PDA

View Full Version : Apple Retail's New Machines for Calibrating Replacement iPhone 5 Displays




MacRumors
Jun 5, 2013, 10:00 PM
http://images.macrumors.com/im/macrumorsthreadlogo.gif (http://www.macrumors.com/2013/06/05/apple-retails-new-machines-for-calibrating-replacement-iphone-5-displays/)


Earlier this week, we noted (http://www.macrumors.com/2013/06/03/apple-begins-offering-in-store-iphone-5-display-replacements-for-149/) that Apple had begun in-store repairs of iPhone 5 displays, a $149 procedure that is part of an effort by Apple to revamp (http://www.macrumors.com/2013/05/10/apple-to-update-applecare-with-subscription-service-and-in-store-repair-options/) its AppleCare and warranty services.

We had been told that Apple had sent new equipment to the stores in order to allow Geniuses to calibrate the replacement displays once they had been installed, and 512 Pixels has now shared a photo (http://512pixels.net/2013/06/iphone5-screen-in-store/) of one of those machines installed in the back-of-house area of an Apple retail store.From what I've heard, Apple Stores have been instructed that the iPhone is the "top priority" for the Genius Bar, and this new repair -- and crazy machine -- surely reflects that. In addition to the program changes, many stores have Geniuses that are dedicated to iPhone repairs for sections of their shifts. In short, Apple is pouring resources in to in-store iPhone repairs.http://images.macrumors.com/article-new/2013/06/iphone_display_calibration.jpg
Apple's standard price for out-of-warranty iPhone 5 repairs is $229, so the new display replacement program may save some customers a bit of money and ensure that they receive their original devices back rather than receiving new units and having to restore backups onto them.

Article Link: Apple Retail's New Machines for Calibrating Replacement iPhone 5 Displays (http://www.macrumors.com/2013/06/05/apple-retails-new-machines-for-calibrating-replacement-iphone-5-displays/)



AutoUnion39
Jun 5, 2013, 10:02 PM
I'm glad Apple is finally doing this. Too many people were abusing the device replacements.

Bolo4u
Jun 5, 2013, 10:03 PM
It's a Wayback machine! From Peabody and Sherman...

dave420
Jun 5, 2013, 10:06 PM
I know a lot of people prefer to have the entire device replaced, but I think it is great if they can just replace the part that is broken. If your phone is working fine except for a cracked screen then there is no reason to replace the entire device.

tanousjm
Jun 5, 2013, 10:18 PM
Having worked in three Apple Retail Stores, and subbed in a total of seven or eight, I have NO idea how a machine like that will fit in the majority of stores. Aside from the flagship stores, BoH (Back of House) is extremely crowded. At one point during the fall rush, non-invasive Genius Bar repairs had to be performed in the already-packed employee break area.

EDIT: Hahaha, I now realize that my scale on this thing was WAY off. Oh boy.

My tired brain saw it like this:

http://i.imgur.com/R0XOHv8.jpg

1080p
Jun 5, 2013, 10:21 PM
I can see the complaint threads now! "The Genius Bar scratched my iPhone's chamfered edge when replacing my iPhone display!"

B-Roll
Jun 5, 2013, 10:32 PM
This "calibration" thing is a sham. Its not something that is adjusted. The display either works or it doesn't.

Have heard reports of many of these machines arriving broken or are breaking down easily. Good luck, Apple.

Maybe they can hire us guys that fix their phones already to fix their machines that are supposed to fix their phones.

ijohn.8.80
Jun 5, 2013, 10:32 PM
About time that society as a whole got the idea that there is actually a limited amount of resources to go around and if we all wanna have our piece, this should be the norm for everything we buy. Repair not discard, that is.

charlituna
Jun 5, 2013, 10:36 PM
This "calibration" thing is a sham. Its not something that is adjusted. The display either works or it doesn't.


So you've used one. Must have if you know the machine is 'a sham'

So which store was it exactly

Rico31262
Jun 5, 2013, 10:37 PM
Now we know who sent out those EPRs claiming it is now a teen fad to smash the glass into creative distress patterns. Apple needed to cost-justify this stupid looking machine so they have to create demand for it.

B-Roll
Jun 5, 2013, 10:48 PM
So you've used one. Must have if you know the machine is 'a sham'

So which store was it exactly


I didn't say the machine is a sham. The machine replaces the display, yes. But there is no actually calibrating anything. The LCD/digitizer is already made. It either works or it doesn't. The whole "needing to be calibrated" thing is just to make the customer feel like it is the only way to do it correctly.

Kirsten Hollerd
Jun 5, 2013, 10:52 PM
This "calibration" thing is a sham. Its not something that is adjusted. The display either works or it doesn't.

Have heard reports of many of these machines arriving broken or are breaking down easily. Good luck, Apple.

Maybe they can hire us guys that fix their phones already to fix their machines that are supposed to fix their phones.

I'm interested to hear what you believe Apple's motivation would be to send non-necessary "sham" equipment out to their stores.

My friend who works there told me that the equipment runs several graphics tests on the display in conjunction with a real calibration app that pairs the display to the phone. It also tests things like the proximity sensor and ambient light sensor before it goes back to the customer.

If $149(from what I've read) is a competitive price and Apple wants to pay for equipment to ensure the best possible repair how is that a "sham", since by definition a sham is not in the customer's best interest? Where are they wronging people?

B-Roll
Jun 5, 2013, 11:00 PM
I'm interested to hear what you believe Apple's motivation would be to send non-necessary "sham" equipment out to their stores.

My friend who works there told me that the equipment runs several graphics tests on the display in conjunction with a real calibration app that pairs the display to the phone. It also tests things like the proximity sensor and ambient light sensor before it goes back to the customer.

If $149 is a (from what I've read) is a competitive price and Apple wants to pay for equipment to ensure the best possible repair how is that a "sham", since by definition a sham is not in the customer's best interest? Where are they wronging people?

They aren't necessarily wronging anyone. Its just an unnecessary term. I explained a little bit more in a different post above yours.

The touchscreen and LCD are already assembled at a factory overseas. The "calibration" isn't an adjustable thing. Basically what the machine is doing is a "quality assurance" test but on the subject of calibration it does not do anything since you can't adjust how the touch screen works and where it touches after the fact that its already been manufactured.

Its no different than you getting your phone back and you go to type an R and your phone types a T. That's just defective and no "calibrating" will fix that.

And I also never said its non-necessary equipment. The machine isn't just a "calibrating" machine. It is listed as one of its features. Hope that clear it up a bit.

macs4nw
Jun 5, 2013, 11:02 PM
Is that a time machine?, I mean a real one.....

Kirsten Hollerd
Jun 5, 2013, 11:05 PM
They aren't necessarily wronging anyone. Its just an unnecessary term. I explained a little bit more in a different post above yours.

The touchscreen and LCD are already assembled at a factory overseas. The "calibration" isn't an adjustable thing. Basically what the machine is doing is a "quality assurance" test but on the subject of calibration it does not do anything since you can't adjust how the touch screen works and where it touches after the fact that its already been manufactured.

Its no different than you getting your phone back and you go to type an R and your phone types a T. That's just defective and no "calibrating" will fix that.

That makes sense. I'm wondering now if that's officially what Apple is calling it or if the Geniuses are just saying that?

I'll check with my friend, I'm almost sure he said something about calibrating the display with the logic board or something, because his team replaced a display that worked but the calibration failed, revealing deeper damage to the phone. Who knows...

B-Roll
Jun 5, 2013, 11:11 PM
That makes sense. I'm wondering now if that's officially what Apple is calling it or if the Geniuses are just saying that?


In the memo that I saw, the word calibration was used. To me it just seems like a fancy word to use to throw at customers. :]

charlituna
Jun 5, 2013, 11:14 PM
I didn't say the machine is a sham. The machine replaces the display, yes. But there is no actually calibrating anything. The LCD/digitizer is already made. It either works or it doesn't. The whole "needing to be calibrated" thing is just to make the customer feel like it is the only way to do it correctly.

And as I said, if you haven't used one you don't KNOW what it is doing. Just what some site is claiming it does. Just like they are saying that Apple has started doing these display replacements when I know for a fact that that's not true. I have had three done on company phones dating back to two months ago.

Also do you really think that Apple would spend money on a machine that no customers sees to fake them out.

B-Roll
Jun 5, 2013, 11:22 PM
And as I said, if you haven't used one you don't KNOW what it is doing. Just what some site is claiming it does. Just like they are saying that Apple has started doing these display replacements when I know for a fact that that's not true. I have had three done on company phones dating back to two months ago.

Also do you really think that Apple would spend money on a machine that no customers sees to fake them out.

I just explained what the machine actually does. And it is true, this just went into effect this week. The misconception here is that the title is calling it a calibrating machine. It is not a calibrating machine. It replaces the display. The "calibration" is just one step in the machines process.

And no I haven't used one, ya got me there but I've got a bit of knowledge on the situation. My forum post broke the original story. I'm famous duh! Haha ;]

charlituna
Jun 5, 2013, 11:34 PM
I just explained what the machine actually does.


No, you didn't. You 'explained' what you, without any real knowledge, claim it does NOT do. Not what it does



And it is true, this just went into effect this week.



If by 'this' you mean replacing displays, not it didn't. As I said, I had it done as much as two months ago. Shattered screens so I know they replaced it not just fiddled with something and left the same one on trying to fool me.

[quote
And no I haven't used one, ya got me there but I've got a bit of knowledge on the situation. [/QUOTE]

An attempt to lay the claim that you worked for an Apple Store. I say worked because something tells me that you won't for much longer given that photos of back room areas are not likely to be on Apple's 'okay to do' list.

Solomani
Jun 5, 2013, 11:37 PM
In the UK Apple Stores, I wouldn't be surprised if Doctor Who stepped out of one of these.

HabSonic
Jun 5, 2013, 11:37 PM
About time that society as a whole got the idea that there is actually a limited amount of resources to go around and if we all wanna have our piece, this should be the norm for everything we buy. Repair not discard, that is.


This. And it's not even idealism. It's common sense.

B-Roll
Jun 5, 2013, 11:45 PM
No, you didn't. You 'explained' what you, without any real knowledge, claim it does NOT do. Not what it does



If by 'this' you mean replacing displays, not it didn't. As I said, I had it done as much as two months ago. Shattered screens so I know they replaced it not just fiddled with something and left the same one on trying to fool me.


And no I haven't used one, ya got me there but I've got a bit of knowledge on the situation.

An attempt to lay the claim that you worked for an Apple Store. I say worked because something tells me that you won't for much longer given that photos of back room areas are not likely to be on Apple's 'okay to do' list.

I explained the whole "calibration" thing pretty clearly to another user above. I don't know how else I can convey it.

Not making assumptions on you but it also helps to have a little bit of knowledge on how these displays are manufactured and how they actually work. Maybe you do, maybe you don't. I'm not trying to start an argument or argue, I'm just giving my knowledge on the subject. If I were unsure, I'd say so. Cheers.

jll62
Jun 6, 2013, 12:01 AM
I didn't say the machine is a sham. The machine replaces the display, yes. But there is no actually calibrating anything. The LCD/digitizer is already made. It either works or it doesn't. The whole "needing to be calibrated" thing is just to make the customer feel like it is the only way to do it correctly.

All displays have variability in how they represent colors. You calibrate individual displays by using special hardware and software to create a custom color profile that can then be used by the OS to correctly map colors so that what's output to an individual screen looks correct to the viewer. Photographers, designers, and other folks who care about spot on color reproduction have been calibrating their desktop and laptop displays by using special hardware to generate these color profiles for years.

I have no insight that this is what Apple's doing here, but when I hear the word "calibrate" in the context of displays, this is what instantly comes to mind. I would not be surprised to hear that this new device has a step in the process where it generates a custom color profile specific to the new display. If that is happening, then yes, they would be calibrating the new displays.

bizzaregood
Jun 6, 2013, 12:09 AM
This "calibration" thing is a sham. Its not something that is adjusted. The display either works or it doesn't.

Have heard reports of many of these machines arriving broken or are breaking down easily. Good luck, Apple.

Maybe they can hire us guys that fix their phones already to fix their machines that are supposed to fix their phones.

You are a sham sir.

Couple of things for the intelligent readers: a tech does the actual display replacement, unscrews the old display pops it up disconnects some cabling and does it in reverse with a new display.
-now the machine(s) come into play, the one on the left calibrates (YES calibrates) the multitouch and runs through some test patterns, the one if the right calibrates proximity/ambient sensors.
- when you calibrate something you also test it to make sure the calibration was successful., so these machines test the display and it will pass or fail, if it fails you run it through again.

-the multitouch sensitvy and such are adjustable... Especially by the company that makes the phone

mbh
Jun 6, 2013, 12:48 AM
The machine replaces the display, yes.

I find that hard to believe. What is your source for this?

Goingtothemall
Jun 6, 2013, 01:18 AM
Dang y'all are ruthless!


The only thing I've heard about these machines is they fail more than they pass. But heres my 2cents - someone stated calibration refers to displays and colors and such. I've been in the repair business for quite some time and maybe I'm just spitballing but perhaps he is referring to the touch calibration. When you're dealing with touch screens day in and day out you can become blind to other meanings lol.

Calibrating the display itself makes sense with monitors and such but this situation is a bit different. The touchscreen digitizer as mentioned is not able to be readjusted after it is attached to the glass at the factory. It's just not happening. Calibrating the display itself well that's a different story. In the repair "biz" when I first hear calibrate I also think of touch screen calibration which just isn't possible. I've seen plenty of dead spots on touchscreens so you have my blessing there!

Whatever the case, Apple has found yet another way to capitalize. Not me, I use Ghost Armor ::knock on wood::

Nozuka
Jun 6, 2013, 01:48 AM
I didn't say the machine is a sham. The machine replaces the display, yes. But there is no actually calibrating anything. The LCD/digitizer is already made. It either works or it doesn't. The whole "needing to be calibrated" thing is just to make the customer feel like it is the only way to do it correctly.


The colors can be calibrated. Why do you think Apple devices do so well on color accuracy tests?

Most of the recent generation LCD Smartphones have Color Gamuts around 60 percent of the Standard Gamut, which produces somewhat subdued colors. The iPhone 4 has a 64 percent Color Gamut, but the new iPad pulled way ahead and has a virtually perfect 99 percent of the Standard Color Gamut. The iPhone 5 has an almost identical Color Gamut to the new iPad and the Viewing Tests confirm its excellent color accuracy.



http://www.displaymate.com/Smartphone_ShootOut_2.htm

iMikeT
Jun 6, 2013, 02:13 AM
Does this machine come with its own fleet of Chinese workers?

AppleMark
Jun 6, 2013, 03:27 AM
How much is the 'Apple care' on one of those?

markie
Jun 6, 2013, 03:42 AM
I'm glad Apple is finally doing this. Too many people were abusing the device replacements.

The device replacement instead of repair is one of the things that makes Apple products worth the price premium to many. It's not "abuse" - it's being used to a very high level of service, and receiving it.

anomie
Jun 6, 2013, 03:52 AM
Having worked in three Apple Retail Stores, and subbed in a total of seven or eight, I have NO idea how a machine like that will fit in the majority of stores. Aside from the flagship stores, BoH (Back of House) is extremely crowded. At one point during the fall rush, non-invasive Genius Bar repairs had to be performed in the already-packed employee break area.

EDIT: Hahaha, I now realize that my scale on this thing was WAY off. Oh boy.

My tired brain saw it like this:

Image (http://i.imgur.com/R0XOHv8.jpg)

ohohohoho very funny....not.

Good thing Apple actually starts to really repair hardware again!

bmclemons
Jun 6, 2013, 04:26 AM
I doubt this in Apple Stores. Seriously? This is a fake article and picture..

TMay
Jun 6, 2013, 06:07 AM
They aren't necessarily wronging anyone. Its just an unnecessary term. I explained a little bit more in a different post above yours.

The touchscreen and LCD are already assembled at a factory overseas. The "calibration" isn't an adjustable thing. Basically what the machine is doing is a "quality assurance" test but on the subject of calibration it does not do anything since you can't adjust how the touch screen works and where it touches after the fact that its already been manufactured.

Its no different than you getting your phone back and you go to type an R and your phone types a T. That's just defective and no "calibrating" will fix that.

And I also never said its non-necessary equipment. The machine isn't just a "calibrating" machine. It is listed as one of its features. Hope that clear it up a bit.

You are in way over your head.

I and millions of other people calibrate our computer/graphics cards and monitors as a system frequently, sometimes daily. The calibration takes into account the room lighting temperature, I prefer 5500k, so that colors are accurate and repeatable on any other calibrated systems, including printers.

So, Apple builds a calibration system that updates the color profile for the replaced iPhone screen in the firmware, giving it what is considered the most accurate color of any smartphone, and you think that is a scam?

Your first month here isn't getting off to a good start at all.

M-O
Jun 6, 2013, 06:23 AM
I doubt this in Apple Stores. Seriously? This is a fake article and picture..

the article is fake? what did i just read?

Verbatim Cookie
Jun 6, 2013, 07:01 AM
About time that society as a whole got the idea that there is actually a limited amount of resources to go around and if we all wanna have our piece, this should be the norm for everything we buy. Repair not discard, that is.


I thought Apple refurbished the iPhones that were turned in for replacement.

Your first month here isn't getting off to a good start at all.

I suspect B-Roll isn't actually new to the MacRumors forums; s/he probably didn't want to use her/his existing account to post about this subject because previous posts may contain enough info for someone at Apple to use to identify her/him.

szw-mapple fan
Jun 6, 2013, 07:19 AM
I didn't say the machine is a sham. The machine replaces the display, yes. But there is no actually calibrating anything. The LCD/digitizer is already made. It either works or it doesn't. The whole "needing to be calibrated" thing is just to make the customer feel like it is the only way to do it correctly.

I don't see Apple trying to advertise this so why buy it if it's just for show?

PinkyMacGodess
Jun 6, 2013, 07:55 AM
Having worked in three Apple Retail Stores, and subbed in a total of seven or eight, I have NO idea how a machine like that will fit in the majority of stores. Aside from the flagship stores, BoH (Back of House) is extremely crowded. At one point during the fall rush, non-invasive Genius Bar repairs had to be performed in the already-packed employee break area.

EDIT: Hahaha, I now realize that my scale on this thing was WAY off. Oh boy.

My tired brain saw it like this:

Image (http://i.imgur.com/R0XOHv8.jpg)

It looks suitcase sized, not shipping container size. That slotted bar above the machine is a shelf bracket. Normally about an inch across the face... It's not big, but I still wonder what it would do...

Fakey
Jun 6, 2013, 07:59 AM
I explained the whole "calibration" thing pretty clearly to another user above. I don't know how else I can convey it.

Not making assumptions on you but it also helps to have a little bit of knowledge on how these displays are manufactured and how they actually work. Maybe you do, maybe you don't. I'm not trying to start an argument or argue, I'm just giving my knowledge on the subject. If I were unsure, I'd say so. Cheers.

The tech replaces the display and the machine calibrates the touch sensitivity and that's all it does. If the calibration was not done the the customer could end up with a display that will activate just before the user touches it or the will not be sensitive enough to respond properly to touches. Maybe you can't calibrate the displays but we can. The second machine tests the proximity sensor and calibrates its intensity.

RBMaraman
Jun 6, 2013, 08:34 AM
Replacing iPhone displays isn't something "new". Apple Stores used to replace the displays on the iPhone 3G and 3GS, and I believe they did on the iPhone 4 and 4S as well. But, customers complained that the process took too long (in reality about 5 minutes, but customers always complain about something...) and that the display felt and looked different (calibration issues). The display replacements often caused the Genius Bar to run behind schedule, which led to lower NetPromoter scores (customer satisfaction) and other issues.

So, let's take a look at this:

1. Apple used to replace displays, but customers complained about quality and length of time. Customers saw longer wait times at the Genius Bar, which caused the NetPromoter scores to drop.
2. In response to complaints, Apple institutes the process where they simply replace the device. However, customers complain they can't keep their original device and now have to restore/etc.
3. Apple responds by bringing back the display replacement process, now instituing a calibration machine to improve quality and time. However, customers still complain that the process takes too long.

Bottom line: You can't please every customer. I'm glad to see Apple bring this process back, but I still hope they offer a replacement. I'd rather have a replacement phone vs. one that someones been messing in.

sclawis300
Jun 6, 2013, 09:14 AM
Having worked in three Apple Retail Stores, and subbed in a total of seven or eight, I have NO idea how a machine like that will fit in the majority of stores. Aside from the flagship stores, BoH (Back of House) is extremely crowded. At one point during the fall rush, non-invasive Genius Bar repairs had to be performed in the already-packed employee break area.

EDIT: Hahaha, I now realize that my scale on this thing was WAY off. Oh boy.

My tired brain saw it like this:

Image (http://i.imgur.com/R0XOHv8.jpg)

Best part of this post was the reason for editing "I'm an idiot". I am laughing with you OP. We have all been there.

I was reading your post and thinking 'what is this guy talking about'.

----------

They aren't necessarily wronging anyone. Its just an unnecessary term. I explained a little bit more in a different post above yours.

The touchscreen and LCD are already assembled at a factory overseas. The "calibration" isn't an adjustable thing. Basically what the machine is doing is a "quality assurance" test but on the subject of calibration it does not do anything since you can't adjust how the touch screen works and where it touches after the fact that its already been manufactured.

Its no different than you getting your phone back and you go to type an R and your phone types a T. That's just defective and no "calibrating" will fix that.

And I also never said its non-necessary equipment. The machine isn't just a "calibrating" machine. It is listed as one of its features. Hope that clear it up a bit.

um, all screens need to be calibrated, no? It has nothing to do with the touch screen aspect. It is about color. Your tv can be calibrated, your monitor can be calibrated. Just because the iphone is smaller, why does that mean it can't be calibrated? I have no doubt that there are adjustments that are not accessible by the user where adjustments can be made. Maybe someone who has experience with jail breaking can confirm. Heck, you could probably make your phone black and white if you wanted to.

Mr Rabbit
Jun 6, 2013, 09:28 AM
If by 'this' you mean replacing displays, not it didn't. As I said, I had it done as much as two months ago. Shattered screens so I know they replaced it not just fiddled with something and left the same one on trying to fool me.

For what it's worth it is quite likely that the Apple store you visited was in the pilot program for these repairs. Apple will test big procedural changes in the real world via pilot programs at a few stores to gauge feedback and iron out problems before rolling the changes out to the rest of their 400~ stores.


Replacing iPhone displays isn't something "new". Apple Stores used to replace the displays on the iPhone 3G and 3GS, and I believe they did on the iPhone 4 and 4S as well. But, customers complained that the process took too long (in reality about 5 minutes, but customers always complain about something...) and that the display felt and looked different (calibration issues). The display replacements often caused the Genius Bar to run behind schedule, which led to lower NetPromoter scores (customer satisfaction) and other issues.

So, let's take a look at this:

1. Apple used to replace displays, but customers complained about quality and length of time. Customers saw longer wait times at the Genius Bar, which caused the NetPromoter scores to drop.
2. In response to complaints, Apple institutes the process where they simply replace the device. However, customers complain they can't keep their original device and now have to restore/etc.
3. Apple responds by bringing back the display replacement process, now instituing a calibration machine to improve quality and time. However, customers still complain that the process takes too long.

Bottom line: You can't please every customer. I'm glad to see Apple bring this process back, but I still hope they offer a replacement. I'd rather have a replacement phone vs. one that someones been messing in.

You're quite close.

The original repair strategy was to replace devices assuming there was no liquid damage. Liquid damage necessitated that the customer buy a new iPhone at the unsubsidized price. The kicker to this was that if a customer dropped the second iPhone in the toilet they were then unable to buy a third iPhone. This didn't last long thanks to obvious outrage by those affected.

The second repair strategy was still to replace the iPhone (still looking at iPhone & iPhone 3G) but offer $199 replacements for those with damage or otherwise out of warranty. This was response to customers who didn't understand that the $199 advertised price was a subsidized portion of the full $599.

The third repair strategy rolled out shortly before the 3GS, Genii could now replace iPhone 3G (and 3GS shortly after it's launch) displays in store. The process could easily be accomplished within a 10-15 minute window. I forget the pricing, either $99 or $199.

The next major change was with the iPhone 4 & 4S. Genii could now replace batteries, vibrate motors, cameras and rear glass. However the display was basically the last component in the device so it was not feasible to replace in house, requiring a full swap of the device if the display was shattered.

That brings us to now.

edit: Just to add, when any of the component level repairs were introduced or available the strategy was always to attempt that before proceeding with a full replacement of the device. However, due to the same reasons you outline with queues running behind and whatnot, this was rarely adhered to by employees. Often management insisted on using swaps rather than component replacement to speed up the queues.

sclawis300
Jun 6, 2013, 09:34 AM
The device replacement instead of repair is one of the things that makes Apple products worth the price premium to many. It's not "abuse" - it's being used to a very high level of service, and receiving it.

not to mention Apple is refurbing the phone you turn in. It doesn't just get thrown away. Lets use a little common sense folks. Where do you think the replacements come from? They are not brand new phones.

(common sense remark was more directed at the "idealism" post.)

----------

I'm glad to see Apple bring this process back, but I still hope they offer a replacement. I'd rather have a replacement phone vs. one that someones been messing in.

Someone has been messing in that phone too.

RobNYC
Jun 6, 2013, 09:37 AM
You are in way over your head.

I and millions of other people calibrate our computer/graphics cards and monitors as a system frequently, sometimes daily. The calibration takes into account the room lighting temperature, I prefer 5500k, so that colors are accurate and repeatable on any other calibrated systems, including printers.

So, Apple builds a calibration system that updates the color profile for the replaced iPhone screen in the firmware, giving it what is considered the most accurate color of any smartphone, and you think that is a scam?

Your first month here isn't getting off to a good start at all.

He's talking about touch screen calibration which has been explained in this thread by others as not being able to be adjusted.

"The touchscreen digitizer as mentioned is not able to be readjusted after it is attached to the glass at the factory. It's just not happening."

God what is wrong with you people and your need to be 100% right no matter what on the internet over something as trivial as this?

B-Roll
Jun 6, 2013, 09:53 AM
He's talking about touch screen calibration which has been explained in this thread by others as not being able to be adjusted.

"The touchscreen digitizer as mentioned is not able to be readjusted after it is attached to the glass at the factory. It's just not happening."

God what is wrong with you people and your need to be 100% right no matter what on the internet over something as trivial as this?

I figured I'd wake up to this storm. Haha. I think I've been a good sport!

BUT, I'm glad someone can pick apart what exactly I was talking about SPECIFICALLY relating to the touch screen. Nothing else.

As someone else stated, being in a background with dealing with touchscreens all day you kinda see one way. In my "world", when I think calibration, I relate it to people talking about the touch screen because I've heard it numerous times from uninformed people. Which I still stand by the fact that once the touchscreen digitizer is applied to the glass/LCD, that's that.

I was not talking about the display itself which would make sense, again as I have stated before.

I was blind in my one track statement talking about the touchscreen and everyone else was blind in their one track to just be "right".

To that one guy - My "first month" is going just great. ;]

Arron924
Jun 6, 2013, 10:01 AM
Im a little confused as to what purpose this machine serves, if you can buy replacement iPhone screens online which work perfectly without any sort of 'calibration' what is the need for this? :confused:

smirking
Jun 6, 2013, 10:29 AM
My tired brain saw it like this:


That's how I saw it too! I was thinking "Wow there must be a lot more room back there than it appears!"

I was also thinking that huge machine must make some really interesting noises.

elpamyelhsa
Jun 6, 2013, 10:35 AM
Im a little confused as to what purpose this machine serves, if you can buy replacement iPhone screens online which work perfectly without any sort of 'calibration' what is the need for this? :confused:

They are never perfect, so a calibration would never go astray.

gmiller744
Jun 6, 2013, 10:52 AM
This "calibration" thing is a sham. Its not something that is adjusted. The display either works or it doesn't.

Have heard reports of many of these machines arriving broken or are breaking down easily. Good luck, Apple.

Maybe they can hire us guys that fix their phones already to fix their machines that are supposed to fix their phones.


It's not a question of the display working or not, it's a question of the antenna calibration which is affected by the internal screws of the iPhones. You "Guys that fix their phones already" have actually been ripping people off this entire time, giving them phones that don't function correctly anymore, because you had no clue about this fact.

charlituna
Jun 6, 2013, 10:59 AM
I'm glad Apple is finally doing this. Too many people were abusing the device replacements.

It's likely less about abuse and more about being more 'green' and cutting off third party shops and their warranty voiding

AutoUnion39
Jun 6, 2013, 11:01 AM
It's likely less about abuse and more about being more 'green' and cutting off third party shops and their warranty voiding

There are plenty of whiners on here who would swap phones after every little issue

charlituna
Jun 6, 2013, 11:09 AM
I didn't say the machine is a sham. The machine replaces the display, yes.

Actually Mr Know it Nothing. The machine doesn't replace the display at all.

I had to take a phone in last night for a broken display and asked the Genius about this rumor and he said its basically false. They hand replace the screen and the machine just tests that all the sensors and the touch functions work properly. And as I've had dealing with this Genius for 4 years I trust him not to blow smoke up my butt.

----------

The device replacement instead of repair is one of the things that makes Apple products worth the price premium to many. It's not "abuse" - it's being used to a very high level of service, and receiving it.

I believe he's referring to resellers and the like who jack up phones to get them replaced. Like they would try to jailbreak and unlock phones and brick it so they would go in and rip the connectors so it won't power on and get a new one for their defective one.

Rumor has it earlier this year they started requiring that every phone that doesn't turn on or charge is opened and inspected for such things. Just like they do in Asia to make sure it's not a knockoff

bearbo
Jun 6, 2013, 11:12 AM
Haven't posted for years, but this is getting ridiculous.

Of course you can calibrate the touch screen. :confused:

How does touch screen work? The digitizer detects where your chubby little finger(s) touch the screen, and sending the OS the coordinates. If the digitizer was manufactured and mounted to the glass perfectly, then those coordinates would correspond to the correct location that you touched the screen.

However, if something was not perfect, for example, the digitizer is consistently telling the OS a x-coordinate 5% to the right compared the actual location of the contact, then the OS can compensate for that on the software level.

Calibrations (of the touch screen) could be done by having the machine "touch" the screen at a number of pre-specified locations, and detect where the digitizer "thinks" that the machine has touched, thereby producing a calibration map.

This kind of calibration has been done for decades on various types of touch screen, such as the likes of Wacom tablets.

Now, I don't profess knowledge of the working of this particular machine, but to say "once the touchscreen digitizer is applied to the glass/LCD, that's that" is laughable. Just because the general public cannot access the part of the OS that can report the raw data from the digitizer, and compensate for the difference, does not mean it cannot be done.

I figured I'd wake up to this storm. Haha. I think I've been a good sport!

BUT, I'm glad someone can pick apart what exactly I was talking about SPECIFICALLY relating to the touch screen. Nothing else.

As someone else stated, being in a background with dealing with touchscreens all day you kinda see one way. In my "world", when I think calibration, I relate it to people talking about the touch screen because I've heard it numerous times from uninformed people. Which I still stand by the fact that once the touchscreen digitizer is applied to the glass/LCD, that's that.

I was not talking about the display itself which would make sense, again as I have stated before.

I was blind in my one track statement talking about the touchscreen and everyone else was blind in their one track to just be "right".

To that one guy - My "first month" is going just great. ;]

RBMaraman
Jun 6, 2013, 11:18 AM
For what it's worth it is quite likely that the Apple store you visited was in the pilot program for these repairs. Apple will test big procedural changes in the real world via pilot programs at a few stores to gauge feedback and iron out problems before rolling the changes out to the rest of their 400~ stores.




You're quite close.

The original repair strategy was to replace devices assuming there was no liquid damage. Liquid damage necessitated that the customer buy a new iPhone at the unsubsidized price. The kicker to this was that if a customer dropped the second iPhone in the toilet they were then unable to buy a third iPhone. This didn't last long thanks to obvious outrage by those affected.

The second repair strategy was still to replace the iPhone (still looking at iPhone & iPhone 3G) but offer $199 replacements for those with damage or otherwise out of warranty. This was response to customers who didn't understand that the $199 advertised price was a subsidized portion of the full $599.

The third repair strategy rolled out shortly before the 3GS, Genii could now replace iPhone 3G (and 3GS shortly after it's launch) displays in store. The process could easily be accomplished within a 10-15 minute window. I forget the pricing, either $99 or $199.

The next major change was with the iPhone 4 & 4S. Genii could now replace batteries, vibrate motors, cameras and rear glass. However the display was basically the last component in the device so it was not feasible to replace in house, requiring a full swap of the device if the display was shattered.

That brings us to now.

edit: Just to add, when any of the component level repairs were introduced or available the strategy was always to attempt that before proceeding with a full replacement of the device. However, due to the same reasons you outline with queues running behind and whatnot, this was rarely adhered to by employees. Often management insisted on using swaps rather than component replacement to speed up the queues.

You're very correct, but I didn't want to go into that much detail in my post!

TMay
Jun 6, 2013, 11:19 AM
Actually Mr Know it Nothing. The machine doesn't replace the display at all.

I had to take a phone in last night for a broken display and asked the Genius about this rumor and he said its basically false. They hand replace the screen and the machine just tests that all the sensors and the touch functions work properly. And as I've had dealing with this Genius for 4 years I trust him not to blow smoke up my butt.

I believe you.

So unless otherwise determined, there aren't any calibrations at all, just automated function tests.

Oh, and it is quite feasible to calibrate the signal from the touchscreen. Capacitive screens output current as an analog signal, that is converted to digital in the SOC. A standardized "touch" or "multitouch" mechanical input could be calibrated, again with a profile in firmware, to give a nominal touch output, and a standardized response.

Evidently, this machine is not for that.

GoCubsGo
Jun 6, 2013, 11:25 AM
In the memo that I saw, the word calibration was used. To me it just seems like a fancy word to use to throw at customers. :]

I just explained what the machine actually does. And it is true, this just went into effect this week. The misconception here is that the title is calling it a calibrating machine. It is not a calibrating machine. It replaces the display. The "calibration" is just one step in the machines process.

And no I haven't used one, ya got me there but I've got a bit of knowledge on the situation. My forum post broke the original story. I'm famous duh! Haha ;]
Why are you saying that the title claims it calibrates when you claimed above that you saw a memo that used the word. I don't think you saw a memo. It sounds like you're claiming you work for Apple.


And you're not famous. ;)

sbailey4
Jun 6, 2013, 11:26 AM
Haven't posted for years, but this is getting ridiculous.

Of course you can calibrate the touch screen. :confused:

How does touch screen work? The digitizer detects where your chubby little finger(s) touch the screen, and sending the OS the coordinates. If the digitizer was manufactured and mounted to the glass perfectly, then those coordinates would correspond to the correct location that you touched the screen.

However, if something was not perfect, for example, the digitizer is consistently telling the OS a x-coordinate 5% to the right compared the actual location of the contact, then the OS can compensate for that on the software level.

Calibrations (of the touch screen) could be done by having the machine "touch" the screen at a number of pre-specified locations, and detect where the digitizer "thinks" that the machine has touched, thereby producing a calibration map.

This kind of calibration has been done for decades on various types of touch screen, such as the likes of Wacom tablets.

Now, I don't profess knowledge of the working of this particular machine, but to say "once the touchscreen digitizer is applied to the glass/LCD, that's that" is laughable. Just because the general public cannot access the part of the OS that can report the raw data from the digitizer, and compensate for the difference, does not mean it cannot be done.

I somewhat agree. The garmin GPS's have a calibration feature the end user can do when it gets sloppy. It asks you to touch certain areas as the test highlights different areas on the screen. Of course I am not Apple engineer but clearly "A" touch screen can be calibrated.

AbSoluTc
Jun 6, 2013, 11:55 AM
My iPhone 5 display stopped working correctly and I called Apple Care a few months back to request a replacement phone. They sent me a phone that looked like crap compared to my phone but the screen was brand new. I swapped the screens and sent the phone they sent me back to them stating it was defective on arrival.

So I kept my original phone and have a new screen on it. Never had an issue with color or touch. Not sure what the calibration is for. However I heard from several Genius guys that they don't replace the screens because they need to be calibrated and so forth (that was before).

What does the calibration do honestly and why would it be necessary on a 5 and not a 4/4S?

charlituna
Jun 6, 2013, 01:07 PM
why would it be necessary on a 5 and not a 4/4S?

Why not the 4/4s. Because they don't replace those screens or authorize anyone else to do so. Could be as simple as that

ijohn.8.80
Jun 6, 2013, 06:18 PM
Lets use a little common sense folks.

(common sense remark was more directed at the "idealism" post.)

This would be the same "common sense" that Apple uses, which had my 27" iMac screen replaced recently instead of just fixing a plug! :rolleyes:

What I was inferring in my post was that things (not just Apple gear) should be designed to be repaired at a better component breakdown level.

B-Roll
Jun 7, 2013, 01:10 AM
my iphone 5 display stopped working correctly and i called apple care a few months back to request a replacement phone. They sent me a phone that looked like crap compared to my phone but the screen was brand new. I swapped the screens and sent the phone they sent me back to them stating it was defective on arrival.

So i kept my original phone and have a new screen on it. Never had an issue with color or touch. Not sure what the calibration is for. However i heard from several genius guys that they don't replace the screens because they need to be calibrated and so forth (that was before).

What does the calibration do honestly and why would it be necessary on a 5 and not a 4/4s?

you mean you didn't calibrate it after you swapped interchangeable parts??!!?! You've really done it now!!!

AbSoluTc
Jun 7, 2013, 07:12 AM
you mean you didn't calibrate it after you swapped interchangeable parts??!!?! You've really done it now!!!

Lol, no.

Jonathan2
Jun 10, 2013, 04:30 AM
I've had my MacBook Pro for about six months, it started flickering. Took it to the Genius Bar but it looks like my AppleCares not good enough. I think I have to take them to court.
This is what it looks like, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qTOx8BgT_7Q&feature=share&list=PLiiASQax4JifDniTm RUO6OfhoNtX70cZR in this link
I think Apple knows it's going to be a recall on these computers for this flickering Ive been reading some other articles about it, that's where i got this video.

----------

This is what it looks like, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qTOx8BgT_7Q&feature=share&list=PLiiASQax4JifDniTm RUO6OfhoNtX70cZR
Most stores would just hand you a new computer apologize and send you on your way not Apple. :mad:

dineshpaatil
Jun 10, 2013, 09:37 AM
What's for i phone 4s??

iphonerepairny
Jun 13, 2013, 12:53 PM
Here's what this new, in-store machine is actually doing:

1. Scraping off the broken digitizer glass from the iPhone 5 display assembly (remember that the LCD and digitizer are glued together with a transparent double sided tape adhesive).
2. Testing that the LCD made it through the separation process intact, both physically and electronically.

3. Attaching a new digitizer glass to the "recycled" LCD, making sure it is affixed accurately (physical calibration is necessary as there is less than 1mm of error in all directions).

4.Finally, testing the whole, refurbished assembly for fit and finish, as well as testing the numerous sensors that are also affixed to the display assembly.

Note: Many "keen-eyed" customers may notice scratches in the finished product (only under the glass) as the LCD is very easily scratched in the scraping process -- however most people won't notice immediately, unless specifically pointed out to them.