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MacRumors
Mar 13, 2013, 11:40 AM
http://images.macrumors.com/im/macrumorsthreadlogo.gif (http://www.macrumors.com/2013/03/13/breathometer-aims-to-save-lives-by-stopping-people-from-driving-drunk/)


Breathometer is a portable breathalyzer (http://breathometer.com) that analyzes the users' breath for blood alcohol content. The device plugs into an iPhone for display and readout, with the intent of informing the user of their BAC so they can make a more informed decision about whether it is safe for them to drive or not.

http://images.macrumors.com/article-new/2013/03/breathometer.jpg
The device is available on Indiegogo (http://www.indiegogo.com/projects/breathometer-drink-smart-be-safe), a crowd funding platform, for $20. At that price, the Breathometer has an estimated ship date of January 2014 for most funders, though some higher funding levels may get their units earlier.
Breathometer is both a device and mobile app that will transform iPhone and Android smartphones into a breathalyzer. Breathometer provides options beyond informing users of their impaired state and plans to connect to local transportation services to quickly connect with a cab or taxi. Upon launch, Breathometer will be available at Breathometer.com, the Apple App Store and Google Play.

Breathometer will be FDA approved and is patent pending. It is ideal for anyone who enjoys even a casual drink, as just one drink can affect judgment or the ability to drive safely. The company will make Breathometer available in Summer 2013, anticipating that the affordable price combined with a quality equivalent to current consumer breathalyzers will encourage widespread use and help grow the market for such devices. 3InreEvqeA4

Article Link: Breathometer Aims to Save Lives by Stopping People from Driving Drunk (http://www.macrumors.com/2013/03/13/breathometer-aims-to-save-lives-by-stopping-people-from-driving-drunk/)



Schmitty11
Mar 13, 2013, 11:44 AM
Imo, if just the bouncer at a bar had this, many drunken idiots could be kept off the roadways. Love the idea.

justperry
Mar 13, 2013, 11:44 AM
Anyone who needs this device already went too far, just don't drink before driving, that's it.

scharf10
Mar 13, 2013, 11:46 AM
At the risk of sounding very boring, a good rule of thumb (at least in the UK anyway) is just don't drink if you're planning on driving.

I know some people get away with it, I just don't think it's worth risking it for the sake of a couple of drinks.

A clever device and app nonetheless - good luck to it, as I suppose it could benefit many!

snoopjonny
Mar 13, 2013, 11:47 AM
This will only be used by college kids to see who can get a higher "score".

dukebound85
Mar 13, 2013, 11:50 AM
Imo, if just the bouncer at a bar had this, many drunken idiots could be kept off the roadways. Love the idea.

This idea is hardly unique nor new.

You can go to bed bath and beyond and pick up a 15 dollar portable breathalizer that does NOT require an iphone right now

Carlanga
Mar 13, 2013, 11:51 AM
Too high a price for crowd funding project. I have seen stand alone units cheaper than that you can just leave in your car. This should be $10 crowd funded maybe $15.99 MRSP


Imo, if just the bouncer at a bar had this, many drunken idiots could be kept off the roadways. Love the idea.

Bouncers are not cops...

sbburning
Mar 13, 2013, 11:54 AM
Next update: Drunk text prevention.

BiigBiscuit
Mar 13, 2013, 11:55 AM
Too high a price for crowd funding project. I have seen stand alone units cheaper than that you can just leave in your car. This should be $10 crowd funded maybe $20 MRSP




Bouncers are not cops...

The way I understand it is that people are still legally culpable if they knowingly let someone drink and drive. Surely if a person could stop someone from drinking and driving but did not and that individual killed a person or two, surely some blame would fall on the one who could have prevented it by taking their keys away.

achtung!
Mar 13, 2013, 11:57 AM
the app doesn't stop anyone from driving, it only tells that they're drunk. ;)

jsw
Mar 13, 2013, 11:58 AM
This idea is hardly unique nor new.

You can go to bed bath and beyond and pick up a 15 dollar portable breathalizer that does NOT require an iphone right now
On the plus side, even if the battery on this is dead and your iPhone is broken, the mere fact that you can successfully plug it into the headphone jack while in your relatively dim car art 2AM means you're at least close to sober enough.

WestonHarvey1
Mar 13, 2013, 11:59 AM
Anyone who needs this device already went too far, just don't drink before driving, that's it.

Drinking and driving is not illegal (in the US anyway).

However, it would still be a mistake to rely on a BAC measurement. The legal limit is an aid to prosecutors, giving them a "de facto" automatic conviction. You can still get a DUI with any BAC greater than 0. The cops want you to believe in this "legal limit" fiction, though.

In general, an adult should be able to have a single beer or glass of wine at a restaurant and not have to worry about a DUI.

jsw
Mar 13, 2013, 11:59 AM
the app doesn't stop anyone from driving, it only tells that they're drunk. ;)
Hey, it could in this case (http://www.macrumors.com/2013/03/13/russian-enthusiasts-modify-car-to-be-controlled-via-ipad/). ;)

bazinga!!
Mar 13, 2013, 11:59 AM
That's a false conclusion because some people (asians, some teenagers) are relatively faster drunk than others, therefore it would be wrong to tell people to drink until they've reached a certain percentage of alcohol in their breath.

dukebound85
Mar 13, 2013, 12:02 PM
Drinking and driving is not illegal (in the US anyway).

However, it would still be a mistake to rely on a BAC measurement. The legal limit is an aid to prosecutors, giving them a "de facto" automatic conviction. You can still get a DUI with any BAC greater than 0. The cops want you to believe in this "legal limit" fiction, though.

In general, an adult should be able to have a single beer or glass of wine at a restaurant and not have to worry about a DUI.

Huh? Open containers are illegal

auero
Mar 13, 2013, 12:05 PM
You probably shouldn't be driving if you need a device to tell you if you're under the legal limit. Alcohol affects each person differently so just because you blow a point under the legal limit doesn't mean you should be driving.

WestonHarvey1
Mar 13, 2013, 12:06 PM
Huh? Open containers are illegal

I didn't say drinking WHILE driving. "Drinking and driving" is a well-understood idiom meaning "drinking prior to and sufficiently proximate to the driving event that alcohol remains detectable in the driver's blood".

StarDal
Mar 13, 2013, 12:07 PM
I don't think this should be batted away so easily. There's a reason why units are popping up in bars, etc. Sometimes people just don't think they've crossed that line and are surprised that they are. Sometimes due to the fact that the effects just haven't really set on at that point, but they will. Sometimes not until after they're behind the wheel.

If anything, even if you don't use it for yourself, you can block a friend and go "see.. you're not driving". People will blow into it to "prove" they're not drunk and then see the results.

dukebound85
Mar 13, 2013, 12:11 PM
I just don't understand the need to make a smartphone required. Why not (like existing devices) be all in one? All one needs is an LED that outputs a few digits.

Furthermore, how is one suppose to keep this device calibrated? I know that is the biggest issue with these portable breathalizers. You need to have confidence in the output it gives

To me, this is reinventing the wheel while simultaneously making it more complicated then it needs to be

Carlanga
Mar 13, 2013, 12:11 PM
The way I understand it is that people are still legally culpable if they knowingly let someone drink and drive. Surely if a person could stop someone from drinking and driving but did not and that individual killed a person or two, surely some blame would fall on the one who could have prevented it by taking their keys away.

Not all states have dram shop laws for drunk people. Also, have you gone to any bar? How many people leave a bar drunk each night would have made owning a bar a liability waiting to happen an no one would open one. Most states that have the law give more emphasis to personal negligence since no one from the bar is forcing you to drink.

dukebound85
Mar 13, 2013, 12:14 PM
I didn't say drinking WHILE driving. "Drinking and driving" is a well-understood idiom meaning "drinking prior to and sufficiently proximate to the driving event that alcohol remains detectable in the driver's blood".

Gotcha. FWIW, after I posted, a few states still have no open container laws...though the vast majority do

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Not all states have dram shop laws for drunk people. Also, have you gone to any bar? How many people leave a bar drunk each night would have made owning a bar a liability waiting to happen an no one would open one. Most states that have the law give more emphasis to personal negligence since no one from the bar is forcing you to drink.

I believe that to really combat drinking and driving, some responsibility MUST be placed on the establishment. Afterall, it takes two to tango

thedeejay
Mar 13, 2013, 12:17 PM
Drinking and driving is not illegal (in the US anyway).

However, it would still be a mistake to rely on a BAC measurement. The legal limit is an aid to prosecutors, giving them a "de facto" automatic conviction. You can still get a DUI with any BAC greater than 0. The cops want you to believe in this "legal limit" fiction, though.

In general, an adult should be able to have a single beer or glass of wine at a restaurant and not have to worry about a DUI..
Who would use this anyways?

hockeyman94
Mar 13, 2013, 12:21 PM
Already made....

http://item.mobileweb.ebay.com/viewitem?itemId=280927497133&index=0&nav=SEARCH&nid=68976790944

KittenMasher
Mar 13, 2013, 12:27 PM
The iDrinkulator iPhone app has had a iBreathulizer for years!

WestonHarvey1
Mar 13, 2013, 12:29 PM
.
Who would use this anyways?

I suppose it would be useful for peace of mind, especially if you were out trying some new beers or ales with unknown alcohol content.

Not everybody at 0.08 or the old standard of 0.1 is impaired to any real degree. There's some interesting YouTube videos of people testing their driving with objective standards and it really varies from person to person.

If I blew a 0.04, and 20 minutes later saw it drop to 0.03, I'd feel pretty comfortable about driving and not risking a DUI. Theoretically I can still be arrested, but the likelihood of conviction greatly decreases when the state can't prove you hit the per se limit. If it climbed to 0.05, I'd wait longer and test again.

acearchie
Mar 13, 2013, 12:53 PM
At the risk of sounding very boring, a good rule of thumb (at least in the UK anyway) is just don't drink if you're planning on driving.

I know some people get away with it, I just don't think it's worth risking it for the sake of a couple of drinks.

A clever device and app nonetheless - good luck to it, as I suppose it could benefit many!

I operate under that method however, the reason I have bought a small breathalyser device is for the morning after. It's common at the moment to drive to my friends house, sleep there or in a tent and drive back in the morning.

A lot of people don't realise that you can be over the limit in the morning and quite easily too.

sundragon
Mar 13, 2013, 12:56 PM
I wonder if they could make this work to prevent drunk texting, haha :D

Carlanga
Mar 13, 2013, 01:03 PM
...I believe that to really combat drinking and driving, some responsibility MUST be placed on the establishment. Afterall, it takes two to tango
While I agree that limits could help unfortunately no research has proven to be effective. The only thing that has been proven using actual data is that there was a state that had stricter rules had more accidents than the one w/ less laws on alcohol. Besides that one all other co-variables have affected the validity of all other tests. Anyways, if a person wants to get drunk they will get drunk, be it at the bar or move to the next one down the road or finish getting drunk somewhere else.

unplugme71
Mar 13, 2013, 01:03 PM
This is great! I can easily drink a lot and be over the limit but still walk, drive, and function fine. At least I can measure if I'm over the limit before I get a DUI.

CGagnon
Mar 13, 2013, 01:05 PM
If you have a breathalyzer on your keychain chances are you shouldn't be driving after the sun goes down.

sososowhat
Mar 13, 2013, 01:08 PM
This could be useful (at least a little) as a defense, showing you were trying to be responsible: "judge, I checked by BAC and it was .04. Here's the iPhone record. I know it's not black & white, but I thought I was safe to drive."

Boatboy24
Mar 13, 2013, 01:16 PM
I'll put it in my giant bag of iphone plug in accessories, right next to the thermometer...

H2SO4
Mar 13, 2013, 01:30 PM
Anyone who needs this device already went too far, just don't drink before driving, that's it.

It measures blood alcohol content. Although its primary use may be for people who've had a jar or two before getting behind the wheel, it's not the only way to get alcohol in your breath/blood.

Just don't drink before driving is great, do you mean just before driving, an hour before, two hours? One drink, two drinks?

nagromme
Mar 13, 2013, 01:32 PM
People are impaired WAY before they think they are. That's playing a game of chance with other people's lives. Repeat that chance over time and you have people dying--sometimes by people who were not obviously trashed: their reaction time was altered but they thought they felt normal.

So this is a good idea.

Except... the same ego and denial that makes people take a chance on drinking "just one or two" and drive in the first place, will make people say they don't need to test themselves. They'll keep on trusting to their own "judgment."

Add to that, ad-fueled groupthink-driven alcohol culture is partly about image. Sucking the corner of your phone would shatter your reputation for "holding your liquor."

Maybe if they made it look like a beer can?

I guess maybe people can tell their friends it's just for defeating law enforcement. Surely that's cool at least! (And would keep them off the road: win-win.)

dukebound85
Mar 13, 2013, 01:43 PM
It measures blood alcohol content. Although its primary use may be for people who've had a jar or two before getting behind the wheel, it's not the only way to get alcohol in your breath/blood.

Just don't drink before driving is great, do you mean just before driving, an hour before, two hours? One drink, two drinks?


As in if you know you are going to drive and don't have plans on how to get back aside from you driving, don't drink at all

QCassidy352
Mar 13, 2013, 01:48 PM
If you're unsure about whether you're ok to drive, you're not ok to drive.

iheartiphone4
Mar 13, 2013, 02:18 PM
This idea is hardly unique nor new.

You can go to bed bath and beyond and pick up a 15 dollar portable breathalizer that does NOT require an iphone right now

Where is the fun in that?

----------

This app and device would be so much cooler if it didn't let you start your car if you blew too high. An app that is a car starter, breathelizer, seat belt checker, and disabled text messages and phone calls while your car was on. Anybody wanna help me make this app?

TallManNY
Mar 13, 2013, 02:53 PM
I suppose it would be useful for peace of mind, especially if you were out trying some new beers or ales with unknown alcohol content.

Not everybody at 0.08 or the old standard of 0.1 is impaired to any real degree. There's some interesting YouTube videos of people testing their driving with objective standards and it really varies from person to person.

If I blew a 0.04, and 20 minutes later saw it drop to 0.03, I'd feel pretty comfortable about driving and not risking a DUI. Theoretically I can still be arrested, but the likelihood of conviction greatly decreases when the state can't prove you hit the per se limit. If it climbed to 0.05, I'd wait longer and test again.

I've used something similar and it is useful for folks to understand what the legal limits feel like. In practice even two pints will put you over the lowest legal limit, three and you are definitely there. Most likely your driving skills are not impacted in any significant way. (Note that every rural and suburban town in the country has bars and basically every single patron has no option but to drive home from that bar at the end of the night. So millions of folks are drinking and driving in this country every day.) Above the point were you are a significant safety risk you (a) should know you are impacted and (b) should know that if you get pulled over you will get DWI that will result in you losing your license in many states. A DUI will also haunt you for years in terms of job applications, insurance, or the ability to rent a car.

So this really isn't a physical safety test as it is a legal safety question. But play around with something like this a few times and you will know the answer to the legal question. And the answer to that is that basically the standards are set so low that you are in trouble if you have had anything beyond a second beer. And if you are small or drink the beers quickly, you could pull a DUI on just two beers.

Liquorpuki
Mar 13, 2013, 02:57 PM
When you and your friends are drunk, these things turn into a game where you try and see who can get the high score

Get a DD, that's the only thing that works

rdlink
Mar 13, 2013, 03:19 PM
At the risk of sounding very boring, a good rule of thumb (at least in the UK anyway) is just don't drink if you're planning on driving.

I know some people get away with it, I just don't think it's worth risking it for the sake of a couple of drinks.

A clever device and app nonetheless - good luck to it, as I suppose it could benefit many!


Both yours, and the post before it are asinine. What if someone has a couple of glasses of wine with dinner, and does the responsible thing by checking their BAC before getting behind the wheel?

----------

If you're unsure about whether you're ok to drive, you're not ok to drive.

It has nothing to do with whether you're OK to drive. It has to do with whether you are legal to drive under state law.

JHankwitz
Mar 13, 2013, 03:54 PM
the app doesn't stop anyone from driving, it only tells that they're drunk. ;)

It only tells how drunk the person blowing into it is. I have a friend that has a can of compressed air with a special nozzel on it that he uses to defeat the breathalizer hooked up to the ignition of his car.

It may be a neat toy, but totally useless to keep drunks off the road.

lazyrighteye
Mar 13, 2013, 04:58 PM
Welcome back to Game Center!
Ick...

BiscottiGelato
Mar 13, 2013, 05:44 PM
If taxi is as reasonable as it is in Asia. Who'd want to drive to a bar or a party? You have cheap liquor and pricey transportation alternative. You can tell all the individuals that they shoudl be responsible, look at the consequences, yada yada yada. However when it comes to managing a mass population, you look at the economics and you can predict the outcome very easily. Human mind naturally magnifies immediate trade-off and brushes off long term, low probability events. Given the current trade-offs ($5 beer, $8 wine but $40 - $60 cab rides 1 way), it's no brainer how this is going to end up.

You dis-incentive drinking and driving, but doesn't give incentive for alternatives. When have a purely punishment based policy worked? Prohibition failed, drug war is failing too. These achieves nothing but feel goods and big governments.

More and cheaper taxi licenses, late night transportation alternatives, in additional to reasonable penalties on violation would be the right direction. Pure demonization is not problem solving at all.

If anything, policy maker should not put red tape all over services such as Uber. I view it as a private enterprise actualy contributing to solve the drinking and driving issue.
http://www.iphoneincanada.ca/news/taxi-app-services-face-proposed-regulation-by-cities-like-toronto/

bassfingers
Mar 13, 2013, 06:22 PM
It Just don't drink before driving is great, do you mean just before driving, an hour before, two hours? One drink, two drinks?

Yes

hendot
Mar 13, 2013, 06:35 PM
Reading some of these comments makes me think the DUI laws in USA are a bit inadequate.

In Australia, the legal limit is 0.05. If you are caught with more than that (and every single police car has a breathalyser) you lose your licence for a minimum of 3 months, have to face court, and have a criminal record against your name.
Oh yeah, and for your first few years of driving, the limit is 0.02. This pretty much equates to zero alcohol.

Times when the Breathometer may be useful:
Have a beer or two, then for an unexpected reason you need to drive;
The morning after a big night;
Helping to learn your limits.

mrsir2009
Mar 13, 2013, 10:28 PM
I can see this being used for drinking contests - The person who gets the highest score within an hour wins :D:D:D

abhibeckert
Mar 13, 2013, 10:49 PM
At the risk of sounding very boring, a good rule of thumb (at least in the UK anyway) is just don't drink if you're planning on driving.

I know some people get away with it, I just don't think it's worth risking it for the sake of a couple of drinks.
And lets say you do have a drink, how long do you wait before driving home?

Do you wait 2 hours? 10 hours? 3 days?

The bus service where I live often involves an hour or so of walking, and you might be assaulted/robbed while walking... and a taxi can cost $50 or $60. More than any young person can afford. So after drinking, driving home is the only sane choice... the question is how long to wait.

Binarymix
Mar 14, 2013, 09:14 AM
Gotcha. FWIW, after I posted, a few states still have no open container laws...though the vast majority do

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I believe that to really combat drinking and driving, some responsibility MUST be placed on the establishment. Afterall, it takes two to tango


The problem is that everyone handles alcohol differently.

I've seen people walk into a bar 'seemingly' sober as heck, and one drink later they're smashed. This same scenario could happen to a sober person walking into a bar, or someone who has had 10 drinks and it doesn't hit them until the 11th.

Then some people can drink all night long, blow way over, and still be coherent, and seem sober.

It is not a bars duty to cut you off until they see the signs of impairment, or knowingly have served you a sufficient amount of drinks to deem you drunk.

I don't think any blame should be placed on a bar unless they knowingly over serve, and even that can be hard to prove in court.

Individuals should be accountable 100% for their own actions, people need to stop trying to find scapegoats for their own faults.

On Topic: this device is nothing but a novelty. If you need a device to tell you wether you're drunk or not, obviously you shouldn't be drinking.

Squilly
Mar 14, 2013, 09:29 AM
Not a fan. They're drunk and delirious, they're making stupid decisions anyways.

peteullo
Mar 14, 2013, 09:50 AM
I think it's pretty amazing what devices they can come up with for the just the audio jack on iOS devices.

aritafoff
Mar 14, 2013, 11:04 AM
"Breathometer will be FDA approved.."???:confused:

Ok so they did't actually have the FDA approval. So, why are they taking preorders??? They cannot!!! :mad:

Portaluk
Mar 14, 2013, 01:13 PM
Both yours, and the post before it are asinine. What if someone has a couple of glasses of wine with dinner, and does the responsible thing by checking their BAC before getting behind the wheel?




Why are their comments asinine?

In the scenario you describe wouldn't the 'responsible' thing to do is to not drink the couple of glasses of wine in the first place?

In the UK if you get caught driving over the limit you loose your licence for a minimum of a year unless there were exceptional circumstances. Go to court and get a criminal record for the rest of your life which you may then have to inform your employer and all future employers. When you get your licence back the cost of your insurance triples as you are deemed to be a high risk. This is all in addition to the increased risk of having a serious accident or killing somebody. Why take the risk all for a few drinks?

Although this device would be handy to check alcohol levels the next day as it can stay in the system for a lot longer than people think my understanding it all depends on the individuals metabolism and efficiency of their liver.

8.33
Mar 14, 2013, 04:52 PM
It would also be quite useful for the morning after. That is when a lot of people get caught as you can feel fine, but still have quite a high level of alcohol in you.

rdlink
Mar 14, 2013, 08:43 PM
Why are their comments asinine?

In the scenario you describe wouldn't the 'responsible' thing to do is to not drink the couple of glasses of wine in the first place?

In the UK if you get caught driving over the limit you loose your licence for a minimum of a year unless there were exceptional circumstances. Go to court and get a criminal record for the rest of your life which you may then have to inform your employer and all future employers. When you get your licence back the cost of your insurance triples as you are deemed to be a high risk. This is all in addition to the increased risk of having a serious accident or killing somebody. Why take the risk all for a few drinks?

Although this device would be handy to check alcohol levels the next day as it can stay in the system for a lot longer than people think my understanding it all depends on the individuals metabolism and efficiency of their liver.

It's asinine because they make the assertion that there would be no legitimate use of this device.

Your logic is pretty screwed up, also. My statement wasn't a discussion of the penalties and pitfalls of driving drunk. My statement was that this product would have a legitimate use to verify that I was not breaking the law before I get behind the wheel of my car.

If I'm sitting down for a dinner and I have two glasses of wine, I know for a fact that I am fine to drive. But, given the relatively low limit of BAC that is illegal in most states, a legitimate use of the product would be for me to blow before I drive, to make sure that I don't get a DUI should I get pulled over.

I'm in no way trying to say that this product could be used to break the law.

Portaluk
Mar 15, 2013, 04:47 AM
It's asinine because they make the assertion that there would be no legitimate use of this device.

Your logic is pretty screwed up, also. My statement wasn't a discussion of the penalties and pitfalls of driving drunk. My statement was that this product would have a legitimate use to verify that I was not breaking the law before I get behind the wheel of my car.

If I'm sitting down for a dinner and I have two glasses of wine, I know for a fact that I am fine to drive. But, given the relatively low limit of BAC that is illegal in most states, a legitimate use of the product would be for me to blow before I drive, to make sure that I don't get a DUI should I get pulled over.

I'm in no way trying to say that this product could be used to break the law.


Not really sure what part of my statement you find illogical.

Its just my personal opinion its not worth consuming any alcohol before driving. Not only because of the breaking the law aspect, if someone has a couple glasses of wine and they are unfortunate enough to have a serious accident that results in the death of someone. Then they will have to live with that for the rest of their life not knowing whether the alcohol was a contributing factor even if legally they are under the limit. Whether their reaction time could have been quicker to avoid the accident or could they have seen the child running into the road earlier if they didn't have the wine.

I drive for a living so i'm seeing this from a different perspective to you as i'm very protective of my licence and I have seen enough serious accidents at the side of the road to last me a lifetime but its your life you do whatever you feel best for you.

rdlink
Mar 15, 2013, 07:35 AM
Not really sure what part of my statement you find illogical.

Its just my personal opinion its not worth consuming any alcohol before driving. Not only because of the breaking the law aspect, if someone has a couple glasses of wine and they are unfortunate enough to have a serious accident that results in the death of someone. Then they will have to live with that for the rest of their life not knowing whether the alcohol was a contributing factor even if legally they are under the limit. Whether their reaction time could have been quicker to avoid the accident or could they have seen the child running into the road earlier if they didn't have the wine.

I drive for a living so i'm seeing this from a different perspective to you as i'm very protective of my licence and I have seen enough serious accidents at the side of the road to last me a lifetime but its your life you do whatever you feel best for you.

One more time: Your feelings about driving after drinking have absolutely NOTHING to do with whether this device has a legitimate use. Period.

But since you seem intent on going there, if I have two glasses of wine with dinner, and I blow a legal BAC, then get in my car and drive I know for a FACT that I am more than competent to drive a car safely. If I got into a wreck under those circumstances I would know beyond a shadow of a doubt that the two glasses of wine had nothing to do with it. What I wouldn't know is whether someone messing with their radio, or their cell phone, or their GPS (like perhaps a professional driver) might have taken their attention off the road long enough to cause an accident. I see people do that every day, completely sober.

mlmwalt
Mar 15, 2013, 09:14 AM
I suppose it would be useful for peace of mind, especially if you were out trying some new beers or ales with unknown alcohol content.

Not everybody at 0.08 or the old standard of 0.1 is impaired to any real degree. There's some interesting YouTube videos of people testing their driving with objective standards and it really varies from person to person.

If I blew a 0.04, and 20 minutes later saw it drop to 0.03, I'd feel pretty comfortable about driving and not risking a DUI. Theoretically I can still be arrested, but the likelihood of conviction greatly decreases when the state can't prove you hit the per se limit. If it climbed to 0.05, I'd wait longer and test again.

I agree. I'm fine through .20, after that I'm almost as bad as someone talking on their phone. :D

WestonHarvey1
Mar 15, 2013, 09:50 AM
"Breathometer will be FDA approved.."???:confused:

Ok so they did't actually have the FDA approval. So, why are they taking preorders??? They cannot!!! :mad:

FDA approval is not required. It's not a drug.