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vikingjunior
May 3, 2013, 01:11 PM
I have been a android user from the very beginning and defended android to no end. Honestly I never game iPhone a fair chance. Well finally today I spent hours on end with it and finally understand why its so popular. Looking at any Android at any size is like looking at a cartoon.
It really is simple and straight forward and I'm willing to sacrifice screen size for the polished iPhone 5.



nas2344
May 3, 2013, 01:12 PM
Yeah iPhone is very polished

Stuntman06
May 3, 2013, 01:22 PM
I have been a android user from the very beginning and defended android to no end. Honestly I never game iPhone a fair chance. Well finally today I spent hours on end with it and finally understand why its so popular. Looking at any Android at any size is like looking at a cartoon.
It really is simple and straight forward and I'm willing to sacrifice screen size for the polished iPhone 5.

When I first had to use an iPhone at work for a period of time, I also understood why the device appeals to so many people. Personally, I don't see myself switching over. There are just too many things that I feel that I would have to give up. Also, some of the things I had to do to set up my wife's iPhone were just annoyingly difficult.

lordofthereef
May 3, 2013, 02:04 PM
I am not sure what you mean by "looking at an Android of any screen size is like looking at a cartoon.", but hey, awesome you gave something new a try and enjoyed it.

KentuckyHouse
May 3, 2013, 02:08 PM
Good for you, OP, but by posting this in the "Alternatives to iOS and iOS Devices" section, you've just opened yourself up to looking like you're just trying to start a flame war.

This is DEFINITELY in the wrong section.

mattopotamus
May 3, 2013, 02:12 PM
Go vanilla android if you want clean and polished.

vikingjunior
May 3, 2013, 02:12 PM
Good for you, OP, but by posting this in the "Alternatives to iOS and iOS Devices" section, you've just opened yourself up to looking like you're just trying to start a flame war.

This is DEFINITELY in the wrong section.

Actually I posted it on the iPhone section and the mod moved it.
I'm going to run for cover but honestly maybe I just needed a change.

jrswizzle
May 3, 2013, 02:15 PM
Go vanilla android if you want clean and polished.

I like my Nexus 4 - don't get me wrong, but vanilla Android seems almost purposefully unfinished.

Part of the charm with vanilla Android is making it your own - so clean, yes but I wouldn't say polished necessarily - depending on how you look at it. I see it as needing quite a bit of user input (apps, launchers etc.) to make it really usefully and awesome.

There is a certain charm to Apple's polish - which is why it's so popular.

KentuckyHouse
May 3, 2013, 02:25 PM
Actually I posted it on the iPhone section and the mod moved it.
I'm going to run for cover but honestly maybe I just needed a change.

LOL...seriously? Then I apologize because you definitely posted it in the right place originally.

Looks like the mods in this section are bored and trying to start trouble so they've got something to do...LMAO. :p

LIVEFRMNYC
May 3, 2013, 03:03 PM
Screw polish, I like my smartphones dirty.

vikingjunior
May 3, 2013, 03:18 PM
LOL...seriously? Then I apologize because you definitely posted it in the right place originally.

Looks like the mods in this section are bored and trying to start trouble so they've got something to do...LMAO. :p
LOL it's all good!

MuffCabbage
May 3, 2013, 03:22 PM
Yep. iOS and Windows Phone have a level of polish leaps and bounds above Android, but Android has a level of flexibility (in some respects) leaps and bounds above iOS and Windows Phone.

The polish is why I left Android and went to Windows Phone and frankly I dont miss too much besides not having SnapChat and random iOS games people tell me to try (which Android also usually lacks).

Frankly, each has their own reasons for why they are "the best choice", but to deny that Android has a lot of flexibility or that Windows Phone and iOS are not more polished than Android would be foolish.

Even without Android's flexibility I manage to get more done on my Windows Phone than I could on my iPhone or Android simply because I am an Office/OneNote/SkyDrive user so Im reading notes, adding photos to OneNote, or editing Excel sheets from my phone etc.

Vegastouch
May 3, 2013, 04:58 PM
I have been a android user from the very beginning and defended android to no end. Honestly I never game iPhone a fair chance. Well finally today I spent hours on end with it and finally understand why its so popular. Looking at any Android at any size is like looking at a cartoon.
It really is simple and straight forward and I'm willing to sacrifice screen size for the polished iPhone 5.

iPhones are nice....if you dont mind being limited and having to use iTunes. I hate iTunes myself and of course the screen is just too small........and i hate their keyboard.

dejo
May 3, 2013, 05:15 PM
LOL...seriously? Then I apologize because you definitely posted it in the right place originally.

Mod Note:

From a Sticky in the Alternatives forum:
The "Alternatives to iOS and iOS Devices" forum is for discussion of non-Apple smartphones and tablets and their operating systems, as well as comparisons with Apple products.

Since the OP was certainly comparing the iPhone to Android phones, it seemed better suited for the Alternatives forum.

jamesbii
May 3, 2013, 06:13 PM
I like my Nexus 4 - don't get me wrong, but vanilla Android seems almost purposefully unfinished.

Part of the charm with vanilla Android is making it your own - so clean, yes but I wouldn't say polished necessarily - depending on how you look at it. I see it as needing quite a bit of user input (apps, launchers etc.) to make it really usefully and awesome.

There is a certain charm to Apple's polish - which is why it's so popular.

I have to agree. I have a Nexus 4 and an iPhone 5, and I found the Nexus collecting a lot of dust because the iPhone had much more appeal out of the box. The Nexus display was crisp, but colors were faded. The camera was good, but usually lagged behind the picture I got with the iPhone. The built-in speaker was tinny and quiet, and battery life was nowhere near the iPhone's. Then one day I decided to take the full plunge with a root, custom ROM, cutom kernel, etc. I was able to get in the Nexus and do some serious work to change the audio signal processing and get the speaker to amazing volumes without distortion, though the sound can be a bit painful because the response is mostly in the higher frequency range. I changed the compression settings for audio and video recording so the videos come out much, much better with fuller audio. I got a color and gamut calibrator to modify the display and, while the Nexus 4 forums are still working on how to get the settings good enough to match the iPhone, the display is gorgeous now. Dynamic CPU controls save tons of battery and provide boosts up to 1.9ghz if using only one (of the four!) CPU cores. Needless to say it took me several days to do all of this, but if you put it on a store shelf next to the stock version you could easily ask more money for these customizations. The hardware was all there, but the software prevented it from reaching its fullest potential. What I found more strange was that, after developers found ways to correct the complaints about the Nexus display after LG and Google largely ignored them, Google promptly issued an update to render the developers' improvements ineffective. That struck me as an odd move, especially if neither Google nor LG were willing to optimize what should be an absolutely gorgeous display. It has all the makings of a top-notch screen, but just wasn't quite calibrated properly.
I think that is the biggest difference between iOS and the many Android phones I've used. iOS is polished and simple, and the iPhone may not have the best camera, the fastest processor, biggest battery, etc. when compared to every phone on the market, but it is positioned so that it has a good overall package that gives good performance in each area and usually holds its own in head-to-head comparison. Most people tend to compare the one iPhone to the array of other phones and then explain why the iPhone is inferior, forgetting that the comparison they are making would require a Frankenstein version of all the other phones that beat it in one area or another. For example, the HTC One X had a beautiful display, but dismal battery life. The Samsung Galaxy line (used to) have oddly tinted and slightly grainy displays, but awesome cameras with endless options for photo taking. If you're willing to do some tinkering to get the max out of your device and make it distinctly personal, only Android can really provide that. If you prefer to go to the store and have something that is going to hit most marks relatively well with not much effort on your part, then Apple is a better choice for some. I personally think both are robust and entertaining platforms, but the only caveat is that not all Androids are equal--choose wisely! Pick the one you like, does what you need, feels good in your hands, whatever. Most people use only a fraction of the huge abundance of features on their phones anyways. And when in doubt, just get one of each ;-).

KentuckyHouse
May 3, 2013, 11:38 PM
Mod Note:

From a Sticky in the Alternatives forum:


Since the OP was certainly comparing the iPhone to Android phones, it seemed better suited for the Alternatives forum.

You knew this was coming. :rolleyes:

Seriously, how in the world can the original post be considered comparing the iPhone to any Android phone? It's the OP's opinion, but it's far from a comparison.

I stand by my original statement. This should be over in the iPhone section of the forum, NOT the Alternatives section.

swoosh0217
May 3, 2013, 11:46 PM
OP... Most of the users that post here are still iPhone owners that now has android phones. I myself owned all iphone models. I still have my jail broken iPhone 5 but comparing it to my HTC One... I will have to pass on my iPhone 5 this time around.

Congrats to you though for being happy with your iPhone. Its just a lot of us here are moving forward.

cuzo
May 4, 2013, 07:19 AM
Op,

Yes the iPhone is very simple and very straightforward and that's what alot of us love about it. I came from android and yes with all the new cool stuff coming or already here for android I get tempted to sell my iPhone 5 but I always know that once I sell my iPhone and get the new latest android with the latest this and the latest that after a while ill go back to my testy iPhone that just works as is and it's something g I never have to tinker with.

Different strokes for different folks, a droid is cool and loads if fund if you like tinkering with it, different ways to customize it so no android phone is truly unique and the ability to set default apps is something f I love like using tubemate and downloading YouTube videos right to my sd card or setting google maps as my default maps and its something apple needs to loosen up on since the experience is so restricted but the trouble if selling and risk getting owned by some punk kid off Craigslist +plus the fact that the iPhone just works and its just too damn reliable always leads me to keep the iPhone.
If you just want a phone as a communication tool and using useful apps ill argue the iPhone is that but if you're staring at the screen all day, adding new widgets, changing wallpaper and all that stuff get a android phone.

onthecouchagain
May 4, 2013, 07:45 AM
I think it's time to admit that Android is better for more reasons than just customization.

It's simply easier to do most of the same basic functions on a modern day Android device than on an iOS device. I can make a phone call to a very specific person with literally one touch, as oppose to requiring multiple touches and/or holding for Siri and speaking (not always practical in a place you can't or don't want to talk) and waiting for Siri to dial the right person. One touch on Android that is guaranteed the right person.

It's easier to open new tabs, or switch tabs, or start private browsing on Chrome than it is to do any of that in Safari. Safari has tap to go back to the top that is one advantage, but not much else. The freedom of scrolling all the way to the top with one flick in Chrome also helps mitigate this.

Accessing mail is easier through Gmail if you have multiple accounts. Sharing is easier because you can actually share to any app you want, as oppose to iOS only allowing you to share to FB/Twitter. DropBox, for example, I can share directly to if I snap a picture, check it out from the camera gallery, and decide I want to load this onto DropBox. I can do this right away. With iOS, I have to exit and go to DropBox and find the picture again to "upload" it.

Then things like the dedicated menu button or the dedicated back button; always there, always reliable. With iOS, sometimes the settings is in the main iOS Settings area, sometimes it's in the app. With the "back" button on iOS, sometimes it's top left, sometimes top right, sometimes it's a "cancel" button on the center-bottom of screen. You have to "look" for it many times.

These are but a few examples. I can go on about turning on/off WiFi, Bluetooth, the lock screen when I don't need the added security, or quickly changing the volume toggles (yes there's a "vibrate" hardware switch but when in an important meeting, even vibrating can be heard and unwanted) -- all these things are doable with Android with one touch. One.

I can launch any app I want directly from the lock screen. Again, easier, faster access.

And don't get me started on the keyboard...

There are a few exceptions, of course, but it's time people realize that most of the things that iOS used to be better at are now either on fair grounds or has been surpassed by Android this day and age. It's not just customizations anymore -- that's now just a bonus. Android has figured out how to do most of the same basic functions in better, faster, easier ways.


EDIT: This post isn't necessarily directed at the OP. I'm happy you found the phone you want and like. Just saying, throughout the thread, noticing people keep mentioning customizations about Android being the only thing "fun" about it. It is fun, but there's much more to Android now than just customizations, is my point.

cuzo
May 4, 2013, 08:04 AM
I think it's time to admit that Android is better for more reasons than just customization.

It's simply easier to do most of the same basic functions on a modern day Android device than on an iOS device. I can make a phone call to a very specific person with literally one touch, as oppose to requiring multiple touches and/or holding for Siri and speaking (not always practical in a place you can't or don't want to talk) and waiting for Siri to dial the right person. One touch on Android that is guaranteed the right person.

It's easier to open new tabs, or switch tabs, or start private browsing on Chrome than it is to do any of that in Safari. Safari has tap to go back to the top that is one advantage, but not much else. The freedom of scrolling all the way to the top with one flick in Chrome also helps mitigate this.

Accessing mail is easier through Gmail if you have multiple accounts. Sharing is easier because you can actually share to any app you want, as oppose to iOS only allowing you to share to FB/Twitter. DropBox, for example, I can share directly to if I snap a picture, check it out from the camera gallery, and decide I want to load this onto DropBox. I can do this right away. With iOS, I have to exit and go to DropBox and find the picture again to "upload" it.

Then things like the dedicated menu button or the dedicated back button; always there, always reliable. With iOS, sometimes the settings is in the main iOS Settings area, sometimes it's in the app. With the "back" button on iOS, sometimes it's top left, sometimes top right, sometimes it's a "cancel" button on the center-bottom of screen. You have to "look" for it many times.

These are but a few examples. I can go on about turning on/off WiFi, Bluetooth, the lock screen when I don't need the added security, or quickly changing the volume toggles (yes there's a "vibrate" hardware switch but when in an important meeting, even vibrating can be heard and unwanted) -- all these things are doable with Android with one touch. One.

I can launch any app I want directly from the lock screen. Again, easier, faster access.

And don't get me started on the keyboard...

There are a few exceptions, of course, but it's time people realize that most of the things that iOS used to be better at are now either on fair grounds or has been surpassed by Android this day and age. It's not just customizations anymore -- that's now just a bonus. Android has figured out how to do most of the same basic functions in better, faster, easier ways.


EDIT: This post isn't necessarily directed at the OP. I'm happy you found the phone you want and like. Just saying, throughout the thread, noticing people keep mentioning customizations about Android being the only thing "fun" about it. It is fun, but there's much more to Android now than just customizations, is my point.

Better is subjective and just depends on the person, it's not "Better" than Iphone imo, imo it is but you have attendancy to push your opinion as gospel around here and people who disagree with you are "sheep".

Nothing is easier and more basic than Iphone....

Most smartphone users don't even turn off wifi or bluetooth or whatever.. they leave it on all day long and forget about it.

How you use your phone you're the minority.

onthecouchagain
May 4, 2013, 08:12 AM
Nothing is easier and more basic than Iphone....


Basic? Sure. Easier? Highly debatable.

----------

So where was this argument of "better is all a matter of preference" back when iOS and iPhone were the better phone and operating system?

There was a time it was a pleasure to recommend the iPhone or defend it. Over the past two years, it's gotten harder and harder to do that.

Now that the competition has caught up and in many areas surpassed the iPhone and iOS, then "better" is now just relative and subjective and can't be used to describe any OS.

Just asking the question.

cuzo
May 4, 2013, 08:48 AM
Basic? Sure. Easier? Highly debatable.

----------

So where was this argument of "better is all a matter of preference" back when iOS and iPhone were the better phone and operating system?

There was a time it was a pleasure to recommend the iPhone or defend it. Over the past two years, it's gotten harder and harder to do that.

Now that the competition has caught up and in many areas surpassed the iPhone and iOS, then "better" is now just relative and subjective and can't be used to describe any OS.

Just asking the question.

Like I said that's debatable for the person. Android is more advanced and it can do things that iOS can't do and I gave two examples of that in multitasking and setting default apps but still that doesn't make it a better Os experience.

For the majority those things aren't a issue due to how the majority uses the phone and even with all the advanced android features you still have to deal with a less stable and more buggy experience.

Take the gs4 and the 9 gigs of internal memory. the memory hog know as touch wiz eats up damn near 8gigs alone, you cant install programs on the memory card anymore and even if you did what if the memory card malfunctions? It won't be as fast as installing to internal memory regardless so that's a trade off. Battery life is still a issue on many android phones while you may have improved stand by time, using the phone you drain faster than the iPhone.

You still have to deal with bloat ware, carriers waiting to install and test updates.... Verizon? Hey, where's the Verizon s4 btw?

It's still a trade off bro, people by iPhones because its just a better all in one solution and your opinion won't change for the way some of us think.

Hey, I remember swift key eating up 50mbs on older android phones and producing lag, some android phones still have lag now you just can't expect a open source os to be as smooth as a closed off os wp8 is pretty smooth and more consistent than android.

It's time to just let it go.

onthecouchagain
May 4, 2013, 09:19 AM
Like I said that's debatable for the person. Android is more advanced and it can do things that iOS can't do and I gave two examples of that in multitasking and setting default apps but still that doesn't make it a better Os experience.

For the majority those things aren't a issue due to how the majority uses the phone and even with all the advanced android features you still have to deal with a less stable and more buggy experience.

Take the gs4 and the 9 gigs of internal memory. the memory hog know as touch wiz eats up damn near 8gigs alone, you cant install programs on the memory card anymore and even if you did what if the memory card malfunctions? It won't be as fast as installing to internal memory regardless so that's a trade off. Battery life is still a issue on many android phones while you may have improved stand by time, using the phone you drain faster than the iPhone.

You still have to deal with bloat ware, carriers waiting to install and test updates.... Verizon? Hey, where's the Verizon s4 btw?

It's still a trade off bro, people by iPhones because its just a better all in one solution and your opinion won't change for the way some of us think.

Hey, I remember swift key eating up 50mbs on older android phones and producing lag, some android phones still have lag now you just can't expect a open source os to be as smooth as a closed off os wp8 is pretty smooth and more consistent than android.

It's time to just let it go.

I don't necessarily disagree with some of the things you say there, so I'll let it be. Only thing I'll point out is that Verizon not getting the S4 has nothing to do with Android the OS itself. I mean, Tmobile only recently got the iPhone 5, but I don't use that to discuss iOS' shortcomings.

And time to iet it go? I'm not holding onto anything. Just posting thoughts on a forum about smartphones. All I did here was point out that Android can now be considered better for more than just the fun of customization.

And that I don't know why we suddenly are so sensitive to calling an OS "better" when many people (myself included) were happily doing so when describing iOS/iPhone not that long ago.. iOS was the better operating system and many people said as much and defended it [easily] as such. Now, the tides have changed and it seems to say a competitive platform is better is unacceptable and somehow insults the subjectivity of a user.

Again, just throwing the point out there.

Irishman
May 4, 2013, 09:41 AM
I think it's time to admit that Android is better for more reasons than just customization.

It's simply easier to do most of the same basic functions on a modern day Android device than on an iOS device. I can make a phone call to a very specific person with literally one touch, as oppose to requiring multiple touches and/or holding for Siri and speaking (not always practical in a place you can't or don't want to talk) and waiting for Siri to dial the right person. One touch on Android that is guaranteed the right person.

It's easier to open new tabs, or switch tabs, or start private browsing on Chrome than it is to do any of that in Safari. Safari has tap to go back to the top that is one advantage, but not much else. The freedom of scrolling all the way to the top with one flick in Chrome also helps mitigate this.

Accessing mail is easier through Gmail if you have multiple accounts. Sharing is easier because you can actually share to any app you want, as oppose to iOS only allowing you to share to FB/Twitter. DropBox, for example, I can share directly to if I snap a picture, check it out from the camera gallery, and decide I want to load this onto DropBox. I can do this right away. With iOS, I have to exit and go to DropBox and find the picture again to "upload" it.

Then things like the dedicated menu button or the dedicated back button; always there, always reliable. With iOS, sometimes the settings is in the main iOS Settings area, sometimes it's in the app. With the "back" button on iOS, sometimes it's top left, sometimes top right, sometimes it's a "cancel" button on the center-bottom of screen. You have to "look" for it many times.

These are but a few examples. I can go on about turning on/off WiFi, Bluetooth, the lock screen when I don't need the added security, or quickly changing the volume toggles (yes there's a "vibrate" hardware switch but when in an important meeting, even vibrating can be heard and unwanted) -- all these things are doable with Android with one touch. One.

I can launch any app I want directly from the lock screen. Again, easier, faster access.

And don't get me started on the keyboard...

There are a few exceptions, of course, but it's time people realize that most of the things that iOS used to be better at are now either on fair grounds or has been surpassed by Android this day and age. It's not just customizations anymore -- that's now just a bonus. Android has figured out how to do most of the same basic functions in better, faster, easier ways.


EDIT: This post isn't necessarily directed at the OP. I'm happy you found the phone you want and like. Just saying, throughout the thread, noticing people keep mentioning customizations about Android being the only thing "fun" about it. It is fun, but there's much more to Android now than just customizations, is my point.

When you cherry pick use cases and features, you can make any point you like.

AppleRobert
May 4, 2013, 09:57 AM
The screen size of the iphone never drew me to it to even bother.

onthecouchagain
May 4, 2013, 10:04 AM
When you cherry pick use cases and features, you can make any point you like.

You don't make phone calls? Or text/email or do anything else that involves the keyboard? Use Safari? You don't ever access settings or navigate back in apps?

Sure I mention a few special cases (like the ability to turn off my lock screen when I don't need the security versus having to punch in my code every single time no matter what), but I also point out plenty of basic everyday uses.

onthecouchagain
May 4, 2013, 10:16 AM
Again, I'm happy to say any OS system is "better" than another. And did so happily a mere 1.5 to 2 years ago when I would speak about the iPhone and iOS. No one seemed to have a problem then regarding subjectivity or relative use. Now it seems we can't say Android is better for fear of stomping on people's preferences and subjectivity. I'm not saying these things don't exist anymore; they of course still do, as they did two years ago when iOS was the better OS. Why are people so sensitive about saying Android is the better OS but not when people say iOS is the better OS? It's okay to admit one is better than the other without having to constantly reference preferences.

I used to constantly recommend the iPhone/iOS to people. Now, I rarely ever do. Friends, colleagues and family that know me come to me for advice regarding tech all the time. I tell them the same thing, that the times have changed and that at this point and time, Android is the better option unless there are very specific reasons why the iPhone would be better suited.

If we're interested in discussing where and how iOS could improve, we need to stop being so sensitive about pointing out its shortcomings. If we always chock it up to preference, then we'd just cancel each other out. Preference still exists, mind you, but again, depending on the discussion, sometimes it's okay to let it sit at the sidelines. Otherwise, one person will say I prefer this, and another person will say, well I don't and I prefer it the complete other way. And if all we can go on is preference, then the conversation is over. There's no more room to discuss improvements.

Understand that I do this with Android too. Dig through my post history. I've pointed out plenty of shortcomings of Android stock or otherwise, and of its manufacturers, from Samsung to HTC to LG. I've even criticize Google directly for some of their foolishness, too.

I'm not trying to be contentious, and I do apologize if there are any misunderstandings. I'll take some of that blame, but likewise, y'all need to relax when I say "Android is better than iOS." I shouldn't have to put a disclaimer every time that it's my opinion or my preference or that you can't prefer something else.

Hope people understand.

Irishman
May 4, 2013, 10:41 AM
You don't make phone calls? Or text/email or do anything else that involves the keyboard? Use Safari? You don't ever access settings or navigate back in apps?

Sure I mention a few special cases (like the ability to turn off my lock screen when I don't need the security versus having to punch in my code every single time no matter what), but I also point out plenty of basic everyday uses.

I'm just a normal phone user. I don't need to maximize the efficiency of button presses, or minimize the number of screens I have to go to in order to toggle BT on and off.

I'm not a phone nerd. Phone nerds are the ones who - by and large - are screaming for these things. Apple doesn't design their iPhone for for that tiny but vocal minority.

adder7712
May 4, 2013, 10:48 AM
The iPhone 5 is a good phone but I can't handle how limited it is.

Internaut
May 4, 2013, 10:55 AM
I bought an iPad Mini this week, to augment rather than replace my Nexus 7. What quickly became overwhelmingly clear was that the Apple experience is far more polished than the Nexus 7's pure Google. It's nice to have a foot in both systems again though, and the Nexus is not without its advantages.

cuzo
May 4, 2013, 11:05 AM
I don't necessarily disagree with some of the things you say there, so I'll let it be. Only thing I'll point out is that Verizon not getting the S4 has nothing to do with Android the OS itself. I mean, Tmobile only recently got the iPhone 5, but I don't use that to discuss iOS' shortcomings.

And time to iet it go? I'm not holding onto anything. Just posting thoughts on a forum about smartphones. All I did here was point out that Android can now be considered better for more than just the fun of customization.

And that I don't know why we suddenly are so sensitive to calling an OS "better" when many people (myself included) were happily doing so when describing iOS/iPhone not that long ago.. iOS was the better operating system and many people said as much and defended it [easily] as such. Now, the tides have changed and it seems to say a competitive platform is better is unacceptable and somehow insults the subjectivity of a user.

Again, just throwing the point out there.

It's not really that serious to many that's what you're not getting here. For someone like me picking up and putting down a phone is all I do, I don't need all the extra hoopla. I'm a basic smartphone user and that's just my style and preference. I don't need to root or hack or whatever. What's competitive to you is nothing to many. It's not really that serious, I have a accurate keyboard, loads of apps and decent battery life. That's all I really need.

I'm just a normal phone user. I don't need to maximize the efficiency of button presses, or minimize the number of screens I have to go to in order to toggle BT on and off.

I'm not a phone nerd. Phone nerds are the ones who - by and large - are screaming for these things. Apple doesn't design their iPhone for for that tiny but vocal minority.

That's what he doesn't get it's pointless explaining and sitting here fighting over a phone, it's a phone... That's it.

These websites I visit them and I think some androids are cool but I'm not selling my iPhone to buy one. I'm not a phone junky, part of the reason I bought the iPhone is for this very reason, simplicity and the ease of use and piece if mind. If I had a android s3 I'd probably be shelling out money for a s4 or one or whatever new phone is out when in reality they all do the same exact thing.

onthecouchagain
May 4, 2013, 11:13 AM
I'm just a normal phone user. I don't need to maximize the efficiency of button presses, or minimize the number of screens I have to go to in order to toggle BT on and off.

I'm not a phone nerd. Phone nerds are the ones who - by and large - are screaming for these things. Apple doesn't design their iPhone for for that tiny but vocal minority.

Um... wanting things to be easier has nothing to do with being a nerd. But okay.

Like I said, hard to defend iOS, nowadays, isn't it? So Android doing basic things easier than iOS suddenly means only nerds want things easier.

All righty!

----------

It's not really that serious to many that's what you're not getting here. For someone like me picking up and putting down a phone is all I do, I don't need all the extra hoopla. I'm a basic smartphone user and that's just my style and preference. I don't need to root or hack or whatever. What's competitive to you is nothing to many. It's not really that serious, I have a accurate keyboard, loads of apps and decent battery life. That's all I really need.



More power to you. I'm not sure why you're here to discuss alternatives, then. And why you'd have a problem with me pointing out iOS' shortcomings. Those shortcomings don't affect you. I'm not saying they do. Again, there's that conversation, and then there's another type of conversation where preferences can be sidelined. Otherwise, at this point, I'd just say, "well, I need more than decent battery life." And our preferences cancel each other out. What's the point of even having forums then?

Again, more power to you and your phone of choice.

And maybe you haven't read this post yet in this thread:

Again, I'm happy to say any OS system is "better" than another. And did so happily a mere 1.5 to 2 years ago when I would speak about the iPhone and iOS. No one seemed to have a problem then regarding subjectivity or relative use. Now it seems we can't say Android is better for fear of stomping on people's preferences and subjectivity. I'm not saying these things don't exist anymore; they of course still do, as they did two years ago when iOS was the better OS. Why are people so sensitive about saying Android is the better OS but not when people say iOS is the better OS? It's okay to admit one is better than the other without having to constantly reference preferences.

I used to constantly recommend the iPhone/iOS to people. Now, I rarely ever do. Friends, colleagues and family that know me come to me for advice regarding tech all the time. I tell them the same thing, that the times have changed and that at this point and time, Android is the better option unless there are very specific reasons why the iPhone would be better suited.

If we're interested in discussing where and how iOS could improve, we need to stop being so sensitive about pointing out its shortcomings. If we always chock it up to preference, then we'd just cancel each other out. Preference still exists, mind you, but again, depending on the discussion, sometimes it's okay to let it sit at the sidelines. Otherwise, one person will say I prefer this, and another person will say, well I don't and I prefer it the complete other way. And if all we can go on is preference, then the conversation is over. There's no more room to discuss improvements.

Understand that I do this with Android too. Dig through my post history. I've pointed out plenty of shortcomings of Android stock or otherwise, and of its manufacturers, from Samsung to HTC to LG. I've even criticize Google directly for some of their foolishness, too.

I'm not trying to be contentious, and I do apologize if there are any misunderstandings. I'll take some of that blame, but likewise, y'all need to relax when I say "Android is better than iOS." I shouldn't have to put a disclaimer every time that it's my opinion or my preference or that you can't prefer something else.

Hope people understand.

cuzo
May 4, 2013, 12:26 PM
Um... wanting things to be easier has nothing to do with being a nerd. But okay.

Like I said, hard to defend iOS, nowadays, isn't it? So Android doing basic things easier than iOS suddenly means only nerds want things easier.

All righty!

----------




More power to you. I'm not sure why you're here to discuss alternatives, then. And why you'd have a problem with me pointing out iOS' shortcomings. Those shortcomings don't affect you. I'm not saying they do. Again, there's that conversation, and then there's another type of conversation where preferences can be sidelined. Otherwise, at this point, I'd just say, "well, I need more than decent battery life." And our preferences cancel each other out. What's the point of even having forums then?

Again, more power to you and your phone of choice.

And maybe you haven't read this post yet in this thread:

Because the core of what you argue about hasn't really changed beside five or take a couple new features so then again what are you continuously arguing over?

b166er
May 4, 2013, 08:06 PM
Right now one of the main things drawing me away from WP8 and toward Android is it's compatibility with third party devices like the fitbit and the pebble. Those things aren't supported on WP8. So while I love my 920, I am gonna pick up an S4 next week. Also really looking forward to iOS7. If it has the kind of changes I most want to see than I will sacrifice screen size and go back to iOS.

iOS is smoother, more polished, and generally just the easiest mobile OS to use, but I like WP8 a lot (but it needs some time) and Android has gotten so much better the last couple of years.

jamesbii
May 4, 2013, 09:02 PM
I've been a flip flopper when it comes to iOS and Android since the G1 debuted. I started with the G1, then moved to the original iPhone when I broke my G1 screen. I won't bore you with my device history, but over time Android has made incremental improvements to its system just as iOS has. Android 4.0 was a major overhaul that has no real parallel with iOS in terms of such a complete refinement of the user experience. With 4.1 Jelly Bean or higher on a newer device I see very little difference in fluidity, lagging or crashes between my iPhone 5 and Nexus 4 as long as you don't get too crazy and start downloading shady stuff on your phone. I use Apple for my computers, so I thought I would have a hard time replacing conveniences like iMessage and other features that made syncing so seamless. It turns out that, for me, this was not the case. Android offers a lot of apps that give those same features (shout out to MightyText!), but you'd never realize the extent of Android's latest refinements without spending time with it as your daily driver. That being said, I still use my iPhone more often than my Nexus for no particular reason. For those people who don't use OS X, the iOS software doesn't have a huge set of advantages. I'm not a big fan of the dark theme of stock Android, but that can be changed quite easily. My favorite Android features are, without a doubt, the ability the change screen brightness/toggle wifi without entering star settings menu, and being able to launch apps from the lock screen. On the flip side, I have yet to find an Android phone with top notch hardware that is a comfortable size for one handed use. I also have to give the iPhone a clear win on battery life vs my previous Androids (HTC One X, Galaxy Note, Nexus 4).

Having contributed essentially nothing to the conversation, I'll go ahead and conclude here lol. Please no haters!

SlCKB0Y
May 5, 2013, 04:29 AM
I have been a android user from the very beginning and defended android to no end.

Which Android phones have you owned?

slu
May 5, 2013, 08:46 AM
I'm just a normal phone user. I don't need to maximize the efficiency of button presses, or minimize the number of screens I have to go to in order to toggle BT on and off.

I'm not a phone nerd. Phone nerds are the ones who - by and large - are screaming for these things. Apple doesn't design their iPhone for for that tiny but vocal minority.

A "normal" phone user would find very little difference between iOS and Android 4.2 stock.

SlCKB0Y
May 5, 2013, 09:18 AM
Why are people so sensitive about saying Android is the better OS but not when people say iOS is the better OS? It's okay to admit one is better than the other without having to constantly refer

Because on macrumors you are entitled to any opinion you like - as long as it is pro-Apple. If it is then you are an intelligent, rational person. If not then you are a troll or a fool! :D

----------

um... Wanting things to be easier has nothing to do with being a nerd. But okay.

Like i said, hard to defend ios, nowadays, isn't it? So android doing basic things easier than ios suddenly means only nerds want things easier.

All righty!

:D

Again, keep up mate! As soon as Android does something better, that characteristic is no longer an important criterion!

iOS has more Apps!
*Android surpasses this*
iOS has better quality Apps

iOS is a more efficient interface!
* Android updates UI *
Only phone geeks care about a few more clicks!

iPhone has much better specs!
* Android OEMs bring out higher spec phones *
Specs are meaningless, its about smoothness!
* Google releases project butter *

Android phone's higher benchmarks are meaningless!
* iPhone 5 does well in benchmarks *
Benchmarks are a very good indicator of phone performance!

If it doesn't have a retina res screen it's worthless!
* Competitors release retina-spec screens *
Resolution doesn't matter - brightness/colour reproduction/readability are most important!!
* Apple releases low res iPad mini *
You can't see the pixels either way on that sized screen!

Look how big and glorious this iPhone 4 screen is!
* Competitors release 4"+ screens
Those screens are ridiculously big, how do you fit that in your pocket! 3.5" is perfect!
* Apple releases 4" screen *
It's got a different aspect ratio so I can use it one handed! 4" is perfect!

Top end Android and Apple phones are roughly the same cost!
* Google releases well specced Nexus device for half the price *
It's pathetic, they have to give their stuff away!

This LG screen/Toshiba SSD in my Macbook Air sucks! I'm taking it back for one with a superior Samsung screen/SSD!
* Apple stops using Samsung as a parts supplier because of competition in the phone market *
The picture ghosting on this LG panel is hardly noticeable!

I could go on and on and on and on....

But it all started with this one:

*Apple borrows heavily from PARC design*
"Picasso had a saying - 'good artists copy, great artists steal' - and we have always been shameless about stealing great ideas. - Steve Jobs
*Microsoft borrow heavily from Apple design*
Thieves!

onthecouchagain
May 5, 2013, 09:28 AM
Because on macrumors you are entitled to any opinion you like - as long as it is pro-Apple. If it is then you are an intelligent, rational person. If not then you are a troll or a fool! :D

----------



:d

Sometimes I forget the rules. :D

NiKeZz
May 5, 2013, 09:33 AM
I've had the HTC One for about 5 days now after owning an iPhone 4s for around a year. I have to be honest with myself and you folks... Having to babysit the battery and download apps that help in that process is the biggest gripe I have. I will be going back to the iPhone 5 this week as I need a phone that works all the time. Not something that I have to tinker with to stay a float.

onthecouchagain
May 5, 2013, 09:50 AM
I've had the HTC One for about 5 days now after owning an iPhone 4s for around a year. I have to be honest with myself and you folks... Having to babysit the battery and download apps that help in that process is the biggest gripe I have. I will be going back to the iPhone 5 this week as I need a phone that works all the time. Not something that I have to tinker with to stay a float.

My experience with the One is quite different. This has been easily the best battery life I've enjoyed on any smartphone, iPhone or otherwise. I get home from my typical usage pattern with roughly 50% of juice still left. I easily manage 15+ hours a day. Very impressed by this considering this is a phone from HTC who have historically had horrid battery life.

Did you turn off Google Now? That might be the culprit. Realize you can keep some cards, but other cards can be useless depending on what you're interested in. For example, I don't need Google Now to poll about sports stats or tell me traffic updates as I rarely drive. Turning those certain cards off help.

But otherwise, enjoy your iPhone 5. I thought the battery life on the 5 was pretty average.

----------

iOS is a more efficient interface!
* Android updates UI *
Only phone geeks care about a few more clicks!



Heh, this is almost exactly how my conversation with Irishman went in this thread:

I pointed out that Android is so much more than just customizations, that even doing most basic everyday phone stuff is easier than iOS. Irishman points out I'm nitpicking features. I point out the examples I used were making phone calls, browsing the web, etc. He points out only nerds want to do things with less steps.

Right on cue. ;)

bean dip
May 5, 2013, 02:01 PM
My experience with the One is quite different. This has been easily the best battery life I've enjoyed on any smartphone, iPhone or otherwise. I get home from my typical usage pattern with roughly 50% of juice still left. I easily manage 15+ hours a day. Very impressed by this considering this is a phone from HTC who have historically had horrid battery life.

Did you turn off Google Now? That might be the culprit. Realize you can keep some cards, but other cards can be useless depending on what you're interested in. For example, I don't need Google Now to poll about sports stats or tell me traffic updates as I rarely drive. Turning those certain cards off help.

But otherwise, enjoy your iPhone 5. I thought the battery life on the 5 was pretty average.

----------




Heh, this is almost exactly how my conversation with Irishman went in this thread:

I pointed out that Android is so much more than just customizations, that even doing most basic everyday phone stuff is easier than iOS. Irishman points out I'm nitpicking features. I point out the examples I used were making phone calls, browsing the web, etc. He points out only nerds want to do things with less steps.

Right on cue. ;)
Wow, I don't even know what to say. Comparing the Ones battery life to the iphone is just bonkers. You must of stumbled upon the holy grail of HTC Ones. I know a few people that have the phone and one of their only gripes is battery life. Every single one of them. Two of these said people came from the iphone 5.

Internaut
May 5, 2013, 02:12 PM
Wow, I don't even know what to say. Comparing the Ones battery life to the iphone is just bonkers. You must of stumbled upon the holy grail of HTC Ones. I know a few people that have the phone and one of their only gripes is battery life. Every single one of them. Two of these said people came from the iphone 5.

I've yet to encounter a situation where an iOS device's battery life didn't spank that of an Android equivalent. That's just the way of it. My solution? A spare battery and charging stand for my S3 :D. Not often needed when home (the S3 is good for a day of intensive use) but has saved my life a few times when travelling.

NiKeZz
May 5, 2013, 02:25 PM
Wow, I don't even know what to say. Comparing the Ones battery life to the iphone is just bonkers. You must of stumbled upon the holy grail of HTC Ones. I know a few people that have the phone and one of their only gripes is battery life. Every single one of them. Two of these said people came from the iphone 5.

I'm getting comparable battery life when I rarely turn my phone on, clear all the open apps, download an app that helps you monitor the battery, turn down the brightness, etc. I don't want to have to do these things to keep my battery life decent though and I never had to worry about these things on my iPhone. I'm still holding onto the phone for a few more days to give the battery time to calibrate.... But if I can't make it through a day of work without having to put it on the charger, then I'll be jumping ship.

ChazUK
May 5, 2013, 03:28 PM
Enjoy your iPhone OP. at least you got around to giving it a fair chance and were pleasantly surprised. :)

So much good choice out there I think we can all find something that'll keep us happy, it's a pity it ends up in subjective bickering so many times! :(

thehustleman
May 5, 2013, 05:41 PM
I think that's the problem with both sides - not giving the other a fair shot.

Iphone people don't try Android long at all then rule it out, Android people rule out ios because of its limited nature and lack of features.

Both fall short and both excel over the other

jrswizzle
May 5, 2013, 09:52 PM
Wow, I don't even know what to say. Comparing the Ones battery life to the iphone is just bonkers. You must of stumbled upon the holy grail of HTC Ones. I know a few people that have the phone and one of their only gripes is battery life. Every single one of them. Two of these said people came from the iphone 5.

I'm an iOS guy and I have to halfway concur with Couch here - my One gets great battery life, on par or better than my iP5. Where I disagree with him is that I think the iPhone 5 gets great battery life as well.

Tarzanman
May 6, 2013, 09:33 AM
Android people rule out ios because of its limited nature and lack of features.


Call me crazy.... but isn't that a *really* good reason to rule out iOS? :confused:

onthecouchagain
May 6, 2013, 09:48 AM
Call me crazy.... but isn't that a *really* good reason to rule out iOS? :confused:

Very.

Dontazemebro
May 6, 2013, 11:18 AM
I probably never really gave it a chance either. I've always been all about android since the G1 and cupcake days and didn't get on the ios bandwagon till the iPhone 4. Tried it for a while but honestly the only thing I really like about ios is the app selection. Everything else just seems like taking a step backwards from android. The worst of it for me was that there wasn't a doggone dedicated back button. I mean who doesn't make a freaking back button. Even my old dumb feature phones had that.

sarcosis
May 6, 2013, 11:50 AM
Call me crazy.... but isn't that a *really* good reason to rule out iOS? :confused:

I would say it depends on what you want your phone to do. Sometimes limited is in fact better.

dojoman
May 6, 2013, 04:04 PM
It's simply easier to do most of the same basic functions on a modern day Android device than on an iOS device. I can make a phone call to a very specific person with literally one touch, as oppose to requiring multiple touches and/or holding for Siri and speaking (not always practical in a place you can't or don't want to talk) and waiting for Siri to dial the right person. One touch on Android that is guaranteed the right person.

How do you make a phone call to specific person with one touch? Is it a short cut on lock screen?

sarcosis
May 6, 2013, 05:03 PM
You add a quick dial to your home screen. It varies from launcher to launcher. But you generally have long press the home screen to bring up you "add" menu. Rather than say picking widgets, you select shortcuts. Direct dial and direct messaging is one of the options.

For the lock screen, you can set it up too using Dash clock and the direct dial extent ion. That only works on 4.2.x.

YourAvgUser
May 6, 2013, 05:19 PM
How do you make a phone call to specific person with one touch? Is it a short cut on lock screen?

Have we really gotten to the point where we are nitpicking things like this? Android is simply easier, and iOS is rotten, because you can call your boyfriend with a shortcut, but you still need to dial out to everyone else :mad:

dojoman
May 6, 2013, 05:27 PM
Have we really gotten to the point where we are nitpicking things like this? Android is simply easier, and iOS is rotten, because you can call your boyfriend with a shortcut, but you still need to dial out to everyone else :mad:

uhmmm... I was simply asking question since I've been using HTC one for only a few weeks. Finally figured it out from above post.
Android can do some things easier but I still cannot find a way to fully backup my phone without rooting? Any answer to that? iTunes can backup and restore to full state.
Some things are better on each OS. None of them are perfect.

Dontazemebro
May 6, 2013, 06:09 PM
uhmmm... I was simply asking question since I've been using HTC one for only a few weeks. Finally figured it out from above post.
Android can do some things easier but I still cannot find a way to fully backup my phone without rooting? Any answer to that? iTunes can backup and restore to full state.
Some things are better on each OS. None of them are perfect.

It requires root but a nandroid backup is truly worth it. Backs up everything including the kitchen sink.

mib1800
May 6, 2013, 07:04 PM
uhmmm... I was simply asking question since I've been using HTC one for only a few weeks. Finally figured it out from above post.
Android can do some things easier but I still cannot find a way to fully backup my phone without rooting? Any answer to that? iTunes can backup and restore to full state.
Some things are better on each OS. None of them are perfect.

Look for Helium in playstore. It allows you to backup without root connected to a usb.

sarcosis
May 6, 2013, 07:35 PM
uhmmm... I was simply asking question since I've been using HTC one for only a few weeks. Finally figured it out from above post.
Android can do some things easier but I still cannot find a way to fully backup my phone without rooting? Any answer to that? iTunes can backup and restore to full state.
Some things are better on each OS. None of them are perfect.

Carbon (not then twitter app of the same name) works too. Its the backup client from then folks who make CWM. I'm not sure how good it is, but its worth a try.

onthecouchagain
May 6, 2013, 09:21 PM
How do you make a phone call to specific person with one touch? Is it a short cut on lock screen?

I don't think Sense offers it but Nova Launcher and stock Android allows you to create a "Direct Dial" widget (also "Direct Text" for opening up a text to a specific person). Pick it, then pick the contact you want and an icon will be placed on your homescreen anywhere you want. One touch dial.

I obviously won't share the screen cap for personal reasons but I have my most common contacts on a homescreen, then a folder on my home screen (you can put Direct Dial widgets into a folder) of less-frequent-but-still-more-frequent-than-normal contacts for a two-step touch access.

Everyone else requires opening my Contacts app. :)

dojoman
May 7, 2013, 11:12 AM
I don't think Sense offers it but Nova Launcher and stock Android allows you to create a "Direct Dial" widget (also "Direct Text" for opening up a text to a specific person). Pick it, then pick the contact you want and an icon will be placed on your homescreen anywhere you want. One touch dial.

I obviously won't share the screen cap for personal reasons but I have my most common contacts on a homescreen, then a folder on my home screen (you can put Direct Dial widgets into a folder) of less-frequent-but-still-more-frequent-than-normal contacts for a two-step touch access.

Everyone else requires opening my Contacts app. :)

I figured it out yesterday. Sense does have a widget for direct dial. Thanks.

thehustleman
May 7, 2013, 01:29 PM
Call me crazy.... but isn't that a *really* good reason to rule out iOS? :confused:

For me and many other users very much so.

But iOS is good for people who agent tech savvy or those that don't care about individuality. Their phone can look like everyone else's without issue. Long as they can do the basic things (talk, text, Web, games) and that's it.

If you're a basic user, why do you even need an advanced os?

YourAvgUser
May 7, 2013, 01:43 PM
For me and many other users very much so.

But iOS is good for people who agent tech savvy or those that don't care about individuality. Their phone can look like everyone else's without issue. Long as they can do the basic things (talk, text, Web, games) and that's it.

If you're a basic user, why do you even need an advanced os?

Ya thats exactly what iPhone and iPad users are. People who aren't tech savy and sheep... They line up and swallow w/e all mighty Apple feeds them :rolleyes:

It's funny that people love Android b/c they give you choice. But when people choose iOS devices they are labeled for their decisions. Looks like a lot of the people on the Alternatives forums are not too tech savy, b/c a lot tote around an iPad.

thehustleman
May 7, 2013, 01:57 PM
Ya thats exactly what iPhone and iPad users are. People who aren't tech savy and sheep... They line up and swallow w/e all mighty Apple feeds them :rolleyes:

It's funny that people love Android b/c they give you choice. But when people choose iOS devices they are labeled for their decisions. Looks like a lot of the people on the Alternatives forums are not too tech savy, b/c a lot tote around an iPad.

I never called anyone a sheep.

People buy what they like or what is marketed best.

People who buy Android are labeled, people who buy ios are labeled.

Personally I want an ipad as a gaming companion to my Galaxy s III.



I'll never understand why developers would rather make a game first for the platform with only 25% of the market when they can make it for the platform with 70% of the market.

You'd think they'd make it for Android first since there are way more potential users there, but they don't.

It's just strange to me.

YourAvgUser
May 7, 2013, 02:34 PM
I never called anyone a sheep.

People buy what they like or what is marketed best.

People who buy Android are labeled, people who buy ios are labeled.

Personally I want an ipad as a gaming companion to my Galaxy s III.



I'll never understand why developers would rather make a game first for the platform with only 25% of the market when they can make it for the platform with 70% of the market.

You'd think they'd make it for Android first since there are way more potential users there, but they don't.

It's just strange to me.

A few generalizations can be made from statistics (take them w/ a grain of salt). First, market share is only quarter to quarter growth in sales, and it is not the full picture. App revenue is still higher on iOS. Even though Android is coming really close, they should have a significant advantage over iOS b/c of sheer volume. But even as app revenue favors Android, it still looks good on the iOS side when you factor in market share.

The variation is also less across all iOS devices (all iPhones and all iPads) than it is on Android. It is easier to achieve a more consistent user experience across all similar devices than across hundreds of different ones, built w/ different hardware configs, using different OS versions.

Going back to market share, close examination would show that there are a lot of low end Android devices carrying that market share. And while the iPhone 4 and 4S split sales w/ the 5, the differences are far and few between these 3 devices. And while we are arguing low end Android devices, these consumers are less likely to pay for apps, look for utilities outside of the basic functions, not likely have hardware to support.

Stuntman06
May 7, 2013, 06:12 PM
I think that's the problem with both sides - not giving the other a fair shot.

Iphone people don't try Android long at all then rule it out, Android people rule out ios because of its limited nature and lack of features.

Both fall short and both excel over the other

If you are use to one platform, another one will seem foreign and may have some differences that are uncomfortable or frustrating. As an Android user, my first experience with an iPhone was a little frustrating. I was trying to do certain things like putting the cursor in the middle of a word and couldn't figure out why it wasn't working. Figured it out later. I'm sure people going from an iPhone to an Android will also find some of these differences frustrating.

thehustleman
May 7, 2013, 06:45 PM
If you are use to one platform, another one will seem foreign and may have some differences that are uncomfortable or frustrating. As an Android user, my first experience with an iPhone was a little frustrating. I was trying to do certain things like putting the cursor in the middle of a word and couldn't figure out why it wasn't working. Figured it out later. I'm sure people going from an iPhone to an Android will also find some of these differences frustrating.

Yeah that's what I faced when I switched to Android.

I was iphone all the way until I went Android

zosokm
May 7, 2013, 08:26 PM
I have to agree. I have a Nexus 4 and an iPhone 5, and I found the Nexus collecting a lot of dust because the iPhone had much more appeal out of the box. The Nexus display was crisp, but colors were faded. The camera was good, but usually lagged behind the picture I got with the iPhone. The built-in speaker was tinny and quiet, and battery life was nowhere near the iPhone's. Then one day I decided to take the full plunge with a root, custom ROM, cutom kernel, etc. I was able to get in the Nexus and do some serious work to change the audio signal processing and get the speaker to amazing volumes without distortion, though the sound can be a bit painful because the response is mostly in the higher frequency range. I changed the compression settings for audio and video recording so the videos come out much, much better with fuller audio. I got a color and gamut calibrator to modify the display and, while the Nexus 4 forums are still working on how to get the settings good enough to match the iPhone, the display is gorgeous now. Dynamic CPU controls save tons of battery and provide boosts up to 1.9ghz if using only one (of the four!) CPU cores. Needless to say it took me several days to do all of this, but if you put it on a store shelf next to the stock version you could easily ask more money for these customizations. The hardware was all there, but the software prevented it from reaching its fullest potential. What I found more strange was that, after developers found ways to correct the complaints about the Nexus display after LG and Google largely ignored them, Google promptly issued an update to render the developers' improvements ineffective. That struck me as an odd move, especially if neither Google nor LG were willing to optimize what should be an absolutely gorgeous display. It has all the makings of a top-notch screen, but just wasn't quite calibrated properly.
I think that is the biggest difference between iOS and the many Android phones I've used. iOS is polished and simple, and the iPhone may not have the best camera, the fastest processor, biggest battery, etc. when compared to every phone on the market, but it is positioned so that it has a good overall package that gives good performance in each area and usually holds its own in head-to-head comparison. Most people tend to compare the one iPhone to the array of other phones and then explain why the iPhone is inferior, forgetting that the comparison they are making would require a Frankenstein version of all the other phones that beat it in one area or another. For example, the HTC One X had a beautiful display, but dismal battery life. The Samsung Galaxy line (used to) have oddly tinted and slightly grainy displays, but awesome cameras with endless options for photo taking. If you're willing to do some tinkering to get the max out of your device and make it distinctly personal, only Android can really provide that. If you prefer to go to the store and have something that is going to hit most marks relatively well with not much effort on your part, then Apple is a better choice for some. I personally think both are robust and entertaining platforms, but the only caveat is that not all Androids are equal--choose wisely! Pick the one you like, does what you need, feels good in your hands, whatever. Most people use only a fraction of the huge abundance of features on their phones anyways. And when in doubt, just get one of each ;-).


I think the last paragraph nicely summed up why many people pick up iphones.
Yes every other phone seems to have special features, but for someone who just wants a good phone and can't be bothered to do too much research - an iphone is still a very good buy.

There seems to be a general bias away from iphones nowadays - because they have become main stream and "boring". A lot of people I know have bought androids because they "have heard" that they can do a lot more with android (which is true). Yet they are unable to use even the basic functionality of android. (Clearly most of them are not tech savvy and are very unlikely to have even heard of macrumors!)

cynics
May 8, 2013, 07:22 AM
I never really gave iOS a chance either. Then my employer bought me an iPhone. Free phone and service > any OS, to me. After a month or so I've actually learn to prefer it.

I'm actually in the process of switching to an Apple ecosystem for its integration between devices.

sentinelsx
May 8, 2013, 09:44 AM
I never called anyone a sheep.

People buy what they like or what is marketed best.

People who buy Android are labeled, people who buy ios are labeled.

Personally I want an ipad as a gaming companion to my Galaxy s III.



I'll never understand why developers would rather make a game first for the platform with only 25% of the market when they can make it for the platform with 70% of the market.

You'd think they'd make it for Android first since there are way more potential users there, but they don't.

It's just strange to me.

70% of users are not using galaxy s 3/4, Htc one/one x/one s.

Majority of that marketshare is actually low to midrange handsets. Optimizing a good game for all of them is a nightmare.

Optimizing the same for just one target (iOS) as iPhones are not as wildly different apart from mild processor and memory bumps, is much easier.

Also every one who buys an iPhone can run it. 4/4s/5 (even 3gs ran 2012 3D games, not sure about the new ones, i suspect it can't now) are pretty solid in that department.

Just put yourself in a developer's shoes and then see. A developer is also targeting the return on his investment which seems to be better on iOS.

daveathall
May 8, 2013, 11:13 AM
I was the other way round, I never really gave Android a chance, I had a iPhone 3GS, 4, 4S and 5 and then tried a Galaxy S3, I preferred it over the iP5 and have since enjoyed a Nexus 4 and Galaxy S4, I can't see me going back to iOS any time soon.

AppleDApp
May 8, 2013, 11:56 AM
I was the other way round, I never really gave Android a chance, I had a iPhone 3GS, 4, 4S and 5 and then tried a Galaxy S3, I preferred it over the iP5 and have since enjoyed a Nexus 4 and Galaxy S4, I can't see me going back to iOS any time soon.

How was the transition? Any must have apps that you couldn't find on android or apps you wished were on iOS?

daveathall
May 8, 2013, 12:34 PM
How was the transition? Any must have apps that you couldn't find on android or apps you wished were on iOS?

Surprisingly, the transition was quite smooth, I am not technically gifted so this is saying something, I searched the web to find out how to export/import my calendar and contacts across to Google and use Google music to store my music from iTunes, I still subscribe to iTunes match and purchase most of my music from iTunes though.

I am not a gamer and used recognised apps so didn't find that many that weren't available, 1Password is slightly different in that it syncs from Dropbox rather than directly from the app on my MBP or iPad.

I have just been scrutinising my phone but honestly can't see/remember any apps that are missing or of so poor quality that I never re downloaded from my iPhone days, although I am led to believe that this is not the case on the gaming front.

I haven't got the best of eyesight so do appreciate the larger screens but do understand that others prefer smaller, for me, it is so nice not to have to put on my glasses to use the phone to surf or read books. :)

If I had to pick an app that I would like on iOS it would be Swiftkey, absolutely wonderful app.

Stuntman06
May 8, 2013, 01:04 PM
I think the last paragraph nicely summed up why many people pick up iphones.
Yes every other phone seems to have special features, but for someone who just wants a good phone and can't be bothered to do too much research - an iphone is still a very good buy.

The iPhone has that brand name recognition. People who want something more than just a feature phone, but don't know much about smartphones are more likely to have heard about the iPhone than any other smartphone. Samsung has become much more popular in the past year, but I think that for the general public, more have hear of the iPhone than any other smartphone.

There seems to be a general bias away from iphones nowadays - because they have become main stream and "boring". A lot of people I know have bought androids because they "have heard" that they can do a lot more with android (which is true). Yet they are unable to use even the basic functionality of android. (Clearly most of them are not tech savvy and are very unlikely to have even heard of macrumors!)

There are still a lot of people who do very little over an above making calls and texting on their phones. I happen to know some people who are like that. Phones that don't have too many options and features is more than enough for these people. Of these type of people that I know, most have iPhones and some have Androids. Even an iPhone can be confusing for these people. I have had to help some family members set up their iOS devices. I don't think that there would be that much of a difference with Android. They won't take advantage of the huge benefit Android has to offer in features, but they certainly won't be at that much of a disadvantage using Android over iOS.

daneoni
May 8, 2013, 09:39 PM
I'm pretty much the opposite. I've given every platform a fair chance and have come out disappointed.

Android (LG NX4)

-UI design and responsiveness vastly improved with JB but...

- Wouldn't connect to my router. Every device i've owned in the last 6 years has had zero issues with my router but the NX4 would only connect for a period and randomly decided it wasn't interested in staying committed to my router anymore and proceeded to file for divorce. Causing un-necessary data charges and battery drain by going cellular

-Getting my media from Google Play on to the device was like trying to mix oil and water. Only some of my content would sync over. Kept giving me storage space errors even though i had plenty. Took me 4 days to finally get most (still not all) of my stuff on.

-Text Editing. Lets just say i frequently considered bashing my phone against a wall.

-App Ecosystem. Much better now than Donut (or even Gingerbread) days but still leaves a lot to be desired in terms of fit and finish

-OS updates; either get a Nexus or you're SOL for months. Galaxy Note on AT&T is just getting JB...which has been out for about 6 months now.

-I've just found with Android things aren't that 'straight forward' i know this is due to the flexibility it offers, but for me out of box experience is lacking. You're either taking stuff off (Custom UI bloat), adding stuff in (dearth stock) or doing workarounds to get to a solid base...and i simply don't have that time/patience anymore.

WP8 (HTC 8X)

-Noticeable improvements but...

-Unboxed device and connected to Windows Phone app for Mac to get my media onto the it and boom...immediate crash. (Ah...typical Microsoft, i've missed you). Tried doubleTwist instead but nope...device not found. (of course not). Had to boot up Windows 7 and use Explorer.

-Battery life = dire. (known issue)

-App ecosystem = scant. At least their getting there but its noticeably lacking still.

-No notification centre or folders support or custom SMS/Email alerts or...etc

-No persistent/pervasive media controls. Either go into the music app or toggle sleep to bring it back. Arguably the most basic media player i've seen on any mobile OS (maybe stock webOS player takes the cake here)

-System volume control = Media volume control and screw you if you don't like it.

-Multi-tasking is worse than iOS, something i didn't think was actually possible

-Bugs galore. Found it baffling that only 1 update had been released in 6 months.

Misc

webOS (HP Pre(2)(3)) - That story tells itself

Sybian (808 PureView) - Dinosaur with great camera

BBOS - This i didn't spend too much time on but great keyboard...not much else. Hub is confusing, no apps, gesture heavy, poor camera...just uninspiring.

I'm exhausted now and calling time on my experiments...decided to just go all in with Apple. The Android/WP devices will remain in my draw as testbeds for any new development when i'm bored. But for me, iPhone will be my daily driver.

Don't get me wrong iOS isn't perfect, far from it. But the little it does (in relation to the other platforms) it does excellently and reliably. And that works for me. I wanted to be really drawn away by other platforms but just wasn't meant to be in my case.

Phew, didn't mean for that to turn into a long-winded rant but there you go

tl;dr tried other platforms but returned to iOS/iPhone.

*flame suit on*

sentinelsx
May 8, 2013, 10:04 PM
I'm pretty much the opposite. I've given every platform a fair chance and have come out disappointed.

Android (LG NX4)

- Wouldn't connect to my router. Every device i've owned in the last 6 years has had zero issues with my router but the NX4 would only connect for a period and randomly decided it wasn't interested in staying committed to my router anymore and proceeded to file for divorce. Causing un-necessary data charges and battery drain by going cellular

-Getting my media from Google Play on to the device was like trying to mix oil and water. Only some of my content would sync over. Kept giving me storage space errors even though i had plenty. Took me 4 days to finally get most (still not all) of my stuff on.

-Text Editing. Lets just say i frequently considered bashing my phone against a wall plenty of times.

-App Ecosystem. Much better now than Froyo days but still leaves a lot to be desired in terms of fit and finish

-OS updates; either get a Nexus or you're SOL for months. Galaxy Note on AT&T is just getting JB...which has been out for about 6 months now.

-I've just found with Android things aren't that 'straight forward' i know this is due to the flexibility it offers, but for me out of box experience is lacking. You're either taking stuff off (Custom UI bloat), adding stuff in (dearth stock) or doing workarounds to get to a solid base...and i simply don't have that time/patience anymore.

WP8 (HTC 8X)

-Unboxed device and connected to Windows Phone app for Mac to get my media onto the it and boom...immediate crash. (Ah...typical Microsoft, i've missed you). Tried doubleTwist instead but nope...device not found. (of course not). Had to boot up Windows 7 and use Explorer.

-Battery life = dire. (known issue)

-App ecosystem = scant. At least their getting there but its noticeably lacking still.

-No notification centre or folders support or custom SMS/Email alerts or...etc

-No persistent/pervasive media controls. Either go into the music app or toggle sleep to bring it back. Arguably the most basic media player i've seen on any mobile OS (maybe stock webOS player takes the cake here)

-System volume control = Media volume control and screw you if you don't like it.

-Multi-tasking is worse than iOS, something i didn't think was actually possible

-Bugs galore. Found it baffling that only 1 update had been released in 6 months.

Misc

webOS (HP Pre(2)(3)) - That story tells itself

Sybian (808 PureView) - Dinosaur with great camera

BBOS - This i didn't spend too much time on but great keyboard...not much else. Hub is confusing, no apps, gesture heavy, poor camera...just uninspiring.

I'm exhausted now and calling time on my experiments...decided to just go all in with Apple. The Android/WP devices will remain in my draw as testbeds for any new development when i'm bored. But for me, iPhone will be my daily driver.

Don't get me wrong iOS isn't perfect, far from it. But the little it does (in relation to the other platforms) it does excellently and reliably. And that works for me. I wanted to be really drawn away by other platforms but just wasn't meant to be in my case.

Phew, didn't mean for that to turn into a long-winded rant but there you go

tl;dr tried other platforms but returned to iOS/iPhone.

*flame suit on*

Hmm I found text editing on n4 to be much easier. There was no chronic input lag either so I never found it "bad".

However the iphone is definitely the overall best package in one. That is because it is apple's handset. The nexus is google and lg's handset. I doubt android will ever get that solid feel of software tightly "hugging" it's hardware because of the licensing nature.

If apple opens up ios a bit though and offers a 4.3 inch variant, I might consider it if i am fed up with android. As it stands now, the nexus covers all my needs perfectly in a smaller $$$ range compared to iPhone

May be that is why I subconsciously want blackberry to succeed. They are the only manufacturer of bb10 handsets which means they have a better chance of providing a solid option later on. Plus the OS is not as tight as ios.

daneoni
May 8, 2013, 10:07 PM
Hmm I found text editing on n4 to be much easier. There was no chronic input lag either so I never found it "bad".



It wasn't so much lag but rather the random jumping around of the cursor when manipulating large blocks of text...at least in my experience.

LIVEFRMNYC
May 8, 2013, 10:23 PM
70% of users are not using galaxy s 3/4, Htc one/one x/one s.

Majority of that marketshare is actually low to midrange handsets. Optimizing a good game for all of them is a nightmare.

Optimizing the same for just one target (iOS) as iPhones are not as wildly different apart from mild processor and memory bumps, is much easier.

Also every one who buys an iPhone can run it. 4/4s/5 (even 3gs ran 2012 3D games, not sure about the new ones, i suspect it can't now) are pretty solid in that department.

Just put yourself in a developer's shoes and then see. A developer is also targeting the return on his investment which seems to be better on iOS.

The low to midrange handsets are decreasing at a rapid rate. Doubt most manufacturers would produce them much longer.

sentinelsx
May 8, 2013, 10:46 PM
It wasn't so much lag but rather the random jumping around of the cursor when manipulating large blocks of text...at least in my experience.

That can be an issue for sure. The magnifying glass of iOS does make this much easier to manipulate. Unfortunately it seems to be under a patent (an educational guess) so i doubt google will be able to implement it :(

tjl3
May 9, 2013, 12:06 AM
The low to midrange handsets are decreasing at a rapid rate. Doubt most manufacturers would produce them much longer.

According to this post, I could not find any documentation where it explicitly reports the screen sizes per each category, you could conclude that the low to mid range smartphone market is not going anywhere anytime soon (another way of saying it is less than 6% of the Android smartphone market is high end Android devices):



Screen size - market share
--------------------------------
Small (2"-3.5") - 9.5%
Normal (3.5"-4.3") - 79.9%
Large (4.3"-7") - 5.7%
XLarge (greater than 7") - 4.9%

Source: http://developer.android.com/about/dashboards/index.html (as of April 24,2013)


And there was an article on the front page of MR that showed room for growth in the mid range market. But I think there is growth to be sought in the low end too. Because the low end is the easiest entry to market, it still has tons of growth b/c there is a good deal of people still using only dumbphones. This group is more likely to enter the market on the low end than to reach for the high end market.

And while these smartphones dominate the market, most of them are running w/ dual core processors, underpowered GPUs, small batteries, and lower PPI screens. Obviously, not every utility or app is going to require the latest and greatest. But Android dominating the smartphone marketshare is not the whole story for choosing a platform to develop in.

LIVEFRMNYC
May 9, 2013, 12:36 AM
Sony and HTC have already stated they will no longer create lower end phones.

tjl3
May 9, 2013, 12:45 AM
Sony and HTC have already stated they will no longer create lower end phones.

I guess it depends on what we consider 'low end phones.' True neither company (not sure for Sony) are releasing low cost phones. But both companies continue to release low spec'd phones. And Samsung + Motorola will continue to produce for this segment.

ReanimationN
May 9, 2013, 12:47 AM
-Text Editing. Lets just say i frequently considered bashing my phone against a wall plenty of times.

It wasn't so much lag but rather the random jumping around of the cursor when manipulating large blocks of text...at least in my experience.

Yes! Why is this not mentioned more often? The Android method of text editing is abysmal. Those caliper things are horrible to try and get to where you want them to be, mine would always go spastic and jump all over the screen, then jump back to where I started selecting text, then back to some random position- it's a nightmare. The pointer thing that is used to select the text insertion position is also annoying to move around compared to iOS' magnifying glass.

daneoni
May 9, 2013, 04:50 AM
Yes! Why is this not mentioned more often? The Android method of text editing is abysmal. Those caliper things are horrible to try and get to where you want them to be, mine would always go spastic and jump all over the screen, then jump back to where I started selecting text, then back to some random position- it's a nightmare. The pointer thing that is used to select the text insertion position is also annoying to move around compared to iOS' magnifying glass.

Exactly.

That can be an issue for sure. The magnifying glass of iOS does make this much easier to manipulate. Unfortunately it seems to be under a patent (an educational guess) so i doubt google will be able to implement it :(

Yup its a shame. Would've loved to have it (or similar) implemented.