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MacRumors
Feb 28, 2013, 10:27 AM
http://images.macrumors.com/im/macrumorsthreadlogo.gif (http://www.macrumors.com/2013/02/28/what-apples-and-googles-headquarters-plans-reveal-about-their-cultures/)


The very different designs for Apple's and Google's planned headquarters buildings are a reflection of their corporate personalities, argues a professor of architecture at the University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee.

In an interview with Professor Brian Schermer (http://qz.com/57399/apples-monolithic-beauty-vs-googles-chaos-what-new-headquarters-reveal-about-their-personalities/) by digital news site Quartz (via Business Insider (http://www.businessinsider.com/apples-monolithic-beauty-vs-googles-chaos-what-new-hqs-reveal-about-their-personalities-2013-2)), the workplace design expert comments on the two companies' respective plans for their new headquarter buildings.

http://images.macrumors.com/article-new/2013/02/apple-2-800x426.png
Apple is ... inscrutable. We don't see the interiors. I have no idea how Apple would organize the building into different work groups. [It] is very tightly controlled. Maybe the Apple employee is somebody who's attracted to that pure, shared vision -- the Jony Ive aesthetic. [It is] an architecture that [one] is meant to behold. The company is shooting for timeless beauty.
http://images.macrumors.com/article-new/2013/02/google_bayview_wp-800x451.png
Google's business is somewhat sprawling and disheveled. They started off with search, and now they are getting into hardware, like Pixel and Google Glass. Similarly, their next campus is a thicket of ideas and places to be. The Google vision is perhaps to recruit people who are attracted to the serendipity of messiness. Architecture can be a very abstract language, but Google is wearing its heart on its sleeve. It's trying to say that you can really inhabit this space.Apple CEO Tim Cook mentioned Apple's new campus (http://www.macrumors.com/2013/02/27/apple-2013-shareholders-meeting-directors-reelected-company-working-on-new-categories/) at yesterday's shareholders meeting, reiterating that Apple plans to move into the facility in 2016, with construction potentially beginning later this year.

Article Link: What Apple's and Google's Headquarters Plans Reveal About Their Cultures (http://www.macrumors.com/2013/02/28/what-apples-and-googles-headquarters-plans-reveal-about-their-cultures/)



vmachiel
Feb 28, 2013, 10:34 AM
Well, you can analyze everything I guess..

Prof.
Feb 28, 2013, 10:38 AM
The OCD professional adult in me likes Apple's campus more because it's organized and clean. The crazy rambunctious kid in me, however likes Google's campus more.

Honestly, depending on my mood i'd like to work at both campuses.

Eugene-DL
Feb 28, 2013, 10:38 AM
Apple - Connected ecosystem
Google - Fragmented (even their ideas are this and that)

Both look stunning in their own ways, I think.

tekno
Feb 28, 2013, 10:43 AM
Odd thing to analyze. But looking at Apple's design it is very "Get lost and don't look in here".

abhishake
Feb 28, 2013, 10:43 AM
This is worthy of the front page over so many other posts lol

shartypants
Feb 28, 2013, 10:47 AM
Apple - Connected ecosystem
Google - Fragmented (even their ideas are this and that)

I agree. Apple's is like a Closed system, but looks awesome and is more functional. Google's is more open, but yes, fragmented.

Rogifan
Feb 28, 2013, 10:48 AM
What a silly article. No wonder it came from Business Insider. :rolleyes:

notjustjay
Feb 28, 2013, 10:52 AM
I agree. Apple's is like a Closed system, but looks awesome and is more functional. Google's is more open, but yes, fragmented.

Apple seems to be a very top-down, driven company. The people at the top have a very precise idea of exactly what they want -- Steve Jobs was the penultimate example -- and the rest of the company strives to make it happen.

Google strikes me as the opposite. They have some general goals, but employees are encouraged to experiment. "Hey, I have an idea that could be great!" And they're willing to try lots of things, hoping to stumble upon something great.

Both approaches have different strengths and weaknesses. The Google approach means they try lots of things that don't really work, possibly wasting time and money, but the employees at least feel like their time and input are valued.

With the Apple approach, if they get it right, it works beautifully and it really helps their image as this magical company that churns out hit after hit and can do no wrong (because we don't get to see the ones that didn't make it out of their labs), but then you get all these comments about how they're "not innovating" because we don't see, and don't know, what's going on in there. Also, if/when Ives & Cook guess something wrong, once the market isn't quick to embrace their latest and greatest, that could be the beginning of a slippery slope.

Eugene-DL
Feb 28, 2013, 10:54 AM
I agree. Apple's is like a Closed system, but looks awesome and is more functional. Google's is more open, but yes, fragmented.

Definitely! Google's Headquarters look like a high-end commercial centre IMHO.

false
Feb 28, 2013, 11:00 AM
I think Apples building design reflects more on their address rather than culture. Their campus is on Infinite Loop (St. Rd.?) A circle is a representation of an infinite loop.

UnfetteredMind
Feb 28, 2013, 11:02 AM
It would have been funny if the new Google headquarters was a single long, phallic shaped building, then we could have seen much better how the two companies interrelate :)

notjustjay
Feb 28, 2013, 11:08 AM
It would have been funny if the new Google headquarters was a single long, phallic shaped building, then we could have seen much better how the two companies interrelate :)

*insert obligatory Samsung reference*

The Bulge
Feb 28, 2013, 11:13 AM
That Google campus? ****ing mess.

bretm
Feb 28, 2013, 11:27 AM
I knew I'd seen this before! Yeah, they blew this place up after the 96 Olympics in ATL.

https://encrypted-tbn1.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTDQWB9AbQketI5jW67XNOTUJnDjuoJQVkHX8XjIS38AtWoD1unuw

JM-Prod
Feb 28, 2013, 11:34 AM
What a silly article. No wonder it came from Business Insider. :rolleyes:

No, it's not.

Almost all our choices are based on some inner personality, this is also true for organisations, and especially in relation to architecture...

needfx
Feb 28, 2013, 11:48 AM
google could not have a similar campus to apple's; too many lawsuits at hand to add another

M-O
Feb 28, 2013, 11:50 AM
Apple has style.

AlphaHumanus
Feb 28, 2013, 11:53 AM
No, it's not.

Almost all our choices are based on some inner personality, this is also true for organisations, and especially in relation to architecture...

Agreed.

Googles campus looks like *****. I mean its neat and all; I do see the appeal and it would be an awesome thing to visit in person, let alone work there. But it just reminds me of a high school art project, not a serious architectural design.

I guess that why I like apple so much? The cold, calculated design aesthetic, the "pure" vision. Ruthless perfection.

Mac-Mariachi
Feb 28, 2013, 11:56 AM
Google´s campus looks like a Disneyworld Resort, not that that is a bad thing. But Apple´s building is beautiful and iconic, just like everything else they make.

bandalay
Feb 28, 2013, 11:58 AM
Doesn't the Apple design feature continuous glass around the entire perimeter?

http://www.cupertino.org/Modules/ShowImage.aspx?imageid=2323
http://www.cupertino.org/Modules/ShowImage.aspx?imageid=2322

Analyzing architecture like this is akin to phrenology.

smithrh
Feb 28, 2013, 12:02 PM
Analyzing architecture like this is akin to phrenology.

Props for the phrenology mention...

johncrab
Feb 28, 2013, 12:03 PM
Apple - Connected ecosystem
Google - Fragmented (even their ideas are this and that)

I was thinking the word "fragmented" also.

SockRolid
Feb 28, 2013, 12:11 PM
Architecture can be a very abstract language, but Google is wearing its heart on its sleeve.

"The only problem with Microsoft is they just have no taste."
- Steve Jobs, 1995

This is also Google's problem.

You're either born with an aesthetic sense or you're not.
Sorry Google. You weren't.

IJ Reilly
Feb 28, 2013, 12:14 PM
Well, you can analyze everything I guess..

Architecture has been an important part of human culture for millennia. So yes, you can analyze it.

eltaurus
Feb 28, 2013, 12:16 PM
Apple - Connected ecosystem
Google - Fragmented (even their ideas are this and that)

Exactly

IJ Reilly
Feb 28, 2013, 12:21 PM
Props for the phrenology mention...

Inappropriate though it may be.

Apple's campus also has to be seen as a monument to Steve, it's his aesthetic through and through. At the same time, Steve's aesthetic is engrained in the company's culture, so in that sense the building still fits Apple's image.

Architecture as corporate image, though... this concept is fraught with practical problems. Corporations have often tried to use their headquarters buildings as logos, with very mixed success. Failure, mainly.

Chupa Chupa
Feb 28, 2013, 12:22 PM
I knew I'd seen this before! Yeah, they blew this place up after the 96 Olympics in ATL.



That's because it was a dated POS stadium like the rest of the 1960s era multi-purpose ashtray stadiums. Jack of all trades, master of none.

But I'm not sure what a bad stadium design has to do with Apple's building design, or say a slightly older infinite loop shaped office building, the world's largest... The Pentagon.

globalhemp
Feb 28, 2013, 12:28 PM
Apple's new headquarters resembles the name of the street address of its current headquarters -- One Infinite Loop.

On the other hand, the circular design is reminiscent of the United Kingdom's GCHQ -- which is the "listening headquarters" of the UK. In other words, the building where "Big Brother is watching you." The UK's equivalent of the US's NSA.

http://static.guim.co.uk/sys-images/Society/Pix/pictures/2008/04/15/GCHQ.jpg

http://www.gchq.gov.uk/Pages/homepage.aspx

There is a negative connotation with this in today's world when you think of CISPA and SOPA which can best be portrayed in the 1998 movie "Enemy of the State" where actor Gene Hackman refers to the NSA's supercomputers use in "Project Echelon."

I'm not saying Apple is "Big Brother" ... what I am saying is that its rather difficult for me to view the building and not think about the original circular shaped building located in the UK.

Eric E. Schmidt
Feb 28, 2013, 12:38 PM
apple's campus is a mix between george clintons funkiest dream and "we're too good for this planet, beam us up".

i'm sure the roof panels can be arranged in patterns as a means to communicate with the fleet.

ianGr
Feb 28, 2013, 12:43 PM
With the Apple Infinite Loop design you can continually travel inside in either direction. It is philosophically perfect and congruent with their address at 1 Infinite Loop, so where exactly will this be, because they will undoubtedly want even their address to be philosophically perfect and beautiful.

Points to Apple also for the solar panels entirely covering the roof.

Someone noted the similarity between the Apple circle and the Atlanta Olympic stadium, but I guess that means it is also similar to every other circle in the universe. :) In contrast, Google's headquarters is more like the London Olympics LOGO! :p

Ahheck01
Feb 28, 2013, 12:46 PM
"Ultimately, it comes down to taste." ~Steve Jobs

ianGr
Feb 28, 2013, 12:46 PM
where exactly will this be, because they will undoubtedly want even their address to be philosophically perfect and beautiful.

88 Infinite Loop ??

sc4rf4c3
Feb 28, 2013, 12:49 PM
I hate to say this but Google's HQ looks like a housing project.

notjustjay
Feb 28, 2013, 12:51 PM
You're either born with an aesthetic sense or you're not.
Sorry Google. You weren't.

Technically, neither was Apple.

Shrink
Feb 28, 2013, 01:01 PM
D
Analyzing architecture like this is akin to phrenology.

Props for the phrenology mention...

Inappropriate though it may be.

Thanks, IJ Reilly, you got there before me.:D

I don't get the phrenology reference at all.:confused:

Rogifan
Feb 28, 2013, 01:05 PM
Apple seems to be a very top-down, driven company. The people at the top have a very precise idea of exactly what they want -- Steve Jobs was the penultimate example -- and the rest of the company strives to make it happen.

Google strikes me as the opposite. They have some general goals, but employees are encouraged to experiment. "Hey, I have an idea that could be great!" And they're willing to try lots of things, hoping to stumble upon something great.

Both approaches have different strengths and weaknesses. The Google approach means they try lots of things that don't really work, possibly wasting time and money, but the employees at least feel like their time and input are valued.

With the Apple approach, if they get it right, it works beautifully and it really helps their image as this magical company that churns out hit after hit and can do no wrong (because we don't get to see the ones that didn't make it out of their labs), but then you get all these comments about how they're "not innovating" because we don't see, and don't know, what's going on in there. Also, if/when Ives & Cook guess something wrong, once the market isn't quick to embrace their latest and greatest, that could be the beginning of a slippery slope.

From Tim Cook's Bloomberg/Businessweek interview (http://www.businessweek.com/articles/2012-12-06/tim-cooks-freshman-year-the-apple-ceo-speaks) last December:

How do you interact with design? You don’t have meetings. You don’t have a formal process. Do you just wander down, and you and Jony look at stuff?

I wouldn’t say we don’t have meetings. I wouldn’t go that far. I’m talking about how the kernels of ideas are born. We want ideas coming from all of our 80,000 people, not five or three. A much smaller number of people have to decide and edit and move forward, but you want ideas coming from everywhere. You want people to explore. So that’s what I was talking about before.

IJ Reilly
Feb 28, 2013, 01:10 PM
Thanks, IJ Reilly, you got there before me.:D

I don't get the phrenology reference at all.:confused:

A reference to pseudoscience, I presume. Nearly everyone spends most of their lives inhabiting buildings created by people with deliberation and intent -- and yet, many still seem to believe that architecture is random and without discernible symbolism or meaning.

monkor
Feb 28, 2013, 01:12 PM
This is perhaps the dumbest article I've read that's been featured on this site. This is like Soviet propaganda, especially considering one picture is a freaking sketch and the other is a filtered wonder. What kind of emotions do you expect a reader to have? The Large Hadron Collider looks like a disheveled mess too, and it's perhaps one of the most impressive things ever built and in it? Some pretty incredible ideas.

tdtran1025
Feb 28, 2013, 01:16 PM
Scientific discoveries are mostly acts of serendipity. Rigid mentality at best can only usher professionalism. Let's how it pans out.

xxnemoxx
Feb 28, 2013, 01:16 PM
I'd love to ride my scooter, skateboard, or bike in circles at the Apple Campus lol

ArtOfWarfare
Feb 28, 2013, 01:23 PM
Google, dotting the space with the same stupid shape again and again.

CrickettGrrrl
Feb 28, 2013, 01:27 PM
The professor sounds more like an astrologer doing Apple & Google horoscopes than an architectural analysis. :rolleyes:

IJ Reilly
Feb 28, 2013, 01:36 PM
A reference to pseudoscience, I presume. Nearly everyone spends most of their lives inhabiting buildings created by people with deliberation and intent -- and yet, many still seem to believe that architecture is random and without discernible symbolism or meaning.

The professor sounds more like an astrologer doing Apple & Google horoscopes than an architectural analysis. :rolleyes:

And there we go.

ThunderSkunk
Feb 28, 2013, 01:52 PM
Keep in mind, renderings always look considerably better than the finished product.

Whenever you see atrocious tenaments, somewhere on a shelf there's a beautiful artistic rendering showing it draped in lush greenery and gleaming in the sunshine.

On a bad day, Apples design will still look how it looks on a good day.
On a bad day, Googles will look like urban sprawl.

samcraig
Feb 28, 2013, 01:58 PM
So what will Samsung's new campus look like?

macUser2007
Feb 28, 2013, 02:24 PM
The design of each campus reflects the taste and esthetic vision of the leaders of each company.

And it does seem to closely correspond to the design sense of the founders of each company.

But Jobs is no longer alive (although Ive seems to be carrying the torch now) and Google did hire some rather talented designers for Android, such as Matias Duarte.

Duarte doesn't quite have the clean design sensibilities of Ive, but Android is at least moving in the right direction esthetically (which MS never did).

Chimp
Feb 28, 2013, 02:31 PM
You're either born with an aesthetic sense or you're not.


What a load of elitist drivel. Apple do hold design in high regard, and its part of why I love their products but you're talking absolute nonsense. You aren't born with aesthetic sense, you develop it. Obviously, if you've got to adulthood and not developed it by that point, it's probably not going to come but to posit that it's something you're born with is utter nonsense. Grow up.

0815
Feb 28, 2013, 02:59 PM
So what will Samsung's new campus look like?

It will look like Apples campus - but have a much bigger radius ... and they will call it a new invention.

They will also use cheap plastic instead of the continues high quality glass windows.

iMacFarlane
Feb 28, 2013, 03:08 PM
I think Apples building design reflects more on their address rather than culture. Their campus is on Infinite Loop (St. Rd.?) A circle is a representation of an infinite loop.

The address is 1 Infinite Loop. There is no street, road, lane, boulevard, way, or bypass. Loop is commonly used in naming streets that, well, are loops.

I remember the first time I saw the address, I thought it was brilliant. Props to the programmers!

JM-Prod
Feb 28, 2013, 03:11 PM
This is perhaps the dumbest article I've read that's been featured on this site. This is like Soviet propaganda, especially considering one picture is a freaking sketch and the other is a filtered wonder. What kind of emotions do you expect a reader to have? The Large Hadron Collider looks like a disheveled mess too, and it's perhaps one of the most impressive things ever built and in it? Some pretty incredible ideas.

Hmm, this is perhaps the dumbest post I've read. The article use available renderings. And I, nor most of the posters seems to agree with you that the Google campus rendering is unfavourable. It looks genuinely playful and fits google's image. The Apple campus is half-kitch, half-elegance, like most of their products. Where is the propaganda?

Krazy Bill
Feb 28, 2013, 03:17 PM
Apple's new campus will have a daycare. There are no corners for the misbehaving urchins of Execs to kneel in with this design:eek:

rmwebs
Feb 28, 2013, 03:26 PM
Apple - Connected ecosystem
Google - Fragmented (even their ideas are this and that)

obviously people can look into things WAY too much....however I saw it as this:

Apple - Cold, closed and controlling
Google - Organised (each department group in their own buildings), messy, open.

Rajani Isa
Feb 28, 2013, 04:00 PM
I hate to say this but Google's HQ looks like a housing project.
Hardly. Not a single building without a curve in it's layout. Horrible use of space for a housing project considering those are typically made with the intent fitting as many units in as you can.
Apple's new headquarters resembles the name of the street address of its current headquarters -- One Infinite Loop.

On the other hand, the circular design is reminiscent of the United Kingdom's GCHQ -- which is the "listening headquarters" of the UK. In other words, the building where "Big Brother is watching you." The UK's equivalent of the US's NSA.


There is a negative connotation with this in today's world when you think of CISPA and SOPA which can best be portrayed in the 1998 movie "Enemy of the State" where actor Gene Hackman refers to the NSA's supercomputers use in "Project Echelon."

I'm not saying Apple is "Big Brother" ... what I am saying is that its rather difficult for me to view the building and not think about the original circular shaped building located in the UK.

Admittedly I had not seen that building before, but Apple's reminds me more of the old forest or launch arcologies from Sim City 2000

judge2005
Feb 28, 2013, 04:01 PM
I would lay money on Apple's campus never getting started, or at the very least, never getting finished. It is an all-or-nothing monument to hubris.

In Google's case they can afford to build some or all of it and adapt to changing conditions as they go.

UnfetteredMind
Feb 28, 2013, 04:29 PM
So what will Samsung's new campus look like?

Aren't they building one in CA? It would be interesting to see.

EDIT: Sounds like expansion: http://techcrunch.com/2012/12/29/samsung-to-build-a-massive-rd-complex-in-silicon-valley/

“Samsung’s expansion in California is great news and it further strengthens the state’s role as a world leader in innovation,” said California Governor Jerry Brown, in a statement back in August. “Here’s a case where government and business work together—and everyone benefits.”

Astroexe
Feb 28, 2013, 05:05 PM
To me, Google's headquarters are shaped more like arrows pointing inwards and around, compared to Apple's singular Loop.

When you compare this, obviously aesthetically it gives and impression, but what about for the people actually /working/ there? How do people move about in those spaces?

I'm an apple lover at heart, but I'm not going to lie about wanting to work in an office-type environment similar to that of Google's. Utilising different zones and 'break-out' spaces, categorising and theming different floors and offices with unique features to inspire the individuals inside is fundamental to keeping creative people on-the-go. There is Architecture in that, it's new, it's forward thinking and it's really radical.
Apple's however, its secretive and, though I know some of the mentioned above elements may be true (just no-one has seen much of the inside spaces, there never really has been a need to.) How do people move from one side to the other? What "clusters" fit together? Is there a hierarchy here? The team working on the design here were definitely focusing on making a piece which is timeless and iconic -- much like all of Apple's products and ecosystem in fact.


Stripping the companies from the buildings, though, if you do a little more research into the way these spaces have been made (regardless of what actual products they're trying to achieve are) the work environments inspire totally different things from their users and are inspiring and displaying very different approaches to work. This is what's fascinating to me.

Ryth
Feb 28, 2013, 05:11 PM
There's a reason Apple chose a circle.

Connected Ecosystem...from products to software.

acslater017
Feb 28, 2013, 05:15 PM
Analyzing architecture like this is akin to phrenology.

Hardly. A company's building and layout is absolutely indicative of their culture and mentality. It tells you their level of openness, their acceptance to serendipitous encounters between groups and co-workers, and of course displays their aesthetic preferences. Not really comparable to phrenology, a discredited psudoscience.

notjustjay
Feb 28, 2013, 05:26 PM
I wouldn’t say we don’t have meetings. I wouldn’t go that far. I’m talking about how the kernels of ideas are born. We want ideas coming from all of our 80,000 people, not five or three. A much smaller number of people have to decide and edit and move forward, but you want ideas coming from everywhere. You want people to explore. So that’s what I was talking about before.

Sure, but how does that translate into the real world? Google says "go ahead, explore your idea on company time, see what happens". I get the impression Apple would say "That's great that you have an idea, but we really need you focused on the development of the iPhone 6."

Disclaimer: I don't work at either company, so obviously I don't know first hand, I'm only inferring based on the stories I hear. I do know a few people who work(ed) at Apple.

calaverasgrande
Feb 28, 2013, 05:36 PM
I'd rather work at Google. If I had to get to a meeting in a another dept, I am confident that I could walk there as-the-bird-fliles, judging by that rendering.
The Apple building looks like it would be an endless long hallway, constantly counting the door numbers until you get to "red 11-A" and not "orange 11-A".
Square buildings may look dorky, but these various architectural stunts are a PITA to navigate.

SlugBlanket
Feb 28, 2013, 08:30 PM
Apple's new headquarters resembles the name of the street address of its current headquarters -- One Infinite Loop.

On the other hand, the circular design is reminiscent of the United Kingdom's GCHQ -- which is the "listening headquarters" of the UK. In other words, the building where "Big Brother is watching you." The UK's equivalent of the US's NSA.

Image (http://static.guim.co.uk/sys-images/Society/Pix/pictures/2008/04/15/GCHQ.jpg)

http://www.gchq.gov.uk/Pages/homepage.aspx

There is a negative connotation with this in today's world when you think of CISPA and SOPA which can best be portrayed in the 1998 movie "Enemy of the State" where actor Gene Hackman refers to the NSA's supercomputers use in "Project Echelon."

I'm not saying Apple is "Big Brother" ... what I am saying is that its rather difficult for me to view the building and not think about the original circular shaped building located in the UK.

Both circular buildings and both organisations highly secretive (dons tin foil hat and starts to develop an implausible and yet by its very nature, a plausible conspiracy theory). :)

lotzosushi
Feb 28, 2013, 08:54 PM
It would be cool if there was a rounded square pathway or something in the middle courtyard at the Apple building. Then it would look like a giant home button from the sky!

user418
Feb 28, 2013, 11:24 PM
The Apple structure looks clean and well defined in my opinion while the Google structure looks like a fragmented airport. Either way, they both are spending big bucks. Lets hope some great new ideas and products are released from both.

mrxak
Mar 1, 2013, 12:06 AM
I'd rather work at Google. If I had to get to a meeting in a another dept, I am confident that I could walk there as-the-bird-fliles, judging by that rendering.
The Apple building looks like it would be an endless long hallway, constantly counting the door numbers until you get to "red 11-A" and not "orange 11-A".
Square buildings may look dorky, but these various architectural stunts are a PITA to navigate.

Or you can walk across through the center, like any other building with a courtyard. At any rate, Apple's teams are kept largely isolated from one another, as part of their secrecy. If you work at Apple, you go to your part of the spaceship, and that's that. I'm sure related teams are close to each other, and mostly it's the high level executives that actually need to visit various areas in a given day.

And hey, let's not forget Apple's emphasis on video chat. I'm sure these people can easily fire up Messages or FaceTime if they have to.

simonmet
Mar 1, 2013, 06:12 AM
Please tell me there'll be a giant circular travelator!!! People could hop on and off to get around the building or stop and chat while admiring the view around 360 degrees! They could have rest bars on it so people that want to stop don't get in the way of walkers...

That would be brilliant!!!

I find Apple's building to be harmonious, thoughtful and beautiful. A statement of purpose and longevity and of creating a utopian future. Google's is disjointed, jarring and disorganised like they don't really know where they're going or want to go.

MonkeySee....
Mar 1, 2013, 06:20 AM
I hate to say this but Google's HQ looks like a housing project.

I was thinking more of a Holiday Restort.

notjustjay
Mar 1, 2013, 09:30 AM
It may also help to keep in perspective that a nice looking workplace could be, but is not necessarily, an indicator of what it's like to work there.

I remember interviewing for a software engineering position, and being really impressed by the lab space I was being shown. The entrance to the lab was in a giant all-glass wall, with the company logo tastefully acid-etched into the panels. Inside, the lab was clean, brightly lit, wires were run cleanly, employees were smiling and watching "The Lord of the Rings" on a laptop while they were working.

I remember thinking "Wow, this is so nice, I could definitely work here".

Well, that company was Nortel. I think everyone knows how that one turned out.

McOndo
Mar 1, 2013, 10:00 AM
Apple's campus is stupid, and makes not a lick of sense. Circular? With buildings on the perimeter? It's almost as if they want to separate their employees as much as possible.

And yes, I felt compelled to register just to post this. It's atrocious. They should level the courtyard and place a windowed tower in the center, they'd at least have a serviceable panopticon then. :apple:

Drunken Master
Mar 1, 2013, 10:42 AM
Apple's campus is stupid, and makes not a lick of sense. Circular? With buildings on the perimeter? It's almost as if they want to separate their employees as much as possible.

And yes, I felt compelled to register just to post this. It's atrocious. They should level the courtyard and place a windowed tower in the center, they'd at least have a serviceable panopticon then.

What is this, a prison?

Gasu E.
Mar 1, 2013, 11:14 AM
Apple's campus also has to be seen as a monument to Steve,.

Yes. It's a circle, so it has a center point. Which in this case, is missing.

----------

So what will Samsung's new campus look like?
A really, really, really big circle.

IJ Reilly
Mar 1, 2013, 12:02 PM
Apple's campus is stupid, and makes not a lick of sense. Circular? With buildings on the perimeter? It's almost as if they want to separate their employees as much as possible.

And yes, I felt compelled to register just to post this. It's atrocious. They should level the courtyard and place a windowed tower in the center, they'd at least have a serviceable panopticon then. :apple:

What is this, a prison?

Not a prison by function, it only employes similar visual cues and spacial organization. If anyone from the architect's office had these concerns about the architectural imagery, I doubt they'd have expressed them to Steve Jobs. They'd have walked out of that meeting with their head in their back pocket.

The real tragedy of this building is that it's retrograde as both architecture and land planning. It harkens back to the day when corporate campuses were monumental and isolated from the urban grid. This concept fell out of favor 30 years ago. It took Apple to revive it in such a big way.

Yes. It's a circle, so it has a center point. Which in this case, is missing.

But just think how nice it will look from the air.

ApfelKuchen
Mar 1, 2013, 02:55 PM
I'm more intrigued by what the style of the renderings might have to say.

As others have mentioned, the Google drawings look like a Disney architectural rendering for one of their Value resorts (Pop Century and Art of Animation in particular). The intended audience is the end-users, "You'll have fun vacationing... uh, working here."

The Apple drawings take an inspirational approach, especially with that low-angle bright sun (cue the choir of angels). You could almost say the halo has a halo. I don't think it's aimed at the end-user in particular. The point is to inspire a feeling about the company that speaks to the public, investors, customers, Wall St. analysts, and city planning commission members. From the standpoint of the prospective or current employee, it's not whether the building will be a great place to work, but that Apple is a great company to work for, whether you work in the capitol building or the Ulaanbaatar retail store.

craftytony
Mar 1, 2013, 03:13 PM
I think they both look great, but aesthetically Apple's iconic work of art will be the one that is remembered and have photos of if published in architecture magazines/sites everywhere.

I'd bet once these are both built, Google's building will be surrounded by parking lots, and Apple's will still have all the trees around it.

http://cultofmac.cultofmaccom.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/12/renderingfull.jpg

SockRolid
Mar 4, 2013, 12:19 PM
What a load of elitist drivel. Apple do hold design in high regard, and its part of why I love their products but you're talking absolute nonsense. You aren't born with aesthetic sense, you develop it. Obviously, if you've got to adulthood and not developed it by that point, it's probably not going to come but to posit that it's something you're born with is utter nonsense. Grow up.

So you're saying that everyone could be the next Leonardo DaVinci?
Not just anyone but everyone. Riiiiiggggghhhhtttt.

"Leonardo Da Vinci combined art and science and aesthetics and engineering, that kind of unity is needed once again."
- Ben Shneiderman

Why can't we all just get along?

knucklehead
Mar 4, 2013, 05:10 PM
A reference to pseudoscience, I presume. Nearly everyone spends most of their lives inhabiting buildings created by people with deliberation and intent -- and yet, many still seem to believe that architecture is random and without discernible symbolism or meaning

If you stop confusing the bolded part with science, you'll have a chance of getting what folks are referring to here.

davidinva
Mar 4, 2013, 05:28 PM
I look at Apple's facility and can't help thinking maybe those "Ancient Astronaut Theorists" are on to something.

IJ Reilly
Mar 4, 2013, 06:39 PM
If you stop confusing the bolded part with science, you'll have a chance of getting what folks are referring to here.

My apologies. Obviously you understand architecture better than I do. I can see now that you've made quite study of it.

knucklehead
Mar 4, 2013, 06:51 PM
My apologies. Obviously you understand architecture better than I do. I can see now that you've made quite study of it.

Your apology is accepted (and indeed, there is tons to apologize for... ). Yes, I actually do know, and work with architects all the time -- Having to deal with their artsy fartsy flako social construct oriented view of the world, and try and actualize it into something that functions in the actual physical world is how I make my living.

SCIENCE -- Google it!

(Phrenology is is but one good example of " THE PROBLEM")

IJ Reilly
Mar 4, 2013, 07:20 PM
Your apology is accepted (and indeed, there is tons to apologize for... ). Yes, I actually do know, and work with architects all the time -- Having to deal with their artsy fartsy flako social construct oriented view of the world, and try and actualize it into something that functions in the actual physical world is how I make my living.

SCIENCE -- Google it!

(Phrenology is is but one good example of " THE PROBLEM")

I did. Science: "the limit of your knowledge" wasn't the definition.

knucklehead
Mar 4, 2013, 07:34 PM
I did. Science: "the limit of your knowledge" wasn't the definition.

Then stick to the unfettered cranking out of prose -- Why bother it's pretending to be anything else? (other than to make yourself feel good, of course --- what higher purpose could there be?)

Actually, "How I feel about this building rendered through interpretive dance" would be much more honest than prose. Words ... can easily be confused with an actual rigorous intellectual attempt at connection with the subject matter.

IJ Reilly
Mar 4, 2013, 08:20 PM
Then stick to the unfettered cranking out of prose -- Why bother it's pretending to be anything else? (other than to make yourself feel good, of course --- what higher purpose could there be?)

Actually, "How I feel about this building rendered through interpretive dance" would be much more honest than prose. Words ... can easily be confused with an actual rigorous intellectual attempt at connection with the subject matter.

Lovely attitude you got on display. Consider keeping it to yourself.

Solomani
Mar 4, 2013, 08:57 PM
I can't say that I either like or dislike Google's campus aesthetic, tho it looks very typical of any other 'corporate' campus. It could very well be IBM or Ford's or WalMart's HQ.

I do know that Samsung's future campus HQ will also look like a circular spaceship. But it will be bigger (i.e. Mothership). And have more buttons. ;)

tech4all
Mar 5, 2013, 08:10 PM
Apple - Connected ecosystem
Google - Fragmented (even their ideas are this and that)

Both look stunning in their own ways, I think.

Or...

The Apple campus looks and functions like a hamster wheel (a nice looking one that is). It's moving and doing things, but really, not moving forward.

The Google campus looks like they're not about not being boring and trying new things. There's more shapes besides a triangle, square or this case a circle.

Bubba Satori
Mar 5, 2013, 10:03 PM
Apple has style.

Yes, monolithic Stalinist style.
Probably what KGB headquarters would look like if built today.
The Google campus is a free flowing variety of structures with
human space between buildings and a variety of interesting shapes.

One is totalitarian butt ugly and the other has an open and playful look.
The one looks like a structure for the drones in the 1984 commercial,
the other could be the setting for the uplifting 'I'd like to teach the world to sing' anthem.

The Cupertino campus could be stood on it's side with the eye of Sauron in it.
and be the perfect expression of the mentality of the corporation occupying it.

simonmet
Mar 6, 2013, 02:16 AM
Apple's campus is stupid, and makes not a lick of sense. Circular? With buildings on the perimeter? It's almost as if they want to separate their employees as much as possible.

And that's a bad thing because??? I've worked in several overcrowded, boxy buildings where all you see are partitions of dividers and booths; completely soul-destroying places that fortunately I won't have to revisit. The interior of Google's buildings have the potential to be just that.

Apple's design provides a much higher surface area to volume ratio, meaning it will feel more spatious and less crowded with more connection to the outside and more natural light. These are very important things in ensuring the health, happiness and therefore productivity and ingenuity of workers.

Even if they do try to cram too many people inside, the design retains a vast and spatious interior courtyard and exterior gardens and woods for people to get out of the office and relax. I don't know about anyone else, but for me it's at these times where sparks of ingenuity are most common. Google's campus provides no such large and open areas.

szw-mapple fan
Mar 8, 2013, 01:59 AM
Doesn't the Apple design feature continuous glass around the entire perimeter?

Image (http://www.cupertino.org/Modules/ShowImage.aspx?imageid=2323)
Image (http://www.cupertino.org/Modules/ShowImage.aspx?imageid=2322)

Analyzing architecture like this is akin to phrenology.


Yes. seamless curved glass made into windows that's not openable. That's "controlled openness", kind of like the App store.

----------

Or...

The Apple campus looks and functions like a hamster wheel (a nice looking one that is). It's moving and doing things, but really, not moving forward.

The Google campus looks like they're not about not being boring and trying new things. There's more shapes besides a triangle, square or this case a circle.


Or maybe google is moving in so many directions it doesn't know where to go.

----------

Apple's new headquarters resembles the name of the street address of its current headquarters -- One Infinite Loop.

On the other hand, the circular design is reminiscent of the United Kingdom's GCHQ -- which is the "listening headquarters" of the UK. In other words, the building where "Big Brother is watching you." The UK's equivalent of the US's NSA.

Image (http://static.guim.co.uk/sys-images/Society/Pix/pictures/2008/04/15/GCHQ.jpg)

http://www.gchq.gov.uk/Pages/homepage.aspx

There is a negative connotation with this in today's world when you think of CISPA and SOPA which can best be portrayed in the 1998 movie "Enemy of the State" where actor Gene Hackman refers to the NSA's supercomputers use in "Project Echelon."

I'm not saying Apple is "Big Brother" ... what I am saying is that its rather difficult for me to view the building and not think about the original circular shaped building located in the UK.




Maybe apple will give you a new view on circular architecture.:D

Renzatic
Mar 8, 2013, 02:55 AM
Steve Jobs was the penultimate example

So who's the ultimate example?

Sorry, couldn't resist. :P

----------

Yes, monolithic Stalinist style.
Probably what KGB headquarters would look like if built today.

I dunno. I like to think the ole Soviets would stick to Brutalist style no matter what the year.

MWPULSE
Mar 15, 2013, 02:09 PM
88 Infinite Loop ??

Hehe ;) good one! Cos one infinite loop isn't enough ;)