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MacRumors
Dec 29, 2012, 03:37 PM
http://images.macrumors.com/im/macrumorsthreadlogo.gif (http://www.macrumors.com/2012/12/29/new-york-mta-introduces-ios-app-with-real-time-subway-arrival-info/)


http://images.macrumors.com/article-new/2012/12/mtasubwaytime.jpgNew York's Metropolitan Transportation Authority just released a new app, MTA Subway Time (https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/mta-subway-time/id561507659?mt=8), which provides accurate real-time information on subway arrivals for six of the numbered lines, including No. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6, plus the 42nd Street shuttle, covering 156 different stations in the city. Subway Time will allow commuters to plan trips down to the minute.

The app works with the countdown clocks that are linked to centralized computers, which have been installed in just seven of the city's 24 lines.

According to The Wall Street Journal (http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424127887323984704578205870642642436.html), the system's age and the cost of upgrading has prevented it from being easily updated, though real-time coverage will roll out to other lines in the future. The first update will come in six to 12 months, when the L line is added.The new app covers only about a third of the subway system, and agency officials acknowledged that it will likely take years of work and hundreds of millions of dollars in new investment before conveniences increasingly common elsewhere are standard in the Big Apple.

The rest, encompassing two-thirds of its total stations and roughly 60% of its daily ridership, continues to rely on signal technology dating to the middle of the 20th century or earlier. It will be years before those lines have signal systems that can generate the digital information that drives countdown clocks on platforms and apps on cellphones with live updates.Other cities have been quicker to incorporate current technology into existing transit systems. California's Bay Area Rapid Transit System, or BART, for example, has developed a web-based mobile app (m.bart.gov) and in 2007, the city released open format transit data that third party developers were able to incorporate into their own apps.

http://images.macrumors.com/article-new/2012/12/subwaytime.jpg
The Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority and the Chicago Transit Authority also provide information for third party developers.

New York Transit officials are hoping to inspire app developers to create third party apps as well, and a free live stream of arrival time data will be given to app developers.

Transit apps have become especially important with the release of iOS 6, because Apple Maps does not provide innate transit directions. Instead, the Maps program redirects users to download relevant routing apps like New York's new Subway Time.

MTA Subway Time (http://appshopper.com/travel/mta-subway-time) can currently be downloaded from the App Store for free. [Direct Link (https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/mta-subway-time/id561507659?mt=8)]

Article Link: New York MTA Introduces iOS App with Real-Time Subway Arrival Info (http://www.macrumors.com/2012/12/29/new-york-mta-introduces-ios-app-with-real-time-subway-arrival-info/)



komodrone
Dec 29, 2012, 03:44 PM
ugly UI

kas23
Dec 29, 2012, 04:01 PM
OK, now we need about 200 more of these apps to cover the majority of the subway times' for major cities.

FuNGi
Dec 29, 2012, 04:15 PM
I hope you all appreciate the chronological irony of this and the previous MR story about i-device theft in NYC.

Now there is more reason than ever to check your phone as you wait on the platform...

Shrink
Dec 29, 2012, 04:26 PM
I hope you all appreciate the chronological irony of this and the previous MR story about i-device theft in NYC.

Now there is more reason than ever to check your phone as you wait on the platform...


Or, perhaps, never take your phone out as you wait on the platform! :eek:

miknos
Dec 29, 2012, 04:29 PM
Or they could have some digital clock in every station so passengers could see when the train is coming.

mrrory
Dec 29, 2012, 04:33 PM
Downloaded and deleted within one minute. It seems like no care was taken designing this. Poor.

StuddedLeather
Dec 29, 2012, 04:36 PM
Or they could have some digital clock in every station so passengers could see when the train is coming.

We have that but only for certain lines, hence this app. It'll be a few more years before the entire system have it.

This app is specifically for the lines which already have the digital signs, which in short is stupid because the signs are active in the stations. Why would we need to look at our phones if we could just look at the countdown clocks?

For reference:
http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2009/08/15/nyregion/15bigcity_600.jpg
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/08/15/nyregion/15bigcity.html

needfx
Dec 29, 2012, 04:45 PM
it should be presented with the Fugliest Design Award

brianbobcat
Dec 29, 2012, 04:49 PM
Chicago's CTA implemented almost real-time train tracking essentially for free by reading the data from their current signals as trains cross them, and combining that with data collected from previous trains to give a very close approximation on arrival time. Just another reason I like Chicago 1000x better than NY. Enjoy your 33% coverage, that sounds like AT&T's slogan.

StuddedLeather
Dec 29, 2012, 05:02 PM
Chicago's CTA implemented almost real-time train tracking essentially for free by reading the data from their current signals as trains cross them, and combining that with data collected from previous trains to give a very close approximation on arrival time. Just another reason I like Chicago 1000x better than NY. Enjoy your 33% coverage, that sounds like AT&T's slogan.

Well this isn't "approximate" timing. This is actual real time. You would think a smaller city like Chicago would already be able to implement this technology to it's smaller system. It'll take a few more years for our entire system to be complete with real time tracking. Not approximate. We already have that.

bedifferent
Dec 29, 2012, 05:03 PM
Seriously with this design? ASCII would have been a better choice.

waldobushman
Dec 29, 2012, 05:11 PM
Now New Yorkers can push people on to the tracks with precision.

JangoFett124
Dec 29, 2012, 05:12 PM
This app is specifically for the lines which already have the digital signs, which in short is stupid because the signs are active in the stations. Why would we need to look at our phones if we could just look at the countdown clocks?

So that if the train isn't coming in 15 minutes I could catch a cab instead of walking to the subway stop. Etc.

RobNYC
Dec 29, 2012, 05:17 PM
We have that but only for certain lines, hence this app. It'll be a few more years before the entire system have it.

This app is specifically for the lines which already have the digital signs, which in short is stupid because the signs are active in the stations. Why would we need to look at our phones if we could just look at the countdown clocks?

For reference:
Image (http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2009/08/15/nyregion/15bigcity_600.jpg)
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/08/15/nyregion/15bigcity.html

The clocks are great but what they really need to do is to put them outside the stations as well so you know how long you're going to have to wait before you go into the station. That would most helpful late at night.

allexp
Dec 29, 2012, 05:20 PM
I would just make API and give private developers to make the app. It will be much better and user friendly. There are many great developers that can do much better job on the UI and much more user friendly app.

StuddedLeather
Dec 29, 2012, 05:36 PM
So that if the train isn't coming in 15 minutes I could catch a cab instead of walking to the subway stop. Etc.

The clocks are great but what they really need to do is to put them outside the stations as well so you know how long you're going to have to wait before you go into the station. That would most helpful late at night.

Both points are true. I too agree though the MTA should try to put the clocks in an area before we pay. Perhaps by the token booth.

Once the technology gets expanded I can see the benefit of this app. Hopefully though the MTA will allow third parties to access the data to create their own apps. While the UI is horrible, it gets the job done.

Yujenisis
Dec 29, 2012, 05:38 PM
Welcome to the 21st Century, NYC!

Is this considered front page news simply because this is New York? Because they are pretty much the last major public transit system in America to do this. :p

brianbobcat
Dec 29, 2012, 05:41 PM
Well this isn't "approximate" timing. This is actual real time. You would think a smaller city like Chicago would already be able to implement this technology to it's smaller system. It'll take a few more years for our entire system to be complete with real time tracking. Not approximate. We already have that.

By approximate, I mean within 1 minute if not dead on. Chicago did it without needing to "take years of work and hundreds of millions of dollars in new investment". This was standard in Chicago a year ago, and they provide all that data free to any app developer. How's your tracking for the other 66% of rail lines not covered by this half-assed app? I get 100% train tracking coverage, do you?

rdlink
Dec 29, 2012, 06:03 PM
ugly UI

Downloaded and deleted within one minute. It seems like no care was taken designing this. Poor.

it should be presented with the Fugliest Design Award

So apparently you don't understand that this UI is pretty much dead on with MTA's own, non-virtual UI? It actually comes across quite nice, if you know that.

JangoFett124
Dec 29, 2012, 06:06 PM
So apparently you don't understand that this UI is pretty much dead on with MTA's own, non-virtual UI? It actually comes across quite nice, if you know that.

Either you're being sarcastic or you work for the MTA. This is the worst designed app I have ever seen, and I am not exaggerating.

StuddedLeather
Dec 29, 2012, 06:50 PM
By approximate, I mean within 1 minute if not dead on. Chicago did it without needing to "take years of work and hundreds of millions of dollars in new investment". This was standard in Chicago a year ago, and they provide all that data free to any app developer. How's your tracking for the other 66% of rail lines not covered by this half-assed app? I get 100% train tracking coverage, do you?

It's funny that you think you know what you're talking about. Let me first say I don't work for the MTA and I admit we should have a better way of tracking the trains. With that said though, no system in America is as advanced as ours, system wise or actual trains. Not to mention the fact that Brooklyn's ridership alone trumps other major cities for ridership (Chicago (http://www.transitchicago.com/assets/1/ridership_reports/2011-Annual.pdf) Brooklyn (http://www.scribd.com/doc/88720085/2011-Subway-Ridership-w-Ranks)). When you combine the TOTAL system ridership forget it, we're light years ahead for the US.

I mention the ridership because we don't have the luxury to just shut down our system like other cities have. It'll take years of work and millions of dollars in new investment because of the old track work/tunnels/24/7 service, the technology wouldn't work on the old system. Building and expanding in NY is expensive, you would think someone from the 2nd city would be able to comprehend this ;).

Ralf The Dog
Dec 29, 2012, 07:22 PM
Cool, when I am in NYC, I spend 90% of my time on the 1,2,3 lines.

Most of the rest of the time, I walk.


We have that but only for certain lines, hence this app. It'll be a few more years before the entire system have it.

This app is specifically for the lines which already have the digital signs, which in short is stupid because the signs are active in the stations. Why would we need to look at our phones if we could just look at the countdown clocks?

For reference:
Image (http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2009/08/15/nyregion/15bigcity_600.jpg)
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/08/15/nyregion/15bigcity.html

It's good to tell you if you need to walk or run to catch the next train.

Either you're being sarcastic or you work for the MTA. This is the worst designed app I have ever seen, and I am not exaggerating.

The question is, does it work or not. A cool UI would be nice, however, a slightly clunky design or a ugly font will not turn me off of a useful tool.

Carlanga
Dec 29, 2012, 08:23 PM
Nice, but why does it cost millions to update the system though? I would assume some detection camaras and math can accomplish tracking accurately?

DaveTheRave
Dec 29, 2012, 08:50 PM
The clocks are great but what they really need to do is to put them outside the stations as well so you know how long you're going to have to wait before you go into the station. That would most helpful late at night.

I think thats the point of the app. Seeing the wait times before you get to the subway station.

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Once the technology gets expanded I can see the benefit of this app. Hopefully though the MTA will allow third parties to access the data to create their own apps. While the UI is horrible, it gets the job done.

They're starting to do this now: http://www.mta.info/apps/

I think they realize they're not experts in app development and are willing to make the data available to anyone who wants it.

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Nice, but why does it cost millions to update the system though? I would assume some detection camaras and math can accomplish tracking accurately?

The subway system is ancient. When sections of the system got wiped out because of Hurricane Sandy, they realized that some parts could not be easily replaced because they were so old the companies that made them had gone out of business years ago. There's so much ~100-year old technology underground.

pnoyblazed
Dec 29, 2012, 09:21 PM
not even iPhone 5 ready..

JangoFett124
Dec 29, 2012, 09:41 PM
The question is, does it work or not. A cool UI would be nice, however, a slightly clunky design or a ugly font will not turn me off of a useful tool.

I would argue that this design is so bad that it limits its usability. Too many taps to get to the info I want. And since it doesn't scroll like a native app (it doesn't use momentum scrolling), it takes longer to find the station I need. This goes way past clunky and ugly.

The app opens with a screen saying "Click on a line to get started, ...". Ignoring the fact that this screen's existence means there's an extra tap to get to what I need, it's "tap", not "click", on a mobile device. Every last detail in this app screams "I don't care!".

Keenupie
Dec 30, 2012, 12:17 AM
I don't know if I am the only one but mostly once I enter the Subway station my phone hardly has ever had network, So how does this work then?

Sorry if I am one of the few who faces this issue.

Regards,

JangoFett124
Dec 30, 2012, 12:18 AM
I don't know if I am the only one but mostly once I enter the Subway station my phone hardly has ever had network, So how does this work then?

Sorry if I am one of the few who faces this issue.

Regards,

When you're in the subway station you don't need this app, since there are electronic signs that have the same information. This is for when you're heading to the station and deciding if you should rush, catch a cab instead, etc.

cloudyo
Dec 30, 2012, 04:54 AM
Big deal...
Where i live we have an app with real time info on most of the public transport for over 2 years now.

Glad to see other cities around the world are also starting to arrive in the 21st century.

Chupa Chupa
Dec 30, 2012, 06:21 AM
Why is this news? DC has had this for over a year with both bus and subway.

CiWill
Dec 30, 2012, 07:39 AM
I'm surprised this is even news in today's world.

Wow, wth have New Yorks mayors been doing all this time? Londons transport system is space age compared to what you guys have to cope with. I just assumed a city like New York would be on par but then again I haven't been there since I was 6. Your subway system should have been taking incremental steps over time, but from this article I wouldn't be surprised if the trains still ran on steam lol.

Citizens of New York need to put more pressure on the people in power, I'm only one person but your subway system looks to be the mould of the Big Apple...

RobNYC
Dec 30, 2012, 08:46 AM
I'm surprised this is even news in today's world.

Wow, wth have New Yorks mayors been doing all this time? Londons transport system is space age compared to what you guys have to cope with. I just assumed a city like New York would be on par but then again I haven't been there since I was 6. Your subway system should have been taking incremental steps over time, but from this article I wouldn't be surprised if the trains still ran on steam lol.

Citizens of New York need to put more pressure on the people in power, I'm only one person but your subway system looks to be the mould of the Big Apple...

As was pointed out, the system is over 100 years old. Second, London shuts their system down every day, NYC's is 24 hours and carries almost twice as many people. The system was collapsing from underfunding in the 70s and 80s. In the past 15 years they've made a lot of changes and invested in the infrastructure. They're replacing a lot of the trains and switches, they're adding a whole new subway line and extending another. Thats in addition to adding subway clocks and cell service in the stations and adding a whole new station for the LIRR at Grand Central.

GenesisST
Dec 30, 2012, 09:17 AM
not even iPhone 5 ready..

It is actually quite easy to make an app support iPhone 5. That is if the UI is not overly complex and can be stretched without major changes... This one looks like it would be an easy one... If you know what you are doing, not all developers are equal... There are a lot of bad developers out there...

That said, it could also be a management decision... For my last app, I had to actually do it on a branch and shove it down the throat of my customer for them to finally accept it... and they were quite glad I did it.

TechZeke
Dec 30, 2012, 09:50 AM
Good for NYC.

This is useless for most other systems. For example, here in Los Angeles, unless it's 1am in the morning, your max wait is ALWAYS 10-12 minutes on rail.

This is perfect for NYC since it's subway is almost as variable as local bus service.

FloatingBones
Dec 30, 2012, 09:56 AM
I would just make API and give private developers to make the app. It will be much better and user friendly. There are many great developers that can do much better job on the UI and much more user friendly app.

Hear, hear.

Is there some good reason why transit providers can't standardize on an API to provide this real-time information?

rdlink
Dec 30, 2012, 10:03 AM
Either you're being sarcastic or you work for the MTA. This is the worst designed app I have ever seen, and I am not exaggerating.

Neither is true, and you're just being ridiculous. This is a decent app, for what limited information it provides. It's straightforward, and intuitive. You press the line you need to ride, and it gives you the list of stations that line services. You can then choose the station and get real-time numbers.

And the information it does provide is useful. I lived in DC for 3+ years, and used a couple of similar apps for the Metro there. It was nice to be able to pull up real-time arrival information for the stations while walking to them, although my apps were typically about a minute behind the boards in the station.

Future enhancements to this app should be the ability to look up nearby stations via GPS, and the ability to look at the whole system on a map.

apfeljonas
Dec 30, 2012, 10:16 AM
Man I wish we could get this for the German Rail and Bus network...

JangoFett124
Dec 30, 2012, 12:23 PM
Neither is true, and you're just being ridiculous. This is a decent app, for what limited information it provides. It's straightforward, and intuitive. You press the line you need to ride, and it gives you the list of stations that line services. You can then choose the station and get real-time numbers.

And the information it does provide is useful. I lived in DC for 3+ years, and used a couple of similar apps for the Metro there. It was nice to be able to pull up real-time arrival information for the stations while walking to them, although my apps were typically about a minute behind the boards in the station.

Future enhancements to this app should be the ability to look up nearby stations via GPS, and the ability to look at the whole system on a map.

The information is useful, but there are too many taps to get to the information (that start screen is unnecessary and redundant - it should remember your previously selected line), it doesn't use any native controls (making scrolling very difficult), it's not retina-ready or iPhone 5-ready, it's not clear which is uptown and which is downtown. I could go on. I'm not sure how they designed this, but it wasn't straight Cocoa in Xcode, and it shows.

When I need to know when my train's coming, I need that information quickly. They've done everything possible to slow down access to that information. With the amount of money the MTA spends (and the soon-to-be-increased ticket prices), they could've paid for a decent developer.

Lukkee24
Dec 30, 2012, 12:32 PM
We have that but only for certain lines, hence this app. It'll be a few more years before the entire system have it.

This app is specifically for the lines which already have the digital signs, which in short is stupid because the signs are active in the stations. Why would we need to look at our phones if we could just look at the countdown clocks?

For reference:
Image (http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2009/08/15/nyregion/15bigcity_600.jpg)
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/08/15/nyregion/15bigcity.html

In London we have real time information for all lines, and I still sometimes use it even when you can check at the platform as it allows you to check it before you leave, to avoid waiting a long time.

KPOM
Dec 30, 2012, 03:11 PM
We have that but only for certain lines, hence this app. It'll be a few more years before the entire system have it.

This app is specifically for the lines which already have the digital signs, which in short is stupid because the signs are active in the stations. Why would we need to look at our phones if we could just look at the countdown clocks?

For reference:
Image (http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2009/08/15/nyregion/15bigcity_600.jpg)
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/08/15/nyregion/15bigcity.html


For me it will come in handy when I'm leaving the office. My office is on the 6 line. I hate getting down into the station and finding out that the next train is 10 minutes away. Now I can check before I leave.

seble
Dec 30, 2012, 06:19 PM
Wow I just downloaded this app even though I'm not a New Yorker, and you can tell it wasn't written natively, a little clunky, too many loading screens, and not visually appealing. When you compare it with something like 'journey pro' which is also available for free in London, and has been available for a while and much clearer, this does just seem pretty damn poor.

KdParker
Dec 30, 2012, 08:10 PM
could be nice if you take the subway.

ConCat
Dec 30, 2012, 09:29 PM
The information is useful, but there are too many taps to get to the information (that start screen is unnecessary and redundant - it should remember your previously selected line), it doesn't use any native controls (making scrolling very difficult), it's not retina-ready or iPhone 5-ready, it's not clear which is uptown and which is downtown. I could go on. I'm not sure how they designed this, but it wasn't straight Cocoa in Xcode, and it shows.

When I need to know when my train's coming, I need that information quickly. They've done everything possible to slow down access to that information. With the amount of money the MTA spends (and the soon-to-be-increased ticket prices), they could've paid for a decent developer.

Once they're done paying those outrageous union wages, not much is left over for simple things like this.

DaveTheRave
Dec 31, 2012, 10:21 AM
Wow, wth have New Yorks mayors been doing all this time

The MTA is a state agency. The mayor of New York has limited influence at best. He gets to nominate a few board members but the majority are appointed by the Govenor of NY. This is part of the eternal battle of upstate/downstate politics, and even downstate there are conflicts with other divisions of the agency like the Long Island Railroad and Metro-North Railroad which serve the counties outside of NYC for passengers on commuter rail.

MadDog31
Dec 31, 2012, 01:31 PM
We have that but only for certain lines, hence this app. It'll be a few more years before the entire system have it.

This app is specifically for the lines which already have the digital signs, which in short is stupid because the signs are active in the stations. Why would we need to look at our phones if we could just look at the countdown clocks

If I'm walking up River Ave. to 161st St. at Yankee Stadium, I can check to see how long the train will be so I can decide if I can keep walking or start running in order to catch the next ride in. I can't see those signs from the streets below.

bmustaf
Dec 31, 2012, 01:45 PM
I haven't been to the City in the last year, so perhaps others could help cure my ignorance here, but is there any meaningful data service in the subway? I did not seem to remember any WiFi or cellular data that was usable.

Now, of course, the above-ground use cases for this app exist, and I understand those, but, without data access in the station, those use cases of real-time data are pretty much unserviceable until wifi or cellular data that works...

ajje1
Dec 31, 2012, 03:20 PM
can't get anything right, a holes

clibinarius
Jan 1, 2013, 02:13 PM
We have that but only for certain lines, hence this app. It'll be a few more years before the entire system have it.

This app is specifically for the lines which already have the digital signs, which in short is stupid because the signs are active in the stations. Why would we need to look at our phones if we could just look at the countdown clocks?

For reference:
Image (http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2009/08/15/nyregion/15bigcity_600.jpg)
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/08/15/nyregion/15bigcity.html

How little you must think about these things. Late at night, you might want to know the 5 train through the bronx and how long it'd take to transfer to the 2...

ingramLee
Jan 1, 2013, 02:19 PM
This is useless!! We dont have service on most subway platforms!!! :confused::p

JangoFett124
Jan 1, 2013, 02:20 PM
This is useless!! We dont have service on most subway platforms!!! :confused::p

On subway platforms that support this, they have boards that display this information anyway. This is for when you're walking to the subway, so you know if you need to rush, take a cab instead, etc.

Eraserhead
Jan 1, 2013, 06:40 PM
OK, now we need about 200 more of these apps to cover the majority of the subway times' for major cities.

The tube in London (which first opened in 1863) has had real time app updates for years. And it has had real time updates on the platforms for as long as I can remember.

There is no excuse for New York being this slow for something this basic.

huntermaclean
Jan 1, 2013, 08:12 PM
Or they could have some digital clock in every station so passengers could see when the train is coming.

This.
I live in Hong Kong and I know exactly where to look when I walk up to the platform to find out when the next train will be there. Much easier than pulling out my phone to check.

akatsuki
Jan 1, 2013, 08:53 PM
The tube in London (which first opened in 1863) has had real time app updates for years. And it has had real time updates on the platforms for as long as I can remember.

There is no excuse for New York being this slow for something this basic.

How much is a ride in London? It is $2.50 in NY.

KPOM
Jan 1, 2013, 11:47 PM
The MTA is a state agency. The mayor of New York has limited influence at best. He gets to nominate a few board members but the majority are appointed by the Govenor of NY. This is part of the eternal battle of upstate/downstate politics, and even downstate there are conflicts with other divisions of the agency like the Long Island Railroad and Metro-North Railroad which serve the counties outside of NYC for passengers on commuter rail.

Exactly. That said, my experience is that people outside the US (and I don't know if that's the case with the poster to whom you responded) don't quite "get" the distinction between local, state, and federal governments here. In London, for instance, the elected mayor doesn't do much except run the transit system (a lot of other things done by mayors here, such as overseeing police, are handled at the national level).

That said, to the poster's point, the MTA isn't held in particularly high regard here in NYC, though to their credit they did an excellent job responding to Hurricane Sandy. To be fair, they are in a bit of a tough position. Only about half their budget is covered through fares. Most of the rest is through a 0.50% sales tax surcharge in NYC and the surrounding areas. They haven't received enough funding for capital projects as they'd like, and even in a city with $30/day parking would still face a near-riot if they raised fares much beyond the $2.25 per trip they charge now, so they have lagged behind other systems such as London or the BART.

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How much is a ride in London? It is $2.50 in NY.

$2.25, actually.

From my recollection it is 2 which is about $3.30. That said, London had the displays with the time to the next train 10 years ago when I lived there. NYC is just getting them now. On the other hand, they still haven't figured out a way to add air conditioning to the trains. It can be downright miserable to take the Tube in the summer.

London leased out most of their lines to private operators in long term deals in the late 1990s, which provided a source of funding for capital improvement. The MTA is still dependent entirely on fares and tax dollars, so is somewhat at a disadvantage in that regard.

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The tube in London (which first opened in 1863) has had real time app updates for years. And it has had real time updates on the platforms for as long as I can remember.

There is no excuse for New York being this slow for something this basic.

The MTA has air conditioned trains. The Tube does not. It would be illegal under EU directives to transport farm animals in conditions like the London Underground during summer.

Eraserhead
Jan 2, 2013, 12:53 PM
The MTA has air conditioned trains. The Tube does not. It would be illegal under EU directives to transport farm animals in conditions like the London Underground during summer.

It is much warmer in New York in the summer than London ;). And you'd literally have to re-dig the tunnels on the tube parts of the tube to add air conditioning with current technology.

KPOM
Jan 2, 2013, 01:16 PM
It is much warmer in New York in the summer than London ;). And you'd literally have to re-dig the tunnels on the tube parts of the tube to add air conditioning with current technology.

I lived in London for 2 years. It can get pretty darn hot down in the Tube since it is so far down the air doesn't circulate well.

Likewise on the MTA, adding the necessary electronic equipment requires replacing lots of infrastructure. Given everything else they are doing (building a new line, expanding another, preparing for the next Sandy, renovating aging stations), this is understandably in their second tier of priority.

curmudgeon32
Jan 3, 2013, 09:46 AM
can't get anything right, a holes Trains were running mere days after the hurricane. I'd like to see you do better.

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Chicago's CTA implemented almost real-time train tracking essentially for free by reading the data from their current signals as trains cross them, and combining that with data collected from previous trains to give a very close approximation on arrival time. Just another reason I like Chicago 1000x better than NY. Enjoy your 33% coverage, that sounds like AT&T's slogan. NYC's subway system runs 24/7 and is orders of magnitude larger and more complex than Chicago's. So yeah, I guess it would be pretty easy to get it done there. And do get in touch when your system accomodates even 10% as many riders as the ours.

thefourthpope
Jan 3, 2013, 12:23 PM
Excellent! Many of these lines have stations with times posted outside the turnstiles, but not all of them. And even for those, this lets you know if it's worth heading to the subway.
Too bad the A B C D lines don't have this; I'm always left waiting for those.

Phrygian
Jan 3, 2013, 03:38 PM
This is perfect for NYC since it's subway is almost as variable as local bus service.

You have no idea what you are talking about.

And while i will be trying this app out, and appreciate the initiative of the MTA in helping individuals and companies create MTA apps, you people really don't seem to get just how FREAKING OLD the NYC subway system is, and that fact that it runs 24/7! Not to mention how ENORMOUS our subway system is compared to other cities, and the huge number of riders every day.

Not to mention that there are tracks not even being used anymore, industrial tracks, and secret tracks for government officials, one of which is public at this point, and another newer one which is purely rumor.

Lil Chillbil
Jan 3, 2013, 09:18 PM
That would be great If I lived in New York