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cabasner
Oct 15, 2005, 07:30 PM
Hi All,

I'm pondering the switch to Mac, but for the time being, I am borrrowing an Imac G5. I've found that clicking on the green '+' button in the upper left hand corner of a window does not appear to have the same effect as on a PC. On the PC, doing so causes that window to go to full screen. On the Mac, it appears to only increase the window to some size larger than the current size, but does not go 'full screen'. Am I missing something? Can anyone tell me if an analogue to the PC full screen function exists?



katie ta achoo
Oct 15, 2005, 07:39 PM
Hi All,

I'm pondering the switch to Mac, but for the time being, I am borrrowing an Imac G5. I've found that clicking on the green '+' button in the upper left hand corner of a window does not appear to have the same effect as on a PC. On the PC, doing so causes that window to go to full screen. On the Mac, it appears to only increase the window to some size larger than the current size, but does not go 'full screen'. Am I missing something? Can anyone tell me if an analogue to the PC full screen function exists?

It makes it be the biggest size it needs to be.
like, if the page is only 400 pixels wide, it won't make it be 1200 wide, and have a lot of blank space of every side.

You CAN stretch it out in the lower-right...

Whenever a windows user is on my PB, they don't understand why it won't go full-screen.. there isn't really a need. Being able to see the 4 open windows at once (or portions of them) really makes switching between apps faster.

mduser63
Oct 15, 2005, 09:40 PM
This is a question that switchers often have. There is no direct analogue to the Windows maximize function on a Mac. The green button is called zoom, and does just what Katie Ta Achoo said. It's one of those little user interface differences between Mac OS X and Windows. Ask just about any Mac user and I think they'll agree that it's one of the many little things that makes the Mac UI superior to Windows. In most cases, maximizing a window serves no practical purpose, and actually just ends up wasting screen space by filling it with blank whitespace. After you get used to Mac behavior, I think you'll see why it's better.

mj_1903
Oct 15, 2005, 10:15 PM
In programmatic terms the "Zoom" button attempts to remove all scroll bars.

As an example, loading Macrumors in Safari and pressing the "Zoom" button will make the window as tall as possible (for the vertical scroller) and about 800-1000 pixels wide (depending on your settings).

If I remember correctly, Mac OS X is a multi-document interface whereas Windows is by default a single-document interface that can clumsily to multiple documents via menus, the taskbar and other assorted methods.

toneloco2881
Oct 15, 2005, 10:17 PM
This was also one of my concerns when I first switched a little over a year ago. Over time I came to appreciate this one-time annoyance, and now wonder why Windows insist on maximizing my windows. I'll find myself on firefox(on my pc) trying to drag the window to just encompass it's present contents, and laugh to myself at how this one-time annoyance has reversed itself. Give it some time, and you'll probably grow to appreciate it as well. It really helps when your working on a high resolution display, and want to have application windows open side by side, etc..

mikemodena
Oct 15, 2005, 10:18 PM
The OS X GUI utilizes floating windows.. You'll notice this when using Flash, Photoshop, Fireworks, Dreamweaver, even final cut, motion, livetype, and iMovie. I think that using a mac brings out creativity because of the elegance of the machine and the elegance of the operating system. The floating windows allow for faster multi-tasking and smoother workflows.

londy
Oct 15, 2005, 10:31 PM
i'm a recent switcher and prefer full-screen, particularly when i'm working in word. i maximize by dragging the screen from the lower left hand corner triangle (you can actually find the same thing in windows--never noticed it).

works for me.

cabasner
Oct 15, 2005, 11:26 PM
Thanks to all of you who answered. That explains a lot! However, it's STILL going to take a lot of time to get used to the difference. For example, in Photoshop, it was really nice to be able to hit maximize and have the entire 'matte' around the image go full gray, then hit 'tab' and be essentially at an 'image only' state. I guess everything has its plusses and minuses...

i4k20c
Oct 15, 2005, 11:29 PM
Thanks to all of you who answered. That explains a lot! However, it's STILL going to take a lot of time to get used to the difference. For example, in Photoshop, it was really nice to be able to hit maximize and have the entire 'matte' around the image go full gray, then hit 'tab' and be essentially at an 'image only' state. I guess everything has its plusses and minuses...

I get what your saying, but the only diff imo is that now the pallate is on the desktop rather than in the program...idk.. i can undersand how its diff (recent switcher).. but at the same time.. its not too hard to get used too.. im used to it by now, and only have been using it for 2-3 weeks. :)

ToastyX
Oct 16, 2005, 02:56 PM
Ask just about any Mac user and I think they'll agree that it's one of the many little things that makes the Mac UI superior to Windows. In most cases, maximizing a window serves no practical purpose, and actually just ends up wasting screen space by filling it with blank whitespace. After you get used to Mac behavior, I think you'll see why it's better.

I don't see how inconsistent and unpredictable behavior is better. If the zoom button is supposed to be a fit to content button, it sure doesn't work that way half the time. The fact is you never know what size window or even what kind of window you'll end up with unless you're already familiar with the application. That's not intuitive. That's confusing. The zoom button should behave the same way in every application, and the behavior should be predictable.

Open Calculator. Click the zoom button. Notice how window switches between basic, scientific, and programmer view. That's not fit to content. That's not even zoom. That's taking a button that was designed for a specific purpose and making it do something completely different.

Open Dictionary. Type in a word like watermelon. Notice how the definition is short. Click the zoom button. Notice how the window maximizes and just ends up wasting screen space by filling it with blank whitespace. I thought the zoom button wasn't supposed to do that. That's not fit to content.

Open iTunes. Click the zoom button. Notice how the window changes into a funky mini window. That's not fit to content. What the heck is that anyway?

Maybe I'm missing something, but I just don't see how this is superior.

Applespider
Oct 16, 2005, 03:03 PM
Maybe I'm missing something, but I just don't see how this is superior.

I prefer the Mac way of doing things now; I spent the first month resizing everything to full size when I first switched.

Why? Because when I use my Windows computer at work, I'm conscious that much of the time my 'full screen' mode is mainly white space that I'm not using. That wasn't the case when we all worked on 800x600 or 1024 x 768 resolutions but now, most Windows programs have acres of white space on the right side. It's useful occasionally when I'm working with very wide Excel sheets, the rest of the time it's annoying since I'm often working with 3 or 4 applications and have to keep clicking between them since trying to have two programs tiled on the screen in Windows is complicated.

On the Mac, it's easy to have window sized to the appropriate content and you can have other apps/windows running in the background that you can still use; whether it's watching what's happening in it or dragging/dropping from it.

SummerBreeze
Oct 16, 2005, 03:16 PM
This is one of those things that seems confusing but turns out to be really intuitive, much like having the menubar at the top of the screen instead of the top of the application. Like others have said, you definitely get used to it.

ToastyX
Oct 16, 2005, 03:31 PM
My point is it doesn't work the way it's supposed to work half the time, otherwise it wouldn't bother me.

dubbz
Oct 16, 2005, 03:37 PM
My point is it doesn't work the way it's supposed to work half the time, otherwise it wouldn't bother me.

I can agree with that. I'm never really sure what will happen when I click that +.

And I mostly prefer to keep things maximized anyway, though that could possibly be because of the low resolution of the 12" screen. The apps really need all the space they can get.

tech4all
Oct 16, 2005, 03:38 PM
Open Calculator. Click the zoom button. Notice how window switches between basic, scientific, and programmer view. That's not fit to content. That's not even zoom. That's taking a button that was designed for a specific purpose and making it do something completely different.

Open Dictionary. Type in a word like watermelon. Notice how the definition is short. Click the zoom button. Notice how the window maximizes and just ends up wasting screen space by filling it with blank whitespace. I thought the zoom button wasn't supposed to do that. That's not fit to content.

Open iTunes. Click the zoom button. Notice how the window changes into a funky mini window. That's not fit to content. What the heck is that anyway?

True. The Zoom button can play a double role. In most apps it resizes the window the utilize the space on the display. In other apps, such as Calculator and iTunes, it's used a "mode switcher". I think it makes sense not to have the calculator take the whole screen. And with iTunes it's nice to have it to where you click the zoom button and it goes to the mini player. True it may not make sense to a new Mac user, but in time they should get used to it and understand how it works in different apps. Then when you think about it, it really does make sense as to why it does what does. I've just noticed on apps suck as iPhoto and Mail that the Zoom button actually acts like the maximize button in Windows; in that it actually does fill up the whole screen.

So in other words, the zoom button doesn't necessarily have a universal way in how it works, other than doing what it does in the most useful way appropriate for a particular app. Course some might disagree with the way it works in some apps, while other find it very useful. With me I tend to remember how it works in different apps, so I usually know what it's going to do.

:)

p0intblank
Oct 16, 2005, 03:46 PM
When I used to be a Windows-only user, I used to think I'd be annoyed by not having my apps in full screen. But now I actually like it a lot more this way. It helps a lot when designing graphics and multi-tasking.

stevep
Oct 16, 2005, 04:40 PM
My point is it doesn't work the way it's supposed to work half the time, otherwise it wouldn't bother me.
Have to agree. Windows floating around on the screen are just not a good use of the available space for many applications. Much as I like OS X I have to say that Windows tends to make better use of the screen.
I don't run all my apps at full screen, but with so many floating palettes in Adobe and MS Ofice apps, I really don't want to see any of the desktop round the edges - I need every single pixel I've got.

Aliquis
Oct 16, 2005, 07:46 PM
I had the same problem when I switched several years ago. I soon got used to it though because when you set a windows size, like scaling it to full screen with the bottom left corner... OSX will generally remember that setting for that application, or that particular folder.

Loge
Oct 17, 2005, 05:46 PM
Why on earth do they call it "Windows" when most users just run things full screen most of the time?

benbondu
Oct 17, 2005, 06:21 PM
I can agree with that. I'm never really sure what will happen when I click that +.

They should just call it "the mystery button". Clicking it won't do any major harm; you might be pleased with the results; if you aren't, just click it again to go back to how it was.

I actually have more beef with the X button. Sometimes it quits the app and sometimes it doesn't.

decksnap
Oct 17, 2005, 06:28 PM
Thanks to all of you who answered. That explains a lot! However, it's STILL going to take a lot of time to get used to the difference. For example, in Photoshop, it was really nice to be able to hit maximize and have the entire 'matte' around the image go full gray, then hit 'tab' and be essentially at an 'image only' state. I guess everything has its plusses and minuses...

In Photohop, you can do this by changing the view at the bottom of your tools palette.

I think maximized views are pretty limiting and pretty wasteful. It's that Windows 'I'm using a program' mentality vs. Mac's 'drag and drop',let's use all these programs together and at the same time' mentality.

NovemberWhiskey
May 30, 2009, 04:34 AM
Sorry to bring a thread back from the dead, but are you telling me I cannot maximize windows on a Macbook Pro 17 (2009)?

I was trying to figure it out in the Apple store today, and found it extremely annoying.

adpeace
May 30, 2009, 05:28 AM
For example, in Photoshop, it was really nice to be able to hit maximize and have the entire 'matte' around the image go full gray, then hit 'tab' and be essentially at an 'image only' state. I guess everything has its plusses and minuses...

For this purpose I press F in Photoshop to switch o full-screen editing mode. Pressing it multiple times will cycle through different modes.

EDIT: Oops - this thread is *old*!

jnc
May 30, 2009, 05:37 AM
Sorry to bring a thread back from the dead, but are you telling me I cannot maximize windows on a Macbook Pro 17 (2009)?

I was trying to figure it out in the Apple store today, and found it extremely annoying.

You should have asked someone.

ryannazaretian
May 30, 2009, 02:30 PM
Sorry to bring a thread back from the dead, but are you telling me I cannot maximize windows on a Macbook Pro 17 (2009)?

I was trying to figure it out in the Apple store today, and found it extremely annoying.

Download RightZoom. It works wonders!

darcy827
Jul 12, 2009, 01:56 AM
Download RightZoom. It works wonders!

wow! love it! this works just like the maximize button in windows. I've been really annoyed of the green button that doesn't really maximize my windows. Because I really like to see all my icons in a folder without having to scroll down. This freeware did it! Thanks so much!:D

supercaliber
Jul 28, 2009, 11:29 AM
i have been using a mac laptop for almost three years.

I hate the default green button behavior. I hate it, I hate it, I hate it. I have never liked it EVER. Period. Do not try and use any psycho techno babble to convince me the default Mac behavior is worth more than crap, it is not.

It never grew on me. I never thought it was clever. I never thought that my life was now easier. I never have believed that it made any sense at all whatsoever. And I certainly never once thought it was better behavior than Windows. Never ever ever.

I installed Right Zoom and it does work at changing the green button, which I do appreciate. But this application does more than just turn the green button into a maximize button, it actually toggles the behavior of the button just like windows does! Click once, maximize, click again and it shrinks to your previous 'i-am-better-at-optimizing-your-windows-size-than-you-will-ever-dream-to-be-because-i-am-a-brilliant-mathematician-and-computer-genius-and-i-love-steve-jobs' windows size.

I don't like flaming people, but I seriously cannot fathom what good reason Macs don't behave this way by default. You get the best of both worlds. Comments, like 'makes the mac UI superior to Windows", is simultaneously condescending and absurd.

Yes its a nit, but this shortcoming has been killing me for years. Thank God Almighty for BlazingTools for providing me with my salvation from Mac maximization HELL! Thank God! Thank God! Thank God!

Now someone please give me a way to find file locations in spotlight!!!!!

orasis
Oct 23, 2009, 08:56 AM
I am running all my fav operating systems I need and use in my studio on several computers for different reasons each one. running ubuntu, osx, windows-xp at the moment, my computers are triple-boot, so it is a paradise of OSs here. I am 35 and I got my first computer when I was like 8 or something. To my view, maximizing a window to full screen size is a MUST for an operating system. mac is missing something, it could have a 4th button instead of completely not being able to maximize a window, and I really don't care about the high fidelity when it comes to simple little things, that to some of you make it JUST different, JUST to be different, or easy, and to some others a pain.

In between many kinds of reasons I use a computer for, professionally, like audio production, I am also into web design. I have to say that previewing a website while creating it etc, needs full window size too.

Some apps also have FULL-SCREEN (not full window only). It is nice to support and love what you have I cannot go against this because I love them all. But in my case, I'm getting the best from each world.

In windows-xp tiling windows on the screen is a right click on the taskbar. It will stick them together ? yes. you will need to sort them better ? not always but lets say, yes. In mac, you will still need to sort them on the screen same way. no ?

Full window size is not that great for all apps in high resolution screens. it is 500% a MUST for screens around 1280x1024.

Alt tab switches greatly and very fast through maximized windows in windows-xp (example, dreamweaver/firefox).

Question. would you watch a movie in a window on your brand new huge tv-set ? I think you would set it to full screen to get the most of it. That's why Full window size or full-screen or window maximize is there, it's there for the user. for us.

And something last. When I do music production, I don't need any other apps running than the sequencer software. So I don't need the "lets work with all those windows together" thing, or something like that, that someone said. I don't even want to know there is an operating system at that time. All I want is 1 (ONE) and only thing (WINDOW) at that time (FULL).

anyway, mac osx is wonderful, none can say anything against this. but lets face the facts before we say that the + button is one of the reasons that makes mac's os better..

cheers

DIABLOW
Oct 25, 2009, 02:53 PM
I just bought an iMac today. 20" screen. I hate it so much because my window cannot go full screen. My iTunes window can only open about 5"x10". When I click the green button even go small. How to open the iTunes window to fullscreen?

Rampant.A.I.
Oct 26, 2009, 06:26 AM
I just bought an iMac today. 20" screen. I hate it so much because my window cannot go full screen. My iTunes window can only open about 5"x10". When I click the green button even go small. How to open the iTunes window to fullscreen?

Click the lower right hand corner, and drag to the size you want the window to be.

mikerr
Oct 26, 2009, 07:05 AM
Click the lower right hand corner, and drag to the size you want the window to be.

For some reason when I do this, I have a 2-3 pixel gap at the bottom of the screen ?

Thanks to whoever mentioned the RightZoom app though,
that's an annoyance I've had with Macs for years!

colourfastt
Oct 26, 2009, 08:39 AM
I've never understood why people by Microsoft Windows and then run it as Microsoft WINDOW. Then when they move to OS X they bring that bad habit over and seem upset that a windowing UI makes them use windowS rather than a WINDOW.

LouisBlack
Oct 26, 2009, 10:27 AM
I just bought an iMac today. 20" screen. I hate it so much because my window cannot go full screen. My iTunes window can only open about 5"x10". When I click the green button even go small. How to open the iTunes window to fullscreen?

I can almost understand people trying to go full screen on a 13" screen or something but a 20"?! That's a hell of a lot of pixels being wasted by just displaying iTunes.

EndlessMac
Oct 26, 2009, 12:15 PM
The closest thing Macs have to full window is if you do it manually by moving the window to the top left corner and then dragging on the bottom right corner of the window until you cover the full screen. Once you do this your Mac will memorize it's position and size and will open it the same as you closed it. This way it will always be "full screen" when you use the program.

The green + button works a little different in each application. Most of them work fairly similar but Apple really hasn't forced programmers to make it consistent. In some applications it does do full screen but that's not always the case. This why I actually don't use the green button much unless it does something I like. Actually I don't use the other buttons much either. I just use the drag for full screen and to close windows I use the keyboard shortcut "command W". To close programs I use "command q". I do use the yellow button more often to minimize windows to the dock but I've noticed I use a lot more keyboard shortcuts on Macs in general. It's just faster that way.

Everyone has their own preference on how they like to do things so just because Steve Jobs likes doing things one way doesn't make him God and everyone should follow his way because he can't ever be wrong now can he? For example, when I need to concentrate on something important I like to have it at full screen so that I don't get any distractions from other windows opened in the background. When I multitask and each application gets the same amount of attention from me then I do like having smaller windows so I can see the others at the same time. Even with full screen I can press "command tab" or use expose to quickly change from one application to the next. There is more than one way to do things and each person needs to find out which one is best for them. Not every application needs full screen either so I have a variety of full screen and non-full.

Saying one is better than the other is as absurd as saying green is the best color and everyone should think so because you like it. I prefer having options because not everyone is the same.

orasis
Oct 26, 2009, 02:00 PM
I agree with all you said EndlessMac, you spoke very well about some stuff in your post. Although having the OS to remember the window position or size is not the case of full-size window and back to normal size with a click. Microsoft's Windows can remember such stuff same way. As you know, it is far different resizing a window with the mouse than changing it's size with a click of a button.

I totally disagree with the way some people think about Microsoft Windows users and multitasking. I know users of all OSs that only use a computer for email and facebook and that's all they wanna do no matter if they are on a mac or whatever else. I also know users like me that use 2 computer screens for years with more than 10 apps running (some would say 10 only ?), and many windows (not full-size) around both screens. That can be on a windows, on a os-x, on a linux OS etc. It's up to the user, and there is no Windows Full screen mentality, and no Mac OS X multitasking mentality.

Mac is not the OS of multitasking and some guys should open their mind and accept this. All OSs are for multitasking. There is no bad habit in having something in full-screen or full window size. Also, there is no better user if the OS he/she is using is a Mac - this doesn't make the user any better. There are only bad/sad/silly users and bad/sad/silly setup OSs same as the opposite.

To my view, if you know how to use them all, you get the most out of all. It's all in your hands. This is the point.

EndlessMac
Oct 26, 2009, 03:47 PM
Although having the OS to remember the window position or size is not the case of full-size window and back to normal size with a click. Microsoft's Windows can remember such stuff same way. As you know, it is far different resizing a window with the mouse than changing it's size with a click of a button.

I know what you are talking about and like I said the dragging feature is the closest thing Macs have to full window because there is no dedicated button. Macs really don't have the same feature to go from memorized smaller window and to the full window with a press of a button like Windows does with its maximize button.

Actually I do remember one application allowing the user to pick two memorized sizes when they click the green + button so they can actually make one the full window and the other the smaller size of their choosing. I really liked it that way because I was able to choose the window sizes myself and I didn't always choose full window. That feature made it very close to Window's maximize button if you made the second memorized size a full window, but like I said earlier the + button can be different from application to application.

felt.
Oct 26, 2009, 03:52 PM
thanks for the tip about rightzoom, very handy!

Elbert C
Oct 26, 2009, 04:12 PM
Now someone please give me a way to find file locations in spotlight!!!!!

Hover the cursor over the file in the Spotlight list. The path to the file will show up for about ten seconds.

stevearm
Oct 26, 2009, 05:38 PM
A lot of fanboy arrogant explanations/excuses on here as to how supposedly superior the + button on OS X is compared to Windows.

The way I see it:

Windows:
- double click the entire top part of a window maximises and de-maximises it
- click the maximise button, maximises it.
- clicking it again, lets you play around with whatever size you like

Mac:
- click the tiny little green button lets OS X decide how big you want it.

Windows gives users the choice of how to sort through windows. OS X, decides how it wants you to display things.

Windows is superior because usability and simplicity wise, it's better and easier.

jnc
Oct 27, 2009, 05:25 AM
A lot of fanboy arrogant explanations/excuses on here as to how supposedly superior the + button on OS X is compared to Windows.

The way I see it:

Here's the way it is:

Green button, auto adjust, no wasted space

Litttle triangle in the bottom right of the window, resize it anyway you like.


Not superior, just different. Seriously, is this thread still going?

Edit: Seems this doesn't go across all apps, but it worked on the ones I used, as advertised...

Shiggity
Oct 29, 2009, 05:05 AM
Green button, auto adjust, no wasted space

Not true. For example, I have an Xcode window open and clicking the green button doesn't maximize horizontally, even though the text in the window runs off the edge and there's a horizontal scroll bar to pan back and forth. This functionality is FAIL as far as I'm concerned.

jnc
Oct 29, 2009, 08:40 AM
Not true. For example, I have an Xcode window open and clicking the green button doesn't maximize horizontally, even though the text in the window runs off the edge and there's a horizontal scroll bar to pan back and forth. This functionality is FAIL as far as I'm concerned.

its the behaviour in Photoshop, Flash, Safari, Finder, Preview at the very least.

Upon inspection (the green button isn't something I use on an app just to check how it works.. until today) It does seem to change dependent on what you're running.
Ditto for the red button (sometimes quits program, usually just closes window) I've just noticed in iLife and VLC too, it will perform Windows-esque Fill Screen. Could do with being more uniform

huski
Nov 30, 2009, 04:51 PM
There is nothing superior about this dumb solution. I usually use "zoom" button when I want to focus on the specific file (articles in PDFs most often) and read it carefully, covering word processor n dozens of other websites, n software running in the background is very handy. Two solutions: this free software: http://www.brighthub.com/computing/mac-platform/articles/31024.aspx
or command in terminal: http://www.tuaw.com/2009/09/28/change-the-behavior-of-the-itunes-zoom-button