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View Full Version : [All iPads] Are magnetic smart covers bad for the iPad?




ZuneMan?
Mar 7, 2013, 09:52 AM
I've been thinking of getting one but I've been put off by all the comments about magnets being bad for devices.



glen e
Mar 7, 2013, 10:17 AM
why would apple use them on their own product if they were "bad"?

you're overthinking this....

RenoG
Mar 7, 2013, 10:41 AM
No affect whats so ever. Its all good. Keep in mind Apple made these magnetic cases specifically for their devices.

TyPod
Mar 7, 2013, 01:20 PM
I've been thinking of getting one but I've been put off by all the comments about magnets being bad for devices.

I think magnets would be bad if there were hard drives in the devices like there used to be. Since they use solid state/flash now, it shouldn't be a concern.

pingfan59
Mar 7, 2013, 06:16 PM
the only downside is some minor scratching when dust sneaks between the smart case magnet strips and the iPad. Other than that, works like a charm.

I use the Smart Cover when I am not using the Zagg Profolio+ keyboard case

SchneiderMan
Mar 8, 2013, 06:51 PM
I've been thinking of getting one but I've been put off by all the comments about magnets being bad for devices.

Is this spam? Because usually bots have less common sense than humans.

TC25
Mar 9, 2013, 03:53 AM
I've been thinking of getting one but I've been put off by all the comments about magnets being bad for devices.

'all the comments' from who, uninformed idiots?

takeshi74
Mar 9, 2013, 08:25 AM
I've been thinking of getting one but I've been put off by all the comments about magnets being bad for devices.
Learn to always consider the source(s).

TC25
Mar 9, 2013, 10:11 AM
Learn to always consider the source(s).

But they probably read it on the Internet and everything on the Internet is true, right? :p

Fry-man22
Mar 9, 2013, 11:16 AM
If a device uses a traditional spinning disk then magnets can kill the disk. The iPod classic is an example of a device that if you take two magnets and put them on either side while it is in operation, you can pretty much bet that it is toast.

The solid state memory in other devices (iPad, iPhone, iPod Touch/nano) is not subject to magnetic damage. The bits in solid state memory are manipulated with electricity, not magnetism, so running a magnet across them has no negative effects.

The only negative impact an unshielded might have on an iPad would be a possible reduction of signal (BT, wifi, cell data), but I'm not sure even that is a concern...

Basically, if you want to get a big fat magnet and stick your iPad to the fridge - Rock on. You have nothing to worry about with the case

Commy1
Mar 11, 2013, 03:54 PM
Look it up on iFixit, he dissects a Smart Cover to see how it works. The iPad has magnets built into it for just this exact purpose.
Magnets are only really issue when it comes to spinning HDD drives, because it can and will knock the needle or platter out of alignment which is obviously bad. I don't believe SSD's are effected at all, which is what is technically in the iPad.

azguy
Mar 12, 2013, 02:33 PM
Look it up on iFixit, he dissects a Smart Cover to see how it works. The iPad has magnets built into it for just this exact purpose.
Magnets are only really issue when it comes to spinning HDD drives, because it can and will knock the needle or platter out of alignment which is obviously bad. I don't believe SSD's are effected at all, which is what is technically in the iPad.

The reason magnets are bad for spinning hard disks is that data is recorded magnetically on the platters and a strong enough magnetic field can erase the data and/or "flip bits"

To actually pull the heads or platters out of alignment would take a magnet on the order of the one used in Breaking Bad to erase Walt's computers.

BTW: Apple uses magnets in the lids and power connector of their macbook pros, so realistically the danger is low

Fry-man22
Mar 12, 2013, 07:12 PM
To actually pull the heads or platters out of alignment would take a magnet on the order of the one used in Breaking Bad to erase Walt's computers.


Just for the record, these are what killed my friend's iPod video a few years back. I don't know if a 3.5"/2.5" disk would be affected so easily, but I would wager that if the disk is in use it would be toast.

http://www.paramountzone.com/magnetic-buzz-balls.htm