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MacBytes
Oct 13, 2005, 01:53 PM
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Category: Opinion/Interviews
Link: Every mainstream consumer doing typical tasks should consider Apple Mac (http://www.macbytes.com/link.php?sid=20051013145333)

Posted on MacBytes.com (http://www.macbytes.com)
Approved by Mudbug

mac 2005
Oct 13, 2005, 02:11 PM
The headline doesn't reflect the essence of the article. While the columnist makes that statement, he doesn't substantiate it.

I'd read the article -- hoping to send it along to some Mac-resistant people I know. How could they resist an objective source such as the Wall Street Journal.

All-too-easily in this case. The article focuses not on the virtues of the Mac vs. a Windows PC but on what hardware will likely be required to run Vista.

csubear
Oct 13, 2005, 02:11 PM
You also won't have to worry about Vista if you buy one of Apple Computer's Macintosh computers, which don't run Windows. Every mainstream consumer doing typical tasks should consider the Mac. Its operating system, called Tiger, is better and much more secure than Windows XP, and already contains most of the key features promised for Vista


Slam! In other words buy a mac :)

Stella
Oct 13, 2005, 02:25 PM
The revamped iMacs are an excellent buy - very fast, good display, excellent quality web cam, and a good software bundle.

For day to day tasks, email, internet etc, word processing, a PC + Windows would be hard pressed to surpass the iMac. ( Apart from people who want a "$400" PC, i.e., where price is crucial. ).

MacFan782040
Oct 13, 2005, 02:35 PM
90% of that article was about Vista. It was like here's stuff about vista, oh btw, and if you don't want crap, consider a mac. Vista's new features are....

mainstreetmark
Oct 13, 2005, 03:48 PM
To be perfectly clear, the title of the article is "What PC to Buy If You Are Planning On a Vista Upgrade", not "Every mainstream consumer doing typical tasks should consider Apple Mac", which made it as the macbytes headline.

This article is clearly targeted to PC users wishing to purchase another PC.

winmacguy
Oct 13, 2005, 04:08 PM
To be perfectly clear, the title of the article is "What PC to Buy If You Are Planning On a Vista Upgrade", not "Every mainstream consumer doing typical tasks should consider Apple Mac", which made it as the macbytes headline.

This article is clearly targeted to PC users wishing to purchase another PC.
The headline was to grab everybodies attention which is why I used it. I was impressed to see that even WSJ is pointing PC customers to the better option of a Mac when they are looking at purchasing Vista.

orion123
Oct 13, 2005, 04:20 PM
The headline doesn't reflect the essence of the article. While the columnist makes that statement, he doesn't substantiate it.

I'd read the article -- hoping to send it along to some Mac-resistant people I know. How could they resist an objective source such as the Wall Street Journal.

It's written by Mossberg. Search around for his other articles in the WSJ and I'm sure you'll see plenty of long diatribes about why the Mac is better. He's a very trusted source and tends to come down on the Mac side.

I feel like the fact that every "What PC to Buy?" article these days mentions a Mac as a good option is a great sign.

nagromme
Oct 13, 2005, 04:53 PM
In a way it's even BETTER for Mac to get this kind of mention than to get a Mac-focussed article.

A Windows-focussed article, all about Windows and how Windows users can best keep on using Windows for years to come. But Apple gets mentioned, in no uncertain terms, as a likely better option! A message that is slowly going to trickle through to some people fed up with Windows.

That kind of aside is gold. Imagine if an article a year before Tiger's release had a note saying, "but Windows Vista is already out and much better anyway." Ouch!

iMeowbot
Oct 13, 2005, 05:43 PM
The headline doesn't reflect the essence of the article. While the columnist makes that statement, he doesn't substantiate it.
Yep, and it's not the real headline either. Some clown keeps submitting articles to Macbytes with the titles doctored to include outrageous spin and/or flamebait.

winmacguy
Oct 13, 2005, 06:02 PM
Yep, and it's not the real headline either. Some clown keeps submitting articles to Macbytes with the titles doctored to include outrageous spin and/or flamebait.
Flamebait headings aside it is still good to see Apple getting reputable mention in an article talking about the up and coming features of Vista. :)

Edit: I have to say after taking a second look at the heading and talking to lots of people in different stores that I agree with it. The fact that our lives not only revolve around spreadsheets and word documents (95% population) but also ripping CD tracks, viewing photos/movies etc. All of which the Mac is ideally suited. It is only people's perception and familiarity that slows them from making a Mac purchase over a PC purchase in the store.

SummerBreeze
Oct 13, 2005, 06:26 PM
I liked the article. They never had to mention the Mac, since the article was about the PC. The fact that they did shows how far Apple has come lately.

nagromme
Oct 14, 2005, 01:36 AM
To defend the submitter (NOT me, for the record :) ), when you submit an article at MacBytes, it doesn't ask for "the headline" it asks for a description (and in fact has a pretty large box to create one in).

So using the description to highlight what's interesting to people here makes good sense, instead of just repeating the headline. (The original headline might often give no hint of what makes the article of interest.)

I don't see this headline as flamebait, just as calling out what makes the link worth submitting.

iMeowbot
Oct 14, 2005, 02:04 AM
I don't see this headline as flamebait, just as calling out what makes the link worth submitting.
This example was all spin, although other recent submissions have been outright flamebait. I've no problem with a headline that is changed for clarity or to point out relevancy, but that is not what is being done here. It's destroying context to change the author's intent.

nagromme
Oct 14, 2005, 10:25 AM
I agree--I just think it's not clear when you submit an article that the description SHOULD follow the author's intent. Following what makes it interesting to Mac users instead has a certain logic, since you also get the author's headline anyway.

(This posting, for instance, WAS of interest to me, and I'd never have clicked it without knowing in advance why it was posted. And since I DID appreciate the link, I felt it would be nice to defend the poster who was being called names. Possibly for something they didn't intend to cause offense with.)

mainstreetmark
Oct 14, 2005, 02:53 PM
I think the macbyte reader should take more care to remember that the links on macbytes are not the article headlines. They're statements. The submitter did perfectly fine - pointing out that there's some mac stuff in there. It's the readers who decided that the article didn't have enough to do with Macs (since, it turned out, it was a PC article)