PDA

View Full Version : Would you be satisfied with iOS 7 if it had all this?


ra4oasis
May 27, 2013, 04:54 PM
If iOS 7 did include these features:
New look/feel
Quick settings
New & improved lock screen
New & improved notifications
Siri improvements

But it did NOT include:
Setting different default apps
Better communication between apps
Dual window/split screen view so you could run 2 apps at once in the iPad
Better overall multitasking

Basically the festures listed in the first list I think are likely to happen, but I don't see the second list making the cut until ios 8, simply because the new look and feel will take so long to implement. Would the first festure list alone satisfy you?

blitzer09x87
May 28, 2013, 09:47 AM
i'm ok with the first list, i can wait one more year for the rest of the features.

fivedots
May 28, 2013, 10:28 AM
I unfortunately agree that the ability to set default apps is probably not coming. But I really do think they've got to make a move in the area of communication between apps sooner rather than later. The workflow is just getting too cumbersome.

WordMasterRice
May 28, 2013, 10:30 AM
I would be satisfied. The fact that Chrome has a dev kit to allow even better integration than safari offers, and that email doesn't really need integration per say I'm comfortable with the default apps.

I'm really looking for a fresh look and some updated functionality without needing to be in individual apps.

beaniemyman
May 28, 2013, 10:54 AM
I would be satisfied. The fact that Chrome has a dev kit to allow even better integration than safari offers, and that email doesn't really need integration per say I'm comfortable with the default apps.

I'm really looking for a fresh look and some updated functionality without needing to be in individual apps.

same here, i want the new look more than tones of new features.
looking for a refreshed look, the old look is quite boring.
i would be satisfied with the list.

MonkeySee....
May 28, 2013, 11:06 AM
If iOS 7 did include these features:
New look/feel
Quick settings
New & improved lock screen
New & improved notifications
Siri improvements

But it did NOT include:
Setting different default apps
Better communication between apps
Dual window/split screen view so you could run 2 apps at once in the iPad
Better overall multitasking

Basically the festures listed in the first list I think are likely to happen, but I don't see the second list making the cut until ios 8, simply because the new look and feel will take so long to implement. Would the first festure list alone satisfy you?

This will never ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever .................happen.

ever

BvizioN
May 28, 2013, 11:14 AM
I would be satisified with the first list (include quick reply to messages)
Not really bothered with any features on the second list.

VulchR
May 28, 2013, 11:24 AM
Actually that list would suit me just fine. I would be even happier if Apple would pull its finger out and offer me the same level of service (maps, Siri, etc.) here in the UK as they do in the US. I did not pay less for my iDevices than people in the US....

Austin M.
May 28, 2013, 11:35 AM
I would be fine with the first list, yes, but default apps get me. I know it's probably not coming, and it'll cause me to jailbreak my phone, but that's just me.

Saladinos
May 28, 2013, 11:53 AM
No, not really. For a year's worth of work, that's pretty pathetic.

As a developer myself, that's the kind of output I expect from just me. For a team of hundreds of experienced engineers in the world's richest company working on their absolute biggest product, it'd be a joke.

Either Apple doubles down on iOS, or they ship updates more frequently. They're killing themselves by not advancing the platform forward quickly enough; it's a waste of the power that's available in these devices.

One thing that really bugs me is Spotlight. It's got such a prominent position from the iOS home-screen, but it's so limited nobody bothers to use it much. If iOS had something closer to OSX's Spotlight, with structured metadata for data in 3rd-party apps, it would totally transform iOS.

If you took full advantage of Spotlight, you'd be able to integrate it with Siri for a start - "Find that email that John sent me a few weeks ago where he mentioned meeting up at WWDC", for example. You could have a little back-and-forth with Siri as she shows you results and you add filters: "No, that's not it. He said something about meeting at a Cafe in downtown SF".

This kind of thing is possible right now. The biggest problem is that constructing those search queries can be a little cumbersome; that's something that Siri could do really well as it understands natural language and builds the query for you.

And that's just the start - you could take it further and use it to build a UI for inter-app data access, too. Spotlight could show you all the documents the current App could open and let you search for the one you want.

That's just one example of one area where iOS is being forgotten.

BvizioN
May 28, 2013, 12:06 PM
No, not really. For a year's worth of work, that's pretty pathetic.

If you took full advantage of Spotlight, you'd be able to integrate it with Siri for a start - "Find that email that John sent me a few weeks ago where he mentioned meeting up at WWDC", for example. You could have a little back-and-forth with Siri as she shows you results and you add filters: "No, that's not it. He said something about meeting at a Cafe in downtown SF".


I think the thread starter covered that with "Siri improvements"

GoCubsGo
May 28, 2013, 12:11 PM
iOS 7 and they haven't figured out how to accomplish multitasking so that it is efficient? When will they pay the 12 year old who has likely already figured this **** out while fiddling around after school in his/her bedroom? I'm pretty sure concepts have been made public if Apple prefers to save face too.

Mad Mac Maniac
May 28, 2013, 12:30 PM
This will never ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever .................happen.

ever

I'm not so sure about that. Apple knows that their greatest platform strength at the moment is their app ecosystem. Fantastic mail, calendar, browser, alarm, notes, etc are being made and, if Apple is being honest with themselves, they are often better than Apple's. Apple should leverage the strength of their ecosystem. Especially because, for the most part, Apple doesn't care if you use their apps. Calendar or Fantastical. mail.app or mailbox. Apple doesn't (shouldn't) care! Their goal is to sell you their hardware for $500+ over and over again. They should simply allow 3rd party apps to build their ecosystem by using things like iCloud.

typeadam
May 28, 2013, 12:37 PM
The feature I look forward to the MOST but that will probably never happen is universal sharing. :(
Example: pressing the 'Share' button when you have a photo open brings up a menu of any and all programs that will accept an image - any email app, any photo editor app, any social networking app (different Twitter clients, etc.), different various other apps like Evernote, Dropbox, Droplr, etc., etc.
Oh, well... a person can dream... :D

Edit: obviously as long as these apps are installed on your phone...

BaldiMac
May 28, 2013, 12:49 PM
I'm not so sure about that. Apple knows that their greatest platform strength at the moment is their app ecosystem. Fantastic mail, calendar, browser, alarm, notes, etc are being made and, if Apple is being honest with themselves, they are often better than Apple's. Apple should leverage the strength of their ecosystem. Especially because, for the most part, Apple doesn't care if you use their apps. Calendar or Fantastical. mail.app or mailbox. Apple doesn't (shouldn't) care! Their goal is to sell you their hardware for $500+ over and over again. They should simply allow 3rd party apps to build their ecosystem by using things like iCloud.

I'm probably missing something obvious, but to me, the browser is really the only type of app that would really benefit from setting a default app out of all the bundled apps. None of the rest are really called from other apps except the phone app. Third party calendar, photo, contact, etc. apps can all read/write to the default libraries.

The only other exceptions are the slide in email/text/tweet/post sheets, but they work for me.

I use Mailbox as my mail client and haven't run into any workflow problems because it's not registered as a "default app" somewhere.

Wicked1
May 28, 2013, 12:58 PM
If iOS7 isn't cool I am ok with 6 and just staying with that on my 5, however if I upgrade to 7 and get poor battery life, that will PO me even more, bad enough I can not make it a full day on a charge now, but understand I use my phone a lot especially for company email, so thus why I have a Mophie Power Pack.

I just want to see what 7 offers, I would prefer an easy way to turn on Settings like the way Android does it, going into Settings now is a pain. I need a quick way of toggling BT, WiFi, LTE and some other features.

ra4oasis
May 28, 2013, 01:32 PM
I could see Apple allowing different default apps, eventually. Maybe in iOS 8 or 9. Think about the fact that basically every major gripe in iOS has been addressed in the past. Going all the way back to lack of copy/paste, then notification center, multitasking, now the new look & feel, sounds like we'll probably get quick settings, these have all been features people have been begging for. People are starting to really ask for different default apps. It might take longer than we want, but I would not at all be surprised if we could someday set Chrome as our default browser, and Google Maps as our default Map app.

Mad Mac Maniac
May 28, 2013, 03:29 PM
I'm probably missing something obvious, but to me, the browser is really the only type of app that would really benefit from setting a default app out of all the bundled apps. None of the rest are really called from other apps except the phone app. Third party calendar, photo, contact, etc. apps can all read/write to the default libraries.

The only other exceptions are the slide in email/text/tweet/post sheets, but they work for me.

I use Mailbox as my mail client and haven't run into any workflow problems because it's not registered as a "default app" somewhere.

Apps I can reasonably see benefiting (and how):
Safari: as you mention
Maps: open when clicked on links in browser/mail/apps
Mail: When emailing from browser/apps. Yes it does make a difference, because it could use the email client's UI, signature, accounts that you are logged in to
Calendar: Clicking on dates/times in mail to create event. Using Siri to create events
Photos: Having your Photo viewer of preference automatically add all photos when taken
Camera: Being able to select from lock screen
Weather: appear in notification center
Stocks: appear in notification center
Reminders: Using siri to create reminders
Notes: Using Siri to make notes
Clock: create alarms with Siri


And there are probably more instances, but I'm stopping now. Haha. Sure some of those might be a bit of a stretch. I mean most people won't cares if Siri sets an alarm with the clock app or another one... but 3rd party apps can create a lot more custom alarms, so there ya go.

But the main apps that I think most people talk about wanting are safari, mail, and maps. But 2 more that are important to me are camera and weather (for notification center). The ONLY reason I use camera instead of camera+ is because of the lock screen shortcut.

fivedots
May 28, 2013, 03:39 PM
Even more than default apps, they need to draw some inspiration from Android's app communication framework. The OS knows what apps are email clients, photo editors, etc. So when I choose to share by email, it would ask me which app I'd like to use. Very useful if say, I use Gmail for one account and Mail for another.

Or if I'm in the photo gallery I can "Open With" and I'm given a list of anything that can support opening a photo instead of having to first open the app and then find the photo again.

BaldiMac
May 28, 2013, 03:58 PM
Apps I can reasonably see benefiting (and how):
Safari: as you mention
Maps: open when clicked on links in browser/mail/apps
Mail: When emailing from browser/apps. Yes it does make a difference, because it could use the email client's UI, signature, accounts that you are logged in to
Calendar: Clicking on dates/times in mail to create event. Using Siri to create events
Photos: Having your Photo viewer of preference automatically add all photos when taken
Camera: Being able to select from lock screen
Weather: appear in notification center
Stocks: appear in notification center
Reminders: Using siri to create reminders
Notes: Using Siri to make notes
Clock: create alarms with Siri


And there are probably more instances, but I'm stopping now. Haha. Sure some of those might be a bit of a stretch. I mean most people won't cares if Siri sets an alarm with the clock app or another one... but 3rd party apps can create a lot more custom alarms, so there ya go.

But the main apps that I think most people talk about wanting are safari, mail, and maps. But 2 more that are important to me are camera and weather (for notification center). The ONLY reason I use camera instead of camera+ is because of the lock screen shortcut.

I'll give you Maps (I knew I missed something :)), but the rest are stretches. Basically third party widgets, Siri integration, and lock screen access. Not simply making apps "default".

As I said earlier, third party apps can already access the photo, contact and calendar libraries. And Apple's Mail can be set with any signatures or accounts you want to use for outgoing messages. (And you can already use Siri to create reminders and notes in third party apps.)

I absolutely realize that there are some small compromises in my post, but my point was that the "default apps" issue isn't as big an issue as it seems at first glance. I still believe Safari being the default browser is the primary complaint (with Maps a strong number two!). And I see why Apple would be very careful with the default browser for security and performance reasons.

fivedots
May 28, 2013, 04:00 PM
I absolutely realize that there are some small compromises in my post, but my point was that the "default apps" issue isn't as big an issue as it seems at first glance. I still believe Safari being the default browser is the primary complaint (with Maps a strong number two!). And I see why Apple would be very careful with the default browser for security and performance reasons.

Mail's a huge one too. I want to use Gmail for my personal mail but Mail for my work mail. When I want to share something from an app by email, I'd like to be able to choose which app I'm sending from.

And while apps can access the photo library, it's still cumbersome. If I'm looking at a photo I want to Instagram after the fact, I've got to close Photos, open Instagram, and find the photo again. Instead of just click Share > Instagram.

BaldiMac
May 28, 2013, 04:08 PM
Mail's a huge one too. I want to use Gmail for my personal mail but Mail for my work mail. When I want to share something from an app by email, I'd like to be able to choose which app I'm sending from.

Why? I use Mailbox as my mail client, but I have no problems sending mail with the system Mail sheet. Just set up the account in the iOS Mail app, turn off notifications for that account, and set fetch to manual. Sent mail shows up in the Gmail app just as if you sent it from the Gmail app.

And while apps can access the photo library, it's still cumbersome. If I'm looking at a photo I want to Instagram after the fact, I've got to close Photos, open Instagram, and find the photo again. Instead of just click Share > Instagram.

Sure, but that's a sharing issue, not a default app issue.

fivedots
May 28, 2013, 04:10 PM
Why? I use Mailbox as my mail client, but I have no problems sending mail with the system Mail sheet. Just set up the account in the iOS Mail app, turn off notifications for that account, and set fetch to manual. Sent mail shows up in the Gmail app just as if you sent it from the Gmail app.

Sure, that works, but it's a clumsy workaround to an issue that is more elegantly resolved by adding this functionality to the OS.

It falls under the same idea as sharing below. Instead of each app building out it's own list of supported apps to share with, it's done at the OS level. So perhaps it not so much a default issue but rather a "let me choose from a list of apps that support what I'm trying to do" issue.


Sure, but that's a sharing issue, not a default app issue.
Agreed.

BaldiMac
May 28, 2013, 04:15 PM
Sure, that works, but it's a clumsy workaround to an issue that is more elegantly resolved by adding this functionality to the OS.

I disagree that it's clumsy in any practical way. I haven't run into any downsides. :)

fivedots
May 28, 2013, 04:18 PM
I disagree that it's clumsy in any practical way. I haven't run into any downsides. :)

Requiring a user to setup a dummy email account solely for the purpose of sending emails from within other apps is clumsy. Having the same email account setup in two apps is clumsy.

What if I want to exclusively use the Gmail app because I prefer composing my emails in it? After all, it's an email app and that's what it's for.

It's as clumsy as every email link I click online opening Outlook by default on my Windows machine.

BaldiMac
May 28, 2013, 04:24 PM
Requiring a user to setup a dummy email account solely for the purpose of sending emails from within other apps is clumsy. Having the same email account setup in two apps is clumsy.

What if I want to exclusively use the Gmail app because I prefer composing my emails in it? After all, it's an email app and that's what it's for.

It's as clumsy as every email link I click online opening Outlook by default on my Windows machine.

As I said, I was speaking practically. Conceptually or theoretically, I suppose you can find some reason to complain. But with the setup I described, you don't have to open the Mail app a single time. And you aren't missing out on any features that I'm aware of.

fivedots
May 28, 2013, 04:33 PM
As I said, I was speaking practically. Conceptually or theoretically, I suppose you can find some reason to complain. But with the setup I described, you don't have to open the Mail app a single time. And you aren't missing out on any features that I'm aware of.
I'm glad it works for you but please don't insinuate that I'm looking for a reason to complain. It's a workaround, plain and simple.

-A new user gets an iPhone. Says, "Hey, I use Gmail, I'll get the Gmail app".
-Installs it. Logs in.
-Wants to share a web page or article.
-Clicks the button and gets a screen asking them to setup up their Gmail account, again.
-Then once that's done, they are presented an interface that is different than the Gmail app for composing their message. Weird.
-Then by default, they are getting double notifications for every Gmail message they get. Yay.
-Now they need to a) figure out why, and b) figure out how to turn off the mail notifications.
-In all likelihood they won't turn off the automatic fetching and will be wasting battery life without even knowing it.

That is not simple. 99% of iPhone users are not you or I. Workarounds need to be researched or Googled and are not intuitive. They are not friendly for the average user.

SnowLeopard2008
May 28, 2013, 04:47 PM
I'm glad it works for you but please don't insinuate that I'm looking for a reason to complain. It's a workaround, plain and simple.

-A new user gets an iPhone. Says, "Hey, I use Gmail, I'll get the Gmail app".
-Installs it. Logs in.
-Wants to share a web page or article.
-Clicks the button and gets a screen asking them to setup up their Gmail account, again.
-Then once that's done, they are presented an interface that is different than the Gmail app for composing their message. Weird.
-Then by default, they are getting double notifications for every Gmail message they get. Yay.
-Now they need to a) figure out why, and b) figure out how to turn off the mail notifications.
-In all likelihood they won't turn off the automatic fetching and will be wasting battery life without even knowing it.

That is not simple. 99% of iPhone users are not you or I. Workarounds need to be researched or Googled and are not intuitive. They are not friendly for the average user.

Give the average user a bit more credit. They know iOS has a built-in mail client.

BaldiMac
May 28, 2013, 06:35 PM
I'm glad it works for you but please don't insinuate that I'm looking for a reason to complain. It's a workaround, plain and simple.

-A new user gets an iPhone. Says, "Hey, I use Gmail, I'll get the Gmail app".
-Installs it. Logs in.
-Wants to share a web page or article.
-Clicks the button and gets a screen asking them to setup up their Gmail account, again.
-Then once that's done, they are presented an interface that is different than the Gmail app for composing their message. Weird.
-Then by default, they are getting double notifications for every Gmail message they get. Yay.
-Now they need to a) figure out why, and b) figure out how to turn off the mail notifications.
-In all likelihood they won't turn off the automatic fetching and will be wasting battery life without even knowing it.

That is not simple. 99% of iPhone users are not you or I. Workarounds need to be researched or Googled and are not intuitive. They are not friendly for the average user.

One time setup and all is well. Definitely counter-intuitive if you don't know what you are doing. However, a good app can provide instructions. Much like Mailbox does.

KenAFSPC
May 28, 2013, 06:54 PM
I could see Apple allowing different default apps, eventually. Maybe in iOS 8 or 9. Think about the fact that basically every major gripe in iOS has been addressed in the past. Going all the way back to lack of copy/paste, then notification center, multitasking, now the new look & feel, sounds like we'll probably get quick settings, these have all been features people have been begging for. People are starting to really ask for different default apps. It might take longer than we want, but I would not at all be surprised if we could someday set Chrome as our default browser, and Google Maps as our default Map app.There are several billion reasons why this will never happen. Google pays Apple several billion per year for google searches through Safari. They pay Apple $0 for searches through Chrome.

Location-based data obtained through the Maps application is worth a hefty sum too.

Michael CM1
May 29, 2013, 01:04 AM
I'm not so sure about that. Apple knows that their greatest platform strength at the moment is their app ecosystem. Fantastic mail, calendar, browser, alarm, notes, etc are being made and, if Apple is being honest with themselves, they are often better than Apple's. Apple should leverage the strength of their ecosystem. Especially because, for the most part, Apple doesn't care if you use their apps. Calendar or Fantastical. mail.app or mailbox. Apple doesn't (shouldn't) care! Their goal is to sell you their hardware for $500+ over and over again. They should simply allow 3rd party apps to build their ecosystem by using things like iCloud.

It's not that Apple cares as far as getting your $500. The thing top-level Apple peeps keep mentioning is controlling the quality of the user experience. In other words, Apple wants to make this little gizmo that interacts in various ways -- take photo, send to Facebook, email photo, add new contact while emailing, etc -- and for the most part works without a hitch.

I'm no expert on all the innards of an OS, but if you start allowing different default apps, you are opening up a ton of holes in your quality control. I know first-hand how damn difficult it is to get website features to work consistently across Safari, Chrome, Firefox and Internet Explorer. All it takes is the geniuses in Redmond being late to the party supporting HTML5 and inventing their own stupid Flash wannabe to really make life hell.

Honestly I'm fine with the default apps for the most part. I do wish Weather and Stocks could go the hell away or improve, but I just hide them.

cambookpro
May 29, 2013, 06:26 AM
Don't really care for the second list. If the first is done really well, count me in!

I really want a new look, quick settings, and possibly more functionality on the home screen.

The Phazer
May 29, 2013, 06:29 AM
No. In fact I think Apple are in desperate trouble if that's the case, and it would probably be my final straw for me to get out of iOS entire as soon as contracts permit.

ra4oasis
May 29, 2013, 07:55 AM
No. In fact I think Apple are in desperate trouble if that's the case, and it would probably be my final straw for me to get out of iOS entire as soon as contracts permit.

I guess what would you want then? If you're already basically set on leaving, I can't see how iOS would make the huge changes to basically be Android anytime soon.

I stay with iOS for several reasons. One is I am very invested in Apple's products and services, and things work very well together. But more importantly, I like elegance. iOS to me is a very elegant, even if not perfect, operating system. I hear many complaints from my Android wielding friends that I just never have to worry about with iOS. I hear complaints about all the OS skins, the default mail app that apparently isn't very good, malware, battery life issues, I could go on and on.

Mad Mac Maniac
May 29, 2013, 08:03 AM
It's not that Apple cares as far as getting your $500. The thing top-level Apple peeps keep mentioning is controlling the quality of the user experience. In other words, Apple wants to make this little gizmo that interacts in various ways -- take photo, send to Facebook, email photo, add new contact while emailing, etc -- and for the most part works without a hitch.

I'm no expert on all the innards of an OS, but if you start allowing different default apps, you are opening up a ton of holes in your quality control. I know first-hand how damn difficult it is to get website features to work consistently across Safari, Chrome, Firefox and Internet Explorer. All it takes is the geniuses in Redmond being late to the party supporting HTML5 and inventing their own stupid Flash wannabe to really make life hell.

Honestly I'm fine with the default apps for the most part. I do wish Weather and Stocks could go the hell away or improve, but I just hide them.

Well first of all, yes they talk about user experience and "building the best products" because they can't say "We want to sell as many products and making the most money as possible". I know that's kind of a cynical view, and I honestly do think that Apple's motication is to build the best user experience/products... but because that will result in more sales.

Secondly, they can give up default's but still control most of the experience. Apple would have to approve which apps are eligible to replace defaults. Apple can issue certain standards (required API's, functionality, etc) and can be more seletive with the approval process.

Lastly, your browser example wouldn't apply to iOS because all browsers must be based on the safari webkit.

The Phazer
May 29, 2013, 08:42 AM
I guess what would you want then? If you're already basically set on leaving, I can't see how iOS would make the huge changes to basically be Android anytime soon.

The changes to the OS could be turned around with Apple's programming resources in thirty days plus testing. Easily.

I'm already out of using pretty much all of Apple's apps - Apple Maps is unusable, so I've jailbroken to restore Google Maps to the default. Safari is also gone, as is Mail and Weather.

At this point, I'm just using apps that are available on Android anyway, except with Android they can do background tasks and update themselves overnight and access a file system and they work better because they're not locked down by the sandbox. I've already dumped the iPad and moved to a Nexus 7.

I stay with iOS for several reasons. One is I am very invested in Apple's products and services, and things work very well together. But more importantly, I like elegance. iOS to me is a very elegant, even if not perfect, operating system. I hear many complaints from my Android wielding friends that I just never have to worry about with iOS. I hear complaints about all the OS skins, the default mail app that apparently isn't very good, malware, battery life issues, I could go on and on.

It's been a long time since iOS was elegant. It's filled full of clumsily bolted on gestures. We're on iOS7 now and in the event I hope up the mail app I still get *three* seperate pop ups which have to be dimissed invidually telling me I can't connect when I have no signal. That's **** design. I have to constantly root through menus to turn wifi on and off unless I jailbreak. If I want to attach a Word doc to an email I'm writing I'm completely screwed.

I now have to charge the battery on my iPhone 5 more than twice a day. Android's battery life is certainly no worse. I don't care that the Android mail app isn't very good - iOS's mail app isn't very good either, which is why I don't use either of them. And at that point why bother using iOS at all, because it's easier to use non-default apps on Android.

ra4oasis
May 29, 2013, 09:16 AM
The changes to the OS could be turned around with Apple's programming resources in thirty days plus testing. Easily.

I'm already out of using pretty much all of Apple's apps - Apple Maps is unusable...

It's been a long time since iOS was elegant. It's filled full of clumsily bolted on gestures. We're on iOS7 now and in the event I hope up the mail app I still get *three* seperate pop ups which have to be dimissed invidually telling me I can't connect when I have no signal. That's **** design. I have to constantly root through menus to turn wifi on and off unless I jailbreak. If I want to attach a Word doc to an email I'm writing I'm completely screwed.

I now have to charge the battery on my iPhone 5 more than twice a day.

I'll quickly address your points, but honestly I don't think I'll change your mind, so I'm not spending too much time on this.

Apple Maps is not unusable, at least to me. I've actually seen only one mistake and I do use it on a semi-regular basis. It isn't perfect by any means, but "unusable" has not at all been my experience. With that said, Google Maps is still better.

I honestly don't know what you're talking about with three separate pop ups when you don't have a signal. And I work in a basement, with no cell signal, so I don't know what you're referring to their. I do agree attaching documents/files to emails could be better. Apple should improve this process.

And "rooting" through the menus to turn off or on the wifi? I mean quick settings will be nice, but to turn off/on the wifi takes three touches of the screen on my phone. I can't call that "rooting" through the menus.

I have an iPhone 5, and don't have any batter issues, and honestly only the very very heavy users that I've dealt with need to charge it as you do. Maybe you're just that heavy of a user, but being realistic, most are not like that.

With the complaints about iOS that people have, I've heard different ones about Android, so to each their own.

The Phazer
May 29, 2013, 09:46 AM
Apple Maps is not unusable, at least to me. I've actually seen only one mistake and I do use it on a semi-regular basis. It isn't perfect by any means, but "unusable" has not at all been my experience. With that said, Google Maps is still better.

Apple Maps is catastrophically bad in the UK. Absolutely unsuable. 90% of the place data is junk.

There are nationally famous buildings near my house with their name displayed on the front in twenty foot letters that Apple Maps claims do not exist. My local town hall is supposedly a chemist or a kebab shop depending on which zoom level you start at. Some of the busiest shopping districts in the world contain only two shops.

I honestly don't know what you're talking about with three separate pop ups when you don't have a signal.

If you have three accounts set up in mail it will display three seperate "can't connect" popups if it offline, all on top of each other and requiring dismissal before the next appears, while the device locks up.

And "rooting" through the menus to turn off or on the wifi? I mean quick settings will be nice, but to turn off/on the wifi takes three touches of the screen on my phone. I can't call that "rooting" through the menus.

It only takes three touches if you're at the homescreen, otherwise it takes a button tap (probably two) and then three touches. So probably five. Which is four too many for what is probably the most common user task on the device.

I have an iPhone 5, and don't have any batter issues, and honestly only the very very heavy users that I've dealt with need to charge it as you do. Maybe you're just that heavy of a user, but being realistic, most are not like that.

My iPhone 4 lasted all day happily. All I hear from every iPhone user I know is how terrible the iPhone 5 battery is, made all the worse because everyone used to have a charging cable for iPhones, and the Lightning debacle has handed that huge ecosystem advantage directly to Android.

With the complaints about iOS that people have, I've heard different ones about Android, so to each their own.

There is certainly stacks wrong about Android, but at least the Android platform gets rapidly better and isn't afraid to tackle fundamental flaws, which Apple is with iOS.

BaldiMac
May 29, 2013, 10:07 AM
Which is four too many for what is probably the most common user task on the device.

:confused: I don't know a single person that regularly turns wifi on and off on Android or iOS devices. And I support a lot of devices.

SpyderBite
May 29, 2013, 10:32 AM
It simply amazes me that people figured out how to use ISP email before Google Gmail came out. Before that it was AOL/Prodigy Mail before ISP mail. Elm/Pine before that.

My point is.. Get your own domain and email and stop depending on these services like Yahoo and Gmail and then maybe worrying about support for them (on any platform) will not be an issue.

Smith288
May 29, 2013, 12:31 PM
This will never ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever .................happen.

ever

Ever?