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Brandon263
May 22, 2013, 05:18 PM
I tried switching from Firefox to Safari because I do heavy web research and Firefox takes way too much memory. After trying it for a week or so and trying to use some extensions to enhance Safari, I have failed to get essential functionality out of it and I simply give up :

1. It crashes: everything works OK for a while and then after you have over 100 tabs it just starts crashing or showing the spinning beach ball. Unacceptable, especially when you're using a 15" rMBP and the sites you were visiting were subscription-based and you can't recover the exact pages where you were because of having to log in again.

2. It loads pages slower than Firefox: What gives? I thought it was developed for Mac OS X?

3, Extensions don't work: Safari Adblock doesn't block YouTube, Facebook and Google ads, and the same goes for other sites. Adblock works fine on Firefox, though.

4. It doesn't have a built-in clear cache on exit function.

All of this is very frustrating, and though I will miss the Reader and dictionary look up functions, those functions are not worth me stressing myself out every time I use it. Back to Firefox.



Mackilroy
May 22, 2013, 05:30 PM
Did you try creating a separate account to see if Safari worked normally under there?

In my experience, Firefox has always been the slowest of the three major browsers.

Jesla
May 22, 2013, 05:31 PM
Ahh…but it's Snappier now….. WebKit

w0lf
May 22, 2013, 05:35 PM
Okay, go back to Firefox then. I thought everyone already knew Safari was bad for anything beyond the Average Joe 10 minute to 1 hour browsing session.

Firefox, Chrome and Opera all smash Safari in terms of extend-ability (better extension, more extension, more open), durability (fewer crashes), larger environment (windows, osx, linux, phones, tables vs just osx/ios for safari), better developer tools, more secure, etc...

chown33
May 22, 2013, 06:49 PM
I tried switching from Firefox to Safari because I do heavy web research and Firefox takes way too much memory.
...
Back to Firefox.

You might consider adding memory to your computer. Without knowing what computer or RAM you have now, it's just something to consider.

Krazy Bill
May 22, 2013, 07:29 PM
Not 100 tabs :eek: but I use at least 20-30 at times.

Does Safari suck up memory? Sure, but what else are you using it for? It will release it for other apps. I prefer Safari to FF or chrome. Maybe 1 crash per year and only god knows which site crashes it or why. Adblock and Click2Flash tame it well enough for me.

SMDBill
May 22, 2013, 07:33 PM
I'm just impressed that you can use 100 tabs open simultaneously and keep track of what's where. Not joking, just impressed because my brain/memory wouldn't allow me to get any realistic use out of that.

If nothing else, rocking 100 tabs at the same time is just something worthy of bragging rights!! :D

Silvereel
May 22, 2013, 08:22 PM
I just don't get all the hate Safari gets. It seems snappy enough to me, and I regularly have 30-40 tabs open. I have had about 2 crashes in the last 5 months, and both of those were caused by poorly coded websites.

Safari has the huge advantage of being built from the ground up for the Mac, and with features like Reading List and iCloud Tabs, I can't imagine using anything else!

fisherking
May 22, 2013, 08:33 PM
i use safari and chrome; both have their strengths (and weaknesses). but safari remains my default browser, runs beautifully (here at least)...

Brandon263
May 22, 2013, 09:11 PM
I'm just impressed that you can use 100 tabs open simultaneously and keep track of what's where. Not joking, just impressed because my brain/memory wouldn't allow me to get any realistic use out of that.

If nothing else, rocking 100 tabs at the same time is just something worthy of bragging rights!! :D

I find that I can get to 100 tabs quite quickly:

1. Open up browser, log into journal database.

2. Input search term, right click to open first 10 relevant articles in new tabs.

3. Quickly scan new articles for relevant info while typing up notes. While reading article, come across interesting claim; look for citation and search for THAT journal article.

4. Find out that that author of that journal article didn't actually do the research that lead to that conclusion. Open up the original article.

5. Come to the sudden realization that Microsoft was supposed to launch new Xbox today. Open up CNet.com in new tab to find out about Xbox One's new features. Halfway down CNet article realize that article doesn't contain any exciting new details. Head to the Verge, while keeping original CNet article open. Verge article interesting but not really. Jump to comments.

6. Wonder what Macrumors commenters have to say about new Xbox and head over to main page. Read first 10 comments, and then stop when I read "It should make Safari snappier."

7. Wonder if there's any new discussion on Haswell and open MacBook Pro sub-forum in new tab.

8. Wonder if there's anything interesting on Google News and open up that page in new tab.

9. Wonder if anyone on Facebook has commented on IRS scandal and open it up in new tab. See interesting link to Buzzfeed. Go to Buzzfeed in new tab. Find interesting link to Reddit on Buzzfeed. Head over there in new tab.

10. Realize I should be summarizing journal articles and head back to the second article I opened at the beginning. Repeat process.

Lunfai
May 22, 2013, 09:22 PM
My safari is fine, but I've been too used to Chrome that I just can't switch. Although they keep adding redundant features, I'm not looking to switch to any other browser anytime soon.

jozeppy26
May 23, 2013, 12:25 AM
My safari is fine, but I've been too used to Chrome that I just can't switch. Although they keep adding redundant features, I'm not looking to switch to any other browser anytime soon.

if only chrome could use the iCloud API. I freaking use iCloud tabs all the time.

in4fun
May 23, 2013, 02:59 AM
It's true that Safari sucks but there is another problem with Chrome and Firefox most people are not aware of.

Maybe you've seen a warning message in your browser which states that "this website may contain malware". Most people believe that their browser scans the webpage you want to visit and puts out that warning. This is not correct.

The browser is not scanning anything. Instead Chrome calls back to Google HQ and compares the URL your're about to visit with their own blacklist. That means that any URL you visit will be transmitted to Google HQ. Since this feature seems to work quite nicely Firefox is using the same backlist, hence any page you visit with Firefox is also transmitted to Google.

So, of course most sheeple don't bother about their privacy. I for my part like to control what Google knows about me and my surfing habbits. I'm happy to give them that information if they pay me for it but since I didn't give them any permission and they didn't even ask I'm quite offended by that practice.

Ledgem
May 23, 2013, 10:10 AM
I find that I can get to 100 tabs quite quickly:

1. Open up browser, log into journal database.

2. Input search term, right click to open first 10 relevant articles in new tabs.
Depending on the type of research you're doing, you might find Papers (http://www.papersapp.com/papers/) to be helpful. I'm no longer in research but I used it extensively during graduate school and it was incredibly useful. I can't imagine trying to organize and keep track of articles in browser tabs; I put up a good effort of managing PDFs on my own, but Papers was far superior.

mumph
May 23, 2013, 10:27 AM
I find that I can get to 100 tabs quite quickly:

1. Open up browser, log into journal database.

2. Input search term, right click to open first 10 relevant articles in new tabs.

3. Quickly scan new articles for relevant info while typing up notes. While reading article, come across interesting claim; look for citation and search for THAT journal article.

4. Find out that that author of that journal article didn't actually do the research that lead to that conclusion. Open up the original article.

5. Come to the sudden realization that Microsoft was supposed to launch new Xbox today. Open up CNet.com in new tab to find out about Xbox One's new features. Halfway down CNet article realize that article doesn't contain any exciting new details. Head to the Verge, while keeping original CNet article open. Verge article interesting but not really. Jump to comments.

6. Wonder what Macrumors commenters have to say about new Xbox and head over to main page. Read first 10 comments, and then stop when I read "It should make Safari snappier."

7. Wonder if there's any new discussion on Haswell and open MacBook Pro sub-forum in new tab.

8. Wonder if there's anything interesting on Google News and open up that page in new tab.

9. Wonder if anyone on Facebook has commented on IRS scandal and open it up in new tab. See interesting link to Buzzfeed. Go to Buzzfeed in new tab. Find interesting link to Reddit on Buzzfeed. Head over there in new tab.

10. Realize I should be summarizing journal articles and head back to the second article I opened at the beginning. Repeat process.

Instead of all those tabs you may find it better using the 'reading list' that way the sites are downloaded to view later instead of having 100 tabs open using up all your memory and causing crashes. You cant possibly use 100 tabs at once so placing items in the reading list to read later would be best all round in my opinion. Give it a go and see how you get on. Another benefit of the reading list is you get a tiny snippet of info with it to help you identify it instead of tab after tab of one or two word page titles to pick from.

I use Safari, Firefox is simply not up to par and although Chrome is fast its UI is very poor.

As an aside you seem to keep tabs open that you yourself say are irrelevant. Maybe close a few of em down. ;)

benwiggy
May 23, 2013, 10:33 AM
1. It crashes:
2. It loads pages slower than Firefox:
3, Extensions don't work: Safari Adblock doesn't block YouTube, Facebook and Google ads, and the same goes for other sites. Adblock works fine on Firefox, though.
4. It doesn't have a built-in clear cache on exit function.
1. Very rarely have crashes on Safari: if it happens it's due to Flash. Perhaps some of the Extensions you've installed are not helping?
2. I find Safari very quick. Again, try it without all the add-ons.
3. Talk to the developers of the extensions.
4. Why do you want to clear your cache on exit? If you want privacy, turn on "Private Browsing".
You can clear the history and other things in Reset Browser. If you want to clear page caches for some reason, you can do so with the Developer menu enabled in the preferences.

w0lf
May 23, 2013, 01:25 PM
if only chrome could use the iCloud API. I freaking use iCloud tabs all the time.

Why would they need to use the iCloud API? Chrome has had it's own cloud tabs since 2011.

IMO Chrome has the best web environment of any browser. No matter where I go or what kind of machine/device I'm using it can run Chrome and instantly have all my bookmarks, search history, active tabs on other devices, extensions, etc... at my finger tips. No other web browser really provides this.

jozeppy26
May 23, 2013, 01:26 PM
Why would they need to use the iCloud API? Chrome has had it's own cloud tabs since 2011.

IMO Chrome has the best web environment of any browser. No matter where I go or what kind of machine/device I'm using it can run Chrome and instantly have all my bookmarks, search history, active tabs on other devices, extensions, etc... at my finger tips. No other web browser really provides this.

Bc chrome on iOS sucks

aPple nErd
May 23, 2013, 01:36 PM
why the h*ll would you open up 100 tabs? obviously its gonna crash. troll post.

SnowLeopard2008
May 23, 2013, 02:10 PM
First off, you can't possibly be actively using 100+ tabs at once. As reference material, sure. But not actively using.

Under what conditions is Safari loading pages slower than Firefox? Normalizing the environmental factors will almost always skew performance in favor of Safari. Firefox's render engine is no match for anything Webkit (including Chrome).

Extensions are indeed a weak point for Safari. But many of the cross-platform extensions generally work the same and with the same feature set.

If you want to clear cache upon exit, use Private Browsing mode?

w0lf
May 23, 2013, 02:11 PM
Bc chrome on iOS sucks

I agree only in the case that you aren't jailbroken and really the main reason that's true is because Apple wont let you set it as your default browser.

With jailbreak:
Nitrous
Browser Changer
AdBlocker

However even without a jailbreak Chrome on iOS already has Safari beat in so many aspects, which is pretty sad.
- Infinite tabs
- Swipe left/right to move between tabs
- Voice search
- Instant incognito windows (one of Mobile Safari's worst features)
- Most Visited + Recently Closed tabs
- Better Fullscreen
- Close all tabs simultaneously
- Omnibar
- Better search for text on page
- Better 'cloud' syncing + the ability to sync stuff from windows/linux
- Easily switch from mobile to desktop version of a site

Plus before some person mentions that you can't save offline reading lists, yes actually you can (although Safari does have Chrome beat on this one)...
- Print
- Save to google drive
- View the pdf in google drive
- Save for offline use

:eek:

why the h*ll would you open up 100 tabs? obviously its gonna crash. troll post.

First off, you can't possibly be actively using 100+ tabs at once. As reference material, sure. But not actively using.

Got to agree that there is no good reason to keep that many tabs open and really you're just asking to cause problems by keeping that many tabs open at the same time.

jozeppy26
May 23, 2013, 02:15 PM
why the h*ll would you open up 100 tabs? obviously its gonna crash. troll post.

My GF almost does this. She just leaves tabs open, sometimes 40 at a time. Then, she wonders why her late 2009 MacBook Pro crawls.

----------

I agree only in the case that you aren't jailbroken and really the main reason that's true is because Apple wont let you set it as your default browser.

With jailbreak:
Nitrous
Browser Changer
AdBlocker

However even without a jailbreak Chrome on iOS already has Safari beat in so many aspects, which is pretty sad.
- Infinite tabs
- Swipe left/right to move between tabs
- Voice search
- Instant incognito windows (one of Mobile Safari's worst features)
- Most Visited + Recently Closed tabs
- Better Fullscreen
- Close all tabs simultaneously
- Omnibar
- Better search for text on page
- Better 'cloud' syncing + the ability to sync stuff from windows/linux
- Easily switch from mobile to desktop version of a site

Plus before some person mentions that you can't save offline reading lists, yes actually you can (although Safari does have Chrome beat on this one)...
- Print
- Save to google drive
- View the pdf in google drive
- Save for offline use

:eek:

Doesn't count as a viable stable alternative if it requires you to jailbreak. I completely agree, Apple should allow us to choose a different default browser with no speed limitations. Then i'd definitely switch to Chrome.

Shrink
May 23, 2013, 02:18 PM
I tried switching from Firefox to Safari because I do heavy web research and Firefox takes way too much memory. After trying it for a week or so and trying to use some extensions to enhance Safari, I have failed to get essential functionality out of it and I simply give up :

1. It crashes: everything works OK for a while and then after you have over 100 tabs it just starts crashing or showing the spinning beach ball. Unacceptable, especially when you're using a 15" rMBP and the sites you were visiting were subscription-based and you can't recover the exact pages where you were because of having to log in again.

2. It loads pages slower than Firefox: What gives? I thought it was developed for Mac OS X?

3, Extensions don't work: Safari Adblock doesn't block YouTube, Facebook and Google ads, and the same goes for other sites. Adblock works fine on Firefox, though.

4. It doesn't have a built-in clear cache on exit function.

All of this is very frustrating, and though I will miss the Reader and dictionary look up functions, those functions are not worth me stressing myself out every time I use it. Back to Firefox.

While I don't question your experience...not all of us share that experience.

All the Extensions work perfectly.

Never crashes.

Works fine for me...no complaints.

(Sorry to screwed up the thread:p)

jozeppy26
May 23, 2013, 02:19 PM
While I don't question your experience...not all of us share that experience.

All the Extensions work perfectly.

Never crashes.

Works fine for me...no complaints.

(Sorry to screw up the thread:p)

Extensions for Safari really suck. There are so many more for Chrome that offer expanded features.

Shrink
May 23, 2013, 02:26 PM
Extensions for Safari really suck. There are so many more for Chrome that offer expanded features.

I'm really sorry the Extensions work for me. You're right...they suck. As soon as I finish this post, I'm going to delete them all.

Thanks for setting me right on this...:D

fisherking
May 23, 2013, 02:28 PM
My GF almost does this. She just leaves tabs open, sometimes 40 at a time. Then, she wonders why her late 2009 MacBook Pro crawls.


i had to check & see if i wrote that post...
same thing (and also 2009 MBP)... :D

jozeppy26
May 23, 2013, 02:30 PM
i had to check & see if i wrote that post...
same thing (and also 2009 MBP)... :D

Women

SandboxGeneral
May 23, 2013, 02:39 PM
Extensions for Safari really suck. There are so many more for Chrome that offer expanded features.

I'm a bit confused here. Are you arguing about the quality of the extensions offered for Safari against the quality of the same extensions offered for Chrome, or is the debate about the quantity of extensions available for Safari and Chrome.

I'm reading mixed signals here.

jozeppy26
May 23, 2013, 02:41 PM
I'm a bit confused here. Are you arguing about the quality of the extensions offered for Safari against the quality of the same extensions offered for Chrome, or is the debate about the quantity of extensions available for Safari and Chrome.

I'm reading mixed signals here.

Haha it was my understanding that extensions written for chrome are able to access more API's than for Safari. For example, Adblock in chrome can block ads in YouTube videos, but not safari.

SandboxGeneral
May 23, 2013, 02:43 PM
Haha it was my understanding that extensions written for chrome are able to access more API's than for Safari. For example, Adblock in chrome can block ads in YouTube videos, but not safari.

Can you cite some other examples where a particular extension (non-ad blocking ones) for Safari is missing features found in the same extension for Chrome?

I'm actually curious to know if developers are doing this often.

SnowLeopard2008
May 23, 2013, 02:43 PM
Haha it was my understanding that extensions written for chrome are able to access more API's than for Safari. For example, Adblock in chrome can block ads in YouTube videos, but not safari.

On an unrelated note, this is probably against YouTube policy.

jozeppy26
May 23, 2013, 05:38 PM
Can you cite some other examples where a particular extension (non-ad blocking ones) for Safari is missing features found in the same extension for Chrome?

I'm actually curious to know if developers are doing this often.

I've never used this extension but it provides a firm of example of what I was saying straight from the extension developer's mouth. http://help.ex.fm/discussions/suggestions/356-is-exfm-extension-not-working-anymore-in-safari-6-108

Here's another: http://www.macworld.com/article/2025387/mac-gems-vimari-brings-more-keyboard-control-to-safari.html

Brandon263
May 23, 2013, 05:42 PM
Did you try creating a separate account to see if Safari worked normally under there?

In my experience, Firefox has always been the slowest of the three major browsers.

When I reset Safari and turn off all extensions, it does seem a bit faster, but it will slow down and occasionally crash when I have many tabs open regardless. I can't operate for long periods with all the extensions turned off as I find ads very distracting/annoying and have to have Adblock turned on.

You might consider adding memory to your computer. Without knowing what computer or RAM you have now, it's just something to consider.

I have a base 15 inch rMBP with 8 GB of RAM. Should be enough for browser-related tasks.

Depending on the type of research you're doing, you might find Papers (http://www.papersapp.com/papers/) to be helpful. I'm no longer in research but I used it extensively during graduate school and it was incredibly useful. I can't imagine trying to organize and keep track of articles in browser tabs; I put up a good effort of managing PDFs on my own, but Papers was far superior.

Looks interesting. Will try it. Thanks!

Instead of all those tabs you may find it better using the 'reading list' that way the sites are downloaded to view later instead of having 100 tabs open using up all your memory and causing crashes. You cant possibly use 100 tabs at once so placing items in the reading list to read later would be best all round in my opinion. Give it a go and see how you get on. Another benefit of the reading list is you get a tiny snippet of info with it to help you identify it instead of tab after tab of one or two word page titles to pick from.

I use Safari, Firefox is simply not up to par and although Chrome is fast its UI is very poor.

As an aside you seem to keep tabs open that you yourself say are irrelevant. Maybe close a few of em down. ;)

I've never really explored the reading list option. Will try it!

First off, you can't possibly be actively using 100+ tabs at once. As reference material, sure. But not actively using.

Under what conditions is Safari loading pages slower than Firefox? Normalizing the environmental factors will almost always skew performance in favor of Safari. Firefox's render engine is no match for anything Webkit (including Chrome).

Extensions are indeed a weak point for Safari. But many of the cross-platform extensions generally work the same and with the same feature set.

If you want to clear cache upon exit, use Private Browsing mode?

I am usually logged into multiple journal databases at once looking into different articles.

My only extensions on both Safari and Firefox are Adblock and Ghostery. Some have suggested that the issue is with Safari Adblock, but even when all extensions are turned off, Safari will usually show the spinning beach ball when you get to around 100 tabs and occasionally crash. Maybe it has something to do with Flash; I'll try uninstalling that and see how Safari works.

I do have a script that launches Safari in Private Browsing mode, but Private Browsing is not ideal as I often need to access my history within each browsing session and sometimes Private Browsing makes some sites inaccessible.

jozeppy26
May 23, 2013, 07:20 PM
When I reset Safari and turn off all extensions, it does seem a bit faster, but it will slow down and occasionally crash when I have many tabs open regardless. I can't operate for long periods with all the extensions turned off as I find ads very distracting/annoying and have to have Adblock turned on.



I have a base 15 inch rMBP with 8 GB of RAM. Should be enough for browser-related tasks.



Looks interesting. Will try it. Thanks!



I've never really explored the reading list option. Will try it!



I am usually logged into multiple journal databases at once looking into different articles.

My only extensions on both Safari and Firefox are Adblock and Ghostery. Some have suggested that the issue is with Safari Adblock, but even when all extensions are turned off, Safari will usually show the spinning beach ball when you get to around 100 tabs and occasionally crash. Maybe it has something to do with Flash; I'll try uninstalling that and see how Safari works.

I do have a script that launches Safari in Private Browsing mode, but Private Browsing is not ideal as I often need to access my history within each browsing session and sometimes Private Browsing makes some sites inaccessible.

Dude, just use EndNote. Should be provided by your institution for free. It lets you organize PDF articles and add journal databases for searching articles. Ive never heard of the program Papers, but isn't EndNote the gold standard?

Brandon263
May 23, 2013, 08:36 PM
Dude, just use EndNote. Should be provided by your institution for free. It lets you organize PDF articles and add journal databases for searching articles. Ive never heard of the program Papers, but isn't EndNote the gold standard?

This is awesome!!! I was just about to fork out $80 for Papers when I read this. My university's library offers free Endnote downloads and I just got it. Thanks a lot! This should solve everything.

jozeppy26
May 23, 2013, 08:49 PM
This is awesome!!! I was just about to fork out $80 for Papers when I read this. My university's library offers free Endnote downloads and I just got it. Thanks a lot! This should solve everything.

Good timing. ;-)

Ledgem
May 25, 2013, 06:43 PM
Dude, just use EndNote. Should be provided by your institution for free. It lets you organize PDF articles and add journal databases for searching articles. Ive never heard of the program Papers, but isn't EndNote the gold standard?
EndNote is the gold standard for citation management, not PDF or papers management. With Papers you can browse journal databases directly from within the program, you can rate articles and organize them, you can make notes and annotations. The program tracks which articles you've read and viewed, so that you can know what you've already gone over when going through a journal's search results. It can also automatically find article citation information, if the PDF that you have doesn't have that information already filled out.

As of version 2.0 Papers has included its own citation management, but it also supports EndNote formatting. You can export your Papers library to an EndNote file, import it into EndNote, and then simply create the EndNote code from within Papers. Paste it into a word processor that has an EndNote plugin and EndNote will automatically handle the formatting. This was how I handled writing papers. It's worth noting that Papers' own citation manager does not require a plugin, and it can theoretically work with any text editor. It's a very intriguing feature, but since it was released when I was already on my way out I never got to give it a full test run. (FWIW, I find working with EndNote to be pretty clunky and what Papers promised would have been very welcome.)

jozeppy26
May 27, 2013, 06:42 PM
EndNote is the gold standard for citation management, not PDF or papers management. With Papers you can browse journal databases directly from within the program, you can rate articles and organize them, you can make notes and annotations. The program tracks which articles you've read and viewed, so that you can know what you've already gone over when going through a journal's search results. It can also automatically find article citation information, if the PDF that you have doesn't have that information already filled out.

As of version 2.0 Papers has included its own citation management, but it also supports EndNote formatting. You can export your Papers library to an EndNote file, import it into EndNote, and then simply create the EndNote code from within Papers. Paste it into a word processor that has an EndNote plugin and EndNote will automatically handle the formatting. This was how I handled writing papers. It's worth noting that Papers' own citation manager does not require a plugin, and it can theoretically work with any text editor. It's a very intriguing feature, but since it was released when I was already on my way out I never got to give it a full test run. (FWIW, I find working with EndNote to be pretty clunky and what Papers promised would have been very welcome.)

EndNote definitely does manage PDF files and allows you to add institutional library catalogs and journal databases for searching and downloading within the EndNote application itself. It also tracks which articles you've read, categorizes your articles (journal articles, newspaper articles, patents, thesis, etc.), annotates the PDF's, attaches PDF's to a citation, etc. Because it attaches the PDF to the citation and organizes it within your EndNote library, it allows you to open PDF's with another program if you want and any annotations made in that outside program (and saved) is included in EndNote. Granted, many of these features may be new compared to when you used EndNote (especially on the Mac). In any case, I welcome the program Papers as a little competition may help to drive down the ridiculous cost of these programs (although luckily we usually get them for free from our institution).

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iBug2
May 28, 2013, 02:33 AM
To be honest I agree that Safari shouldn't be crashing with 200 tabs open even. It just should get slower. Before Webkit 2, Safari could easily handle 120+tabs but Webkit2 just crashes or stops responding with too many tabs. It's annoying.

I think it's because it uses core animation now and it caches all websites into the GPU memory, and eventually it fills up. Like a game tying to load too many textures.

Ledgem
May 29, 2013, 07:05 PM
EndNote definitely does manage PDF files and allows you to add institutional library catalogs and journal databases for searching and downloading within the EndNote application itself. It also tracks which articles you've read, categorizes your articles (journal articles, newspaper articles, patents, thesis, etc.), annotates the PDF's, attaches PDF's to a citation, etc. Because it attaches the PDF to the citation and organizes it within your EndNote library, it allows you to open PDF's with another program if you want and any annotations made in that outside program (and saved) is included in EndNote. Granted, many of these features may be new compared to when you used EndNote (especially on the Mac). In any case, I welcome the program Papers as a little competition may help to drive down the ridiculous cost of these programs (although luckily we usually get them for free from our institution).
Very interesting, thanks for letting me know and providing the images. The last version of EndNote that I used was X2 (old stuff). To be honest, even if the PDF management capabilities were there with that version I would have missed it, because I was already using Papers (version 1) before I installed EndNote. I upgraded to Papers version 2 a year ago but it was only for a light project and I never got to delve into the newer features; I wonder how Papers and EndNote compare now? Papers wins out on price, but if you get EndNote through your institution (as I did) then it doesn't really matter (and Papers is actually more expensive - you can't compete with free).

sjinsjca
May 29, 2013, 07:34 PM
after you have over 100 tabs

Jeez Louise, and I thought I was a tab-whore. That's a pretty rugged test. And yes, Safari does have issues when you get tab-happy. It's better in that respect than it used to be but still a bit fragile in that usage.

Having said that, it's still my favored browser for the simple reason of Reader Mode and its ability (on the Mac) to fling the re-rendered contents of a web page to an email. Such a time-saver.

jozeppy26
Jun 5, 2013, 11:01 PM
...you can't compete with free

Amen. haha

DisplacedMic
Jun 7, 2013, 11:11 AM
people still use Safari?

Badagri
Jun 8, 2013, 10:17 AM
people still use Safari?

No, they make pointless posts because they're bored. What do you think?

Shrink
Jun 8, 2013, 10:23 AM
people still use Safari?

Not super smart techno geniuses...only dopes like me.:p

But what do I know. I just use this browser, which obviously sucks because OP says it does, because it works for me, is stable (for me), and does everything I want from a browser.

So, you are right in your question...only fools use Safari...:D

DisplacedMic
Jun 8, 2013, 12:18 PM
No, they make pointless posts because they're bored. What do you think?

well gosh, i was just joking. terribly sorry to give offense.

Badagri
Jun 8, 2013, 03:02 PM
well gosh, i was just joking. terribly sorry to give offense.

Ah, the old famous it was just a joke. I'm sure. Offended, more sarcasm? if you think I'm offended with that, afraid not.

coldjeanzzz
Jun 8, 2013, 03:15 PM
First of all I just want to know why the ******* do people need to open up 100 tabs? :confused:How the hell can you be efficient doing this?

Anyway

When I switched to Mac I thought I would never use Safari bc it was supposed to be like the IE equivalent and being a Chrome user on Windows I figured I would be on OS X. After using both browsers extensively, there's just no competition. Safari destroys Chrome. It's faster, drains the battery less for me and doesn't heat up as quickly when watching HD videos, has better integration with OS X and just flat out looks better instead of having Chrome's own ugly interface.

Firefox is the worst of all of them to me though

DisplacedMic
Jun 8, 2013, 04:35 PM
Ah, the old famous it was just a joke. I'm sure. Offended, more sarcasm? if you think I'm offended with that, afraid not.

You don't think I was joking? Do you think I am claiming that literally no one uses Safari? I really was just kidding around, not sure why it rubbed you the wrong way.

Never the less, I'm glad that I didn't offend you then. Sorry to give cause for sarcasm?

Ledgem
Jun 9, 2013, 02:57 PM
When I switched to Mac I thought I would never use Safari bc it was supposed to be like the IE equivalent and being a Chrome user on Windows I figured I would be on OS X. After using both browsers extensively, there's just no competition. Safari destroys Chrome. It's faster, drains the battery less for me and doesn't heat up as quickly when watching HD videos, has better integration with OS X and just flat out looks better instead of having Chrome's own ugly interface.
I've noticed that Safari is a lot better about activating the discrete graphics card only when absolutely necessary and then about switching back to the integrated card than Chrome. Chrome has made progress in this area but there will still be times when I close a tab that had activated the discrete card and Chrome still sticks to it, requiring me to quit Chrome to get back to the integrated graphics. That could explain your battery life and heat observations.

I prefer the way that Chrome handles tabs, though. Having a defined size that doesn't grow to take up the entire bar when only a few tabs are open is nicer than Safari's, and having the tab close button slide to your mouse when closing tabs is also a very nice feature. Splitting off and merging tabs between windows is also a nice feature.

coldjeanzzz
Jun 9, 2013, 04:07 PM
I've noticed that Safari is a lot better about activating the discrete graphics card only when absolutely necessary and then about switching back to the integrated card than Chrome. Chrome has made progress in this area but there will still be times when I close a tab that had activated the discrete card and Chrome still sticks to it, requiring me to quit Chrome to get back to the integrated graphics. That could explain your battery life and heat observations.

I prefer the way that Chrome handles tabs, though. Having a defined size that doesn't grow to take up the entire bar when only a few tabs are open is nicer than Safari's, and having the tab close button slide to your mouse when closing tabs is also a very nice feature. Splitting off and merging tabs between windows is also a nice feature.

I actually do not even have discrete graphics on MBA so that can't be it

I agree about the tabs though, Chrome does a much better job with that

henry72
Jun 9, 2013, 07:30 PM
Well it's my favourite browser because it works great for me :D

Come on... 100 tabs :eek:

DisplacedMic
Jun 10, 2013, 12:37 PM
wow - watching the keynote right now. looks like i'm way off - everybody might go back to using Safari after all!

beautifulcoder
Sep 7, 2013, 03:27 AM
I don't even bother with Apple's browser anymore. To the OP, Opera works really well for me and it has a stash feature which should keep you logged in. I'm currently using Opera Mini in my iPad as a web reader: it keeps 20+ tabs open and never lags.

Traverse
Jan 6, 2014, 08:48 PM
Okay, go back to Firefox then. I thought everyone already knew Safari was bad for anything beyond the Average Joe 10 minute to 1 hour browsing session.

I don't think its THAT bad. ;)

Safari 7 is a nice improvement, and much lighter on resources. Safari's downfall is its slow development. Safari once a year vs Chrome 4+ times a year.