home screen that actually do stuff without having to launch apps. A parallel to iOS would be app icons that auto update and display information. But they don't have to be 1x1 on android, they can be all the way up to 4x4. I prefer this system but maybe that's because I was stuck on iOS for so long without seeing what it's like to use this functionality.

hyteckit
Nov 11, 2012, 10:39 PM
Oh, yeah, different screen sizes are so bad or is it that you don't realize people have different size hands and eyesight levels. Apple loyalists seem to think a 3.5 inch screen is the perfect size whether you are a 12 year old petite girl or Lebron James.

Guess you are not a programmer.

Why do you think there are so few tablet specific apps on Android tablet?
Why do you think there are so many android apps that don't run on my Android tablet?
Why do you think there are so many versions of the same Android app?

It's a freaking mess cause of fragmentation.

zbarvian
Nov 11, 2012, 10:40 PM
Wow, so you mean Android has advantages to iOS? This isn't news, they both have advantages over the other. It's--pardon the platitude--all about personal preference.

hyteckit
Nov 11, 2012, 10:52 PM
Some examples of incompatibility issues with android apps.

I have an android tablet and android phone. Tablet running ICS and phone running gingerbread. What works and what doesn't.

Just some game examples.


NBA Jam
tablet - YES
phone - NO

MADDEN NFL 12
tablet - NO
phone - YES

FIFA 12
tablet - YES
phone - NO

Plants vs. Zombies
tablet - NO
phone - YES


TETRIS
tablet - NO
phone - NO


Worms
tablet - NO
phone - YES

Need for Speed™ Hot Pursuit
tablet - NO
phone - NO

Tiger Woods PGA TOUR® 12
tablet - YES
phone - NO

Asphalt 6: Adrenaline
tablet - NO
phone - NO

N.O.V.A. 2
tablet - NO
phone - NO

mib1800
Nov 11, 2012, 11:01 PM
I understand what a widget is. I may have written my last post in a kinda of confusing way. My quest was more like this: What customizations do you use to improve productivity other then widgets?

- How about auto switching your ring profile based on time/appointment (instead of tediously remembering to flip the silent switch on iphone?
- How about having a multi-clipboard (last X number of clippings + predefined ones)
- How about auto-changing your wallpaper periodically (only when you are using your phone)?
- How about tapping a NFC tag and have phone automatically change settings/start up apps/etc.
- How about auto-upload or download photos/podcasts/files/content/log/sms/links to ANY share providers (without needing to manually start apps one-by-one)?
- How about creating "shortcuts" to any apps/predefined sms/contacts/files/links/content anywhere in the phone and needing just one tap to activate action.
- How about using transparent icons in homescreen (so wallpaper is not obscured)?
- How about having information in widgets that auto-refresh?
- How about having phone performance actions automatically based on events (e.g. auto-send sms for birthday, on-off settings or run apps based on time/location, block calls based on rules)

hyteckit
Nov 11, 2012, 11:27 PM
How about my android tablet being able to run android apps I paid for?

blackhand1001
Nov 11, 2012, 11:36 PM
How about my android tablet being able to run android apps I paid for?

What tablet do you have anyway. If you bought some no name tablet or something I am not surprised it can't run them. By a nexus or an asus transformer next time.

hyteckit
Nov 11, 2012, 11:50 PM
What tablet do you have anyway. If you bought some no name tablet or something I am not surprised it can't run them. By a nexus or an asus transformer next time.

Acer Iconia with Tegra 2 running ICS.

blackhand1001
Nov 11, 2012, 11:53 PM
Acer Iconia with Tegra 2 running ICS.

The 10 inch version or the 7 inch.

hyteckit
Nov 11, 2012, 11:58 PM
The 10 inch version or the 7 inch.

7"

Why?

moargolems
Nov 12, 2012, 04:32 AM
If someone prefers iOS over Android or vice versa, so what? Seems that there's something fundamentally wrong in having opinions.

****ing idiots.

Dave.UK
Nov 12, 2012, 06:55 AM
I do love all the chat about widgets! Unless you've really used widgets, I honestly dont think you understand how great they are! Below is a post I made on another thread, but thought I would share it here :)

_______________________________

Here's just a couple of things that I can do with Android but cant with ios. Please note that this is how I have my phone set up and its the way I like it. What appeals to me might not appeal to others.

Screen 1

http://www.airportcitygame.com/other/1.jpg

This is my main home screen. I love having the time/date and weather automatically update. If I click on the time it takes me straight through to my alarm setting screen. Click on the weather and it gives me a 7 day forecast.

Ive then got my countdown app telling me how long till my next race. Gives me motivation everytime I unlock the screen.

Ive then got 4 apps that I use pretty often - Camera, Gallery, Flashlight and the Play store. Underneath I have links to Contacts, Email, App Draw, SMS and Internet.

Im also using a beautiful live wall paper - Which despite what people may say, dosent drain the battery!

Screen 2

http://www.airportcitygame.com/other/2.jpg

Calendar/Appointments app at the top
Juice defender toggle and prop points widget
Runtastic widget

If I click on any of the widgets, it takes me through to the app. However its nice to see the info I want on the screen without having to load the app.

Screen 3

http://www.airportcitygame.com/other/3.jpg

Shiftworker widget so I can see what shifts ive got coming up. Quick click on the widget brings up the entire month.

Video player and below that my music player.

I personally could never move over to a phone that dosent have widgets. Having all the information I want on different screens, so it only takes a swipe to see it. Of course some people dont need or want widgets, but its not until you use them that you realise how useful they really are.

Then theres the notification bar!

http://www.airportcitygame.com/other/4.jpg

You can slide the notification bar across and it shows more settings, but its nice and easy to get to.

technowar
Nov 12, 2012, 07:41 AM
Let me ask you a few questions about your post, if you do not mind:

1) Fragmentation - If you buy a new Nexus 4, 7 or 10 sold directly from and supported directly by Google where you get the latest OS updates directly from Google, how does fragmentation effect you?

2) If you customize any OS to the point of it not being useful, how is that the OS's fault? Isn't that the users fault for not knowing exactly what they want? Why would anyone customize to the point that its useless? Wouldn't you stop once you reached the point of satisfaction?

3) So, its more productive to say, open the cal app to see your appointments next week, open your reminders app to see your to do list, then open your mail app to see your recent emails, then open your Podcast app to listen to a pod cast, then open your music app to listen to music, of then open Pages to look at a document...of and you want to know the weather, then go to notification center, and press the date to OPEN THE WEATHER APP...

Isn't it nicer to have all that information, assuming that is important to you, on a screen or two, nicely summarized and then, if needed open the related app to work with the data, instead of opening apps only to decide if you need to do something?

The above are just examples; but you get the idea; I could go on and on how widgets make the OS far more productive over opening apps over and over again.

1. Uhm, how does these devices compete with iDevices? How does these devices delivered the apps? Can you use some apps from NX4 to NX7 to NX10 and vice versa?

With regards to Widgets - there are some people that doesn't really like having one. Let's just respect them for that. I personally like having a widget but since I'm with iOS, I don't mind opening apps over and over again. Just my 2 cents.

Dave.UK
Nov 12, 2012, 07:51 AM
With regards to Widgets - there are some people that doesn't really like having one. Let's just respect them for that. I personally like having a widget but since I'm with iOS, I don't mind opening apps over and over again. Just my 2 cents.

That's the great thing with Android -You get the choice on whether you want to use widgets or not.

white4s
Nov 12, 2012, 08:17 AM
how about this, who the **** cares!? buy what you want

sviato
Nov 12, 2012, 08:58 AM
Not going to watch an hour of video about this. Yes, Android has a lot of customization options and you can root, flash roms etc. Bottom line is that you can do a lot with Android but a small number of people actually use these features.

I've met a bunch of people recently who have their Galaxy S3s and have no idea about rooting, XDA forums, or even about how to kill background apps. This is not why these people bought an Android device, yet this seems to be the main advantage that people present in Android vs iOS.

Personally, I love customization. I've customized and built UIs for various games that I've played and often like things to be very specific to my preferences.

I actually don't have a problem with the Android OS, and I'm sure many people don't either. The issue is with the handset manufacturers. There are several Android OEMs making a dozen identical phones per year. If I buy the best thing now, a few months later something better will be out, and my device might not even get the software update that the new device comes with. Of course I can wait for my carrier to maybe release it for my phone, or go to forums and hope that someone had figured out a way to get this on my phone and hope that my phone's specs can support it without issues. How do I know my phone will even be supported next year? Fragmentation exists in Apple's ecosystem too, but isn't nearly as bad.

Warranty is another issue. If I have a software issue do I contact Google? Do I send my phone to Samsung? Where can I go to talk to a person and get live help? Is there an out of warranty replacement option without having to pay full price for a new phone?

One thing that I do not like about the actual Android OS though is that it just isn't as smooth as iOS. You can try to tell me that I'm wrong but I've played with my friend's GS3 for an hour and have seen this and it even shows up in OP's first video. Just by swiping across icons there is a stutter, and doing that isn't really an intensive task so it's worse when it happens elsewhere.


All that said, I can weight the benefits vs. the "faults" all day but none of that matters. The only thing that does is preference. If something works for you, then that's good for you. A bunch of my friends who use Android keep trying to push it on me while I never push my Apply devices on them. Why? I have nothing to prove, my iPhone does everything that I need it to as of now so should I really change to Android just for the sake of having more features? Maybe if the iPhone was no longer usable in my day-to-day activities then I would look for something new. People's preferences are different, I know your egos require whatever you use to be "the best", but people really need to leave this issue of Android vs iOS alone - just use what you like.

hyteckit
Nov 12, 2012, 09:34 AM
Im also using a beautiful live wall paper - Which despite what people may say, dosent drain the battery!


I bought a bunch of live wall paper.

After playing with it for a few days, end up turning it off.

Not only does it drain the battery, it slows down the device by a lot.

cmChimera
Nov 12, 2012, 09:43 AM
Let me ask you a few questions about your post, if you do not mind:

1) Fragmentation - If you buy a new Nexus 4, 7 or 10 sold directly from and supported directly by Google where you get the latest OS updates directly from Google, how does fragmentation effect you? Inconsistent app experience because developers aren't designing an app specifically for that device. Resolution and screen sizes make a difference. Software optimization is also an issue, both for the app and the OS.

donrsd
Nov 12, 2012, 10:10 AM
I do love all the chat about widgets! Unless you've really used widgets, I honestly dont think you understand how great they are! Below is a post I made on another thread, but thought I would share it here :)

Screen 2

Image (http://www.airportcitygame.com/other/2.jpg)

Calendar/Appointments app at the top
Juice defender toggle and prop points widget
Runtastic widget

If I click on any of the widgets, it takes me through to the app. However its nice to see the info I want on the screen without having to load the app.



Good ol Juice Defender.
Nothing like having an app to kill your apps or an app to save the battery life on apps that never stop running.

I had a Sprint EVO when it 1st came out. Worst 8 months of my cell phone life until I got out of the contract.
I hacked the crap out of the phone, customized everything & even installed every 'free' app I could get for free :D
Went to an iPhone 4 and never looked back.
Had an iPhone 4S and now an iPhone 5.

I do like the SG3 screen size, but thats where my love for anything android end.

lunaoso
Nov 12, 2012, 12:14 PM
- How about auto switching your ring profile based on time/appointment (instead of tediously remembering to flip the silent switch on iphone?
- How about having a multi-clipboard (last X number of clippings + predefined ones)
- How about tapping a NFC tag and have phone automatically change settings/start up apps/etc.
- How about auto-upload or download photos/podcasts/files/content/log/sms/links to ANY share providers (without needing to manually start apps one-by-one)?
- How about creating "shortcuts" to any apps/predefined sms/contacts/files/links/content anywhere in the phone and needing just one tap to activate action.
- How about having information in widgets that auto-refresh?
- How about having phone performance actions automatically based on events (e.g. auto-send sms for birthday, on-off settings or run apps based on time/location, block calls based on rules)

I got rid of the ones in that list that don't help productivity at all. And of those that are listed above, I would probably only use maybe one or two. And really flipping the silent switch is tedious? :rolleyes:

AlyseM
Nov 12, 2012, 12:25 PM
I had a lot of performance issues with my android. I think it will be a long while before I give them another chance.

jsw
Nov 12, 2012, 12:38 PM
And really flipping the silent switch is tedious? :rolleyes:
No, but remembering to flip it back off silent can be a problem.

I was able to set timed profiles on Nokia phones in the 1990s. The fact I can't on my iPhone remains a sore point. I work roughly the same hours every weekday. I am supposed to keep my phone on silent at work. It would be really great to not have to remember twice a day, five days a week, to flip the switch. Most days, I remember, but I'm embarrassed at work when I don't remember in the morning, and I miss calls in the evening if I forget to switch back.

There is absolutely no reason whatsoever to not have this capability in iOS. None.

cynics
Nov 12, 2012, 01:13 PM
I got rid of the ones in that list that don't help productivity at all. And of those that are listed above, I would probably only use maybe one or two. And really flipping the silent switch is tedious? :rolleyes:

You and I can't use ANY off that list though. Having a list of stuff the iPhone can't do then saying "I'd only use one or two" is a moot point isn't it? You could want everything there or only one thing there, the result will still be the same.

lunaoso
Nov 12, 2012, 01:47 PM
You and I can't use ANY off that list though. Having a list of stuff the iPhone can't do then saying "I'd only use one or two" is a moot point isn't it? You could want everything there or only one thing there, the result will still be the same.

Yes I agree with that. As I said above, I believe Android is a very capable OS. The things I took out were having the wallpaper change every once in a while. That doesn't improve productivity. Some of those things on that list I thought were kind of useless, such as Using NFC chips for settings, considering the limited amount of NFC chips.

matttye
Nov 12, 2012, 05:14 PM
Used Android for three years. Formed my own opinions; don't have to view someone else's on YouTube. Prefer iOS.

Next!

blesio
Nov 12, 2012, 05:29 PM
No, but remembering to flip it back off silent can be a problem.

I was able to set timed profiles on Nokia phones in the 1990s. The fact I can't on my iPhone remains a sore point. I work roughly the same hours every weekday. I am supposed to keep my phone on silent at work. It would be really great to not have to remember twice a day, five days a week, to flip the switch. Most days, I remember, but I'm embarrassed at work when I don't remember in the morning, and I miss calls in the evening if I forget to switch back.

There is absolutely no reason whatsoever to not have this capability in iOS. None.

But you do have this option, although its been introduced in iOS 6, a little late, it's still there and working fine :)

jsw
Nov 12, 2012, 05:37 PM
But you do have this option, although its been introduced in iOS 6, a little late, it's still there and working fine :)
Ah, I did not know that! However, until there's a decent jailbreak, I'm stuck on iOS 5. :)

iEvolution
Nov 12, 2012, 05:47 PM
Apple works on the concept of KISS (keep it simple stupid), they keep their products simple instead of seeing how many features they can shove in there.

Not saying it is right or wrong but this is what Apple has been doing the last 8 or so years that has been making the company a killing.

I prefer android myself but I would definitely be giving Apple products to those less technically inclined.

marc11
Nov 12, 2012, 05:51 PM
Inconsistent app experience because developers aren't designing an app specifically for that device. Resolution and screen sizes make a difference. Software optimization is also an issue, both for the app and the OS.

However, unless you own several devices, running several different versions of Android, this does not really apply. The app is the app is the app; if it isn't a good app for what ever reason, then that is different. Again, if you buy a new generation of Nexus product from Google, fragmentation is a non issue IMHO.

technowar
Nov 12, 2012, 06:10 PM
No fragmentation, yes. But how does these devices outperformed the iDevices.

jsw
Nov 12, 2012, 06:16 PM
No fragmentation, yes. But how does these devices outperformed the iDevices.
In any real sense, each company's flagship phone is fast enough. Performance of all of these is, in normal use, roughly equivalent. It comes down to the OS and ecosystem and your personal preferences, because the fact that Phone A is twice as fast as Phone B in SpecTest 1 and 0.75 times as fast in SpecTest 2 is usually irrelevant.

I know people who are perfectly happy with iPhone 3s - which are, what, 8x slower than the iPhone 5? For tablets, speed matters more. For phones? It just has to be fast enough, and they all are.

cmChimera
Nov 12, 2012, 06:16 PM
However, unless you own several devices, running several different versions of Android, this does not really apply. The app is the app is the app; if it isn't a good app for what ever reason, then that is different. Again, if you buy a new generation of Nexus product from Google, fragmentation is a non issue IMHO.

I'm apps are subpar because of the fragmentation. I'm also saying that the OS and the apps suffer from a lack of optimization because it's impossible to optimize for hardware due to the fact that the hardware configurations are sporadic. Games and apps almost uniformly look better on iOS. Higher quality games are on iOS. This has a direct effect on any Android user because it is their experience. You can have a Nexus device all you want, but if a fragmented ecosystem is subpar then it is subpar.

jsw
Nov 12, 2012, 06:20 PM
Games and apps almost uniformly look better on iOS. Higher quality games are on iOS.
This seems less and less true over time. I've got plenty of attractive, fun games on my Nexus 7, and they look pretty much identical to the ones on my iDevices.

I grant that there are more iOS game options, but it's not like the Android options are some vast wasteland. It's a rich ecosystem, just not as rich. For some, that extra iOS set of apps is critically important. For others, Play has far more than enough, and the gap continues to narrow.

marc11
Nov 12, 2012, 06:23 PM
I'm apps are subpar because of the fragmentation. I'm also saying that the OS and the apps suffer from a lack of optimization because it's impossible to optimize for hardware due to the fact that the hardware configurations are sporadic. Games and apps almost uniformly look better on iOS. Higher quality games are on iOS. This has a direct effect on any Android user because it is their experience. You can have a Nexus device all you want, but if a fragmented ecosystem is subpar then it is subpar.

Okay then name the apps and devices which the app is subpar between Android devices, by subpar I mean the app looks and works great and has features and functions which are not available on another device. Specifically, name the apps which do not work or are subpar on the Nexus 7 which are better on a different Android device.

Wrathwitch
Nov 12, 2012, 06:29 PM
Here's my outlook on those videos.

They DID open my eyes to what Android had to offer wherein I would not have considered it before. They also motivated me to try an android device. SSGS3.

Is Android better? No, it is merely different. Is iOS better? No it is merely different.

Point of fact is that I really like customizing and hiding apps that I am not using and if I could have done that with the iPhone, I would not have switched. There IS much more customization available and things that you can do with Android that you cannot with iPhone.

However, fragmentation IS an issue. One example: I cannot get a compatible version of PvZ on my phone... so therefore, despite what people say it IS an issue. Android developers do not care as much about Android as they do for iOS and this is reflected in app quality.

Can I do everything I want to on my Android phone? Yes (excepting some games that I really liked available only to iOS). Do I love looking at my homescreen compared to iOS, YES.

If I could get an iPhone with a 4.3-4.5" screen with the availability to add a widget or two or customize how it appears, with the apps available AND (most importantly, CURRENT and timely OS updates) I would be all over it faster than a fat kid on chocolate cake!

Despite fanaticism on both sides, pick the OS that offers what you most want in a phone. I don't mind if people are fans of an OS, but I really am getting sick of people trying to convert people like some desperate TV evangelist. Just because YOU might like a particular OS, doesn't mean that everyone shares your point of view. Despite what many fanbois of both OS's think, the sun does not rise and set out of that particular device's ass.

LIVEFRMNYC
Nov 12, 2012, 07:31 PM
When it comes to phones......... I see myself sticking with Android for now on. Will only consider the top of the line models. I currently use the GS3. I'm on a Jelly Bean touchwiz ROM and it crushes iOS when it comes to functionality, speed, and smoothness. The iPhone is still a great phone. I'm just the type of user that wants and needs everything possible(not literally), and exactly the way I want it setup. That's hard to achieve on the iPhone even with Jailbreak.

When it comes to Tablets....... I'm still using my iPad 2 daily and don't have any urge at all to replace it with any Android tablet. I mainly use it for browsing and some certain apps. I'll probably keep using it until I run into issues, still Jailbroken on 5.0.1.

iOS is still king of the app world when it comes to releases, but I don't see any real difference in the quality of apps that are on both platforms. The GS3 is one of the most popular Android phones, so I haven't run into any compatibility issues. I'm sure others with less popular phones have.

killerbee79
Nov 12, 2012, 07:35 PM
Here's my outlook on those videos.

They DID open my eyes to what Android had to offer wherein I would not have considered it before. They also motivated me to try an android device. SSGS3.



Couldn't have said it better myself. That is what the videos did for me and why I posted it. Showed me things that I never knew existed or that I could do with Android. Only I don't have a SSGS3, or smartphone for that matter. I just won't pay $70+ a month for phone service, waste of good money. I'll stick with my prepaid pay-as-you-go $15/month minimum.

But it did cause me to buy a Nexus 7 which I absolutely LOVE. I carry it with me to work in my jacket pocket so I can read, or play Nintendo games, or Playstation games, or Sega games, or surf on my work's free WIFI, and more during my breaks and lunch hour. Use it around the house all the time, heck I now use my MBP sparingly as I've now noticed that I don't really need it 80% of the time.

Love the fact I can customize to look and feel how I want it, not how Apple tells me I must have it with their rows of icons. But iOS does let you change wallpaper :p Love that darn Nexus and Android. If I did have a smartphone it would now be an Android. Coming from a former iPhone user (3G that I disconnected in 2009), current MBP user, former iPod Touch user.

technowar
Nov 12, 2012, 07:39 PM
In any real sense, each company's flagship phone is fast enough. Performance of all of these is, in normal use, roughly equivalent. It comes down to the OS and ecosystem and your personal preferences, because the fact that Phone A is twice as fast as Phone B in SpecTest 1 and 0.75 times as fast in SpecTest 2 is usually irrelevant.

I know people who are perfectly happy with iPhone 3s - which are, what, 8x slower than the iPhone 5? For tablets, speed matters more. For phones? It just has to be fast enough, and they all are.

Amen to this.

cmChimera
Nov 13, 2012, 08:59 AM
This seems less and less true over time. I've got plenty of attractive, fun games on my Nexus 7, and they look pretty much identical to the ones on my iDevices.

I grant that there are more iOS game options, but it's not like the Android options are some vast wasteland. It's a rich ecosystem, just not as rich. For some, that extra iOS set of apps is critically important. For others, Play has far more than enough, and the gap continues to narrow. This is maybe true for the iPhone but far from the truth on the iPad. iPad has an ecosystem that is far and away better than the Android tablet counterparts.

Okay then name the apps and devices which the app is subpar between Android devices, by subpar I mean the app looks and works great and has features and functions which are not available on another device. Specifically, name the apps which do not work or are subpar on the Nexus 7 which are better on a different Android device.I'm sorry but did I make the claim that an app did not fuction from device to device? I said the OS and apps cannot optimize to the hardware like iOS can. Why do you think the SG3 has 2GB of RAM yet the iPhone 5 with half that can manage to have an at least equally smooth (I would argue smoother) experience? Apps function from device to device, but in my opinion many apps don't quite measure up to iOS counterparts. Not all apps, some are largely identical.

Stuntman06
Nov 13, 2012, 03:18 PM
What customizations do you have to improve productivity other then widgets? I never understood the point of the whole themes thing on jailbroken iOS either.

Not sure about themes on jailbroken iOS. At least for me, widgets are what would either improve my productivity or make things more convenient. A number of others have listed a number of things already. I'll list what hasn't already been mentioned.

I have a Volume Widget that controls the volume of the various sounds on my phone. This widget does more than simply mute and unmute sounds. On an Android phone, you can set different volume levels for the following sounds: ringtone, notification sound, alarm, media and voice.

When I go to bed, I want notifications muted, but I still want my alarm and ringtone to sound. With Volume widget, I set a profile where only the notifications are muted with the others set to a lower volume level. With a single tap of the widget I can mute my notification sounds, so an email will not disturb my sleep.

When I wake up, I want to turn back on the notification sounds and raise the sound levels to a normal level. I have a sound profile for this and can activate it with a single tap on the widget.

I also have a third sound profile for loud environments where all of the sounds are maxed. I can activate this with the widget, too.

Another widget that I find most useful is a widget for Seesmic, a third party Twitter app. I have a list set up for traffic tweets. Normally, if you launch Twitter, you get to the main feed. Then I have to select lists and my traffic list to see all of the traffic tweets. My Seesmic shortcut takes me directly to this traffic list without having to navigate through a bunch of menus.

It is true that few people uses the full potential of Android or any smartphone. I just find that there are things that I use on my Android phone that makes some things more convenient than on an iOS device.

mib1800
Nov 13, 2012, 08:06 PM
This is maybe true for the iPhone but far from the truth on the iPad. iPad has an ecosystem that is far and away better than the Android tablet counterparts.

I don't quite agree.
Fact: You need separate app for ipad. iphone apps on ipad just look extremely crap. (i.e. raster view zoom) and virtually unusable. On Android, those apps (except games) that have not added a "tablet view", still scaled up nicely on tablet screen.


I'm sorry but did I make the claim that an app did not fuction from device to device? I said the OS and apps cannot optimize to the hardware like iOS can. Why do you think the SG3 has 2GB of RAM yet the iPhone 5 with half that can manage to have an at least equally smooth (I would argue smoother) experience?

A MS-DOS computer (i.e. iOS) requires much less RAM because it needs only to do ONE task at a time. On Android, there are so many tasks (incl. UI) running at same time and competing for CPU time.


Apps function from device to device, but in my opinion many apps don't quite measure up to iOS counterparts. Not all apps, some are largely identical.

I would say differently. Even for same identical app, the iOS version is usually dumber and have less functionality. Android version has added capability (incl. background sync/upload/download, alert notification, reacts to intents like "share"/"open", widget in home screen etc). Just checkout some mainstream app like dropbox, opera mini, catch, rss reader and you can see the Android versions are so much more capable than iOS.

And there are so MANY type of Android apps that have no equivalent (or cannot be programmed) in IOS because of the restrictive/dumbed down iOS. Technically there isnt any iOS apps that cannot be ported to Android.

Jinzen
Nov 13, 2012, 08:21 PM
Let me ask you a few questions about your post, if you do not mind:

1) Fragmentation - If you buy a new Nexus 4, 7 or 10 sold directly from and supported directly by Google where you get the latest OS updates directly from Google, how does fragmentation effect you?

2) If you customize any OS to the point of it not being useful, how is that the OS's fault? Isn't that the users fault for not knowing exactly what they want? Why would anyone customize to the point that its useless? Wouldn't you stop once you reached the point of satisfaction?

3) So, its more productive to say, open the cal app to see your appointments next week, open your reminders app to see your to do list, then open your mail app to see your recent emails, then open your Podcast app to listen to a pod cast, then open your music app to listen to music, of then open Pages to look at a document...of and you want to know the weather, then go to notification center, and press the date to OPEN THE WEATHER APP...

Isn't it nicer to have all that information, assuming that is important to you, on a screen or two, nicely summarized and then, if needed open the related app to work with the data, instead of opening apps only to decide if you need to do something?

The above are just examples; but you get the idea; I could go on and on how widgets make the OS far more productive over opening apps over and over again.

Spoken like someone who has never used widgets. Widgets are almost completely useless. A gigantic widget for weather - a live icon does that in iOS. Widgets for mail? LOL. Calendar widget? Yes, I need to have all my appointments constantly on my home screen.

Purant
Nov 13, 2012, 08:59 PM
Not going to watch an hour of video about this. Yes, Android has a lot of customization options and you can root, flash roms etc. Bottom line is that you can do a lot with Android but a small number of people actually use these features.

And this is why I am annoyed by Apple lately. They really target the lowest common denominator. "a few people use that so why bother". As soon as you need something beyond the intended you use, you are out of luck.

And you know what? Most people are missing at least one feature in iOS. It might be something obscure and/or even silly, but everyone's has at least on pet feature that would like to see on iOS. It's not the same for everyone but gather enough of those features that "a small number of people actually use" and you result in an OS where EVERY user misses something.

It's like going to a restaurant that only has french fries, because all other food is something that "a small number of people actually eat" while everyone eats fries. It may be the best french fries you've ever eaten, but if... if it happens that one day you're feeling like eating a salad... We'll... you're out of luck.

[DISCLAIMER: I'm exaggerating a bit, but I usually do that when I'm trying to make a point, apologies]

mib1800
Nov 13, 2012, 09:14 PM
Spoken like someone who has never used widgets. Widgets are almost completely useless. A gigantic widget for weather - a live icon does that in iOS. Widgets for mail? LOL. Calendar widget? Yes, I need to have all my appointments constantly on my home screen.

Spoken like someone who has no idea what a widget is. :p

jsw
Nov 13, 2012, 09:29 PM
Spoken like someone who has never used widgets. Widgets are almost completely useless.
So, you've never really used them.
A gigantic widget for weather - a live icon does that in iOS.
Um, no. A live icon in iOS can, at best, tell you temperature and a very rough view of the current weather. The Android weather widgets show you a ton of info at a glance with no more effort than a swipe, if that. However, it's good to see you supporting live icons, which are, of course, widgets.
Widgets for mail? LOL.
So, clearly, you don't care to check your mail. Seeing it in a swipe is vastly easier that opening the Mail app and navigating to the Inbox messages, then closing it back up to go to see something else. Calendar widget? Yes, I need to have all my appointments constantly on my home screen.Some of us have more in our lives, it seems.

Being able to check almost anything I want in a few swipes is a time saver. There is no good argument against it. There is no way opening multiple apps and switching betweent them is more time efficient.

arashb
Nov 14, 2012, 02:26 AM
Just got the Nexus 7 after selling my iPad 2.

Short and sweet: Android is great, but very unpolished when compared to iOS. I'm happier with it on my tablet than I was with the iPad 2. But for my phone I want something reliable, polished and working just as it should. I would never depend on Android for that.

Oletros
Nov 14, 2012, 02:30 AM
Just got the Nexus 7 after selling my iPad 2.

Short and sweet: Android is great, but very unpolished when compared to iOS. I'm happier with it on my tablet than I was with the iPad 2. But for my phone I want something reliable, polished and working just as it should. I would never depend on Android for that.

What is unreliable and doesn't works to not depend on it?

otherjobs
Nov 14, 2012, 02:47 AM
Unfortunately, Android is in fragmentation hell. A lot of people could never update their devices. I wonder how much people at old 2.3 at the moment.

mib1800
Nov 14, 2012, 02:57 AM
Just got the Nexus 7 after selling my iPad 2.

Short and sweet: Android is great, but very unpolished when compared to iOS. I'm happier with it on my tablet than I was with the iPad 2. But for my phone I want something reliable, polished and working just as it should. I would never depend on Android for that.

Since I have my Galaxy S2 and now S3, both these phones can go on for months (yes you heard it right) without crashing, self-reboot or slowdown.

I would say Android is as dependable as iOS now (since ICS). Just let the old wife's tale (that Android is very unstable) remains at that.

Oletros
Nov 14, 2012, 03:01 AM
Unfortunately, Android is in fragmentation hell. A lot of people could never update their devices. I wonder how much people at old 2.3 at the moment.

58%

But I don't know what makes that a fragmentation hell? Do you really know what fragmentation means?

otherjobs
Nov 14, 2012, 03:19 AM
58%

But I don't know what makes that a fragmentation hell? Do you really know what fragmentation means?

When a huge number on people uses old, outdated versions, and there are several popular old versions amoung them.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/7/7c/Android_chart.png

You see, only a few Android users have the opportunity to use the latest Jelly Bean,
while most iPhone users have latest iOS without problem.

Most of these Android users would never have the ability to install a newer version of Android,
with fixed bugs and other valuable improvements, to their device.

So, if you are buying a new Android phone, be prepared that you might not ever get even a single minor update. :eek:

Oletros
Nov 14, 2012, 03:23 AM
You see, only a few Android users have the opportunity to use the latest Jelly Bean,
while most iPhone users have latest iOS without problem.



And you're forgetting that most of the core apps in Android are not tied to the OS update, they are independent.

So, perhaps you don't have Android 4.1 but you have the same app features in GMail or Maps than those.

iOS core apps are tied to the OS update.

What fragmentation hell? Do you really know what fragmentation means?

hyteckit
Nov 14, 2012, 03:24 AM
58%

But I don't know what makes that a fragmentation hell? Do you really know what fragmentation means?

Fragmentation means I can't run many of the games and apps on my Android tablet running ICS.

Some games/apps only run on my android phone running gingerbread.
Some games/apps only run on my android tablet running ICS.

Big mess.

Oletros
Nov 14, 2012, 03:28 AM
Fragmentation means I can't run many of the games and apps on my Android tablet running ICS.

Some games/apps only run on my android phone running gingerbread.
Some games/apps only run on my android tablet running ICS.

Big mess.

Yap, because ALL of the games in the Apple App store runs in every iOS device and in every iOS version, really?


By the way, the source code for 4.2 is in the repository

hyteckit
Nov 14, 2012, 03:32 AM
Yap, because ALL of the games in the Apple App store runs in every iOS device and in every iOS version, really?

Nothing close to the mess on Android side.

Not even close.


I have an android tablet and android phone. Tablet running ICS and phone running gingerbread. What works and what doesn't.

Just some game examples.


NBA Jam
tablet - YES
phone - NO

MADDEN NFL 12
tablet - NO
phone - YES

FIFA 12
tablet - YES
phone - NO

Plants vs. Zombies
tablet - NO
phone - YES


TETRIS
tablet - NO
phone - NO


Worms
tablet - NO
phone - YES

Need for Speed™ Hot Pursuit
tablet - NO
phone - NO

Tiger Woods PGA TOUR® 12
tablet - YES
phone - NO

Asphalt 6: Adrenaline
tablet - NO
phone - NO

N.O.V.A. 2
tablet - NO
phone - NO

paulsalter
Nov 14, 2012, 03:37 AM
And you're forgetting that most of the core apps in Android are not tied to the OS update, they are independent.



This seems to be what most people miss, I have a older tablet still on 2.3, it is still getting updates to the google apps (mail, maps etc)

Another thing to look at is the carrier versions on android, my GSII went from 2.3 to 4.0 and it still looks exactly the same

personally, I think all this complaining about different version is overblown

you buy a device with the features you want, if it doen's get the latest update, are you losing features you did have

Oletros
Nov 14, 2012, 03:41 AM
Nothing close to the mess on Android side.

So you're admitting that there is fragmentation also in iOS devices? Will you bash them like you're constantly doing in this subforum?

hyteckit
Nov 14, 2012, 03:43 AM
Same games on the iOS side. What works.

NBA Jam, iOS 3.2 and up
iPad 1 - YES
iPad Mini - YES
iPhone 4S - YES

MADDEN NFL 12, iOS 3.2 and up
iPad 1 - YES
iPad Mini - YES
iPhone 4S - YES

FIFA 12, iOS 3.2 and up
iPad 1 - YES
iPad Mini - YES
iPhone 4S - YES

Plants vs. Zombies, iOS 4.3 and up
iPad 1 - YES
iPad Mini - YES
iPhone 4S - YES

TETRIS, iOS 3.1 and up
iPad 1 - YES
iPad Mini - YES
iPhone 4S - YES


Worms, iOS 3.1.3 and up
iPad 1 - YES
iPad Mini - YES
iPhone 4S - YES

Need for Speed™ Hot Pursuit, iOS 3.1 and up
iPad 1 - YES
iPad Mini - YES
iPhone 4S - YES


Tiger Woods PGA TOUR® 12, iOS 4.3 and up
iPad 1 - YES
iPad Mini - YES
iPhone 4S - YES


Asphalt 6: Adrenaline, iOS 3.1.3 and up
iPad 1 - YES
iPad Mini - YES
iPhone 4S - YES

N.O.V.A. 2, iOS 3.1.3 and up
iPad 1 - YES
iPad Mini - YES
iPhone 4S - YES

arashb
Nov 14, 2012, 03:43 AM
What is unreliable and doesn't works to not depend on it?

Since I have my Galaxy S2 and now S3, both these phones can go on for months (yes you heard it right) without crashing, self-reboot or slowdown.

I would say Android is as dependable as iOS now (since ICS). Just let the old wife's tale (that Android is very unstable) remains at that.

Things do work, I've had a few times where my app menu blacks out and I have to scroll just to get out of it. But other than that for the most part they work.

But when I have to hack the tablet just to get the "Tablet UI", it makes me feel like I have to someone else's unnecessary sloppiness to Google's code.

Or the fact that the Nexus faces a problem with the screen popping out, like I said before this isn't Google's problem but it could happen to any phone/tablet out there, but it could never happen to an Apple product. Glass + aluminum = sex. Glass + plastic = a Saturn Ion -.-

It's just not polished as much as iOS and developers don't take it as seriously, widgets are cool and all but Facebook's widget only works half the time. If widgets were enabled on iOS, Facebook would probably have had this bug fixed before it was released.

In regards to Android, it's not optimized at all... that's why I have to used a custom rom to get the most that I can out of my tablet. And I find it very strange that Google doesn't optimize the simple things like Google Play banners for the tablet. Also, for being a "Tablet UI" the menu settings labels don't even fit without using ellipsis.

Android hasn't exactly failed me yet, but I don't have that sense of security like I do when I'm on iOS which is why if I have a chance of being stuck somewhere, I'd rather have an iOS phone than an Android phone.

hyteckit
Nov 14, 2012, 03:44 AM
So you're admitting that there is fragmentation also in iOS devices? Will you bash them like you're constantly doing in this subforum?

Not fragmentation.

Outdated hardware or unsupported software that the developer abandon.

iOS games/apps says iOS 3.2 and up.

Android games/apps says pray that it works.

The Android app/game might run on gingerbread device or maybe not.
The Android app/game might run on ICS device or maybe not.

Oletros
Nov 14, 2012, 03:45 AM
Not fragmentation.

Outdated hardware or unsupported software that the developer abandon.

:D:D:D:D

Because you're joking, don't you? You can't say such things with an straight face

ups, I remember your "Android is not open source", I won't waste the time with such obvious trolling.

hyteckit
Nov 14, 2012, 03:48 AM
:D:D:D:D

Because you're joking, don't you? You can't say such things with an straight face

ups, I remember your "Android is not open source", I won't waste the time with such obvious trolling.

Spoken like a clueless fandroid.

Don't know the difference between "openness" and "open source".

Oletros
Nov 14, 2012, 03:52 AM
Don't know the difference between "openness" and "open source".

The one that clearly doesn't know nothing about open sourve is you

My God, you even don't know the difference between opern development and open source.

And in the other thread we are still waiting your arguments about not being open source.

arashb
Nov 14, 2012, 03:56 AM
Like what the hell is up with this banner?
http://db.tt/PjPGq8jy

I'd rather there be no banner at all than this crap. Sure it doesn't deal with functionality but makes me think what else they may have "forgotten" to deal with since Android has such a huge range of phones and tablets to deal with.

Like I said before, I like using the Nexus 7 more than my old iPad. It's more like a computer than the iPad ever was or could be. But I'd never consider trading my iPhone for an Android.

hyteckit
Nov 14, 2012, 04:01 AM
The one that clearly doesn't know nothing about open sourve is you

My God, you even don't know the difference between opern development and open source.

And in the other thread we are still waiting your arguments about not being open source.

The discussing was about openness, not open source. So stop being silly.

A carrier lock android device is not open, no matter how much you think it is just because it's android.

That's why there is so much fragmentation because you are locked in to what the carriers and handset makers allow.

You see the pie graph from another poster?

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/7/7c/Android_chart.png


Funny how my android phone running gingerbread and my tablet running ICS belongs to the 1st and 2nd bigger percentage of the pie, yet unable to run so many apps/games.

SlCKB0Y
Nov 14, 2012, 04:16 AM
The discussing was about openness, not open source. So stop being silly.

A carrier lock android device is not open, no matter how much you think it is just because it's android.


NO. You flat out claimed that Android was not open source. You never qualified that with "some phones have locked bootloaders", or "carriers take their time updating handsets".

You straight up claimed that Android was not open source. You went into arguments claiming that because the source code for Android 4.2 was not available prior to it's release that this supported your claim.

Oletros was pointing out that you couldn't understand the difference between open development and open source. Something can still be open source whilst not having an open or collaborative development model.

Guess what, Google has now released Android 4.2, and it has also now released the source code to AOSP.

You were making completely baseless claims, we called you on your rubbish and asked you to back them up, and you ran away.

hyteckit
Nov 14, 2012, 04:30 AM
NO. You flat out claimed that Android was not open source. You never qualified that with "some phones have locked bootloaders", or "carriers take their time updating handsets".



Read my original post. It was about openness, not open source:

http://forums.macrumors.com/showpost.php?p=16264713&postcount=5

Here's the summary of what I wrote:

It's "open" to carriers and handset makers. However, it's really "closed" to consumers. You can't just take the latest Android OS and install it on your Android phone without some sort of hack.

You are stuck in the close system of your handset maker and carrier.


You straight up claimed that Android was not open source. You went into arguments claiming that because the source code for Android 4.2 was not available prior to it's release that this supported your claim.

Oletros was pointing out that you couldn't understand the difference between open development and open source. Something can still be open source whilst not having an open or collaborative development model.

Guess what, Google has now released Android 4.2, and it has also now released the source code to AOSP.

You were making completely baseless claims, we called you on your rubbish and asked you to back them up, and you ran away.

The discussion was about openness. I mention the availability of Android 4.2 source code as an example of the lack of openness. Keeping the source code close to chest and not making it available to public shows the lack of openness. It wasn't available until yesterday.

You can't claim Android 4.2 is open source until Android 4.2 is open sourced.

It was only made available yesterday as open source.

So don't be silly.

cynics
Nov 14, 2012, 07:40 AM
Read my original post. It was about openness, not open source:

http://forums.macrumors.com/showpost.php?p=16264713&postcount=5

Here's the summary of what I wrote:

It's "open" to carriers and handset makers. However, it's really "closed" to consumers. You can't just take the latest Android OS and install it on your Android phone without some sort of hack.

You are stuck in the close system of your handset maker and carrier.


The discussion was about openness. I mention the availability of Android 4.2 source code as an example of the lack of openness. Keeping the source code close to chest and not making it available to public shows the lack of openness. It wasn't available until yesterday.

You can't claim Android 4.2 is open source until Android 4.2 is open sourced.

It was only made available yesterday as open source.

So don't be silly.

Uhh, the source code was released before Google shipped it in a product. How much more open do you want?

It went online before Google pushed it to the N7 and at the same time you were able to install it yourself to the N7.

I think you are being silly thinking else wise. The software has to be completed before they can make it open source now doesn't it?

Jinzen
Nov 14, 2012, 07:54 AM
Yap, because ALL of the games in the Apple App store runs in every iOS device and in every iOS version, really?


By the way, the source code for 4.2 is in the repository

Hahha! I love the people wasting their time trolling Android on Macrumors.

----------

So, you've never really used them.

Um, no. A live icon in iOS can, at best, tell you temperature and a very rough view of the current weather. The Android weather widgets show you a ton of info at a glance with no more effort than a swipe, if that. However, it's good to see you supporting live icons, which are, of course, widgets.

So, clearly, you don't care to check your mail. Seeing it in a swipe is vastly easier that opening the Mail app and navigating to the Inbox messages, then closing it back up to go to see something else. Some of us have more in our lives, it seems.

Being able to check almost anything I want in a few swipes is a time saver. There is no good argument against it. There is no way opening multiple apps and switching betweent them is more time efficient.

LOL! Yes you do, Mr. Demi-God you. So much going on you defend Android on a Mac forum.

Oh, when I did use my Nexus 7, Galaxy S3, Droid Razr M, Galaxy Nexus, Droid Razr, and OG Droid, I'm *pretty* sure I never trolled Mac forums while I was at it.

I also found that MANY, like me, preferred leaving their home screens like stock ICS and with NO Widgets.

Because the ones you mentioned are completely useless and take up desktop space. Mail App? You see 4 emails and then you have to go into the Mail App anyway. Same thing with Calendar. Same thing with Weather. Have YOU ever found your widgets replaced going into the App itself?

Useful widgets? LED light. Radio toggles. Music player. These are the few things that are actually useful to have as a widget on the home screen.

/Getting a Droid DNA to play with but Apple stuff is still >>> most other Crap.

LIVEFRMNYC
Nov 14, 2012, 08:21 AM
Nothing close to the mess on Android side.

Not even close.


I have an android tablet and android phone. Tablet running ICS and phone running gingerbread. What works and what doesn't.

Just some game examples.


NBA Jam
tablet - YES
phone - NO

MADDEN NFL 12
tablet - NO
phone - YES

FIFA 12
tablet - YES
phone - NO

Plants vs. Zombies
tablet - NO
phone - YES


TETRIS
tablet - NO
phone - NO


Worms
tablet - NO
phone - YES

Need for Speed™ Hot Pursuit
tablet - NO
phone - NO

Tiger Woods PGA TOUR® 12
tablet - YES
phone - NO

Asphalt 6: Adrenaline
tablet - NO
phone - NO

N.O.V.A. 2
tablet - NO
phone - NO



What Android tablet and phone do you have, or are referring to?






Same games on the iOS side. What works.

NBA Jam, iOS 3.2 and up
iPad 1 - YES
iPad Mini - YES
iPhone 4S - YES

MADDEN NFL 12, iOS 3.2 and up
iPad 1 - YES
iPad Mini - YES
iPhone 4S - YES

FIFA 12, iOS 3.2 and up
iPad 1 - YES
iPad Mini - YES
iPhone 4S - YES

Plants vs. Zombies, iOS 4.3 and up
iPad 1 - YES
iPad Mini - YES
iPhone 4S - YES

TETRIS, iOS 3.1 and up
iPad 1 - YES
iPad Mini - YES
iPhone 4S - YES


Worms, iOS 3.1.3 and up
iPad 1 - YES
iPad Mini - YES
iPhone 4S - YES

Need for Speed™ Hot Pursuit, iOS 3.1 and up
iPad 1 - YES
iPad Mini - YES
iPhone 4S - YES


Tiger Woods PGA TOUR® 12, iOS 4.3 and up
iPad 1 - YES
iPad Mini - YES
iPhone 4S - YES


Asphalt 6: Adrenaline, iOS 3.1.3 and up
iPad 1 - YES
iPad Mini - YES
iPhone 4S - YES

N.O.V.A. 2, iOS 3.1.3 and up
iPad 1 - YES
iPad Mini - YES
iPhone 4S - YES

What about the 3GS, Since your comparing from Gingerbread days?

cynics
Nov 14, 2012, 08:44 AM
Hahha! I love the people wasting their time trolling Android on Macrumors.

----------



LOL! Yes you do, Mr. Demi-God you. So much going on you defend Android on a Mac forum.

Oh, when I did use my Nexus 7, Galaxy S3, Droid Razr M, Galaxy Nexus, Droid Razr, and OG Droid, I'm *pretty* sure I never trolled Mac forums while I was at it.

I also found that MANY, like me, preferred leaving their home screens like stock ICS and with NO Widgets.

Because the ones you mentioned are completely useless and take up desktop space. Mail App? You see 4 emails and then you have to go into the Mail App anyway. Same thing with Calendar. Same thing with Weather. Have YOU ever found your widgets replaced going into the App itself?

Useful widgets? LED light. Radio toggles. Music player. These are the few things that are actually useful to have as a widget on the home screen.

/Getting a Droid DNA to play with but Apple stuff is still >>> most other Crap.

Widgets aren't supposed to replace apps that's why the widget is part of the app. Mail widget = mail app, calendar widget = calendar app.

It just a quick view and quick access to a particular part of an app be it a specific email or specific day on the calendar.

Case closed because you find something that iOS can't do without JB not useful THEN call someone else the troll in the alternatives to iOS section? Ok lol

onthecouchagain
Nov 14, 2012, 08:47 AM
I'm not caught up on the thread but I assume it's become an Android vs. iOS "debate." ;)


Here's my take:

You have an operating system, Android, that is basically filling in features that it's been missing that the competition may or may not have, whilst also adding new features that no one else is doing.

Versus...

An operating system that is also filling in features that it's been missing that the competition already does have, whilst not always necessarily adding brand new features each update.

And... one of them is doing what they're doing at a much faster rate (hint: Android).

If I was a betting man, I'd bet on Android. It's already regarded by many as the superior operating system. Even many dedicated iOS users are ready for more and are putting their hopes on Ive and his "overhaul" of iOS 7. Apple Maps was, more or less, a flop; this era's "Damn You iPhone Auto Correction," and they've still got a long way to go in providing users customization, quick information at a glance, and easier access to settings. I have no doubt these features will eventually come, but when and to what degree? We shall see.

Stuntman06
Nov 14, 2012, 12:18 PM
Spoken like someone who has never used widgets. Widgets are almost completely useless. A gigantic widget for weather - a live icon does that in iOS. Widgets for mail? LOL. Calendar widget? Yes, I need to have all my appointments constantly on my home screen.

Widgets in Android can display more information than a live icon in iOS. Widgets can also provide more functionality than live icons in iOS. Widgets come in many different shapes and sizes. Not everyone needs every single widget. I use the ones that I feel are useful to me like one that displays my appointments on my home screen. Not everyone needs it. It all depends on the individual.

onthecouchagain
Nov 14, 2012, 12:26 PM
I think widgets are a little overrated, but I do find them incredibly helpful nonetheless.

The best type of widgets, in my opinion, are the ones that let you toggle settings. Direct-dials and direct-texts are so awesome too. I have a home screen dedicated to my most frequented contacts. Easy-peasy.

cynics
Nov 14, 2012, 01:49 PM
I think widgets are a little overrated, but I do find them incredibly helpful nonetheless.

The best type of widgets, in my opinion, are the ones that let you toggle settings. Direct-dials and direct-texts are so awesome too. I have a home screen dedicated to my most frequented contacts. Easy-peasy.

I can agree. They are nice to have the option of using though. I like the time/weather combo widgets. The music player and podcast players are nice too.

onthecouchagain
Nov 14, 2012, 01:54 PM
I can agree. They are nice to have the option of using though. I like the time/weather combo widgets. The music player and podcast players are nice too.

100%.

I use the music player widget too, actually, now that I think of it. Ditto weather.

ReanimationN
Nov 14, 2012, 05:50 PM
Forget it.

mib1800
Nov 14, 2012, 09:30 PM
Things do work, I've had a few times where my app menu blacks out and I have to scroll just to get out of it. But other than that for the most part they work.

But when I have to hack the tablet just to get the "Tablet UI", it makes me feel like I have to someone else's unnecessary sloppiness to Google's code.

Or the fact that the Nexus faces a problem with the screen popping out, like I said before this isn't Google's problem but it could happen to any phone/tablet out there, but it could never happen to an Apple product. Glass + aluminum = sex. Glass + plastic = a Saturn Ion -.-

It's just not polished as much as iOS and developers don't take it as seriously, widgets are cool and all but Facebook's widget only works half the time. If widgets were enabled on iOS, Facebook would probably have had this bug fixed before it was released.

In regards to Android, it's not optimized at all... that's why I have to used a custom rom to get the most that I can out of my tablet. And I find it very strange that Google doesn't optimize the simple things like Google Play banners for the tablet. Also, for being a "Tablet UI" the menu settings labels don't even fit without using ellipsis.


I like Android handling of UI code better. Developers don't have to distinguish betw. tablet or phone (unlike iOS). And UI elements in Android scale up nicely unlike iOS (which is total crap when you run a phone app on tablet).


Android hasn't exactly failed me yet, but I don't have that sense of security like I do when I'm on iOS which is why if I have a chance of being stuck somewhere, I'd rather have an iOS phone than an Android phone.

I have the opposite view. In the event, there is no data connection iOS just get stuck. I encounter many iOS apps just dont start without data connection. No such issue with Android. Furthermore, iOS is so dependent on iCloud/itunes that you are basically dead in the water when these services are not available. It is so lockdown there is no way to get stuff in/out of phone.

To us who are free from Apple jail, it is such a relief that we will never get stuck like those who use iOS devices. ;)

matttye
Nov 15, 2012, 02:09 AM
I'm not caught up on the thread but I assume it's become an Android vs. iOS "debate." ;)


Here's my take:

You have an operating system, Android, that is basically filling in features that it's been missing that the competition may or may not have, whilst also adding new features that no one else is doing.

Versus...

An operating system that is also filling in features that it's been missing that the competition already does have, whilst not always necessarily adding brand new features each update.

And... one of them is doing what they're doing at a much faster rate (hint: Android).

If I was a betting man, I'd bet on Android. It's already regarded by many as the superior operating system. Even many dedicated iOS users are ready for more and are putting their hopes on Ive and his "overhaul" of iOS 7. Apple Maps was, more or less, a flop; this era's "Damn You iPhone Auto Correction," and they've still got a long way to go in providing users customization, quick information at a glance, and easier access to settings. I have no doubt these features will eventually come, but when and to what degree? We shall see.

Android has a plethora of features, many more than iOS, but iOS does what it does really well.

For example... my last two Android phones (Galaxy S3 & S2) were hit and miss with regards to automatically connecting to the bluetooth in my car. Sometimes worked, sometimes I'd have to connect manually and sometimes I'd have to restart the phone to get it to connect (the latter only being true with my S3). My i5, however, connects every time before I even open the door.

Little things like that make the user experience much better.

hyteckit
Nov 15, 2012, 02:21 AM
What Android tablet and phone do you have, or are referring to?



Acer iconia tablet and Samsung admire android phone.




What about the 3GS, Since your comparing from Gingerbread days?

You don't think it's a major issue when my ICS tablet can't running many games/apps?


iPhone 3GS still runs iOS 6, so I'm assuming all those games I've listed would work fine.

iPhone 3GS came out in June 2009.
Gingerbread came out in Dec 2010.

hyteckit
Nov 15, 2012, 02:33 AM
Here's my take:

If you don't care much about app/games and care more about customization/widgets, then get an Android device.

If you care about apps/games and prefer simplicity over customization/widgets, then get an iOS device.


customization/widgets: Android wins
apps/games: iOS wins

mib1800
Nov 15, 2012, 02:44 AM
Here's my take:

If you don't care much about app/games and care more about customization/widgets, then get an Android device.

If you care about apps/games and prefer simplicity over customization/widgets, then get an iOS device.


customization/widgets: Android wins
apps/games: iOS wins

How can iOS win in apps? Just go and compare mainstream apps that are available on both platforms. You will see that most likely the Android version has more functionality than iOS version. There are so many automation/productivity/system/UI apps that are available for Android that can never be found in iOS due to the fact that the limited/restrictive capability of iOS cannot support these kind of apps..

hyteckit
Nov 15, 2012, 03:04 AM
How can iOS win in apps? Just go and compare mainstream apps that are available on both platforms. You will see that most likely the Android version has more functionality than iOS version. There are so many automation/productivity/system/UI apps that are available for Android that can never be found in iOS due to the fact that the limited/restrictive capability of iOS cannot support these kind of apps..

If only the Android app/game actually works on your Android device. Just because it's on the Google Play store, doesn't mean it'll run. I made the assumption about the Android platform. Big mistake. Many apps/games don't run on my Android tablet running ICS.


Compare Android with iOS. Same games.

ANDROID

I have an android tablet and android phone. Tablet running ICS and phone running gingerbread. What works and what doesn't.

Just some game examples.


NBA Jam
tablet - YES
phone - NO

MADDEN NFL 12
tablet - NO
phone - YES

FIFA 12
tablet - YES
phone - NO

Plants vs. Zombies
tablet - NO
phone - YES


TETRIS
tablet - NO
phone - NO


Worms
tablet - NO
phone - YES

Need for Speed™ Hot Pursuit
tablet - NO
phone - NO

Tiger Woods PGA TOUR® 12
tablet - YES
phone - NO

Asphalt 6: Adrenaline
tablet - NO
phone - NO

N.O.V.A. 2
tablet - NO
phone - NO


iOS

Same games. What works.

NBA Jam, iOS 3.2 and up
iPad 1 - YES
iPad Mini - YES
iPhone 4S - YES

MADDEN NFL 12, iOS 3.2 and up
iPad 1 - YES
iPad Mini - YES
iPhone 4S - YES

FIFA 12, iOS 3.2 and up
iPad 1 - YES
iPad Mini - YES
iPhone 4S - YES

Plants vs. Zombies, iOS 4.3 and up
iPad 1 - YES
iPad Mini - YES
iPhone 4S - YES

TETRIS, iOS 3.1 and up
iPad 1 - YES
iPad Mini - YES
iPhone 4S - YES


Worms, iOS 3.1.3 and up
iPad 1 - YES
iPad Mini - YES
iPhone 4S - YES

Need for Speed™ Hot Pursuit, iOS 3.1 and up
iPad 1 - YES
iPad Mini - YES
iPhone 4S - YES


Tiger Woods PGA TOUR® 12, iOS 4.3 and up
iPad 1 - YES
iPad Mini - YES
iPhone 4S - YES


Asphalt 6: Adrenaline, iOS 3.1.3 and up
iPad 1 - YES
iPad Mini - YES
iPhone 4S - YES

N.O.V.A. 2, iOS 3.1.3 and up
iPad 1 - YES
iPad Mini - YES
iPhone 4S - YES

throAU
Nov 15, 2012, 03:14 AM
Dont care on android feature set. Their security model is broken.

mib1800
Nov 15, 2012, 03:20 AM
If only the Android app/game actually works on your Android device. Just because it's on the Google Play store, doesn't mean it'll run. I made the assumption about the Android platform. Big mistake. Many apps/games don't run on my Android tablet running ICS.


Compare Android with iOS. Same games.

ANDROID

I have an android tablet and android phone. Tablet running ICS and phone running gingerbread. What works and what doesn't.

Just some game examples.


NBA Jam
tablet - YES
phone - NO

MADDEN NFL 12
tablet - NO
phone - YES

FIFA 12
tablet - YES
phone - NO

Plants vs. Zombies
tablet - NO
phone - YES


TETRIS
tablet - NO
phone - NO


Worms
tablet - NO
phone - YES

Need for Speed™ Hot Pursuit
tablet - NO
phone - NO

Tiger Woods PGA TOUR® 12
tablet - YES
phone - NO

Asphalt 6: Adrenaline
tablet - NO
phone - NO

N.O.V.A. 2
tablet - NO
phone - NO





Your list just show games. I am talking about APPS.

btw: during the the google 25 billion download sale - i bought alphalt 7 and fifa 12 and these games are working for both phone and tablet. NFS HD just came out and it works for both phone and tablet.

So I am not sure where you got your Android info from. You just need to get yourself up to date. :p . Don't take yesterday fact and assume it still the same today.

Oletros
Nov 15, 2012, 03:23 AM
Their security model is broken.

Why is broken?

hyteckit
Nov 15, 2012, 03:35 AM
Your list just show games. I am talking about APPS.

btw: during the the google 25 billion download sale - i bought alphalt 7 and fifa 12 and these games are working for both phone and tablet. NFS HD just came out and it works for both phone and tablet.

So I am not sure where you got your Android info from. You just need to get yourself up to date. :p . Don't take yesterday fact and assume it still the same today.

Where I got my Android info from?

From play.google.com showing my Android devices and what's not compatible.

From my android device that shows "Your device isn't compatible with this version" when trying to install an app/game using google play.

Apps? Here are 2 apps I use for VOIP that doesn't work on my tablet.

Viber
RingCentral

Was hoping to use my android tablet as a business VOIP device running RingCentral. Doesn't work.

d0vr
Nov 15, 2012, 04:03 AM
Let me ask you a few questions about your post, if you do not mind:

1) Fragmentation - If you buy a new Nexus 4, 7 or 10 sold directly from and supported directly by Google where you get the latest OS updates directly from Google, how does fragmentation effect you?

2) If you customize any OS to the point of it not being useful, how is that the OS's fault? Isn't that the users fault for not knowing exactly what they want? Why would anyone customize to the point that its useless? Wouldn't you stop once you reached the point of satisfaction?

3) So, its more productive to say, open the cal app to see your appointments next week, open your reminders app to see your to do list, then open your mail app to see your recent emails, then open your Podcast app to listen to a pod cast, then open your music app to listen to music, of then open Pages to look at a document...of and you want to know the weather, then go to notification center, and press the date to OPEN THE WEATHER APP...

Isn't it nicer to have all that information, assuming that is important to you, on a screen or two, nicely summarized and then, if needed open the related app to work with the data, instead of opening apps only to decide if you need to do something?

The above are just examples; but you get the idea; I could go on and on how widgets make the OS far more productive over opening apps over and over again.

Oh dear. Point 2 has stopped me from reading this thread as I imagine it's a downward spiral from here. Call me synical, but 'users' don't know what they want. Too many options is always a bad thing - and it's the manufacturers/OS creators fault for not knowing that.

Oletros
Nov 15, 2012, 04:23 AM
Oh dear. Point 2 has stopped me from reading this thread as I imagine it's a downward spiral from here. Call me synical, but 'users' don't know what they want. Too many options is always a bad thing - and it's the manufacturers/OS creators fault for not knowing that.

Who decides what is too many?

paulsalter
Nov 15, 2012, 04:26 AM
Is this a sign of this awful term 'Post PC'

I assume people who find Android has too many options have never used a computer before (OS X or Windows) as they have way more options than any tablet

Drunken Master
Nov 15, 2012, 04:32 AM
Does the stock UI still look like a piece of ****?

Let me know when they fix that.

Lindsford
Nov 15, 2012, 05:58 AM
Be prepared to be amazed. Be prepared for the controversy. Be prepared for the Apple fanboys to start crying and defending their precious to the end.

But Android is better. This little bit of research sealed the deal for me on why I just became an ex-Apple iOS device user.

Even if you love Apple and iOS, watch the videos. Learn what you could have. Learn what you are missing. Open your eyes to what you lack.

Take a moment to watch these 5 videos for proof on just how far behind Apple is and how much better Android is. I highly recommend parts 2, 3, and 4.

Part 1: http://youtu.be/NMiY1kSTHZw
Part 2: http://youtu.be/Ayx4XsBaJBI
Part 3: http://youtu.be/fsGQ_xts_Gw
Part 4: http://youtu.be/jlPKVWv1WxU
Part 5: http://youtu.be/Ayx4XsBaJBI
Those videos are heavily biased. I see why people prefer Android over iOS but some of his points are irrelevant and just incorrect. I'm not watching that much video over again to point out each one but he certainly went out of his way to make Android look more appealing, which it doesn't need.

People will buy what fits them best. Nothing more nothing less. Android vs iOS is a silly debate. Android does many things, decent. iOS does fewer things great. (With the exception or their stupid, awful, terrible map service that got me lost today) Tough, Google maps fudged them up just as bad. Had to rely on Tom Tom:mad:

LIVEFRMNYC
Nov 15, 2012, 06:10 AM
Acer iconia tablet and Samsung admire android phone.


You don't think it's a major issue when my ICS tablet can't running many games/apps?


iPhone 3GS still runs iOS 6, so I'm assuming all those games I've listed would work fine.

iPhone 3GS came out in June 2009.
Gingerbread came out in Dec 2010.

What specific model of the Acer iconia?

Also, is the Play store not letting you download cause it says not compatible or can you download and it doesn't work? If it's the Play store not letting you download, just use another app store. I myself came across a couple of apps that the Play store didn't let me download, so I just installed the 1mobile market app store and it let me download and install those same apps. They worked perfectly.

Then include the iP4 in your list. I can't count how many default features are missing from iOS6, so I'm sure many games don't work.

theluggage
Nov 15, 2012, 07:08 AM
Why is broken?

Not sure what GP was referring to, but the idea seems to be that, when Joe User installs an app, it lists all the permissions the App requires, and Joe somehow decides whether or not he wants to grant those permissions.

So, for instance, Polaris Office (which Samsung has licensed for free to Galaxy users) asks for permissions to:

"Initiate phone calls and send SMS messages".

Since it's a well-known piece of software (rather than a fart app written by a teenager), one has to assume that this is so that you can dial numbers direct from an office doc, and isn't a euphemism for "Make bogus calls to premium-rate numbers and text spam all your contacts." The user is in no position to make such a judgement and is really faced with a choice between keeping their fingers crossed or being so paranoid that large numbers of apps are ruled out.

It is poor design that such a privilege should be available on a non-rooted phone or that a (respectable) app should need it. If an app wants to send an SMS there should be an OS-level API that ensures that user interaction is required for each message or that it is routed through the notification system.

If you want to bypass the safeties and side-load an application that replaces the basic phone functionality then fine - Android, unlike iOS, gives you this choice. It shouldn't be a choice you have to make when installing from official App stores, though.

SprSynJn
Nov 15, 2012, 07:16 AM
Already saw those videos. The guy is horribly biased. I've used Android and still prefer iOS over it.

There comes a point when customization is just for the sake of it. This guy likes to repeat how "customizable" Android is, but I think he misses the point of what an OS should be: a platform for apps. Honestly, if I was given too many options to customize, I would go crazy over how I would want the phone to look. I'm perfectly happy with iOS's appearance.

This guy single handily destroyed the original poster's thread, and it's only the first post! I would reiterate what he said, but I couldn't do it any better. My mistake, I would have worded it like this:

I use to use a Samsung gs2. 90% of the time I don't even bother using any of the features listed in the videos. What I do use now on my iPhone 5 with ios6 I use 100% of the time.

Do you know why I got rid of my android device? It isn't because it can't do anything ios can, it's because the things it can do not many care for and the things people do care for android does it in a hack style way. It's definitely jack of all trades and master of nothing. Ios looks and feels solid but you can argue it's getting so efficiently boring.

I dont care how good android is or how bad ios is. I care about how I can use my apps and how long the battery lasts and how infrequent my phone crashes. Everything else is just extra fluff no one really cares for except to look good on a spec sheet.

I spend 99.9% of my time in an app. Period. I don't care for live tiles, clocks, nor widgets because I use my apps 100% of the time.

Well said, both of you.

cynics
Nov 15, 2012, 07:22 AM
I really like my 4S a lot. What kind of bothers me is games have been formatted to show more info (you can see further in side scrollers and have better peripheral vision in 3D shooters) on the iPhone 5. So someone with an iPhone 5 has an obvious advantage vs someone with a 4S or less. If I were a hardcore iPhone gamer I'd consider the 4S obsolete. I'm not however, I don't play any games but sudoku.

Here is a visual example of what I mean.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7qjTel0puoQ&sns=em

Btw watch till the end to see how organized the App Store is. You type in the exact name of the game and although nothing else is called that its pages from the top.

With Android everything is the same across the board. In higher end games there is generally a high, medium and low graphic setting in case you are on an older device.

Personally I only ever bought higher end devices so I rarely have a compatibility issue. But like I mentioned I never really play games on my mobile devices.

kdarling
Nov 15, 2012, 07:23 AM
It is poor design that such a privilege should be available on a non-rooted phone or that a (respectable) app should need it. If an app wants to send an SMS there should be an OS-level API that ensures that user interaction is required for each message or that it is routed through the notification system.

There are many times that an app sending a background SMS makes total sense. E.g. automatic notifications to your family that you're on your way home, or about to pick someone up from school.

I think a major piece that's missing from all the current mobile OSes, is a clean, easy to read system log of data transmissions, with programmable alarms.

Knowing that a certain app is sending information (especially when you're not doing anything with the app), would raise flags with the user and thus require explanation by the developer. For example, with previous versions of iOS it was easy (and not uncommon) for an app to grab the contact list and send it to a server. A log that noted a contact access, followed by a transmission, would have been very helpful.

Oletros
Nov 15, 2012, 07:26 AM
Not sure what GP was referring to, but the idea seems to be that, when Joe User installs an app, it lists all the permissions the App requires, and Joe somehow decides whether or not he wants to grant those permissions.

So, for instance, Polaris Office (which Samsung has licensed for free to Galaxy users) asks for permissions to:

"Initiate phone calls and send SMS messages".

Since it's a well-known piece of software (rather than a fart app written by a teenager), one has to assume that this is so that you can dial numbers direct from an office doc, and isn't a euphemism for "Make bogus calls to premium-rate numbers and text spam all your contacts." The user is in no position to make such a judgement and is really faced with a choice between keeping their fingers crossed or being so paranoid that large numbers of apps are ruled out.

It is poor design that such a privilege should be available on a non-rooted phone or that a (respectable) app should need it. If an app wants to send an SMS there should be an OS-level API that ensures that user interaction is required for each message or that it is routed through the notification system.

If you want to bypass the safeties and side-load an application that replaces the basic phone functionality then fine - Android, unlike iOS, gives you this choice. It shouldn't be a choice you have to make when installing from official App stores, though.

Ah, so it is not broken, it is only that you don't like the permission process

cynics
Nov 15, 2012, 07:33 AM
Not sure what GP was referring to, but the idea seems to be that, when Joe User installs an app, it lists all the permissions the App requires, and Joe somehow decides whether or not he wants to grant those permissions.

So, for instance, Polaris Office (which Samsung has licensed for free to Galaxy users) asks for permissions to:

"Initiate phone calls and send SMS messages".

Since it's a well-known piece of software (rather than a fart app written by a teenager), one has to assume that this is so that you can dial numbers direct from an office doc, and isn't a euphemism for "Make bogus calls to premium-rate numbers and text spam all your contacts." The user is in no position to make such a judgement and is really faced with a choice between keeping their fingers crossed or being so paranoid that large numbers of apps are ruled out.

It is poor design that such a privilege should be available on a non-rooted phone or that a (respectable) app should need it. If an app wants to send an SMS there should be an OS-level API that ensures that user interaction is required for each message or that it is routed through the notification system.

If you want to bypass the safeties and side-load an application that replaces the basic phone functionality then fine - Android, unlike iOS, gives you this choice. It shouldn't be a choice you have to make when installing from official App stores, though.

When you download new iOS apps the first time you run it it will ask for permissions too.

I think we've all see this a million times asking for different permissions. I don't know the extent but I just don't think Apple allows an app to be very powerful in iOS. Hence the lack of automation apps and toggles.

http://img.tapatalk.com/d/12/11/15/bazuhy6u.jpg

LIVEFRMNYC
Nov 15, 2012, 08:18 AM
Not sure what GP was referring to, but the idea seems to be that, when Joe User installs an app, it lists all the permissions the App requires, and Joe somehow decides whether or not he wants to grant those permissions.

So, for instance, Polaris Office (which Samsung has licensed for free to Galaxy users) asks for permissions to:

"Initiate phone calls and send SMS messages".

Since it's a well-known piece of software (rather than a fart app written by a teenager), one has to assume that this is so that you can dial numbers direct from an office doc, and isn't a euphemism for "Make bogus calls to premium-rate numbers and text spam all your contacts." The user is in no position to make such a judgement and is really faced with a choice between keeping their fingers crossed or being so paranoid that large numbers of apps are ruled out.

It is poor design that such a privilege should be available on a non-rooted phone or that a (respectable) app should need it. If an app wants to send an SMS there should be an OS-level API that ensures that user interaction is required for each message or that it is routed through the notification system.

If you want to bypass the safeties and side-load an application that replaces the basic phone functionality then fine - Android, unlike iOS, gives you this choice. It shouldn't be a choice you have to make when installing from official App stores, though.

Show me an instance or cluster of instances where this actually happens. Those who download only from the Playstore have little to worry about. The average user has a much higher chance of seeing unsolicited subscription services on their carrier bill vs having some malware make calls.

onthecouchagain
Nov 15, 2012, 09:43 AM
Android has a plethora of features, many more than iOS, but iOS does what it does really well.



Not sure if I necessarily agree. In some cases, yes. But for me and my use, I find these few things better on Android:

Gmail > Mail

Swiftkey (or even stock Android keyboard) > iOS keyboard. Swiftkey/Android also have better auto correcting and more control over dictionary.

Chrome > Safari. In Chrome, swiping between tabs is heavenly. The little bubble that pops up to help you clarify what links you're picking, very handy. (Widgets help me launch directly to the sites I want too).

Notification bar > Notification Center and badges

Dedicated back button > a "back" button within the app that takes up screen real-estate of an already small screen

Dedicated menu button > sometimes finding the settings in iOS Settings, sometimes finding the settings in the app itself. (Access to Phone settings, in general, is easier on Android).

People > Address Book. I love swiping between screens to get between my call logs, to my favorites, to the dialer. Just feels more intuitive. (And again, direct-dial and direct-text widgets help gain access to people much faster).


These are probably the "main features" of smartphones, and for me, Android beats out the iOS experience on nearly all fronts. I will give iOS iMessage though. That's better than the stock SMS app on Android.

theluggage
Nov 15, 2012, 10:41 AM
When you download new iOS apps the first time you run it it will ask for permissions too.

Yes - the 'xx wants to use your location' is fair enough, also AFAIK you can deny it and still run the app.

Android apps, however, typically ask for a laundry list of permissions before you install them - take it or leave it. For example, Bad Piggies - a big name game - asks for:


Your Location (approximate network-based location)
Network communication (full network access)
Storage (modify or delete the contents of your USB storage)
Phone Calls (read phone status and identity)
System Tools (prevent phone from sleeping)
Network communication (Google Play billing service, view network connections, view WiFi connections)
Development Tools (test access to protected storage)


There is no way that a non-technical user can make an informed judgement about that lot, especially 3 (why does a game need those? Surely it gets its own sandboxed storage area?) and 7 (nothing that requires this should make it into an App store, at least outside the 'developer' category). As for 6, with a decent security design, all it should need access to is the in-App-purchase API which should have it's own safeguards (such as always requiring user confirmation or asking for a PIN).

If a these are all legitimately needed for a game (even with in-game purchasing) then there is something wrong with the security model. If not, the game shouldn't make it into the store.

As I said - this model might make sense when you're a consenting sideloader, but it should be redundant on an App store.

jsw
Nov 15, 2012, 10:46 AM
There is no way that a non-technical user can make an informed judgement about that lot, especially 3 (why does a game need those? Surely it gets its own sandboxed storage area?) and 7 (nothing that requires this should make it into an App store, at least outside the 'developer' category). As for 6, with a decent security design, all it should need access to is the in-App-purchase API which should have it's own safeguards (such as always requiring user confirmation or asking for a PIN).

If a these are all legitimately needed for a game (even with in-game purchasing) then there is something wrong with the security model. If not, the game shouldn't make it into the store.

As I said - this model might make sense when you're a consenting sideloader, but it should be redundant on an App store.
Agreed, 100%.

kdarling
Nov 15, 2012, 11:56 AM
As I said - this model might make sense when you're a consenting sideloader, but it should be redundant on an App store.

It should be, but unfortunately it is still very helpful because no one has the time or ability to totally vet every app's binary code. Not even Apple.

For example, remember that incredibly simple flashlight app that got into the Apple App Store, yet it turned out to have a secret WiFi hotspot built in as well? Requiring WiFi permissions to even load, would've immediately flagged that app as being more than it said it was.

The more fine-grained the permissions are, the better. Yet you're right, it's also not possible to guess everything that an app could do with even legitimate permissions. Or apps that wait for a while, or create code on the fly, so they won't be caught during submission monitoring.

That's why I say, a log after the fact is far more useful. And/or groups of volunteers (or companies) that monitor suspicious apps, such as who often find current malware.

matttye
Nov 15, 2012, 02:17 PM
Not sure if I necessarily agree. In some cases, yes. But for me and my use, I find these few things better on Android:

Gmail > Mail

Swiftkey (or even stock Android keyboard) > iOS keyboard. Swiftkey/Android also have better auto correcting and more control over dictionary.

Chrome > Safari. In Chrome, swiping between tabs is heavenly. The little bubble that pops up to help you clarify what links you're picking, very handy. (Widgets help me launch directly to the sites I want too).

Notification bar > Notification Center and badges

Dedicated back button > a "back" button within the app that takes up screen real-estate of an already small screen

Dedicated menu button > sometimes finding the settings in iOS Settings, sometimes finding the settings in the app itself. (Access to Phone settings, in general, is easier on Android).

People > Address Book. I love swiping between screens to get between my call logs, to my favorites, to the dialer. Just feels more intuitive. (And again, direct-dial and direct-text widgets help gain access to people much faster).


These are probably the "main features" of smartphones, and for me, Android beats out the iOS experience on nearly all fronts. I will give iOS iMessage though. That's better than the stock SMS app on Android.

I do prefer Androids keyboard and swiftkey. Having to "train" the iPhone keyboard is a real ballache.

Have no strong feelings for safari vs. chrome, like both.

Back button is pretty cool, but again, no strong feelings. On screen back button isn't a big issue.

The fact that a lot of apps use the iOS settings app is a good thing as it provides a consistent UI.

Direct dial and text widgets are faster but not by much. Tap phone > tap favourites > tap contact. If you closed the phone app before on the favourites tab, then you'd skip the second step. Or you can ask Siri to call a contact.

Either way, no big difference.

We're really comparing some tit for tat things here that don't make a big difference to the user experience.

onthecouchagain
Nov 15, 2012, 02:24 PM
I do prefer Androids keyboard and swiftkey. Having to "train" the iPhone keyboard is a real ballache.

Have no strong feelings for safari vs. chrome, like both.

Back button is pretty cool, but again, no strong feelings. On screen back button isn't a big issue.

The fact that a lot of apps use the iOS settings app is a good thing as it provides a consistent UI.

Direct dial and text widgets are faster but not by much. Tap phone > tap favourites > tap contact. If you closed the phone app before on the favourites tab, then you'd skip the second step. Or you can ask Siri to call a contact.

Either way, no big difference.

We're really comparing some tit for tat things here that don't make a big difference to the user experience.

Agree for the most part, except for the typing experience. I email and text a lot. iOS' keyboard is in desperate need of updating. Otherwise, yeah, we're at a great point in smartphone tech.

matttye
Nov 15, 2012, 02:33 PM
Agree for the most part, except for the typing experience. I email and text a lot. iOS' keyboard is in desperate need of updating. Otherwise, yeah, we're at a great point in smartphone tech.

The keyboard on iOS is fine IMO and quite accurate, but it's annoying when it takes weeks to learn slang words or acronyms. :(

Swiftkey learns in one tap; much better.

onthecouchagain
Nov 15, 2012, 02:49 PM
The keyboard on iOS is fine IMO and quite accurate, but it's annoying when it takes weeks to learn slang words or acronyms. :(

Swiftkey learns in one tap; much better.

Ah, I guess we type differently. I always had missed keys which led to horrible auto corrections. I still experience it constantly on my iPad 3rd gen. And yes, iOS dictionary gives zero flexibility. I remember having to wipe the dictionary every now and then to undo typos that it learned.

The iOS keyboard also gave birth to the "Damn You iPhone Auto Correction" phenom too. It could definitely use some updating.

Not to mention, the competition is running away with their keyboards. Stock Android keyboard just added gesture-typing functionality. And apparently, it's very good.

Swiftkey > all, though, for sure.

SprSynJn
Nov 15, 2012, 05:45 PM
Yes - the 'xx wants to use your location' is fair enough, also AFAIK you can deny it and still run the app.

Android apps, however, typically ask for a laundry list of permissions before you install them - take it or leave it. For example, Bad Piggies - a big name game - asks for:


Your Location (approximate network-based location)
Network communication (full network access)
Storage (modify or delete the contents of your USB storage)
Phone Calls (read phone status and identity)
System Tools (prevent phone from sleeping)
Network communication (Google Play billing service, view network connections, view WiFi connections)
Development Tools (test access to protected storage)


There is no way that a non-technical user can make an informed judgement about that lot, especially 3 (why does a game need those? Surely it gets its own sandboxed storage area?) and 7 (nothing that requires this should make it into an App store, at least outside the 'developer' category). As for 6, with a decent security design, all it should need access to is the in-App-purchase API which should have it's own safeguards (such as always requiring user confirmation or asking for a PIN).

If a these are all legitimately needed for a game (even with in-game purchasing) then there is something wrong with the security model. If not, the game shouldn't make it into the store.

As I said - this model might make sense when you're a consenting sideloader, but it should be redundant on an App store.

I was always wondering what the purpose of those permissions were. I know it makes some people feel better knowing what it is they are getting themselves into, but wouldn't it just be better to leave it up to the company? Apple seems to think so anyway, and I agree.

throAU
Nov 15, 2012, 07:29 PM
Why is broken?

Because history (past 30+ years of computing) has shown that allowing end users to run un-signed code from anywhere is a recipe for disaster.

LIVEFRMNYC
Nov 15, 2012, 08:23 PM
Because history (past 30+ years of computing) has shown that allowing end users to run un-signed code from anywhere is a recipe for disaster.

The past 4 years of Android prove differ. Then there was WM which was pretty popular and catching on mainstream for at least a 4 year period before the iPhone. No major outbreaks or even close to.

throAU
Nov 15, 2012, 08:55 PM
The past 4 years of Android prove differ. Then there was WM which was pretty popular and catching on mainstream for at least a 4 year period before the iPhone. No major outbreaks or even close to.

Yet.

Look, if it works for you, great. But i've been in this industry for 20 years now and attacks are becoming ever more sophisticated. Just because an outbreak hasn't happened yet, does not mean it isn't a time bomb just waiting to happen.

SlCKB0Y
Nov 15, 2012, 09:10 PM
allowing end users to run un-signed code from anywhere

Android phones by default don't allow sideloading and even if you enable this feature, Android doesn't allow the installation of unsigned software.

----------


3. Storage (modify or delete the contents of your USB storage)


There is no way that a non-technical user can make an informed judgement about that lot, especially 3 (why does a game need those? ...)

How about to create a save file or download the game data files like textures etc...
:rolleyes:

----------

Yet.

Look, if it works for you, great. But i've been in this industry for 20 years now

Let me guess, Windows Sysadmin/projects? :D

LIVEFRMNYC
Nov 15, 2012, 09:32 PM
Yet.

Look, if it works for you, great. But i've been in this industry for 20 years now and attacks are becoming ever more sophisticated. Just because an outbreak hasn't happened yet, does not mean it isn't a time bomb just waiting to happen.

I'm not that young either, 34yrs. The malware and viruses people carelessly install on their Windows PCs, the mobile world has been pretty safe in comparison. Even OSX users get fooled into installing malware toolbars and apps when installing the intentional app.

Your right, the attacks are becoming more sophisticated. But realize the user/tech community is much more proactive and outspoken nowadays. It's not easy to slip something into the mainstream anymore, and when something does slip by, it gets outed very quickly before it reaches the masses. Also it's much harder for a virus to spread via mobile to mobile(near impossible) compared to PC to PC.

Most attackers are amateurs that just use pre written code for their own gain, like stealing identity, info, and passwords. Then you have those who get paid by shaddy companies. The real malicious hackers are after the bigger picture.

Rodimus Prime
Nov 15, 2012, 09:48 PM
The keyboard on iOS is fine IMO and quite accurate, but it's annoying when it takes weeks to learn slang words or acronyms. :(

Swiftkey learns in one tap; much better.

it may be fine but compared to the alternatives out there it is pretty much crap. It used to have a leg up on the stock android keyboard but in Android 4.2 that is over. Android keyboard for the most part blow iOS completely out of the water.

onthecouchagain
Nov 15, 2012, 10:15 PM
Android keyboard for the most part blow iOS completely out of the water.

I agree. Ever since ICS, it blew the iOS keyboard out of the water. It had a few odd glitches though, but that's since been ironed out.

Gesture typing is quite awesome too.

matttye
Nov 16, 2012, 01:11 AM
it may be fine but compared to the alternatives out there it is pretty much crap. It used to have a leg up on the stock android keyboard but in Android 4.2 that is over. Android keyboard for the most part blow iOS completely out of the water.

I agree, kinda. I don't think the iOS keyboard is bad, but I do think it could be improved upon, and I think the Android stock and swiftkey keyboards are much better. The S3 default keyboard was horrendous. :p

theluggage
Nov 16, 2012, 05:18 AM
How about to create a save file or download the game data files like textures etc...
:rolleyes:[COLOR="#808080"]


This permission is about "USB Storage" rather than storage in general: You can plug memory sticks into Android devices with a suitable adaptor - and I guess the reason this permission exists is that FAT devices have nonexistent access control. Is the MicroSD card slot in my phone actually connected using internal USB? Quite plausible, but damned if I know!

The point is regular users will not have a clue whether or not they should grant these permissions, and will end up just clicking through. Google should vet this at the store submission stage and not bother users heads with it unless they choose to root their phone or sideload.

In a well-designed, modern OS, the vast majority of Apps should run without any special privileges, and the OS itself should ensure that potentially malicious, expensive or privacy-violating operations can't happen without user interaction.

paulsalter
Nov 16, 2012, 05:26 AM
I am more than happy with the way android handles permissions that apps are allowed

If it ever moves over to the full sandboxing system that ios uses, then I will get rid of android

Oletros
Nov 16, 2012, 05:30 AM
This permission is about "USB Storage" rather than storage in general: You can plug memory sticks into Android devices with a suitable adaptor - and I guess the reason this permission exists is that FAT devices have nonexistent access control. Is the MicroSD card slot in my phone actually connected using internal USB? Quite plausible, but damned if I know!


The permission is WRITE_EXTERNAL_STORAGE and READ_EXTERNAL_STORAGE and applieas to any external storage

http://developer.android.com/reference/android/Manifest.permission.html

SprSynJn
Nov 16, 2012, 06:20 AM
I am more than happy with the way android handles permissions that apps are allowed

If it ever moves over to the full sandboxing system that ios uses, then I will get rid of android

Why? And where would you go?

Tinmania
Nov 16, 2012, 06:54 AM
But you do have this option, although its been introduced in iOS 6, a little late, it's still there and working fine :)

Except it would not work fine for what he explained. Do Not Disturb's idea of a schedule is every single day. He doesn't work 7 days a week.




Mike

jsw
Nov 16, 2012, 07:44 AM
Except it would not work fine for what he explained. Do Not Disturb's idea of a schedule is every single day. He doesn't work 7 days a week.
Exactly.

If one could use something built into iOS, like, oh, the Calendar, to schedule DND time, that would be great. Or even use the options in Clock's alarms.

It's really a bad design, and I'm surprised they didn't think of the fact that DND times might vary.

paulsalter
Nov 16, 2012, 08:23 AM
Why? And where would you go?

I will stick with my desktop that has a full file system

For me I do not want documents (or any files) that an application creates to be stored within the app, I want full access to them via any app I choose

Rodimus Prime
Nov 16, 2012, 09:04 AM
This permission is about "USB Storage" rather than storage in general: You can plug memory sticks into Android devices with a suitable adaptor - and I guess the reason this permission exists is that FAT devices have nonexistent access control. Is the MicroSD card slot in my phone actually connected using internal USB? Quite plausible, but damned if I know!


No that has to do with writing and reading from the SD card. Btw the internal memory is considered sd card so to write/read outside of your apps own private folder requires that permission.

Now if you get an app from the google play store they explain it better for the normal people. You are reading it from a developer site which means they more for developer line of thinking so not as easy to understand for norms.

theluggage
Nov 16, 2012, 09:38 AM
The permission is WRITE_EXTERNAL_STORAGE and READ_EXTERNAL_STORAGE and applieas to any external storage

http://developer.android.com/reference/android/Manifest.permission.html

So why does my phone say "modify or delete the contents of your USB storage"?


You are reading it from a developer site which means they more for developer line of thinking so not as easy to understand for norms.

No, I'm reading it from the "App Info" panel in the Applications Manager on my phone, which I'm pretty sure is the exact same text that shows up when you install from Google Play. (Look at the message - "your USB storage" is clearly someones idea of user-friendly language.)

377671

Oletros
Nov 16, 2012, 09:49 AM
So why does my phone say "modify or delete the contents of your USB storage"?

Because anything apart of the internal app memory is external storage

This is what it says in the Play Store permission tab:

STORAGE
MODIFY/DELETE USB STORAGE CONTENTS MODIFY/DELETE SD CARD CONTENTS
Allows the app to write to the USB storage. Allows the app to write to the SD card.

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.rovio.BadPiggies&feature=nav_result#?t=W251bGwsMSwyLDNd

Rodimus Prime
Nov 16, 2012, 10:20 AM
So why does my phone say "modify or delete the contents of your USB storage"?




No, I'm reading it from the "App Info" panel in the Applications Manager on my phone, which I'm pretty sure is the exact same text that shows up when you install from Google Play. (Look at the message - "your USB storage" is clearly someones idea of user-friendly language.)

377671

Nope in google play click on it and they give a much better way or explaining more in detail on how it works.

you are seeing much shorter and more from the dev permission set up. It more of a limitation of how the permission is set up.

But when you install the app they explain what each one is and a hell of a lot better.

Cod3rror
Nov 16, 2012, 11:10 AM
iOS is still much better. Android lacks polish, it does not have effects like bounce-back. It's a small animation but it has a huge effect on the UI, makes it feel much more responsive. Android's edge glow is not good.

Android does not have a centralized audio controls and does not play background audio. If a developer codes a background playing capability it can do that, but it does not have a centralized and standardized api to make it very easy for the devs. And as mentioned it does not have centralized audio controls, which are so, so handy. You can control your music player from the Notification Center, but you cannot control, say, a backgrounded YouTube video. With iOS you can.

iOS has much better and higher quality third party apps, they are more polished and look better too.

Here are couple of examples that I prefer on iOS.

Soulver - Android has no equivalent, awesome calculator.
Notes - Android does not have a simple notes app. iOS' app also syncs/backs up to Yahoo.
Music - iOS' music app is just leaps and bounds better than anything Android has to offer.
GPS - Third party GPS apps are much better on iOS.
Photos - The default app is much better, cleaner without any extra nonsense effects. Also displays pictures on the map.
Tunebox - Dropbox music streamer, couldn't find anything like this for Android.
PhotoSync - Nothing like this on Android. Awesome app.
PinDrop - Again, nothing like this on Android.
SongExporter - Again, nothing like this on Android.
Instacast - None of Android's podcast apps come close.
OPlayer - An awesome video player. DivX, XviD, MKV, etc... plays them all. Also, you can play videos from your SAMBA(Windows) share over the network... i.e. Share a folder with movies from you Windows machine, connected with your iPhone and stream movies. Haven't found a player on Android that does that.
SuperList - There is Mighty Grocery List on Android but it's just not as good.
Converter+ - Awesome converter.
Skype - On iOS it is better.



Android and Android apps feel like such an ax job, they just reek of low quality. I might have ignored it all had Android had centralized audio controls and a background audio, that kills Android option for me.

What Android has is customization... which I do not care about. I love how iOS looks. And this a matter of opinion but customization is a waste of time, you get a phone, customize, customize, modify... then a new version comes out, customize, customize, modify... I want to do things with the device, not waste time on customizing it and making it look acceptable.

BoxerGT2.5
Nov 16, 2012, 11:18 AM
iOS is still much better. Android lacks polish, it does not have effects like bounce-back. It's a small animation but it has a huge effect on the UI, makes it feel much more responsive. Android's edge glow is not good.

Android does not have a centralized audio controls and does not play background audio. If a developer codes a background playing capability it can do that, but it does not have a centralized and standardized api to make it very easy for the devs. And as mentioned it does not have centralized audio controls, which are so, so handy. You can control your music player from the Notification Center, but you cannot control, say, a backgrounded YouTube video. With iOS you can.

iOS has much better and higher quality third party apps, they are more polished and look better too.

Here are couple of examples that I prefer on iOS.

Soulver - Android has no equivalent, awesome calculator.
Notes - Android does not have a simple notes app. iOS' app also syncs/backs up to Yahoo.
Music - iOS' music app is just leaps and bounds better than anything Android has to offer.
GPS - Third party GPS apps are much better on iOS.
Photos - The default app is much better, cleaner without any extra nonsense effects. Also displays pictures on the map.
Tunebox - Dropbox music streamer, couldn't find anything like this for Android.
PhotoSync - Nothing like this on Android. Awesome app.
PinDrop - Again, nothing like this on Android.
SongExporter - Again, nothing like this on Android.
Instacast - None of Android's podcast apps come close.
OPlayer - An awesome video player. DivX, XviD, MKV, etc... plays them all. Also, you can play videos from your SAMBA(Windows) share over the network... i.e. Share a folder with movies from you Windows machine, connected with your iPhone and stream movies. Haven't found a player on Android that does that.
SuperList - There is Mighty Grocery List on Android but it's just not as good.
Converter+ - Awesome converter.
Skype - On iOS it is better.



Android and Android apps feel like such an ax job, they just reek of low quality. I might have ignored it all had Android had centralized audio controls and a background audio, that kills Android option for me.

What Android has is customization... which I do not care about. I love how iOS looks. And this a matter of opinion but customization is a waste of time, you get a phone, customize, customize, modify... then a new version comes out, customize, customize, modify... I want to do things with the device, not waste time on customizing it and making it look acceptable.


How's maps? lol

jim.bright17
Nov 16, 2012, 11:31 AM
No, but remembering to flip it back off silent can be a problem.

I was able to set timed profiles on Nokia phones in the 1990s. The fact I can't on my iPhone remains a sore point. I work roughly the same hours every weekday. I am supposed to keep my phone on silent at work. It would be really great to not have to remember twice a day, five days a week, to flip the switch. Most days, I remember, but I'm embarrassed at work when I don't remember in the morning, and I miss calls in the evening if I forget to switch back.

There is absolutely no reason whatsoever to not have this capability in iOS. None.

You can schedule the "Do not disturb" setting. Mine is set from 12-6 every night.

Tinmania
Nov 16, 2012, 11:42 AM
You can schedule the "Do not disturb" setting. Mine is set from 12-6 every night.

Yes but gawd forbid you maybe want to sleep in on the weekends. Can't do that.

That feature will debut in iOS 7. Maybe.



Michael

----------

iOS is still much better. Android lacks polish, it does not have effects like bounce-back. It's a small animation but it has a huge effect on the UI, makes it feel much more responsive. Android's edge glow is not good.

Android does not have a centralized audio controls and does not play background audio. If a developer codes a background playing capability it can do that, but it does not have a centralized and standardized api to make it very easy for the devs. And as mentioned it does not have centralized audio controls, which are so, so handy. You can control your music player from the Notification Center, but you cannot control, say, a backgrounded YouTube video. With iOS you can.

iOS has much better and higher quality third party apps, they are more polished and look better too.

Here are couple of examples that I prefer on iOS.

Soulver - Android has no equivalent, awesome calculator.
Notes - Android does not have a simple notes app. iOS' app also syncs/backs up to Yahoo.
Music - iOS' music app is just leaps and bounds better than anything Android has to offer.
GPS - Third party GPS apps are much better on iOS.

A calculator was your first thought? Seriously? Ahem.

Then Notes? I'd much rather use Evernote than the brain-dead Notes app, thank you very much. Syncs everywhere. (Loved the 2007'ish "syncs back up to Yahoo" by the way.)

But applauding the iTunes-or-the-highway music app really takes the cake.

Oh wait, selectively forgetting the iOS 6 maps disaster and jumping right to third-party... now THAT takes the cake.

Pull up your pants, dude. It's too late to save your shoes.




Michael

cynics
Nov 16, 2012, 11:42 AM
iOS is still much better. Android lacks polish, it does not have effects like bounce-back. It's a small animation but it has a huge effect on the UI, makes it feel much more responsive. Android's edge glow is not good.

Android does not have a centralized audio controls and does not play background audio. If a developer codes a background playing capability it can do that, but it does not have a centralized and standardized api to make it very easy for the devs. And as mentioned it does not have centralized audio controls, which are so, so handy. You can control your music player from the Notification Center, but you cannot control, say, a backgrounded YouTube video. With iOS you can.

iOS has much better and higher quality third party apps, they are more polished and look better too.

Here are couple of examples that I prefer on iOS.

Soulver - Android has no equivalent, awesome calculator.
Notes - Android does not have a simple notes app. iOS' app also syncs/backs up to Yahoo.
Music - iOS' music app is just leaps and bounds better than anything Android has to offer.
GPS - Third party GPS apps are much better on iOS.
Photos - The default app is much better, cleaner without any extra nonsense effects. Also displays pictures on the map.
Tunebox - Dropbox music streamer, couldn't find anything like this for Android.
PhotoSync - Nothing like this on Android. Awesome app.
PinDrop - Again, nothing like this on Android.
SongExporter - Again, nothing like this on Android.
Instacast - None of Android's podcast apps come close.
OPlayer - An awesome video player. DivX, XviD, MKV, etc... plays them all. Also, you can play videos from your SAMBA(Windows) share over the network... i.e. Share a folder with movies from you Windows machine, connected with your iPhone and stream movies. Haven't found a player on Android that does that.
SuperList - There is Mighty Grocery List on Android but it's just not as good.
Converter+ - Awesome converter.
Skype - On iOS it is better.



Android and Android apps feel like such an ax job, they just reek of low quality. I might have ignored it all had Android had centralized audio controls and a background audio, that kills Android option for me.

What Android has is customization... which I do not care about. I love how iOS looks. And this a matter of opinion but customization is a waste of time, you get a phone, customize, customize, modify... then a new version comes out, customize, customize, modify... I want to do things with the device, not waste time on customizing it and making it look acceptable.

So much of this is your opinion it's hard to read.

The photo app is better? You mean the camera roll that is just a chronologically ordered mess with NO DATES? That app? The one you make folders and it keeps pics in the camera roll AND folder?

GPS? There are no good GPS apps in iOS like 'GPS Essentials' on Android. If you mean maps there are no alternatives to Google maps really because nothing can compete.

I prefer android podcast apps for there widgets I can set on a home screen.

Notes? Gimme a break there are plenty of simple ones but most prefer good ones like Evernote.

Video players?! There are what seems to be hundreds. I use moboplayer and it plays anything you throw at it. And like all Android apps you can set it to the default player instead of "open in" then browsing through the player app and opening your file. Such a pita.

Plenty of streaming apps. Twonky, air sync etc. you can stream in a compatible TV, Xbox, ps3, Apple TV, etc etc.

Converter+? I'm not sure if this is serious.

Most apps are made by the same dev cross platform. Usually the app is identical to the iOS version sometimes with more features since apps can access more of the phone.

What do you even mean by background audio? Like me browsing the web while listening to a podcast in the background which I do all the time on Android?

You are obviously just making things up or repeating things you've heard.

theluggage
Nov 16, 2012, 12:34 PM
Nope in google play click on it and they give a much better way or explaining more in detail on how it works.

Ok, that's the full website - it's different on the Play Store App on the phone - I've checked and you initially get the short descriptions I posted, but you can tap on them to get the longer descriptions from the full website. I'd dispute that they'd be any more helpful to a non-techie user though.

The App version still only talks about USB devices, though, not the SD card (the text is different from the web version).

Cod3rror
Nov 16, 2012, 03:54 PM
A calculator was your first thought? Seriously? Ahem.

Then Notes? I'd much rather use Evernote than the brain-dead Notes app, thank you very much. Syncs everywhere. (Loved the 2007'ish "syncs back up to Yahoo" by the way.)

But applauding the iTunes-or-the-highway music app really takes the cake.

Oh wait, selectively forgetting the iOS 6 maps disaster and jumping right to third-party... now THAT takes the cake.

Pull up your pants, dude. It's too late to save your shoes.


Yes, a calculator, it is important to me, much more than an animated wallpaper, or some useless widget :rolleyes:

And yes Notes too... I tried Evernote(BTW better on iOS) and I did not like it. I want a simple notes app, iOS' is perfect for me. I'd like to be able to add images into the notes but, even without them, I like it.

I did not forget the maps, I agree, Apple Maps isn't that good, however, look how much Google wants to put their maps into the Apple ecosystem. It won't be long before iOS has Google Maps, their own maps and third party maps too. Which, yes, are better than Android counterparts.

Dropbox music streaming app is VERY handy.

So much of this is your opinion it's hard to read.

The photo app is better? You mean the camera roll that is just a chronologically ordered mess with NO DATES? That app? The one you make folders and it keeps pics in the camera roll AND folder?

GPS? There are no good GPS apps in iOS like 'GPS Essentials' on Android. If you mean maps there are no alternatives to Google maps really because nothing can compete.

I prefer android podcast apps for there widgets I can set on a home screen.

Notes? Gimme a break there are plenty of simple ones but most prefer good ones like Evernote.

Video players?! There are what seems to be hundreds. I use moboplayer and it plays anything you throw at it. And like all Android apps you can set it to the default player instead of "open in" then browsing through the player app and opening your file. Such a pita.

Plenty of streaming apps. Twonky, air sync etc. you can stream in a compatible TV, Xbox, ps3, Apple TV, etc etc.

Converter+? I'm not sure if this is serious.

Most apps are made by the same dev cross platform. Usually the app is identical to the iOS version sometimes with more features since apps can access more of the phone.

What do you even mean by background audio? Like me browsing the web while listening to a podcast in the background which I do all the time on Android?

You are obviously just making things up or repeating things you've heard.

Yes, Photos app is better.

Yes, GPS situation is better, CoPilot, TomTom, Sygic, NAVIGON are all better on iOS. GPS Essentials? There are tons of apps that are better in the App Store.

Widgets... useless.

Reading comprehension... I wrote, streaming FROM a Windows machine INTO the iPhone. I've searched, RockPlayer, MoboPlayer, Vplayer, QQPlayer. None of them have SMB support.

Converter+ is awesome! Nothing better exists on Android.

Background Audio = Browse the web, and listen to YouTube in the background. Or make your MoboPlayer play a video in the background. And don't forget, not only Android cannot do background audio properly, there are no centralized controls either like on iOS.

balamw
Nov 16, 2012, 04:32 PM
MOD NOTE: Please take a break from this thread. Go outside and get some fresh air. I will reopen in a while.

EDIT: Please proceed per the forum rules. Please avoid any name-calling.

B

arashb
Nov 19, 2012, 04:43 AM
I like Android handling of UI code better. Developers don't have to distinguish betw. tablet or phone (unlike iOS). And UI elements in Android scale up nicely unlike iOS (which is total crap when you run a phone app on tablet).



I have the opposite view. In the event, there is no data connection iOS just get stuck. I encounter many iOS apps just dont start without data connection. No such issue with Android. Furthermore, iOS is so dependent on iCloud/itunes that you are basically dead in the water when these services are not available. It is so lockdown there is no way to get stuff in/out of phone.

To us who are free from Apple jail, it is such a relief that we will never get stuck like those who use iOS devices. ;)

Scaling is only an issue for the first few weeks a new resolution is introduced. And I've never ran into a problem with an app not opening without data.

Android does have its advantages, its nice to be able to download a GBA emu from the play store and widgets are cool when you find the right ones but there are also disadvantages..

- My nexus's screen lift is getting much worse.
- And recently I connected the charger to my nexus for around 1-2 hours and I came back to it only to see that it didn't charge at all but was pretty warm.
- Not sure how you're scaling android apps, I'm not able to download any because its not compatible with my tablet... The banners in the play store are scaled just awfully for tablets though.
- And apparently Android thinks that 0% means 10% sometimes
- Apps for iOS are taken much more seriously than they are for Android it seems like, for example YouTube, a Google company, can't do background audio for Android but it can for iOS. Not a big deal but when a Google app is better for iOS than for Android it makes you see where priorities are.

So tomorrow I need to use my tablet in class but I can't leave it charging overnight because I just don't trust it. If my phone ever did not charge, I'd be screwed big time. I rely on that to wake me up in the mornings. I can't blame Google over the tablet not charging, but I can blame Apple for creating something I can rely on when I need it. You can say all you want about Apple products, but there's a reason why everyone is following in Apples footsteps.

Awakener
Nov 23, 2012, 10:43 PM
- How about auto switching your ring profile based on time/appointment (instead of tediously remembering to flip the silent switch on iphone?
- How about having a multi-clipboard (last X number of clippings + predefined ones)
- How about auto-changing your wallpaper periodically (only when you are using your phone)?
- How about tapping a NFC tag and have phone automatically change settings/start up apps/etc.
- How about auto-upload or download photos/podcasts/files/content/log/sms/links to ANY share providers (without needing to manually start apps one-by-one)?
- How about creating "shortcuts" to any apps/predefined sms/contacts/files/links/content anywhere in the phone and needing just one tap to activate action.
- How about using transparent icons in homescreen (so wallpaper is not obscured)?
- How about having information in widgets that auto-refresh?
- How about having phone performance actions automatically based on events (e.g. auto-send sms for birthday, on-off settings or run apps based on time/location, block calls based on rules)

Does anyone really care about these features, or widgets, or more useless social media integration?

Yes - the 'xx wants to use your location' is fair enough, also AFAIK you can deny it and still run the app.

Android apps, however, typically ask for a laundry list of permissions before you install them - take it or leave it. For example, Bad Piggies - a big name game - asks for:


Your Location (approximate network-based location)
Network communication (full network access)
Storage (modify or delete the contents of your USB storage)
Phone Calls (read phone status and identity)
System Tools (prevent phone from sleeping)
Network communication (Google Play billing service, view network connections, view WiFi connections)
Development Tools (test access to protected storage)


There is no way that a non-technical user can make an informed judgement about that lot, especially 3 (why does a game need those? Surely it gets its own sandboxed storage area?) and 7 (nothing that requires this should make it into an App store, at least outside the 'developer' category). As for 6, with a decent security design, all it should need access to is the in-App-purchase API which should have it's own safeguards (such as always requiring user confirmation or asking for a PIN).

If a these are all legitimately needed for a game (even with in-game purchasing) then there is something wrong with the security model. If not, the game shouldn't make it into the store.

As I said - this model might make sense when you're a consenting sideloader, but it should be redundant on an App store.

Android "security" is interesting. Those videos from the op make don't mention negatives. Did anyone think of this when the video reviewer showed how to track his phone (video 4):

http://bgr.com/2012/03/23/google-wants-to-listen-to-your-phone-calls-to-promote-ads/

A quick search will pull up many articles just like it.

Solomani
Nov 23, 2012, 11:45 PM
Be prepared to be amazed. Be prepared for the controversy. Be prepared for the Apple fanboys to start crying and defending their precious to the end.

I am prepared!!!! Very very prepared!! I stocked up, too. See below!

:D

Oletros
Nov 24, 2012, 02:16 AM
Does anyone really care about these features, or widgets, or more useless social media integration?

Useless social media integration sharing from any application to any other application?

And yes, people care about widgets and those features.

Android "security" is interesting. Those videos from the op make don't mention negatives. Did anyone think of this when the video reviewer showed how to track his phone (video 4):

http://bgr.com/2012/03/23/google-wants-to-listen-to-your-phone-calls-to-promote-ads/

A quick search will pull up many articles just like it.

Really? A patent filing?

tech4all
Nov 24, 2012, 02:39 AM
Spoken like someone who has never used widgets. Widgets are almost completely useless. A gigantic widget for weather - a live icon does that in iOS. Widgets for mail? LOL. Calendar widget? Yes, I need to have all my appointments constantly on my home screen.

That describes your entire comment.

Just got the Nexus 7 after selling my iPad 2.

Short and sweet: Android is great, but very unpolished when compared to iOS. I'm happier with it on my tablet than I was with the iPad 2. But for my phone I want something reliable, polished and working just as it should. I would never depend on Android for that.

That's so odd. I have an Android phone that I depend on for, umm, making phone calls. Works great. Go figure! :rolleyes:

MOD NOTE: Please take a break from this thread. Go outside and get some fresh air. I will reopen in a while.

EDIT: Please proceed per the forum rules. Please avoid any name-calling.

B

It's sad when a debate about phone operating system get so out of control a MOD has to close it for a while. Good grief people, it's a PHONE. Go outside and live a little. That's why it gets annoying going to forums where fanboys come out like crazy...both iOS and Android. Heck even I get sucked into these silly 'debates.'

Forget iOS. Forget Android. I'm going back to a rotary phone! :D

matttye
Nov 24, 2012, 04:36 AM
[QUOTE=tech4all;16354571
Forget iOS. Forget Android. I'm going back to a rotary phone! :D[/QUOTE]

At least the rotary phone has a bounce back UI! :D

IFRIT
Nov 24, 2012, 09:12 AM
Yes, a calculator, it is important to me, much more than an animated wallpaper, or some useless widget :rolleyes:

And yes Notes too... I tried Evernote(BTW better on iOS) and I did not like it. I want a simple notes app, iOS' is perfect for me. I'd like to be able to add images into the notes but, even without them, I like it.

I did not forget the maps, I agree, Apple Maps isn't that good, however, look how much Google wants to put their maps into the Apple ecosystem. It won't be long before iOS has Google Maps, their own maps and third party maps too. Which, yes, are better than Android counterparts.

Dropbox music streaming app is VERY handy.



Yes, Photos app is better.

Yes, GPS situation is better, CoPilot, TomTom, Sygic, NAVIGON are all better on iOS. GPS Essentials? There are tons of apps that are better in the App Store.

Widgets... useless.

Reading comprehension... I wrote, streaming FROM a Windows machine INTO the iPhone. I've searched, RockPlayer, MoboPlayer, Vplayer, QQPlayer. None of them have SMB support.

Converter+ is awesome! Nothing better exists on Android.

Background Audio = Browse the web, and listen to YouTube in the background. Or make your MoboPlayer play a video in the background. And don't forget, not only Android cannot do background audio properly, there are no centralized controls either like on iOS.

What experience with Android phones do you have? You post reeks of stuff you just made up or heard.

Cod3rror
Nov 24, 2012, 10:33 AM
What experience with Android phones do you have? You post reeks of stuff you just made up or heard.

Quite a lot of experience.

Enough experience to say that IMO(note I-M-O), Widgets, something Android is so praised for are quite useless.

They drain battery.

And I also realized that even though a widget showed some info, I still usually ended up going into the app, which rendered widgets useless to me, so slowly once the novelty wore off, widget filled homescreen got replaced by icons.

Why do I need to have a gigantic clock on the main screen when there is a clock on status bar?

IMO, if Apple opens up the Notification Center to third party, that will be widgets done well. They won't drain your battery, yet, they'll be instantly available, just a swipe down away.

walie
Nov 24, 2012, 10:49 AM
Quite a lot of experience.

Enough experience to say that IMO(note I-M-O), Widgets, something Android is so praised for are quite useless.

They drain battery.

And I also realized that even though a widget showed some info, I still usually ended up going into the app, which rendered widgets useless to me, so slowly once the novelty wore off, widget filled homescreen got replaced by icons.

Why do I need to have a gigantic clock on the main screen when there is a clock on status bar?

IMO, if Apple opens up the Notification Center to third party, that will be widgets done well. They won't drain your battery, yet, they'll be instantly available, just a swipe down away.

Fail to see how my bookmark, calendar, music, google tasks, starbucks, custom made tasker transit checker widgets drain battery, but whatever.

I see lots of "They drain battery" statements, fail to see proof backing it up. Every. Single. Time.

lol, IF Apple opens up Notification Center...IF they finally get around to it, it will be limited to the iPhone5 and newer devices, because it will need massive resources to work correctly that only newer apple devices can provide.

dalbir4444
Nov 24, 2012, 11:07 AM
Quite a lot of experience.

Enough experience to say that IMO(note I-M-O), Widgets, something Android is so praised for are quite useless.

They drain battery.

And I also realized that even though a widget showed some info, I still usually ended up going into the app, which rendered widgets useless to me, so slowly once the novelty wore off, widget filled homescreen got replaced by icons.

Why do I need to have a gigantic clock on the main screen when there is a clock on status bar?

IMO, if Apple opens up the Notification Center to third party, that will be widgets done well. They won't drain your battery, yet, they'll be instantly available, just a swipe down away.

So what you're saying is that once iOS has widgets, only then will they not drain battery and become useful? Yeah, spoken like a true fanboy.

Cod3rror
Nov 24, 2012, 11:21 AM
So what you're saying is that once iOS has widgets, only then will they not drain battery and become useful? Yeah, spoken like a true fanboy.

It's true though.

iOS' widgets would be hidden away in the Notification Center and hence would not drain the battery.

Even then, I doubt I would use many widgets... I would like music controls in the Notification Center and Toggles, but other than that... no use for me.

----------

Also as mentioned, Android UI is still years behind iOS.

The scrolling physics, UI response, etc... just isn't there. I don't know what techniques Apple uses, is it motion blur? But when you scroll a list in iOS, it's just so incredibly smooth and at the same time responsive... and at the end of the list you get that sweet bounce-back effect. In Android you just run into a "wall" and get that glow effect, meh...

onthecouchagain
Nov 24, 2012, 11:22 AM
If widgets were first introduced by iOS and wasn't available on Android, every outspoken post against widgets would be singing an entirely different tune.

And those that are against widgets always seem to forget this one simple fact: you don't have to use it. I myself use very few.

Choice -- it's a beautiful thing.

Oletros
Nov 24, 2012, 11:25 AM
They drain battery.


They drain the battery exactly the same as your notification center widgets

iOS' widgets would be hidden away in the Notification Center and hence would not drain the battery.

Ah, because they are hidden they don't drain battery.

Can you explain me the difference between a calendar widget in the hompage and a calendar widget on ontification center regarding battery drain?

walie
Nov 24, 2012, 11:30 AM
It's true though.

iOS' widgets would be hidden away in the Notification Center and hence would not drain the battery.



So by your reasoning, my calendar widget would not drain the battery because because its "hidden away" on my second home screen. Is that correct?

wikus
Nov 24, 2012, 11:37 AM
Pretty much everything the guys says in all 5 videos is spot on. To dispute his talking points is to be delusional.

My favourite advantages of Android over iOS:

- No need to use iTunes to transfer music, movies, etc. Any computer on any platform can transfer all files back and forth between my phone. None of this 'locked down' crap
- 3rd party keyboards catered to MY liking
- notifications pull down menu with shortcuts for wifi, data, gps, etc. love it.
- contact shortcuts on homescreens that give menus, kind of acting like simple widgets
- custom roms (MIUI and CyanogenMod)

There are a ton more small things that make a world of a difference between Android and iOS (like being able to put in more than 12 apps in a folder). I currently run MIUI on Android 2.3.7 on an old HTC Glacier and this device still packs more features and functionality than even a jailbroken iPhone. MIUI's notifications are awesome. I cant wait to upgrade my phone and run MIUI on ICS.

IFRIT
Nov 24, 2012, 12:07 PM
It's true though.

iOS' widgets would be hidden away in the Notification Center and hence would not drain the battery.

Even then, I doubt I would use many widgets... I would like music controls in the Notification Center and Toggles, but other than that... no use for me.

----------

Also as mentioned, Android UI is still years behind iOS.

The scrolling physics, UI response, etc... just isn't there. I don't know what techniques Apple uses, is it motion blur? But when you scroll a list in iOS, it's just so incredibly smooth and at the same time responsive... and at the end of the list you get that sweet bounce-back effect. In Android you just run into a "wall" and get that glow effect, meh...

Be specific of your experience because you still smell of someone who played with a phone for 5 minutes in a shop and think they know it all.

----------

Quite a lot of experience.

Enough experience to say that IMO(note I-M-O), Widgets, something Android is so praised for are quite useless.

They drain battery.

And I also realized that even though a widget showed some info, I still usually ended up going into the app, which rendered widgets useless to me, so slowly once the novelty wore off, widget filled homescreen got replaced by icons.

Why do I need to have a gigantic clock on the main screen when there is a clock on status bar?

IMO, if Apple opens up the Notification Center to third party, that will be widgets done well. They won't drain your battery, yet, they'll be instantly available, just a swipe down away.

Widgets are not useless, i can pick up my phone and within seconds i can see updates on my social media, see how my shares are doing, when my favorite T.V shows are next being shown and also the weather. If i wanted to see the same on iOS i'd have to go into umteen apps. Widgets only drain battery if they update automatically and even then if they update every few hours the battery usage is going to be negligible.

Tinmania
Nov 24, 2012, 12:20 PM
Quite a lot of experience.

Enough experience to say that IMO(note I-M-O), Widgets, something Android is so praised for are quite useless.
And that is where I wrote off your post as being completely clueless.

Toggle widgets are without question useful and something you can only come close to after jailbreaking on an iPhone.

I really don't think you are serious though. So bravo for tro.... trawling with such stinky bait.



Mike

NT1440
Nov 24, 2012, 12:25 PM
lol, IF Apple opens up Notification Center...IF they finally get around to it, it will be limited to the iPhone5 and newer devices, because it will need massive resources to work correctly that only newer apple devices can provide.

What exactly are you talking about? Why in the world would that require massive resources?

walie
Nov 24, 2012, 12:32 PM
What exactly are you talking about? Why in the world would that require massive resources?

In the same way Siri and turn-by-turn directions are too intensive for older iOS devices :rolleyes:

NT1440
Nov 24, 2012, 12:35 PM
In the same way Siri and turn-by-turn directions are too intensive for older iOS devices :rolleyes:

So first you make a technical based post, then you make a marketing one.

Which is it?

I'm trying to figure out if you thought this through in good faith, or if you're trying to find something to complain about.

Cod3rror
Nov 24, 2012, 12:38 PM
And that is where I wrote off your post as being completely clueless.

Toggle widgets are without question useful and something you can only come close to after jailbreaking on an iPhone.

I really don't think you are serious though. So bravo for tro.... trawling with such stinky bait.



Mike

The moderators are watching this thread, why don't you let them decide whether I am trolling or not.

The accusation of trolling gets throwing around way too easily... somebody does not agree with you? Troll...



I used Android and found widgets useless. Take a bookmarks widget for example. Why do I need bookmarks displayed on the homescreen when upon tapping on them the web browser is going to open anyway... I'll just have a web browser icon, tap that and open a bookmark.

Or why do I need a Calendar widget that displays the whole month when to change something, I need to open the Calendar app.

Or my favorite places widget, why do I need that whole list on the homescreen? Just open the Maps app and it's there.

Why do I need a messages widget? The messages are already displayed in the Notification Center.



One way or the other you end up with the full app anyway, widgets seems like a battery draining, oversized shortcut.

I also like how you guys conveniently ignore everything I wrote about iOS being much, much more responsive and smoother with a bounce back effect. It's a small thing, but it makes a big difference in the touch UI.

Oletros
Nov 24, 2012, 12:44 PM
Or why do I need a Calendar widget that displays the whole month when to change something, I need to open the Calendar app.

You're kidding now, right?

And still waiting for that battery drain reason

spinedoc77
Nov 24, 2012, 12:46 PM
The moderators are watching this thread, why don't you let them decide whether I am trolling or not.

The accusation of trolling gets throwing around way too easily... somebody does not agree with you? Troll...



I used Android and found widgets useless. Take a bookmarks widget for example. Why do I need bookmarks displayed on the homescreen when upon tapping on them the web browser is going to open anyway... I'll just have a web browser icon, tap that and open a bookmark.

Or why do I need a Calendar widget that displays the whole month when to change something, I need to open the Calendar app.

Or my favorite places widget, why do I need that whole list on the homescreen? Just open the Maps app and it's there.

Why do I need a messages widget? The messages are already displayed in the Notification Center.



One way or the other you end up with the full app anyway, widgets seems like a battery draining, oversized shortcut.

I also like how you guys conveniently ignore everything I wrote about iOS being much, much more responsive and smoother with a bounce back effect. It's a small thing, but it makes a big difference in the touch UI.

Widgets are awesome and blow anything iOS has, but that's me specifically, if you don't find them useful of course you are entitled to use your device the way you use it. For me widgets provide me a LOT of variable information at a quick glance. On my desktop I have a calendar widget, an email widget, and a google voice widget for example, they each have several emails/gvoice messages/appointments etc so I can tell at a glance, without opening a single program, who left me messages, when, what they said, etc. I'm not sure how you use your device in business and personal, but for me that's HUGE, especially if I'm careening down the road at 80mph (yeah sue me).

walie
Nov 24, 2012, 12:47 PM
So first you make a technical based post, then you make a marketing one.

Which is it?

I'm trying to figure out if you thought this through in good faith, or if you're trying to find something to complain about.

your first assumption was an incorrect assumption

NT1440
Nov 24, 2012, 12:50 PM
your first assumption was an incorrect assumption

You're the one that laid out the technical claim (too resource hungry) without even hinting that it was your take on Apple's marketing.

AppleAlfred
Nov 24, 2012, 12:59 PM
I think that widgets really can be extremely useful for some, and for others couldn't mean anything less. I personally fell into the latter group, mainly because of the way I use my phone. I have owned in the last six months: Droid Razr, Galaxy S2, iPhone 4, iPhone 4S, Galaxy Note, HTC One X, Galaxy S3, and now an iPhone 5.

Personally I tried to use widgets, I really wanted to like them (and all the other things you can customize on android) but at the end of the day I found myself with a plain old iOS - esque homescreen with just apps.

One thing I will say, is being able to open apps from a homescreen using shortcuts is fantastic. Huge plus for android. On the other hand, not having very good options to show messages on the homescreen - BIG minus. Overall though I found myself craving iOS after all that experimentation

Oletros
Nov 24, 2012, 01:04 PM
not having very good options to show messages on the homescreen - BIG minus.

I don't understand that, what is showing messages on the home screen?

AppleAlfred
Nov 24, 2012, 01:13 PM
I don't understand that, what is showing messages on the home screen?

When you get a text on the S3 for example it just shows that a message has arrived. I like to see my messages. The Droid Razr was worse, it didn't even have a notification. Having said that the One X did have a decent option to view messages so this is by no means an android-wide issue.

dalbir4444
Nov 24, 2012, 01:13 PM
The moderators are watching this thread, why don't you let them decide whether I am trolling or not.

The accusation of trolling gets throwing around way too easily... somebody does not agree with you? Troll...


Even if they are watching this thread, your comments won't get deleted. So you're safe. I remember perfectly well how it went down the last time we had a conversation.

walie
Nov 24, 2012, 01:34 PM
When you get a text on the S3 for example it just shows that a message has arrived. I like to see my messages. The Droid Razr was worse, it didn't even have a notification. Having said that the One X did have a decent option to view messages so this is by no means an android-wide issue.

Then you get an alternative app that has options to show an incoming message. chompsms or handcentsms come to mind. Why would you think you're stuck with the default messaging client on Android? :confused::confused::confused:

tmoney82
Nov 24, 2012, 01:41 PM
When you get a text on the S3 for example it just shows that a message has arrived. I like to see my messages. The Droid Razr was worse, it didn't even have a notification. Having said that the One X did have a decent option to view messages so this is by no means an android-wide issue.

When I get a text on my S3, it comes in the notification bar at top. I can read the whole text as it comes through. If i miss it, i just pull down the bar and read the whole thing there without opening the app. Not only that, i can quick reply or call back from the pull down bar without opening the apps. Idk if you can do that on your Iphone, but if I can do that this easy, then doing it on the Iphone just takes to long!

Cod3rror
Nov 24, 2012, 02:01 PM
I think that widgets really can be extremely useful for some, and for others couldn't mean anything less. I personally fell into the latter group, mainly because of the way I use my phone. I have owned in the last six months: Droid Razr, Galaxy S2, iPhone 4, iPhone 4S, Galaxy Note, HTC One X, Galaxy S3, and now an iPhone 5.

Personally I tried to use widgets, I really wanted to like them (and all the other things you can customize on android) but at the end of the day I found myself with a plain old iOS - esque homescreen with just apps.

One thing I will say, is being able to open apps from a homescreen using shortcuts is fantastic. Huge plus for android. On the other hand, not having very good options to show messages on the homescreen - BIG minus. Overall though I found myself craving iOS after all that experimentation

My sentiments exactly.

After a while I just found them useless. Maybe you all find them useful, but I do not.

And don't get me wrong, I think you guys are thinking that I don't like Android. I do, I'm glad there is Android and there is a fierce competition between Apple and Google/Samsung, it's only better for consumers.

But it seems that all the advantages Android offers are not really what I want. It has all these grandiose features but in the end they are more like bragging rights than actual useful features you'd use.

There are lots of videos showing how you can connect tons of USB drives, etc... use an Android phone as a computer... but are you really going to do it? It's a pretty ****** replacement for a computer, good luck getting any real work done on it. I mean, the technology is going there, no doubt, in couple of years phones WILL replace laptops, mobile and desktop operating systems will merge. Maybe even next year Google will give Android an official "desktop mode". But now? Nothing but a show off feature.

Or sending files through bluetooth... be honest, when was the last time you sent your friend a file through bluetooth? Nowadays you use email, or cloud sharing service, like Dropbox.

I'd much rather take what the iPhone can do with bluetooth. I get into my car with a Pioneer stereo, turn the ignition, there is an instant connection and I can control my iPhone through the car stereo, don't even need to take it out of the pocket... now that is amazing and actually useful and functional. I cannot do that with Android.

What matters to me are also the "little things"...

Polished UI, with attention to detail, bounce-back, motion blur or whatever it is that makes iOS' use so smooth looking when scrolling.

And small apps, as listed before

Soulver - Android has no equivalent, awesome calculator.
Notes - Android does not have a simple notes app. iOS' app also syncs/backs up to Yahoo.
Music - iOS' music app is just leaps and bounds better than anything Android has to offer.
GPS - Third party GPS apps are much better on iOS.
Photos - The default app is much better, cleaner without any extra nonsense effects. Also displays pictures on the map.
Tunebox - Dropbox music streamer, couldn't find anything like this for Android.
PhotoSync - Nothing like this on Android. Awesome app.
PinDrop - Again, nothing like this on Android.
SongExporter - Again, nothing like this on Android.
Instacast - None of Android's podcast apps come close.
OPlayer - An awesome video player. DivX, XviD, MKV, etc... plays them all. Also, you can play videos from your SAMBA(Windows) share over the network... i.e. Share a folder with movies from you Windows machine, connected with your iPhone and stream movies. Haven't found a player on Android that does that.
SuperList - There is Mighty Grocery List on Android but it's just not as good.
Converter+ - Awesome converter.
Skype - On iOS it is better.

All the above, even small things like third party Calculator, iOS does better and in the end, it's all these small everyday things that matter to me more than being able to connect a mouse and keyboard once in a blue moon.

And also, as noted, centralized audio controls, background audio API.

EDIT: You know what, I don't even need the toggles widgets, it'd be useless to me, I just have everything on and let iOS manage it, which it does beautifully.

AppleAlfred
Nov 24, 2012, 03:28 PM
Then you get an alternative app that has options to show an incoming message. chompsms or handcentsms come to mind. Why would you think you're stuck with the default messaging client on Android? :confused::confused::confused:

I am well aware that you are not stuck with the stock messages app, but trust me I tried many other apps, and only found them to be more trouble than they were worth. Bottom line for me was that the iOS way of showing messages on the screen and being able to swipe them to reply is simple and really doesn't take much time at all. This is one of my small gripes with android, along with garbage music players.... both are things that apple has just done better.

Oletros
Nov 24, 2012, 04:55 PM
When you get a text on the S3 for example it just shows that a message has arrived. I like to see my messages. The Droid Razr was worse, it didn't even have a notification. Having said that the One X did have a decent option to view messages so this is by no means an android-wide issue.

Ah, I see. Well, you can instal any SMS app that shows a pop up notification then.

AppleAlfred
Nov 24, 2012, 06:29 PM
Ah, I see. Well, you can instal any SMS app that shows a pop up notification then.

Oh I tried, found many to be terrible, and a couple that were good in that respect but had other more irritating issues. Overall, this is a small complaint on a platform that I very much enjoyed.

IFRIT
Nov 24, 2012, 10:04 PM
My sentiments exactly.

After a while I just found them useless. Maybe you all find them useful, but I do not.

And don't get me wrong, I think you guys are thinking that I don't like Android. I do, I'm glad there is Android and there is a fierce competition between Apple and Google/Samsung, it's only better for consumers.

But it seems that all the advantages Android offers are not really what I want. It has all these grandiose features but in the end they are more like bragging rights than actual useful features you'd use.

There are lots of videos showing how you can connect tons of USB drives, etc... use an Android phone as a computer... but are you really going to do it? It's a pretty ****** replacement for a computer, good luck getting any real work done on it. I mean, the technology is going there, no doubt, in couple of years phones WILL replace laptops, mobile and desktop operating systems will merge. Maybe even next year Google will give Android an official "desktop mode". But now? Nothing but a show off feature.

Or sending files through bluetooth... be honest, when was the last time you sent your friend a file through bluetooth? Nowadays you use email, or cloud sharing service, like Dropbox.

I'd much rather take what the iPhone can do with bluetooth. I get into my car with a Pioneer stereo, turn the ignition, there is an instant connection and I can control my iPhone through the car stereo, don't even need to take it out of the pocket... now that is amazing and actually useful and functional. I cannot do that with Android.

What matters to me are also the "little things"...

Polished UI, with attention to detail, bounce-back, motion blur or whatever it is that makes iOS' use so smooth looking when scrolling.

And small apps, as listed before



All the above, even small things like third party Calculator, iOS does better and in the end, it's all these small everyday things that matter to me more than being able to connect a mouse and keyboard once in a blue moon.

And also, as noted, centralized audio controls, background audio API.

EDIT: You know what, I don't even need the toggles widgets, it'd be useless to me, I just have everything on and let iOS manage it, which it does beautifully.

People are not bothing to retort your apps post because it;s just plain wrong or full of opinion that it's not worth their time replying too. And you are still ignoring my question about what specific experience of Android you actually have.

hyteckit
Nov 25, 2012, 03:32 AM
Been playing with my Note 2 for about a week.

Not liking it as much as I hope. Too many things that annoys me.

3rd android phone and 5th android device. Best Android device I've own so far. Jelly Bean finally got rid of the annoying lag of Android. Almost as smooth as iOS.

Will probably go back to my iPhone 4S as my main phone.

The only 2 things I'll miss form Android is:

widgets
quick settings

I think that's about it.

hyteckit
Nov 25, 2012, 03:48 AM
I've been using Apple Maps for over 2 months now. Apple Maps never gotten me lost.

Been using Google Maps on my Note 2 for about a week. Already gotten me lost tonight. About 4 blocks off the mark.

Directions in Google Maps is wrong.
Yet Google Navigator got it right.

Google Maps and Google Navigator should be one app. Seem silly to be two separate apps.

tmoney82
Nov 25, 2012, 07:04 AM
Been playing with my Note 2 for about a week.

Not liking it as much as I hope. Too many things that annoys me.

3rd android phone and 5th android device. Best Android device I've own so far. Jelly Bean finally got rid of the annoying lag of Android. Almost as smooth as iOS.

Will probably go back to my iPhone 4S as my main phone.

The only 2 things I'll miss form Android is:

widgets
quick settings

I think that's about it.

Whats things you didn't like?

mib1800
Nov 25, 2012, 09:38 PM
Oh I tried, found many to be terrible, and a couple that were good in that respect but had other more irritating issues. Overall, this is a small complaint on a platform that I very much enjoyed.

You can try something Popup Notifier. This not only popup SMS but any notifications (i.e. those that appears in notification pulldown). A lot of customization on how the popup appears. It works flawlessly and certainly much better than iOS.

hyteckit
Nov 26, 2012, 02:04 AM
Whats things you didn't like?

I think the problem is multiple apps fighting over who is the default app. Part of the other issue is being accustom to iOS. First week is always the adjustment period.

Just yesterday while driving.

Got in car. Car sync to Note 2 through bluetooth. Bluetooth popup dialog shows up. Had to get rid of it.

Music starts playing. Starts playing classical music on my phone. My car display shows the song info, but it's showing 'superman' as the song name, which is not correct. Using my car controls to change song does change the song, but it still shows "superman" as the song name on my car display.

Want to see what music app is open. Double click on home button for app switcher. Force of habit on iOS. Got s-voice instead.

Hold onto home button. I get app switcher. Problem is no music app is showing. Didn't want to mess with finding the music app, so I just left my car playing classical music.

I think the problem is that double twist somehow started playing classical music when my Note 2 sync to my car. The last song played on Play Music app was "superman". So Play Music was sending the song info to my car. But doubletwist was the app playing the music.

Obviously the simple solution to the music issue is to place the music widget or music app shortcut on the home screen.


I then use Google Now to search for directions to a store. Google Now then opens up Google Maps with directions. I tap only navigate. It opens up another app Google Navigator. Now I somehow got 2 voice directions. One telling me to go straight, the other voice telling me to turn left. Navigator map shows I should go straight. I keep going straight, it keeps telling me to go left while another voice said continue going straight. Not sure where the other voice direction is coming from. Directions were wrong, about 4 blocks off the actual location. Somehow routing to the name of the store
gives wrong direction. Tapping on the store name and getting the address and using the address for directions instead works fine.

It was a frustrating experience being away from my iPhone.


Didn't like the app switcher on my Note 2. Didn't like that multiple apps are fighting for the same functionality. Wished Google Maps and Google Navigator is one app. Wished I can customize my home button.


The Note 2 is pretty huge for one hand use while driving. I'm glad it has a physical home butting I can feel and press when I'm driving. If it was like the touch buttons on the Nexus 4, it would frustrate me a lot.

tmoney82
Nov 26, 2012, 06:23 AM
I think the problem is multiple apps fighting over who is the default app. Part of the other issue is being accustom to iOS. First week is always the adjustment period.

Just yesterday while driving.

Got in car. Car sync to Note 2 through bluetooth. Bluetooth popup dialog shows up. Had to get rid of it.

Music starts playing. Starts playing classical music on my phone. My car display shows the song info, but it's showing 'superman' as the song name, which is not correct. Using my car controls to change song does change the song, but it still shows "superman" as the song name on my car display.

Want to see what music app is open. Double click on home button for app switcher. Force of habit on iOS. Got s-voice instead.

Hold onto home button. I get app switcher. Problem is no music app is showing. Didn't want to mess with finding the music app, so I just left my car playing classical music.

I think the problem is that double twist somehow started playing classical music when my Note 2 sync to my car. The last song played on Play Music app was "superman". So Play Music was sending the song info to my car. But doubletwist was the app playing the music.

Obviously the simple solution to the music issue is to place the music widget or music app shortcut on the home screen.


I then use Google Now to search for directions to a store. Google Now then opens up Google Maps with directions. I tap only navigate. It opens up another app Google Navigator. Now I somehow got 2 voice directions. One telling me to go straight, the other voice telling me to turn left. Navigator map shows I should go straight. I keep going straight, it keeps telling me to go left while another voice said continue going straight. Not sure where the other voice direction is coming from. Directions were wrong, about 4 blocks off the actual location. Somehow routing to the name of the store
gives wrong direction. Tapping on the store name and getting the address and using the address for directions instead works fine.

It was a frustrating experience being away from my iPhone.


Didn't like the app switcher on my Note 2. Didn't like that multiple apps are fighting for the same functionality. Wished Google Maps and Google Navigator is one app. Wished I can customize my home button.


The Note 2 is pretty huge for one hand use while driving. I'm glad it has a physical home butting I can feel and press when I'm driving. If it was like the touch buttons on the Nexus 4, it would frustrate me a lot.
I think you hit the nail on the head when you said that you was use to ios! Apps fighting over defaults can be fix by just choosing always when you find the one you like best!

hyteckit
Nov 26, 2012, 06:47 AM
I think you hit the nail on the head when you said that you was use to ios! Apps fighting over defaults can be fix by just choosing always when you find the one you like best!

How do I set the default music app that automatically plays when I connect to Bluetooth?

tmoney82
Nov 26, 2012, 08:30 AM
How do I set the default music app that automatically plays when I connect to Bluetooth?

I don't really know since I don't listen to music that way. Probably theres a setting in double twist that makes it the default player. You may have to just chose which one you want to use, whether it's Play Music or Double Twist. Or transfer all of your music to Play music and use it. Or maybe you can use a car mode app if there is note one built in the phone to use double twist as a default player. Idk man Im just throwing out options/ideals!

AppleAlfred
Nov 26, 2012, 05:09 PM
You can try something Popup Notifier. This not only popup SMS but any notifications (i.e. those that appears in notification pulldown). A lot of customization on how the popup appears. It works flawlessly and certainly much better than iOS.

Hmm I wish I would have heard of that while I still had my S3 lol, next time. Thanks for the tip!

nickchallis92
Nov 26, 2012, 06:01 PM
The Note 2 is pretty huge for one hand use while driving. I'm glad it has a physical home butting I can feel and press when I'm driving. If it was like the touch buttons on the Nexus 4, it would frustrate me a lot.

As a fellow road user, I find that extremely irresponsible

dgree03
Nov 26, 2012, 06:03 PM
Here are couple of examples that I prefer on iOS.

Soulver - Android has no equivalent, awesome calculator.
Notes - Android does not have a simple notes app. iOS' app also syncs/backs up to Yahoo.
Music - iOS' music app is just leaps and bounds better than anything Android has to offer.
GPS - Third party GPS apps are much better on iOS.
Photos - The default app is much better, cleaner without any extra nonsense effects. Also displays pictures on the map.
Tunebox - Dropbox music streamer, couldn't find anything like this for Android.
PhotoSync - Nothing like this on Android. Awesome app.
PinDrop - Again, nothing like this on Android.
SongExporter - Again, nothing like this on Android.
Instacast - None of Android's podcast apps come close.
OPlayer - An awesome video player. DivX, XviD, MKV, etc... plays them all. Also, you can play videos from your SAMBA(Windows) share over the network... i.e. Share a folder with movies from you Windows machine, connected with your iPhone and stream movies. Haven't found a player on Android that does that.
SuperList - There is Mighty Grocery List on Android but it's just not as good.
Converter+ - Awesome converter.
Skype - On iOS it is better.


Calculator app? There are 4 I can think of that are the same or better than iOS versions...

Tip Calculator
Scientific Calculator
RealCalc Scientific

Notes?

ColorNote Notepad, better than iOS simple because I can post a widget of my notes on my homescreen. Invaluable feature
Gnotes - Syncs with Gmail...

Music?

Poweramp - nothing on iOS compares.

GPS?

Google Maps Nav - Better than all third party apps because I can manage my maps on my desktop.

Photos?

Jelly Beans stock photo app is on par with iOS. But you could also DL Quick pic which is excellent also.

Dropbox music player?

MusicDropNPlayLite for Dropbox

Photosync?

I agree, there isnt anything like it on Android. MoPhotos give similar functionality tho (Compat with Eyefi and Lightroom)

Video Players? HAHAHAHA

MX player
Moboplayer
VLCPlayer

I could go on and on...you obviously haven't spent much time looking with Android...

smellysox8
Nov 26, 2012, 06:10 PM
I'll echo Poweramp recommendation. Nothing competes with this music player.

Cod3rror
Nov 26, 2012, 06:26 PM
People are not bothing to retort your apps post because it;s just plain wrong or full of opinion that it's not worth their time replying too. And you are still ignoring my question about what specific experience of Android you actually have.

But you replied and your opinion is the only one I care for here anyway. You're awesome!

Zwhaler
Nov 26, 2012, 06:38 PM
As for the Calculator and Notes comment, on the Note 2 there is an extremely robust notes app with optional S-Pen functionality that's way more advanced than anything free on iOS that I know of, and also on this device there is not only a calculator but I can actually write out complex functions and equations with every symbol you can think of. It will also solve these equations with variables and give me numerous characteristics of any resulting lines, curves, parabolas etc. Amazing!

Cod3rror
Nov 26, 2012, 06:55 PM
Calculator app? There are 4 I can think of that are the same or better than iOS versions...

Tip Calculator
Scientific Calculator
RealCalc Scientific

Notes?

ColorNote Notepad, better than iOS simple because I can post a widget of my notes on my homescreen. Invaluable feature
Gnotes - Syncs with Gmail...

Music?

Poweramp - nothing on iOS compares.

GPS?

Google Maps Nav - Better than all third party apps because I can manage my maps on my desktop.

Photos?

Jelly Beans stock photo app is on par with iOS. But you could also DL Quick pic which is excellent also.

Dropbox music player?

MusicDropNPlayLite for Dropbox

Photosync?

I agree, there isnt anything like it on Android. MoPhotos give similar functionality tho (Compat with Eyefi and Lightroom)

Video Players? HAHAHAHA

MX player
Moboplayer
VLCPlayer

I could go on and on...you obviously haven't spent much time looking with Android...

Why do I need all those 3 calculators when I can replace them with one, on iOS, also none of them work the way Soulver does. Did you even have a look at it? Also all those Android calculators have terrible UIs.

Notes, didn't know about that app. Thanks! It's an iOS rip off though.

Not a big fan of PowerAMP, in fact, I prefer TouchWiz music player and iOS music player of them all.

GPS - Google Maps is fantastic, however, good luck using that in a foreign country with no data.

MusicDropNPlayLite - The UI is terrible! How do such apps get approved? Android has low standards for UI.

I've checked out all those players, none of them play videos over SMB network. Which means you can't have files on your Windows machine and play them with these players. OPlayer on iOS plays almost any video over the network, plus has a Dropbox support, etc...

You guys are telling me I don't know about Android, yet you yourself seem to have no clue about iOS. I familiar with Android quite well.

dalbir4444
Nov 26, 2012, 07:13 PM
Why do I need all those 3 calculators when I can replace them with one, on iOS, also none of them work the way Soulver does. Did you even have a look at it? Also all those Android calculators have terrible UIs.

Notes, didn't know about that app. Thanks! It's an iOS rip off though.

Not a big fan of PowerAMP, in fact, I prefer TouchWiz music player and iOS music player of them all.

GPS - Google Maps is fantastic, however, good luck using that in a foreign country with no data.

MusicDropNPlayLite - The UI is terrible! How do such apps get approved? Android has low standards for UI.

I've checked out all those players, none of them play videos over SMB network. Which means you can't have files on your Windows machine and play them with these players. OPlayer on iOS plays almost any video over the network, plus has a Dropbox support, etc...

You guys are telling me I don't know about Android, yet you yourself seem to have no clue about iOS. I familiar with Android quite well.

Oh. You're still here...

hyteckit
Nov 26, 2012, 07:54 PM
As a fellow road user, I find that extremely irresponsible

You mean you don't use the radio when driving? Or use the car nav when driving?

Only difference is the controls are on my phone.

mib1800
Nov 26, 2012, 08:53 PM
To those who consider widget useless on Android.

Just think about this:-

Android: With widgets, I can see latest posts of tw,fb,g+, next few upcoming agendas/tasks/birthday, stock prices, headline news and weather all at one glance without lifting a finger.

iOS: You need to open apps one-by-one to see all the information. Say you need 60sec just to do the action of opening/closing apps. Repeat this say 8x a day and in a year you would have wasted TWO days of you life doing this. A really smart way to waste life with i-smartphone (pun intended).

dalbir4444
Nov 26, 2012, 08:56 PM
To those who consider widget useless on Android.

Just think about this:-

Android: With widgets, I can see latest posts of tw,fb,g+, next few upcoming agendas/tasks/birthday, stock prices, headline news and weather all at one glance without lifting a finger.

iOS: You need to open apps one-by-one to see all the information. Say you need 60sec just to do the action of opening/closing apps. Repeat this say 8x a day and in a year you would have wasted TWO days of you life doing this. A really smart way to waste life with i-smartphone (pun intended).

I'm sure people waste a lot more time that that during their lifetime, so two days is probably not a big deal.

walie
Nov 26, 2012, 10:19 PM
I've checked out all those players, none of them play videos over SMB network. Which means you can't have files on your Windows machine and play them with these players. OPlayer on iOS plays almost any video over the network, plus has a Dropbox support, etc...

You guys are telling me I don't know about Android, yet you yourself seem to have no clue about iOS. I familiar with Android quite well.

Diceplayer, BSplayer do exactly what you claim android can't. Hell you can just use a file manager
Iike ESFile explorer to browse to smb, FTP, or cloud servers and use the android intent system to open videos with whatever player you desire.

smellysox8
Nov 26, 2012, 10:21 PM
Not a big fan of PowerAMP, in fact, I prefer TouchWiz music player and iOS music player of them all.


In what way is the stock iPhone music player anywhere close to Poweramp?

onthecouchagain
Nov 26, 2012, 10:39 PM
If widgets existed on iOS instead of Android hooooo-boy, you betcha they'd be used as a talking point against the competition!

http://images.sodahead.com/polls/000533377/polls_YouBetcha_2134_181007_answer_1_xlarge.jpeg

mib1800
Nov 26, 2012, 10:44 PM
I'm sure people waste a lot more time that that during their lifetime, so two days is probably not a big deal.

Also, don't forget the frustration of doing this (opening apps over and over) most probably will take quite a few more days off their lifetime ;)

Technarchy
Nov 26, 2012, 10:47 PM
If widgets existed on iOS instead of Android hooooo-boy, you betcha they'd be used as a talking point against the competition!

Image (http://images.sodahead.com/polls/000533377/polls_YouBetcha_2134_181007_answer_1_xlarge.jpeg)

That depends on if those widgets crashed, forced battery pulls, killed battery life, killed performance...all that good stuff

hyteckit
Nov 26, 2012, 10:47 PM
To those who consider widget useless on Android.

Just think about this:-

Android: With widgets, I can see latest posts of tw,fb,g+, next few upcoming agendas/tasks/birthday, stock prices, headline news and weather all at one glance without lifting a finger.

iOS: You need to open apps one-by-one to see all the information. Say you need 60sec just to do the action of opening/closing apps. Repeat this say 8x a day and in a year you would have wasted TWO days of you life doing this. A really smart way to waste life with i-smartphone (pun intended).

Seems that Windows 8 mobile does it better than iOS and Android.

You can check weather, stocks, and reminders without opening an app on iOS. Hell, my iPhone beeps me and tells me I have a task or reminder when I arrive at work right on the lock screen with location based reminders.

joelovesapple
Nov 26, 2012, 11:09 PM
In response to the original poster, I have an iPod Touch as detailed in my signature, and I wish it was my phone. My phone is a junky Samsung Galaxy S (the very first one, the one that looked like the 3gs!).

Honestly, I can understand the appeal of customisation, but if it renders the user experience to be less than satisfactory, with crashes, freezes and other inconsistencies, I'd rather avoid it.

In short, I'm only interested in having features if they don't ruin *my user experience*. Your mileage may vary.

Oletros
Nov 27, 2012, 12:30 AM
That depends on if those widgets crashed, forced battery pulls, killed battery life, killed performance...all that good stuff

Ah, talking from experience?

Technarchy
Nov 27, 2012, 12:34 AM
Ah, talking from experience?

You know it.

Oletros
Nov 27, 2012, 12:38 AM
You know it.

Clearly, I know that you're wrong and biased

SlCKB0Y
Nov 27, 2012, 01:39 AM
GPS - Google Maps is fantastic, however, good luck using that in a foreign country with no data.


It's amazing how people almost seem proud of their lack of knowledge. I can tell Google Maps to cache whatever areas I will need when I got away and it works fine.

Have you actually used Android for more than a few minutes or do you just not understand how to use it? Either option is not the best reflection on you.

siiip5
Nov 27, 2012, 01:45 AM
Notes, didn't know about that app. Thanks! It's an iOS rip off though.

I always enjoy reading this garbage. The iOS fans will claim that Apple i vented everything, and anything that looks like it is a ripoff. I won't be surprised if you think it was Apple that invented the notification center for mobile devices. And Greg Hughes wasnt happy with Apple denying his app for the App Store, and then going into Cydia and stealing the code AND icon for ios5!

Greg Hughes Wifi app icon on left and the one Apple 'invented'.
http://phone.digestbit.com/uploadfiles/phonedigestbitcom-1308453475/cydia-dev-apple-stole-both-my-idea-and-my-icon-for-wifi-sync_1.jpg

Apple is a company that steals and cheats. Most successful companies do. Don't pretend that Apple is the almighty inventor and everyone copies them.

matttye
Nov 27, 2012, 01:53 AM
GPS - Google Maps is fantastic, however, good luck using that in a foreign country with no data.

You can install maps to the phone to be used offline now.

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I always enjoy reading this garbage. The iOS fans will claim that Apple i vented everything, and anything that looks like it is a ripoff. I won't be surprised if you think it was Apple that invented the notification center for mobile devices. And Greg Hughes wasnt happy with Apple denying his app for the App Store, and then going into Cydia and stealing the code AND icon for ios5!

Greg Hughes Wifi app icon on left and the one Apple 'invented'.
Image (http://phone.digestbit.com/uploadfiles/phonedigestbitcom-1308453475/cydia-dev-apple-stole-both-my-idea-and-my-icon-for-wifi-sync_1.jpg)

Apple is a company that steals and cheats. Most successful companies do. Don't pretend that Apple is the almighty inventor and everyone copies them.

People just won't let that story go :p It's been what, six months, a year? Since it was first reported, yet people still use that in these petty squabbles. :rolleyes:

dalbir4444
Nov 27, 2012, 06:33 AM
Clearly, I know that you're wrong and biased

I thinks his signature shows that quite well.

SlCKB0Y
Nov 27, 2012, 07:12 AM
I thinks his signature shows that quite well.

Having them on ignore is very gratifying. I only occasionally have to see their nonsense in quotes.

walie
Nov 27, 2012, 07:36 AM
You can install maps to the phone to be used offline now.

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People just won't let that story go :p It's been what, six months, a year? Since it was first reported, yet people still use that in these petty squabbles. :rolleyes:

Typical. Apple fan accuses Samsung of "RIPPING APPLE OFF OMG THEY SUCK. THEY MUST PAY" Pointed out that notification center was ripped off of Android they say "what? that again? why do you keep bringing that up?"

Oletros
Nov 27, 2012, 07:40 AM
Typical. Apple fan accuses Samsung of "RIPPING APPLE OFF OMG THEY SUCK. THEY MUST PAY" Pointed out that notification center was ripped off of Android they say "what? that again? why do you keep bringing that up?"

Notification center is not a ripoff of Android notifications

onthecouchagain
Nov 27, 2012, 08:54 AM
The concept may be a rip off of Android's, but Notification Center is no where as usable as Android's notification pull down. Expandable notifications (now expandable with one finger) and the ability to swipe away single entries is so useful. I can't believe Apple doesn't allow you to swipe away single notifications. Joke.

Not to mention, you still never get to see notification icons at the top in your status bar. Why is the carrier icon still up there, really, for iOS?

Pjstock42
Nov 27, 2012, 08:58 AM
The concept may be a rip off of Android's, but Notification Center is no where as usable as Android's notification pull down. Expandable notifications (now expandable with one finger) and the ability to swipe away single entries is so useful. I can't believe Apple doesn't allow you to swipe away single notifications. Joke.

Not to mention, you still never get to see notification icons at the top in your status bar. Why is the carrier icon still up there, really, for iOS?

Even on a tablet sized screen (Nexus 7 in my case) I have to swipe 4/5 times to get one of those single bars to swipe away because they are too narrow for this action to be practical.

onthecouchagain
Nov 27, 2012, 09:07 AM
Even on a tablet sized screen (Nexus 7 in my case) I have to swipe 4/5 times to get one of those single bars to swipe away because they are too narrow for this action to be practical.

The notifications are narrow? It's a solid bar of information.

I don't know, mate. I don't have trouble swiping notifications away... at all. I've never heard anyone missing it or struggling because it's too narrow. Practice some more? :confused:

EDIT: How does one have troubling swiping away bars this big? Not trying to demean in anyway. Serious question. It shouldn't be difficult.

http://static.trustedreviews.com/94/000023d92/158a/nexus-7-notifications.jpg

ReanimationN
Nov 27, 2012, 09:29 AM
I didn't mind the Android notification centre, until 4.2. I used to absent-mindedly swipe anywhere at the top of my N7 to bring it down, now you have to specifically aim for the top-left of the device to get the notification centre, whereas before I think I used to pull it down from the right of the screen more. That action now pulls down quick settings. I'd prefer a bar of quick settings to be in the notification centre in stock Android, oh well.

onthecouchagain
Nov 27, 2012, 09:32 AM
I didn't mind the Android notification centre, until 4.2. I used to absent-mindedly swipe anywhere at the top of my N7 to bring it down, now you have to specifically aim for the top-left of the device to get the notification centre, whereas before I think I used to pull it down from the right of the screen more. That action now pulls down quick settings. I'd prefer a bar of quick settings to be in the notification centre in stock Android, oh well.

Yeah, I thought about this. There should be an option to turn this on/off. If Quick settings can be turned off, I'd use Power Toggles anyway. It's better.

Is the split dead center? At the very least, the quick settings should be further right. Otherwise, will just have to adjust. More features usually means adjustments in some form.

dalbir4444
Nov 27, 2012, 09:34 AM
Even on a tablet sized screen (Nexus 7 in my case) I have to swipe 4/5 times to get one of those single bars to swipe away because they are too narrow for this action to be practical.

I'd say you're exaggerating.

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I didn't mind the Android notification centre, until 4.2. I used to absent-mindedly swipe anywhere at the top of my N7 to bring it down, now you have to specifically aim for the top-left of the device to get the notification centre, whereas before I think I used to pull it down from the right of the screen more. That action now pulls down quick settings. I'd prefer a bar of quick settings to be in the notification centre in stock Android, oh well.

I haven't played around with 4.2 yet but IMO it would'be been better if they had power toggles, kind of like in Touchwiz and Cyanogenmod ROMs.

ReanimationN
Nov 27, 2012, 09:44 AM
Yeah, I thought about this. There should be an option to turn this on/off. If Quick settings can be turned off, I'd use Power Toggles anyway. It's better.

Is the split dead center? At the very least, the quick settings should be further right. Otherwise, will just have to adjust. More features usually means adjustments in some form.
Not quite, mine still pulls down the notification centre slightly to the right of the camera, go any further right though and you get quick settings.

I agree that you should be able to turn it off, I liked swiping from anywhere along the top to get notifications.
I'd say you're exaggerating.

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I haven't played around with 4.2 yet but IMO it would'be been better if they had power toggles, kind of like in Touchwiz and Cyanogenmod ROMs.

Yeah, I think that set-up is ideal. Toggles in the notification centre just seems like such a natural addition.

Cod3rror
Nov 27, 2012, 09:47 AM
In what way is the stock iPhone music player anywhere close to Poweramp?

It's simpler and neater.

Diceplayer, BSplayer do exactly what you claim android can't. Hell you can just use a file manager
Iike ESFile explorer to browse to smb, FTP, or cloud servers and use the android intent system to open videos with whatever player you desire.

So if they do the same thing, why should I downgrade to Android?

It's amazing how people almost seem proud of their lack of knowledge. I can tell Google Maps to cache whatever areas I will need when I got away and it works fine.

Have you actually used Android for more than a few minutes or do you just not understand how to use it? Either option is not the best reflection on you.

Google Maps caches only a small portion of the map or the route. That's it.

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Also, Android does not have an edge bounce back effect. iOS does. It's awesome!

onthecouchagain
Nov 27, 2012, 09:51 AM
Also, Android does not have an edge bounce back effect. iOS does. It's awesome!

http://media.tumblr.com/tumblr_m4ilyeuQxE1qbbtm3.gif

spinedoc77
Nov 27, 2012, 10:51 AM
I didn't mind the Android notification centre, until 4.2. I used to absent-mindedly swipe anywhere at the top of my N7 to bring it down, now you have to specifically aim for the top-left of the device to get the notification centre, whereas before I think I used to pull it down from the right of the screen more. That action now pulls down quick settings. I'd prefer a bar of quick settings to be in the notification centre in stock Android, oh well.

They definitely went backwards in 4.2, they should just have a single unified notification bar. Another thing I hate about android is you can't swipe to go back, something that I miss about iOS, I think Apple has a patent on that, but I'm not sure. It really really sucks having a chunk of your screen taken up by the back/home buttons, really unintuitive to reach down there sometimes and annoying to have that wasted screen space.

Tinmania
Nov 27, 2012, 11:12 AM
Yeah, I thought about this. There should be an option to turn this on/off. If Quick settings can be turned off, I'd use Power Toggles anyway. It's better.

Is the split dead center? At the very least, the quick settings should be further right. Otherwise, will just have to adjust. More features usually means adjustments in some form.
On my Nexus 4 I can swipe down from any place at the top of screen to slide down notifications. There is no way to get anything else. Two fingers brings down quick settings. What am I missing about this split thing?



Michael

dalbir4444
Nov 27, 2012, 11:15 AM
On my Nexus 4 I can swipe down from any place at the top of screen to slide down notifications. There is no way to get anything else. Two fingers brings down quick settings. What am I missing about this split thing?



Michael

He's referring to tablets.

Tinmania
Nov 27, 2012, 11:17 AM
He's referring to tablets.

Then for me I would like that! It's sometimes awkward to use 2 fingers to get to quick settings so I just use one then get to quick settings from notification drop-down. Usually it is to see battery percentage lol.



Michael

dalbir4444
Nov 27, 2012, 11:29 AM
Then for me I would like that! It's sometimes awkward to use 2 fingers to get to quick settings so I just use one then get to quick settings from notification drop-down. Usually it is to see battery percentage lol.



Michael

I really feel that the Stock ROM should provide the option of using either a battery bar or showing the percentage. Custom ROMs have had this for a while.

walie
Nov 27, 2012, 12:26 PM
So if they do the same thing, why should I downgrade to Android?

Not trying to convince you to do anything. Just shutting down your claim of there being no android equivalent to whatever crap you were spewing. Nice job on the fox news caliber spin job though

matttye
Nov 27, 2012, 01:12 PM
Typical. Apple fan accuses Samsung of "RIPPING APPLE OFF OMG THEY SUCK. THEY MUST PAY" Pointed out that notification center was ripped off of Android they say "what? that again? why do you keep bringing that up?"

I think the Samsung ripping off Apple digs are just as dated and boring.

IFRIT
Nov 27, 2012, 03:10 PM
It's simpler and neater.



So if they do the same thing, why should I downgrade to Android?



Google Maps caches only a small portion of the map or the route. That's it.

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Also, Android does not have an edge bounce back effect. iOS does. It's awesome!

Smacks Forehead... Just give it up.

dojoman
Nov 27, 2012, 04:15 PM
I honestly don't understand why so many Apple iDevice haters keep coming back to website called Macrumors. Seriously, why are you guys here if you hate all "i" device so much?

aerok
Nov 27, 2012, 04:17 PM
I honestly don't understand why so many Apple iDevice haters keep coming back to website called Macrumors. Seriously, why are you guys here if you hate all "i" device so much?

Who says they hates all ''i''devices, haven't noticed one in this thread.

dalbir4444
Nov 27, 2012, 04:20 PM
I honestly don't understand why so many Apple iDevice haters keep coming back to website called Macrumors. Seriously, why are you guys here if you hate all "i" device so much?

Criticizing a product is not the same as hating it.

dojoman
Nov 27, 2012, 04:26 PM
Criticizing a product is not the same as hating it.

To me it's the same especially some of you here (you know who you are) have nothing good to say about any Apple device. Seriously, there must be thousands of Android related forums beside Macrumors.

dalbir4444
Nov 27, 2012, 04:28 PM
To me it's the same.

Not to me. I use Android and like it, but I can criticize it and admit that it has its faults.

Make of it what you will.

Edit: I just checked some of your comments. They don't seem very reasonable. I can see why you wouldn't like this sub-forum.

dojoman
Nov 27, 2012, 04:37 PM
Not to me. I use Android and like it, but I can criticize it and admit that it has its faults.

Make of it what you will.

Yeah I understand that...I use iPhone and it has its many faults too but some people are here for a different reason.

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Not to me. I use Android and like it, but I can criticize it and admit that it has its faults.

Make of it what you will.

Edit: I just checked some of your comments. They don't seem very reasonable. I can see why you wouldn't like this sub-forum.

Of course you don't since you have Android. You see??? It's not that I don't like it but it's more amusing than annoying.

aerok
Nov 27, 2012, 04:37 PM
To me it's the same especially some of you here (you know who you are) have nothing good to say about any Apple device. Seriously, there must be thousands of Android related forums beside Macrumors.

I shall critisize everything I deem critisizable.

I hate the sharp edges on the iPhone 4/4s/5
I hate TouchWiz
I hate the price of iMacs
I hate the glass design of the N4

Just don't expect me to critisize about Android on an Apple forum... I rather stay on topic.