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asifnaz
Dec 3, 2012, 01:16 AM
This book is dual booting OS 9 and OS X 10.2 . 10 gb Hard disk . 256 mb of ram .

I want to use it for listening to music watching non-hd videos , web browsing and office 2004 .

Is it worth buying and what price I should pay for it .



Jessica Lares
Dec 3, 2012, 01:49 AM
This book is dual booting OS 9 and OS X 10.2 . 10 gb Hard disk . 256 mb of ram .

I want to use it for listening to music watching non-hd videos , web browsing and office 2004 .

Is it worth buying and what price I should pay for it .

None of the G3 machines are worth it anymore. Stay clear of them. People here will tell you to either stick to OS 9, or they'll say to put Linux on it, but both won't allow you to do what you want. You can listen to music, but video and web browsing is pretty much dead. Office would look horrible on a screen with that low of resolution and wouldn't run very well as it's the minimum specs you need.

The latest models of the iBook G4s are much better, can run Leopard, and can still do non-HD video and web browsing pretty well. They're going to cost you in the $200-$300 range, so honestly think about whether you want a 7 year old machine that can't run all the new stuff and can cost you more if it starts needing replacement parts, or a 2006 MacBook Pro that can run up to Lion for the same price.

There's a reason why you can get most of the G3s at $50 or less. Even if you upgrade them yourself and stick Tiger on it, it does nothing to really improve them.

California
Dec 3, 2012, 01:51 AM
This book is dual booting OS 9 and OS X 10.2 . 10 gb Hard disk . 256 mb of ram .

I want to use it for listening to music watching non-hd videos , web browsing and office 2004 .

Is it worth buying and what price I should pay for it .

If the battery is working, maybe forty or fifty bucks.

I've only owned one once and I think the best you can do is 10.4 tiger with 576mb of ram and a 120 gig hard drive, though it would be awesome to see if anyone has put an SSD in one of them. Find out if it has an airport card and how long the battery lasts. The video is going to be poor.

asifnaz
Dec 3, 2012, 02:02 AM
They're going to cost you in the $200-$300 range, so honestly think about whether you want a 7 year old machine that can't run all the new stuff and can cost you more if it starts needing replacement parts, or a 2006 MacBook Pro that can run up to Lion for the same price.


you mean I can find 2006 macbook pro for under 300$..?

Jessica Lares
Dec 3, 2012, 02:43 AM
you mean I can find 2006 macbook pro for under 300$..?

Yes, and it's only going to get cheaper and cheaper. so keep that in mind. There are three cycles of Mac releases, the Early, the Mid, and the Late. By January, there will be more 2006/7 Intel models on eBay, and they will blow away anything an old PowerPC model can do right now and will last you a very, very, very long time with only a small 4GB RAM upgrade.

rjcalifornia
Dec 3, 2012, 09:32 AM
This book is dual booting OS 9 and OS X 10.2 . 10 gb Hard disk . 256 mb of ram .

I want to use it for listening to music watching non-hd videos , web browsing and office 2004 .

Is it worth buying and what price I should pay for it .

Only if it cost USD $4 dollars.

I strongly recommend you to get either:

PowerBook G4 1.67 Ghz with 2GB of RAM 17" DLSD/HR

or a Macbook Pro (2006)


For newbies: Run Far Far Far Away from G3

skateny
Dec 3, 2012, 10:37 AM
This book is dual booting OS 9 and OS X 10.2 . 10 gb Hard disk . 256 mb of ram .

I want to use it for listening to music watching non-hd videos , web browsing and office 2004 .

Is it worth buying and what price I should pay for it .

I never liked the clam shell form factor. But even if it were a G3 PowerBook with similar specs, I'd pass unless it were a gift.

justperry
Dec 3, 2012, 10:42 AM
Only if it cost USD $4 dollars.

I strongly recommend you to get either:

PowerBook G4 1.67 Ghz with 2GB of RAM 17" DLSD/HR

or a Macbook Pro (2006)


For newbies: Run Far Far Far Away from G3

Keep in mind there are plenty of them with a failed lower RAM slot, I know, I have one.:o

Zotaccian
Dec 3, 2012, 10:55 AM
Well when focusing on performance and software support those are pretty much worthless. They might have some collection value, but that's pretty much it. They can of course be used in very light tasks (just like my Pentium I 166MHz could be used) and for web surfing if you are very patient person. Only multiprocessor / core G5's feel OK in everyday use when speaking about PowerPC -machines. Dual G4 1.42GHz was noisy and didn't make up in performance.

asifnaz
Dec 3, 2012, 12:22 PM
i am not a collector i am just look for a cheap apple laptop

crewkid89
Dec 3, 2012, 12:51 PM
The aluminum PowerBooks still work very well for the most part. I currently have a 15 inch 1.67 ghz with 2gbs of ram. leopard runs great but web pages re getting progressively slower. Still does most of what I need. I just got a chromebook to complement it because my graduate program uses google docs a lot which runs like a wounded bantha on older hardware and browsers.

before that I had a 12" 1ghz model that also ran leopard surprisingly well

cocacolakid
Dec 3, 2012, 01:06 PM
i am not a collector i am just look for a cheap apple laptop

Look for a G4 PowerBook or G4 iBook instead. The G3 clamshells aren't going to stream any video, period, even non-HD.

If you use Greasemonkey or Greasekit you can stream videos just fine on a G4 PowerBook or G4 iBook (non-HD videos). If you're active on eBay or Craigslist you can find one of those under $100. Clamshells are cool but they're still popular among collectors, so they are in the $50-100 range or more, more like $100 or more for a clean, fully working one. You can buy a G4 PowerBook or G4 iBook (avoid G3 iBooks) for that same price and they are a much more powerful and competent computer, even today.

skateny
Dec 3, 2012, 01:53 PM
Look for a G4 PowerBook or G4 iBook instead. The G3 clamshells aren't going to stream any video, period, even non-HD.

If you use Greasemonkey or Greasekit you can stream videos just fine on a G4 PowerBook or G4 iBook (non-HD videos). If you're active on eBay or Craigslist you can find one of those under $100. Clamshells are cool but they're still popular among collectors, so they are in the $50-100 range or more, more like $100 or more for a clean, fully working one. You can buy a G4 PowerBook or G4 iBook (avoid G3 iBooks) for that same price and they are a much more powerful and competent computer, even today.

What he said.

It's a nice collectors' item, but there isn't much you can do with it.

I got my iBook almost three years ago, and I still use it for everything I need.

rjcalifornia
Dec 3, 2012, 02:12 PM
i am not a collector i am just look for a cheap apple laptop

Ok, some recommendations before you buy a PowerPC (if you choose to get PowerPC):

iBook G4/1.42 14-Inch (Mid-2005 - Op)1.42 GHz PowerPC 7447a (G4)


PowerBook G4 1.67 17" (DLSD/HR - Al)1.67 GHz PowerPC 7447a (G4)

Both with RAM above 1GB

Now Intel, well, choose the Macbook:

MacBook Pro "Core Duo" 1.67 15"1.67 GHz Core Duo (L2400) (SuperDrive)

Regards,

Zotaccian
Dec 3, 2012, 02:33 PM
i am not a collector i am just look for a cheap apple laptop

Yes if you are looking for the cheapest possible option for an Apple laptop then PowerPC is the way to go. Those tasks which you mentioned can be done on a low end machine, maybe some videos might be too much for G3, I recently tried to watch BluRay rip of one movie on my G4 and it absolutely choked, it was not exact rip meaning that it was compressed down quite a bit but still, it was too much. My Intel PC laptop and 120 dollar Android -tablet had no problems playing the video (I believe even those dirt cheap tablets would be able to play it). For basic web surfing G4 1.67GHz or near similar MHz G4 is OK if you use something other than Safari, it was ridiculous that Google image search brought the machine down to its knees with the famous spinning beach ball....

MisterKeeks
Dec 3, 2012, 05:10 PM
Now Intel, well, choose the Macbook:

MacBook Pro "Core Duo" 1.67 15"1.67 GHz Core Duo (L2400) (SuperDrive)

Regards,

Actually, I would upgrade to on of the early Core 2 Duos, as those are 64 bit. which = much better, longer lasting support.

Jessica Lares
Dec 4, 2012, 12:52 AM
Actually, I would upgrade to on of the early Core 2 Duos, as those are 64 bit. which = much better, longer lasting support.

They don't have 64-bit EFI, but they can run the 64-bit apps.

But yeah, there are the early models that are stuck on Snow Leopard (or it may just be the MacBooks), which would be as bad as sticking to Leopard soon enough. Lion is going to be supported for yet awhile, so it's best to get the cheapest machine that can load it.

MultiFinder17
Dec 4, 2012, 08:38 AM
http://www.macofalltrades.com/Apple_MacBook_13_inch_2_0GHz_Intel_Core_Duo_p/mb-13-20-e06w.htm

2GHz Core Duo MacBook for $299.

http://www.macofalltrades.com/Apple_MacBook_13_inch_2_4GHz_Intel_Core_2_Duo_2008_p/mb-13-24-e08w.htm

2.4GHz Core 2 Duo MacBook for $449.

As many have stated, stay away from the G3 machines if you're intending to use them as regular computers. If you want to stay with a PowerPC Mac, then go for a late-model PowerBook or iBook, although I'd lean towards the PowerBook. In reality though, go for an early-model MacBook, Pro or not.

asifnaz
Dec 5, 2012, 01:51 AM
http://www.macofalltrades.com/Apple_MacBook_13_inch_2_0GHz_Intel_Core_Duo_p/mb-13-20-e06w.htm

2GHz Core Duo MacBook for $299.

http://www.macofalltrades.com/Apple_MacBook_13_inch_2_4GHz_Intel_Core_2_Duo_2008_p/mb-13-24-e08w.htm

2.4GHz Core 2 Duo MacBook for $449.

As many have stated, stay away from the G3 machines if you're intending to use them as regular computers. If you want to stay with a PowerPC Mac, then go for a late-model PowerBook or iBook, although I'd lean towards the PowerBook. In reality though, go for an early-model MacBook, Pro or not.

I am really tempted to buy these Intel macbooks . With some research I have found that PPC is not supported by Apple and not even Linux . I am not a collector so I should get Intel macbooks for better mac experience .

I wonder what maximum OS X above mentioned macbooks can run...?

Jessica Lares
Dec 5, 2012, 01:56 AM
I am really tempted to buy these Intel macbooks . With some research I have found that PPC is not supported by Apple and not even Linux . I am not a collector so I should get Intel macbooks for better mac experience .

I wonder what maximum OS X above mentioned macbooks can run...?

Core Duo, Snow Leopard, Core 2 Duo, Lion.

You will need to add some RAM though, but you'll love it.

crewkid89
Dec 5, 2012, 07:43 AM
I am really tempted to buy these Intel macbooks . With some research I have found that PPC is not supported by Apple and not even Linux . I am not a collector so I should get Intel macbooks for better mac experience .

I wonder what maximum OS X above mentioned macbooks can run...?

The Linux Kernel supports the PowerPC architecture. All of the common distros have a PowerPC version.

Imixmuan
Dec 5, 2012, 09:24 AM
That most common Linux distros have a "unsupported" PPC build, but OP seems like a newbie and probably would be best served by picking up one of those early Intel macs and going Snow Leopard. They have come down in price quite a bit of late.

Still use and love my PPC ibook, but I wouldn't buy one. Definitely would not buy any G3 at this juncture. Especially when really decent Core Duo and Core 2 Duo's PC laptops can now be picked up for sub 200 dollars, I saw one go for sub 100 on ebay last night. Slap a LTS Ubuntu or Mint or anything on those and you are good to go for a few years.

skateny
Dec 5, 2012, 09:36 AM
That most common Linux distros have a "unsupported" PPC build, but OP seems like a newbie and probably would be best served by picking up one of those early Intel macs and going Snow Leopard. They have come down in price quite a bit of late.

Still use and love my PPC ibook, but I wouldn't buy one. Definitely would not buy any G3 at this juncture. Especially when really decent Core Duo and Core 2 Duo's PC laptops can now be picked up for sub 200 dollars, I saw one go for sub 100 on ebay last night. Slap a LTS Ubuntu or Mint or anything on those and you are good to go for a few years.

There's pretty much only one scenario in which I'd buy a G3: If it came new in an unopened box and at a bargain price. I'd keep it around as a collector's item, and that's it.

GermanyChris
Dec 5, 2012, 11:07 AM
i am not a collector i am just look for a cheap apple laptop

Where do you live?

There is no such thing as a cheap Apple laptop here in europe that I've found. Though there are some MDD's on ebay for 85Euro BIN that I'm have a hard time not BIN.

Paulywauly
Dec 5, 2012, 01:58 PM
Dude, i got a G3 Clamshell just under 2 years ago (The last SE model, 455MHz, 500-600MB RAM, 10GB hard drive. Came with Panther/OS9, upgraded to Tiger)

Here is my experience:

RAM wasnt too much of an issue, but i had to do a lot of streamlining of Tiger for it to perform well. (e.g. turning off Spolight/Dashboard/Visual Effects etc)After doing this i could run numerous apps at the same time.

iTunes - Worked fine, although the latest verison it ran didn't have access to the iTunes Store (version 5?) This would also be a pain if you have an iPod bought in the last 5 years you need to sync.

Office 2004 ran like a pig on my late 2006 iMac, on the clamshell it was worse. I did look into iWork but was unable to find a copy that ran on the clamshell which didnt cost as much as the laptop itself. Ended up using Bean and saving in .rtf format :(

Web Browsing isn't great. The 800x600 screen isn't good for web browsing at all, pages are natively larger than the screen so theres alot of zooming out or horizontal scrolling. The latest version of Safari that works is version 4 and this crashed a lot. Tried the latest versions of Opera/Comino to work on Power PC G3 and there were numerous rendering issues. TenFourFox was better but not great. A lot of more complex webpages refused to load on any browser.

Video - i spent a lot of time on this. Numerous web browsers, video optimisation/compression in Opera. Different media players. The MacTubes YouTube client. The mobile Youtube site, YouTube HTML5 etc i couldn't get ANY video to run more than a few frames per second. You can also forget about any form of Flash video.

MobileMe did work fine, but iCloud doesn't.

i was very surprised to find Dropbox was still supported, although i don't know if this is still the case.

The built in networking is adequate for light use. the Ethernet is basically what you still get on some cheaper laptops. The wifi is 802.11a which may not work with your router depending on its setup.

external storage is provided by a FW400 port and a USB1.1 port. USB1.1 is painful, it took hours to backup 6GB to a memory stick.

The speaker is mono and doesn't even sound as good as an iPhone lol

The keyboard and trackpad are surprisingly good, although the trackpad doesn't support right clicking at all.

The screen isn't a patch on the iMac G4 i still have, but is usable.

Its HEAVY, but sturdy.

I can imagine most of the issues mentioned would be exacerbated if the clamshell was running an even older OS. Bearing in mind my Clamshell is the last top-end release i can't recommend it or a lower specc'd model for anything more than a hobby/collectors piece.

If you're just looking for a cheap laptop i'd recommend not paying too much attention to its funky styling and go for something newer. Preferably an intel macbook, or even a Windows laptop or a small tablet.

skateny
Dec 5, 2012, 02:04 PM
Where do you live?

There is no such thing as a cheap Apple laptop here in europe that I've found. Though there are some MDD's on ebay for 85Euro BIN that I'm have a hard time not BIN.

There are plenty of good deals here in the states, and not just on eBay. Some people pick up their gear from local MUGS, schools, Craig's List and office supply warehouses. I took home an iMac over ten years ago from the university I was teaching at for $200 when it was only four years old. Their computer labs and library were predominantly Macs. Because I spent some time teaching students to use Macs, in addition to my regular teaching responsibilities, I was often able to get good deals.

Which leads me to my question: When Apple discontinued producing PowerPCs, what did they do with all the computers they had that went unsold? Anyone know what specific resellers did with their iBooks and iMacs? And does anyone know what Apple's policy is currently for unsold inventory?

ihuman:D
Dec 5, 2012, 02:59 PM
Keep in mind there are plenty of them with a failed lower RAM slot, I know, I have one.:o

The DDR2 models don't have this problem - I'm a proud owner of one!

----------

Yes if you are looking for the cheapest possible option for an Apple laptop then PowerPC is the way to go. Those tasks which you mentioned can be done on a low end machine, maybe some videos might be too much for G3, I recently tried to watch BluRay rip of one movie on my G4 and it absolutely choked, it was not exact rip meaning that it was compressed down quite a bit but still, it was too much. My Intel PC laptop and 120 dollar Android -tablet had no problems playing the video (I believe even those dirt cheap tablets would be able to play it). For basic web surfing G4 1.67GHz or near similar MHz G4 is OK if you use something other than Safari, it was ridiculous that Google image search brought the machine down to its knees with the famous spinning beach ball....

For moderate web browsing I would recommend a 1.25GHz single G4 with Camino(which I use) and for heavy web browsing I would recommend a Safari/Camino on 1.67GHz single G4(which I use).

Camino works very well and is slick with Google images on my 1.25GHz iMac G4 - last time I checked - about a few weeks ago.

ChrisMan287
Dec 5, 2012, 07:49 PM
Keep in mind there are plenty of them with a failed lower RAM slot, I know, I have one.

Not here :D *knock on wood*

I'd go with a later model PowerBook G4 or earlier Intel MacBook.

Jessica Lares
Dec 5, 2012, 09:34 PM
Which leads me to my question: When Apple discontinued producing PowerPCs, what did they do with all the computers they had that went unsold? Anyone know what specific resellers did with their iBooks and iMacs? And does anyone know what Apple's policy is currently for unsold inventory?

Apple had the Lisa destroyed in a landfill to get a tax write-off. Apple doesn't stock a lot of inventory to begin with now, so I don't think there were many that went unsold. Most of it just stayed as AppleCare replacements I would think.

crewkid89
Dec 5, 2012, 09:41 PM
Another aspect of Apple's supply chain is the concept of just-in-time production. They talk about it in the biography. Apple doesn't store very much inventory at any given time. Inventory is produced as it is needed.

Dane D.
Dec 5, 2012, 09:49 PM
None of the G3 machines are worth it anymore. Stay clear of them. People here will tell you to either stick to OS 9, or they'll say to put Linux on it, but both won't allow you to do what you want. You can listen to music, but video and web browsing is pretty much dead. Office would look horrible on a screen with that low of resolution and wouldn't run very well as it's the minimum specs you need.

The latest models of the iBook G4s are much better, can run Leopard, and can still do non-HD video and web browsing pretty well. They're going to cost you in the $200-$300 range, so honestly think about whether you want a 7 year old machine that can't run all the new stuff and can cost you more if it starts needing replacement parts, or a 2006 MacBook Pro that can run up to Lion for the same price.

There's a reason why you can get most of the G3s at $50 or less. Even if you upgrade them yourself and stick Tiger on it, it does nothing to really improve them.
You are flat out wrong, my G3 is my home rig. I cruise the 'net just fine with Camino and Firefox. I use Thunderbird for email, have Adobe Photoshop 7, Adobe Illustrator 10, NeoOffice, Fireworks 8 and many other apps that are no longer supported but it does what I want. It is dual boot, OS 9.2.2 and OS 10.4.6. Have 3 internal drives, PCI cards for USB 2.0/1.1, Firewire 400, ATI Radeon 9200 vid card, 1 GB RAM and it runs 24/7/365.

It doesn't do video well, it is slow running iMovie 3.0.3, runs iTunes 6.0.4, Audacity 2.0.2, and many other legacy apps. I'm not a person who needs leading-edge technology. It works and the electric consumption is very little, 9 watts at 1.1GHz.

I still boot into OS 9 to use ClarisWorks 2.1 for my MPG spreadsheets, to play legacy games such as Unreal Tournament GOTY, Links Pro and Links 2000. It all depends on what you do with a computer. I'm not a Facebook member, nor a Twitter member, nor LinkedIn, complete waste of time IMO. I like that I can come home from work and it is running Folding@Home, waiting for me.

It works, period. If I want something faster I turn my sat around and use a 1.25GHz eMac. I'm old school, not a first-adopter, not one to spend money on new, leading-edge hardware. People today are inpatient and spoiled. I come from a background where key punch cards were the norm and line command was the way to use a computer before 1984.

That said, my work unit is a quad-core MacPro. The only difference, it runs the latest software.

Jessica Lares
Dec 5, 2012, 10:23 PM
It works, period. If I want something faster I turn my sat around and use a 1.25GHz eMac. I'm old school, not a first-adopter, not one to spend money on new, leading-edge hardware. People today are inpatient and spoiled. I come from a background when punch cars were the norm and line command was the way to use a computer.

That said, my work unit is a quad-core MacPro. The only difference, it runs the latest software.

:rolleyes: It works, sure, I have my 466 on OS 9 and use Classilla and some other stuff. I was running QuarkXPress and Photoshop when I was still booting into Tiger. However, we can't pretend like it's still as easy as it was 10 years ago when those machines were still relevant. We have to tell it like it is, that the internet is not designed for those displays anymore, that it's going to be difficult to cram the Office 2004 interface into that 800x600 screen, and that it flat out isn't good for flash content.

And the biggest thing is that it was a machine that came with Mac OS 8 or 9 to begin with. It plays DVDs GREAT, it plays Quicktime GREAT, and it probably is great with really old Flash versions, but it has come a long way of being a 1MB file you stream for a minute or so, into 50MB files that go through the network and playback through the machine. It's a lot of information the old hardware can't handle.

For someone looking for a machine to use on the side, it's OK. But not as a main computer. I mean, be honest here... Could you really still function on just a command line? Besides for word processing and programming? I couldn't.

asifnaz
Dec 6, 2012, 12:25 AM
The Linux Kernel supports the PowerPC architecture. All of the common distros have a PowerPC version.

The support is decreased over the time .

ihuman:D
Dec 6, 2012, 11:31 AM
If you're thinking like this then you have no option but to get a brand new machine since with the older machines:The support is decreased over the time .

skateny
Dec 6, 2012, 11:44 AM
You are flat out wrong, my G3 is my home rig. I cruise the 'net just fine with Camino and Firefox. I use Thunderbird for email, have Adobe Photoshop 7, Adobe Illustrator 10, NeoOffice, Fireworks 8 and many other apps that are no longer supported but it does what I want. It is dual boot, OS 9.2.2 and OS 10.4.6. Have 3 internal drives, PCI cards for USB 2.0/1.1, Firewire 400, ATI Radeon 9200 vid card, 1 GB RAM and it runs 24/7/365.

It doesn't do video well, it is slow running iMovie 3.0.3, runs iTunes 6.0.4, Audacity 2.0.2, and many other legacy apps. I'm not a person who needs leading-edge technology. It works and the electric consumption is very little, 9 watts at 1.1GHz.

I still boot into OS 9 to use ClarisWorks 2.1 for my MPG spreadsheets, to play legacy games such as Unreal Tournament GOTY, Links Pro and Links 2000. It all depends on what you do with a computer. I'm not a Facebook member, nor a Twitter member, nor LinkedIn, complete waste of time IMO. I like that I can come home from work and it is running Folding@Home, waiting for me.

It works, period. If I want something faster I turn my sat around and use a 1.25GHz eMac. I'm old school, not a first-adopter, not one to spend money on new, leading-edge hardware. People today are inpatient and spoiled. I come from a background where key punch cards were the norm and line command was the way to use a computer before 1984.

That said, my work unit is a quad-core MacPro. The only difference, it runs the latest software.

It's fantastic to know that there are people with the time, patience and wherewithal to get G3 systems working at such a high level. You sound like you can do most of your upgrades and maintenance with little assistance (this makes you somewhat unique among G3 users), and I don't know that I've ever seen you post here before.

But someone new to Macs who purchases a G3 is likely going to be very disappointed if this is their entry level machine.

You've moved in small increments from the very beginning. I've had several Apple laptops and desktops, beginning with the 520c PowerBook, and I never had a problem with patience or with feeling left behind by new hardware. Those early machines performed much better than their Intel counterparts. It was so much easier to upgrade and maintain my Macs.

My apartment building burned down about three years ago. I lost almost everything, including my 1GHz PowerBook. Soon after, I bought a 1.33GHz iBook from eBay for $200. It was in pristine condition (I think it was from some business office that was either no longer in existence or was upgrading to something else.)

I was homeless for a short time, and my iBook served me very well. (I'm very partial to PowerBooks and iBooks.) Once I got back on my feet, I spent about $70 to upgrade my iBook. Replaced DC-in Board, replacement battery, 1GB of RAM and a new AC-adapter. I don't have an SSD or a SuperDrive, since there are limits to how much I'm willing to spend to keep my baby running.

I certainly don't need the latest-and-greatest hardware, and I'm very patient with my iBook. I simply don't like the Intel Macs. They just don't feel right. Plus, I started, I think, with System 7, so a large part of my computing experience is from a time when manipulating hardware and software was both much more simple than it is today, and certainly more fun.

I think getting your hands on a PowerPC Mac can be a great experience. Mine certainly has been. But it's not for everyone. I imagine that within the next year or so I'll upgrade to a late, second-hand MacBook in order to run Mountain Lion. But I am in no hurry to do this. I like my iBook, and I will continue to use it as my main machine as long as I can.

On a final note, during the recent hurricane, I spent a great deal of time away from home, in local restaurants, coffee shops and the local library. I often got comments and questions about my iBook. This happens frequently when I am away from home. More recently, I had hip replacement surgery followed by inpatient rehab. My iBook got a similar amount of attention. In both instances, most people were fascinated to learn that my iBook is seven years old, that the display was as sharp as it is, and that it handles streaming video so well.

I'm dedicated or loyal to the PowerPC. I just like using much more than anything else that's available.

crewkid89
Dec 6, 2012, 12:26 PM
The support is decreased over the time .

This is still not true. IBM is still developing POWER based processors. These machines need operating systems and software to run on them. Linux is very commonly used on these machines. The Linux Kernel is actively updated and plenty of software has prebuilt binaries and build able source available. I honestly don't understand why you are saying this.

There is some software that has never existed for PowerPC Linux and never will. This does not mean the platform is unsupported.

For typical end users, Linux is not going to outperform OSX but it still definitely works especially on the later G4s and G5s. If you need it to run on an older G3, you will need a lighter distro that can run with limited resources. There are still many of these around or you can easily build your own from a cli install.

GermanyChris
Dec 6, 2012, 12:45 PM
:rolleyes: It works, sure, I have my 466 on OS 9 and use Classilla and some other stuff. I was running QuarkXPress and Photoshop when I was still booting into Tiger. However, we can't pretend like it's still as easy as it was 10 years ago when those machines were still relevant. We have to tell it like it is, that the internet is not designed for those displays anymore, that it's going to be difficult to cram the Office 2004 interface into that 800x600 screen, and that it flat out isn't good for flash content.

And the biggest thing is that it was a machine that came with Mac OS 8 or 9 to begin with. It plays DVDs GREAT, it plays Quicktime GREAT, and it probably is great with really old Flash versions, but it has come a long way of being a 1MB file you stream for a minute or so, into 50MB files that go through the network and playback through the machine. It's a lot of information the old hardware can't handle.

For someone looking for a machine to use on the side, it's OK. But not as a main computer. I mean, be honest here... Could you really still function on just a command line? Besides for word processing and programming? I couldn't.

LOL, if you ever come to Germany I'll buy you a beer that is simply the best most blunt post I've from you I've read in the 18 or so months I've been here. This includes the the PRSI posts.

asifnaz
Dec 7, 2012, 12:25 AM
T Linux is very commonly used on these machines. The Linux Kernel is actively updated and plenty of software has prebuilt binaries and build able source available. I honestly don't understand why you are saying this.



Because I asked for for PPC version on Fedora forums . And most of the answers I received were suggesting that PPC is not very much updated now as Apple has moved on to Intel .