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MacBytes
Oct 3, 2005, 08:35 AM
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Category: Apple Hardware
Link: Apple's Mighty Mouse May Accumulatively Induce Carpal Tunnel Syndrome And Tendinitis (http://www.macbytes.com/link.php?sid=20051003093500)

Posted on MacBytes.com (http://www.macbytes.com)
Approved by Mudbug

iGary
Oct 3, 2005, 08:37 AM
I love mine.

My problem is with my left hand and key commands. That is where I will have problems, personally.

nagromme
Oct 3, 2005, 09:52 AM
"Note: This is based on the single experience of one individual."

Duly noted.

There must be multiple WAYS that people use mice, and this is never addressed in any article I've seen. Otherwise, WHY does ANYONE want one of those big "hand rest" mice that are supposed to be ergonomic? They must be using mice in some different way from how I do.

I love Apple's mouse shape/size (scrolling and extra buttons are nice, but secondary in importance to me). I often discard my big Intellimouse and use my one-button Apple mouse by choice: it's comfortable.

Why? beacaue my habd barely rests on it. I can move it with my fingertips. Gentle pressure, no muscle cramps. And my hand is quite naturally tilted, resting on the pinky-finger side. Much the same tilted pose these "ergonomic" mice force on you. I also add a gel wrist rest at times. Very comfortable.

A big "arm rest" mouse--the popular style these days--makes the mouse take the weight of my whole arm. More friction, more effort needed! Worse yet, you can't move it with your fingers, you must move your whole arm--and all the weight OF your arm. Goodbye precision, hello wasted effort. And that wrist rest I use? No longer comfortable: my arm drags over it instead of resting in one place.

I do think ergonomic mice must have legitimate value--I'm not questioning that--I just suspect that it must be for people who use mice differently from the way I do.

Also--the healthiest thing, I think, is variety. Don't use ANY one hand position or mouse 100% of the time. I switch off every few days. I even have a trackball in the mix, plus my trackpad.

rjwill246
Oct 3, 2005, 09:53 AM
As a physician and researcher, I never ceased to be amazed by someone making a personal observation and then projecting his/her experience to the rest of us. There might be a problem with this mouse but to prove that one would need many proven cases of "new" hand and wrist problems that occurred soley as a result of using this mouse, then a comparison with users using other similar mice, starting at some point in time and tracking the results for a year or so. This of course won't happen and thus a replay of the silicone breast issue will take place- all emotion, lots of vested legal interests, big payouts and no science. Brilliant.
I have not used this mouse- it may suck- but claims of permanent wrist damage, oh! come on!!!

angelwatt
Oct 3, 2005, 10:30 AM
I don't have a MM, but I do use a 2-button mouse and only use my index finger for doing either click so I have to lift my index finger any time that I make a right-click just like someone using a MM. I'm also at a computer on average of 12 hours a day (unfortunately, not proud of this) and I generally don't have issues other than general "hand" fatigue. I'd say this problem was more that his hand was just use to and old way of doing things and now his hand was trying to get new muscle motions down and he probably didn't allow time for his hand to adjust and used the mouse just as often so just over exerted it. This is no different than like changing a workout routine or diet, the body needs to gradually adjust. We're not computers with drivers that you can upload for new things and have everthing be okie dokie. I'd suggest to this guy that he should use it less at first and especially not for games at first then gradually use it more since is having problems. For most people though I'm sure they aren't have any issues out of the ordinary from other mice. Just listen to your body, it's smarter than you, haha.

devilot
Oct 3, 2005, 10:36 AM
Just listen to your body, it's smarter than you, haha.That's good advice... except sometimes it fails. Example: my stomach seems to be very out of tune w/ my brain. The result? I will go for more than 8 hours before realizing I really need to eat. Of course by then, my blood sugar level is so low that my hands are literally shaking-- gosh darn my stomach! No warning grumbles! :p

But I agree, for something like hand fatigue related to mouse usage, I feel that there are your body's natural 'warning signals.'

dubbz
Oct 3, 2005, 11:00 AM
There must be multiple WAYS that people use mice, and this is never addressed in any article I've seen. Otherwise, WHY does ANYONE want one of those big "hand rest" mice that are supposed to be ergonomic? They must be using mice in some different way from how I do.

True.

Personally, I don't find the one-button Apple mice comfortable at all. Quite possibly because I've been using two/multi-button mouses for as long as I've used computers, and most of them have been of the kind that is "shaped" for you hand. I've just become very accustomed to using them.

It's quite possible that things whould have been different if I had started out using Apple's mouse instead.

That's good advice... except sometimes it fails. Example: my stomach seems to be very out of tune w/ my brain. The result? I will go for more than 8 hours before realizing I really need to eat.

Haha! I have that problem too. :D


:(

mrsebastian
Oct 3, 2005, 11:39 AM
haven't gotten the mm, but it's on the list and i find this article amusing. i've only played with mm at the store, but it felt pretty good to me and to say you got cts from using a new mouse for a month is silly. it takes a good amount of time to get to that point. it's a degenerative process that takes most people years to see and feel the effects.

perhaps the author should consider why (in his own diagnosis) cts has occurred. when you play games (computer, ps2, etc.) and pay attention to your hands, you will find that the excitement of playing transfers into the actions of moving the controller and/or buttons... meaning you tend to press way to hard, though you don't need to. it's not like throwing a ball, where a stronger action makes a difference on performance. that said and since i'm not actually a doctor, i just play one on the internet, perhaps the author would be wise to learn some stretching techniques... damn, my hands are starting to hurt from typing on this "apple" keyboard! that's it, i'm suing apple for cts.

formicahjones
Oct 3, 2005, 03:23 PM
he has to be joking, getting carpal tunnel from lifting his pointer finger a centemeter in the air.

he must be lifting his finger 3 inches off the mouse..

applextrent
Oct 3, 2005, 06:32 PM
I am not suing Apple. I am not seeking anything from this article other than to raise question about the Mighty Mouse's design. I am aware that carpal tunnel syndrome has most likely been developing in my wrist for some time now and that its not possible for the Mighty Mouse to be the only thing that caused it. I am simply raising the idea that because of its obtuse design for performing a right-click the Mighty Mouse induces a higher probability of accelerating what was previously a benign condition. This is why in my article I ask the audience if they have been experiencing problems, and according to some comments and several e-mails I have received there are others who have experienced pain and suffered repetitive stress injuries due to Mighty Mouse use. I repeat: this is not an attack against Apple, I am not trying to spur traffic, or anything ridiculous like that. I am fortunate enough to be able to afford the medical care that I am now going to require. However, there may be someone out there not as fortunate and it is for them that I have raised these questions and concerns.

--Trent Lapinski
Senior Editor of AppleXnet.com

Sun Baked
Oct 3, 2005, 07:10 PM
Time for Apple to add a second button to the hockey puck mouse design, and reissue it for a free trade-in for anyone complaining about the Mighty Mouse.

Even swap high-tech tiny mouse for big low-tech hockey puck.

A win-win for everyone. :rolleyes:

Plus people are less likely to stick the hockey puck in their pocket and break it. ;)

Lacero
Oct 3, 2005, 07:10 PM
I tried using Apple's one button mouse in earnest when I got my G5. I really wanted to like it and prescribe to using Control for right-clicking. I really tried.

After a week, I gave up. I knew then I ********** hate Apple's one button mouse. It causes so much hand strain and was uncomfortable. I can imagine their Mighty Mouse might be the same way.

I now use MS Intellimouse multi-button with scroll and I love it. Can use it for hours on end with no fatigue.

winmacguy
Oct 3, 2005, 09:54 PM
That's good advice... except sometimes it fails. Example: my stomach seems to be very out of tune w/ my brain. The result? I will go for more than 8 hours before realizing I really need to eat. Of course by then, my blood sugar level is so low that my hands are literally shaking-- gosh darn my stomach! No warning grumbles! :p

But I agree, for something like hand fatigue related to mouse usage, I feel that there are your body's natural 'warning signals.'
I wish I had your problem devilot :eek:
My brain is fueled by my stomach :D