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View Full Version : Is Amarra worth it with 44,100Hz sampled songs???




50548
Dec 10, 2012, 04:03 PM
I am considering buying an Amarra HiFi license (the cheapest) to complement and enhance my iTunes library (most of encoded in Apple Lossless format) - having just used their trial version, I tend to hear the difference but am still not sure about the real benefits.

My question revolves around the fact that most if not all of my library is 44,100Hz sampled, therefore kind of defeating Amarra's purpose...or am I wrong?

Any expert advice is highly appreciated..!



bwhli
Dec 11, 2012, 02:02 PM
I don't think it's worth it. It won't necessarily sound better, maybe just different. You'd essentially be processing processed audio.

50548
Dec 11, 2012, 04:05 PM
I don't think it's worth it. It won't necessarily sound better, maybe just different. You'd essentially be processing processed audio.

So in which situations an app like Amarra would make sense? What about other alternatives?

By the way, is my Creative X-Fi USB interface already a DAC?

bwhli
Dec 11, 2012, 05:15 PM
So in which situations an app like Amarra would make sense? What about other alternatives?

By the way, is my Creative X-Fi USB interface already a DAC?

I think products like Amarra and SRS take advantage of the whole concept of "good sound quality". They don't make anything sound better (better is subjective). They just boost certain frequencies for a different perceived sound, and some people might find that better.

Yes, your USB interface is a DAC. If I were you, I'd save up and get this (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B003Y5FRNS/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=B003Y5FRNS&linkCode=as2&tag=bristum-20) instead. The sound quality is REALLY good for the money.

50548
Dec 11, 2012, 05:32 PM
I think products like Amarra and SRS take advantage of the whole concept of "good sound quality". They don't make anything sound better (better is subjective). They just boost certain frequencies for a different perceived sound, and some people might find that better.

Yes, your USB interface is a DAC. If I were you, I'd save up and get this (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B003Y5FRNS/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=B003Y5FRNS&linkCode=as2&tag=bristum-20) instead. The sound quality is REALLY good for the money.

Looks good, thanks...but which one should I get? The Icon 2 or the Icon HDP? I want to use my digital audio port on the iMac, by the way...

bwhli
Dec 11, 2012, 10:59 PM
Looks good, thanks...but which one should I get? The Icon 2 or the Icon HDP? I want to use my digital audio port on the iMac, by the way...

If you want to use digital out from your Mac, only the HDP supports S/PDIF. I've only had experience with u-DAC2. Since the HDP is a few hundred dollars more expensive, I expect it will perform even better than the u-DAC2.

Destroysall
Dec 11, 2012, 11:20 PM
Don't make the assumption that songs in 16-Bit/44.1kHz resolution (CD format) are not worth the investment in terms of quality playback. Not every form of music is available in high resolutions yet the audiophile world is still growing large. Perhaps 85% of my music library is in the standard "Red book" (CD format) resolution.

Amarra is considered among the best, if not the best, OS X players available. If you find the investment worth it, give it a go. Here's an article on OS X Audio Players:
http://www.headfonia.com/os-x-audio-players-amarra-audirvana-pure-music-fidelia-decibel-and-bitperfect/

As far as DACs are concerned, I've owned both the both HDP and the u-DAC2 from NuForce, and personally I find the FiiO E10 much more appealing. It's been the most favorable DAC of the year for those on a tight budget. I use at current as I am aiming for a Schiit Audio Bifrost.

destroysall.