PDA

View Full Version : Intel Shows Off Prototype 128GB Thunderbolt Thumb Drive




MacRumors
Jun 6, 2013, 12:06 PM
http://images.macrumors.com/im/macrumorsthreadlogo.gif (http://www.macrumors.com/2013/06/06/intel-shows-off-prototype-128gb-thunderbolt-thumb-drive/)


Intel introduced a 128GB Thunderbolt thumb drive at the Computex trade show in Taipei today, reports PCWorld (http://www.pcworld.com/article/2040903/intel-shows-worlds-fastest-thumb-drive.html). The drive, which Intel is calling the "world's fastest thumb drive," is similar in size to a standard flash drive and does not require an expensive Thunderbolt cable to connect to a Mac or PC.

http://images.macrumors.com/article-new/2013/06/intelthumbdrive.jpgThis is one of the first thumb drives demonstrated using Thunderbolt connectivity, which is the fastest technology available to transfer data between computers and peripherals, said Oren Huber, a Thunderbolt engineer at Intel Israel.

Thunderbolt can transfer data at a speed of 10Gbps, which is faster than USB 3.0 and USB 2.0. Right now USB 3.0 is about half the speed of Thunderbolt.Intel's thumb drive uses a SanDisk SSD for storage, though that may change if the product goes into production. At this point, the thumb drive is just a prototype, with no potential price point provided.

Given the high prices and limited adoption of Thunderbolt, it may be quite some time before a consumer version of the Thunderbolt thumb drive is available for purchase. Earlier this week, Intel officially announced (http://www.macrumors.com/2013/06/04/intel-shares-additional-details-on-20gbps-thunderbolt-2/)*the next iteration of Thunderbolt, Thunderbolt 2, which will begin production in late 2013.

Article Link: Intel Shows Off Prototype 128GB Thunderbolt Thumb Drive (http://www.macrumors.com/2013/06/06/intel-shows-off-prototype-128gb-thunderbolt-thumb-drive/)



techpr
Jun 6, 2013, 12:09 PM
The most expensive Thumb Drive on the Planet.

winston1236
Jun 6, 2013, 12:11 PM
The most expensive Thumb Drive on the Planet.

No kidding. Thunderbolt 2? Does anyone have the first version at this point.

subsonix
Jun 6, 2013, 12:13 PM
The most expensive Thumb Drive on the Planet.

Also the fastest, by far. And at 128GB it's besides it's physical size closer to a regular drive.

KieranDotW
Jun 6, 2013, 12:13 PM
Only $1,499.

Crzyrio
Jun 6, 2013, 12:15 PM
That is insane, you could transfer the entire contents of the Thumb Drive in under 5 mins.

techpr
Jun 6, 2013, 12:19 PM
That is insane, you could transfer the entire contents of the Thumb Drive in under 5 mins.

This is faster than Thunderbolt and USB 3 together.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N5b4_5hvOog

camnchar
Jun 6, 2013, 12:19 PM
Hello time machine backup!

verniesgarden
Jun 6, 2013, 12:20 PM
I wouldn't mind a smaller one of these like 32gb even as a scratchdisk for photoshop. I work on some rather large files and would like to see if this could help performance.

fiveainone
Jun 6, 2013, 12:20 PM
Thunderbolt 2?? I haven't even been able to use my Thunderbolt 1!

ellsworth
Jun 6, 2013, 12:20 PM
Thunderbolt 2 simply means: "Whoops... we messed something up with thunderbolt 1... so here's something completely new instead."

subsonix
Jun 6, 2013, 12:21 PM
That is insane, you could transfer the entire contents of the Thumb Drive in under 5 mins.

At full speed, in 1 minute and 42 seconds. :D

milo
Jun 6, 2013, 12:23 PM
It's hard to imagine the pricing for this being announced by anyone but Doctor Evil.

Will it necessarily be that fast? I was under the impression that the bottleneck in most typical thumb drives was slow (cheap) memory that wasn't even as fast as the interface. Are there USB3 thumb drives that actually transfer half a gig per second?

Adolfo
Jun 6, 2013, 12:25 PM
Thunderbolt 2 simply means: "Whoops... we messed something up with thunderbolt 1... so here's something completely new instead."

2x faster ...2x more expensive?

subsonix
Jun 6, 2013, 12:26 PM
It's hard to imagine the pricing for this being announced by anyone but Doctor Evil.

Will it necessarily be that fast?

Not necessarily, but in this case it uses a Sandisk SSD. It would be pretty dumb to just use regular thumb drive internals.

milo
Jun 6, 2013, 12:27 PM
Thunderbolt 2 simply means: "Whoops... we messed something up with thunderbolt 1... so here's something completely new instead."

It's not completely new, just the same thing but double the speed. I don't know what would be messed up about the first version, it just hasn't been widely adopted and thus is still expensive, but I haven't heard any complaints about the technology itself.

Not necessarily, but in this case it uses a Sandisk SSD. It would be pretty dumb to just use regular thumb drive internals.

Thanks, I missed the SSD part. It would be pretty crazy to have SSD thumb drives running at full speed. I wonder if the "thumb" form factor could potentially keep down the price compared to putting an SSD into an external TB hard drive case. I would hope so.

SnowLeopard2008
Jun 6, 2013, 12:30 PM
It's hard to imagine the pricing for this being announced by anyone but Doctor Evil.

Will it necessarily be that fast? I was under the impression that the bottleneck in most typical thumb drives was slow (cheap) memory that wasn't even as fast as the interface. Are there USB3 thumb drives that actually transfer half a gig per second?

The "half gig per second" you quote is theoretical speed. It's near impossible to reach that in real life especially for (relatively) small files that most people use thumb drives for. Thunderbolt can easily saturate the connection. Also, flash memory (the cheap memory you mentioned) and SSD, in very technical terms, two different storage mediums. I don't want to get technical here but there's a reason why SSDs right now are like 500MB/s (BYTE not BIT) read/write and USB flash drives are much much slower.

That being said, I'm going to venture out and guess that this won't be cheap. Certainly not USB drive cheap. USB 3 is roughly $1/GB, give or take. This is so much faster with better memory chips. Plus, Thunderbolt ports aren't as ubiquitous as USB 2/3. Not many PCs have them, while pretty much any 1-2 year old Mac does.

GenesisST
Jun 6, 2013, 12:31 PM
I wish I could send that to my teenage self in the 80s... My mom would never have found my "stash"...

jclo
Jun 6, 2013, 12:34 PM
The most expensive Thumb Drive on the Planet.

It is not, actually, the most expensive thumb drive on the planet. See here:

http://news.yahoo.com/blogs/technology-blog/world-most-expensive-flash-drive-37-000-sparkly-172140917.html

IzzyJG99
Jun 6, 2013, 12:36 PM
i wish i could send that to my teenage self in the 80s... My mom would never have found my "stash"...

ha!

Nee412
Jun 6, 2013, 12:36 PM
This may well be the fastest thumb drive in existence. It may well be quite large at 128GB.

The only way it would be a success is if it retailed at £80-£100. High speed Thunderbolt for the masses. It won't though. It'll most likely hit £250-£300 minimum.

Which makes it pointless. USB 3.0 isn't exactly slow and I can get a 64GB drive shipped from Amazon for £27.

subsonix
Jun 6, 2013, 12:42 PM
USB 3.0 isn't exactly slow and I can get a 64GB drive shipped from Amazon for £27.

The bottle neck isn't USB with a regular thumb drive. They are really slow, regardless of interface. If someone puts a Sandisk SSD inside a USB thumbdrive, it will not cost 27 pounds, you may have to add a zero.

ArtOfWarfare
Jun 6, 2013, 12:43 PM
Only $1,499.

How much is your time worth, though?

If you need to transfer a lot of data, and you value your time highly, this price may not seem as crazy as I imagine you thought it was when you wrote your post.

It's probably nowhere near that price, though. I'd estimate it's no more than $500, based on the price of flash storage and lightning connectors.

Orlandoech
Jun 6, 2013, 12:49 PM
Only $1,499.

On sale for $1449 duh!

antonis
Jun 6, 2013, 12:49 PM
This is not your typical transfer thumb drive for simple file transferring, though.
It's actually a removable ssd-speed disk expansion. You can actually use it as a main boot / system drive for any mac you own.

Possibilities are way beyond a thumb drive as we know it.

PracticalMac
Jun 6, 2013, 12:49 PM
Can the Flash NAND even write the data that fast???

milo
Jun 6, 2013, 12:51 PM
Looks like there are already USB3 sticks that can do in the ballpark of 200MB/second reads. And they run about a buck a gig for that speed - the question with this TB version is actual benchmarked speed and cost. In theory, it should be possible to do USB3 SSD thumb drive that gets over 400. The TB version may be a bit faster, but potentially way more expensive than the USB3 version.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=20-220-585&ParentOnly=1&IsVirtualParent=1

subsonix
Jun 6, 2013, 12:59 PM
In theory, it should be possible to do USB3 SSD thumb drive that gets over 400.

USB have quite a bit of protocol overhead, 400MB is a theoretical max for USB3 I believe.

cclloyd
Jun 6, 2013, 01:02 PM
This is not your typical transfer thumb drive for simple file transferring, though.
It's actually a removable ssd-speed disk expansion. You can actually use it as a main boot / system drive for any mac you own.

Possibilities are way beyond a thumb drive as we know it.

I was thinking the same thing. Use it as a boot drive, and if they make it in large enough capacities, (while 128 is enough), and thunderbolt gets large enough adoption, I could see a lot of people just carrying their whole computer along with them.

Winter Charm
Jun 6, 2013, 01:07 PM
Can the Flash NAND even write the data that fast???

Individual flash chips can only write around 30 MB/s

How SSD's are blazing fast is they basically set up a RAID 0 with all the flash chips they contain. That's why, when you open up an SSD, you see an *array* of flash chips.

if they use 8 flash chips in a raid 0 configuration, with the onboard controller acting as the raid card, you get 8*30 = 240 MB/s write speed.

Nee412
Jun 6, 2013, 01:12 PM
The bottle neck isn't USB with a regular thumb drive. They are really slow, regardless of interface. If someone puts a Sandisk SSD inside a USB thumbdrive, it will not cost 27 pounds, you may have to add a zero.

True, but this is a thumb drive not an external SSD. I was merely pointing out that the thumb drive I mentioned had more than enough speed for use as a thumb drive in today's standards.

Sure it'll be great when we can all carry around 128GB super speed SSD thumb drives instead of portable hard drives. Problem is that although the technology exists, it doesn't exist in the right price bracket for it to be viable in today's market.

thejadedmonkey
Jun 6, 2013, 01:13 PM
I was thinking the same thing. Use it as a boot drive, and if they make it in large enough capacities, (while 128 is enough), and thunderbolt gets large enough adoption, I could see a lot of people just carrying their whole computer along with them.

How would this be any different from a USB booting OS (such as a Windows To Go, Ubuntu) or eSATA?

subsonix
Jun 6, 2013, 01:17 PM
True, but this is a thumb drive not an external SSD. I was merely pointing out that the thumb drive I mentioned had more than enough speed for use as a thumb drive in today's standards.

If more than enough speed is very very low speed, sure. My point was that the speed of USB is irrelevant for regular thumb drives, USB2 or 3 don't make any difference.

This thing will likely be more expensive than a regular thumb drive, but it's not really aimed for the mass market of regular thumb drives either I'm sure.

GeekLawyer
Jun 6, 2013, 01:18 PM
I was thinking the same thing. Use it as a boot drive, and if they make it in large enough capacities, (while 128 is enough), and thunderbolt gets large enough adoption, I could see a lot of people just carrying their whole computer along with them.

Makes me think of this Apple patent from 2006... the "Home on iPod" concept.

http://arstechnica.com/apple/2007/07/apple-granted-patent-for-ipod-home-directory-portability/

http://appleinsider.com/articles/06/10/11/apples_missing_home_on_ipod_feature_resurfaces_in_filing

Wow, it's a concept older than 2006. From 2003: http://www.macrumors.com/2003/10/08/pulled-panther-feature-home-on-ipod/

FuNGi
Jun 6, 2013, 01:20 PM
What? No comments about how easily it scratches?:cool:

animatedude
Jun 6, 2013, 01:27 PM
only geeks would want to carry a 128GB thumb drive in their keychains.

give me something which is much smaller and 4GB to carry the important stuff not my entire life.

M-O
Jun 6, 2013, 01:30 PM
How would this be any different from a USB booting OS (such as a Windows To Go, Ubuntu) or eSATA?

speed

macs4nw
Jun 6, 2013, 01:31 PM
Can the Flash NAND even write the data that fast???

Exactly what I was wondering. The new XQD-S memory cards can do sustained read/write transfer speeds of 168 MBps, thats MBps, so the bottleneck is still with the Flash Nand. Not sure about the speed of the SANDISK memory they're using, but it's probably less than this state-of-the-art XQD-S, that's meant to replace CF for professional applications.

"The company says that its new cards offer sustained read/write transfer speeds of 168 MBps (actual speed)"
Source: http://www.gizmag.com/sony-xqd-s-series-media-cards-launched/23189/

http://www.sony.net/Products/memorycard/en_us/xqd/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/XQD_card

At any rate, good to see more TB products released; that can only help adoption of the standard, and eventually, lower prices.

milo
Jun 6, 2013, 01:33 PM
USB have quite a bit of protocol overhead, 400MB is a theoretical max for USB3 I believe.

http://forums.macrumors.com/showthread.php?t=1483374

This guy got over 400 with SSD in a usb3 case. Maybe it's possible to get similar speeds with USB3 SSD thumb, maybe not.


True, but this is a thumb drive not an external SSD.

The article says it's SSD in a thumb drive form factor.

iThinkIt
Jun 6, 2013, 01:48 PM
This is faster than Thunderbolt and USB 3 together.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N5b4_5hvOog

if i could hook it directly to my cortex.. umm methinks the memory.. UMMM I forgot.. error.. error... :)

http://www.rsc.org/images/FEATURE-memory-400_tcm18-185088.jpg

Tankmaze
Jun 6, 2013, 01:55 PM
at first I was like whoaaa 10 gbps transfer speed, and then I remember there is no thunderbolt devices that I use daily vs usb and that is a shame :(

I rather take usb 3.0 with half speed but lots of compatible device ex my tv, car tape, etc.

intel and apple needs to push thunderbolt further.

subsonix
Jun 6, 2013, 02:06 PM
Maybe it's possible to get similar speeds with USB3 SSD thumb, maybe not.


It's not. That example would be right at the bleeding edge, this is taken right from the USB 3.0 spec document:

At a 5 Gbps signaling rate with 8b/10b encoding, the raw throughput is 500 MBps. When link flow control, packet framing, and protocol overhead are considered, it is realistic for 400 MBps or more to be delivered to an application.

Rampage Dev
Jun 6, 2013, 02:20 PM
In 10 years perhaps....

milo
Jun 6, 2013, 02:23 PM
That quote agrees with exactly what I said.

it is realistic for 400 MBps or more to be delivered to an application

nekonari
Jun 6, 2013, 02:24 PM
10Gbps...

Am I seeing this right? Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serial_ATA#SATA_revision_3.0_-_6_Gbit.2Fs_-_600_MB.2Fs) says SATA has top transfer rate of 6.0 Gbps.. So Thunderbolt 2 tops internal drive speed? Damn, when Thunderbolt's price goes down, why have SATA at all then? :d

subsonix
Jun 6, 2013, 02:25 PM
That quote agrees with exactly what I said.

You quoted me on the theoretical max of USB3, I may have missed what you meant.

milo
Jun 6, 2013, 02:35 PM
So Thunderbolt 2 tops internal drive speed?

TB1 already is faster than SATA III.

Damn, when Thunderbolt's price goes down, why have SATA at all then?

TB prices will probably never go down to the point of being as cheap as SATA. Heck, just look at the price of cables, much less the price of devices themselves. And TB is intended as an external standard, they could potentially do an internal version but that doesn't seem likely at this point.

KindredMAC
Jun 6, 2013, 03:01 PM
Things to do with this:
- Time Machine
- Bootable drive
- External expansion drive

So think about this... you put your whole computer on this Thunder-Drive™ (you see what I did there?) and then can go to any Mac you want and run your whole system from where ever!

Jimmy James
Jun 6, 2013, 03:08 PM
Can the flash memory even support the speeds thunderbolt can offer?

milo
Jun 6, 2013, 03:10 PM
Can the flash memory even support the speeds thunderbolt can offer?

It's not flash memory, it's SSD.

ValSalva
Jun 6, 2013, 03:37 PM
Proof of concept. It's pretty cool but not close to coming to market yet.

jweinraub
Jun 6, 2013, 03:41 PM
I really want this! Not so much for the size, since that is about 50% of my SSD I got now, but I want to love thunderbolt. I want it to succeed, I don't want it to end up like Firewire.

Nightarchaon
Jun 6, 2013, 04:03 PM
And the award for the most pointless peripheral goes to ...... :rolleyes:

milo
Jun 6, 2013, 04:13 PM
And the award for the most pointless peripheral goes to ......

What's pointless about big, fast, portable storage? Obviously it has a limited audience, but that's not the same as pointless.

ikir
Jun 6, 2013, 04:15 PM
I would love to have a thunderbolt thumbdrive... even 32GB would be cool. I hope it become reality.

----------

I really want this! Not so much for the size, since that is about 50% of my SSD I got now, but I want to love thunderbolt. I want it to succeed, I don't want it to end up like Firewire.
FireWire is heavily used and essential to its market: PRO. Which is the same as Thunderbolt. Not everyone needs it, but some users can't live without it.

Jimmy James
Jun 6, 2013, 05:03 PM
It's not flash memory, it's SSD.

Same question. Can the ssd utilize the speed??

milo
Jun 6, 2013, 05:07 PM
Same question. Can the ssd utilize the speed??

Nobody knows what speed this specific SSD is, but the fastest SSDs can read over 500 megs per second, faster than FW800 or USB3. So if they built it with a fast enough SSD inside, yes.

MattInOz
Jun 6, 2013, 07:17 PM
Same question. Can the ssd utilize the speed??

More of the same question?
Is the SSD controller SATA or a PCIe direct like IO fusion?

raniel
Jun 6, 2013, 08:25 PM
My wallet will be drained faster than the TB 2 speed

ijohn.8.80
Jun 6, 2013, 09:49 PM
OMG! The new Mac Pro will run off a bank of these! :eek:

markiv810
Jun 6, 2013, 11:07 PM
intel has been testing the thumb drive for quite some time, this thumb drive in the picture looks worn out, the paint (finish) seems to be worn out. Have to wait and see if thunderbolt thumb drive is a viable option in the long run.

cclloyd
Jun 7, 2013, 12:02 AM
How would this be any different from a USB booting OS (such as a Windows To Go, Ubuntu) or eSATA?

I didn't say it would be different. Just faster :P

inscrewtable
Jun 7, 2013, 02:42 AM
This a the thumb for Goldfinger.

Nightarchaon
Jun 7, 2013, 03:52 AM
What's pointless about big, fast, portable storage? Obviously it has a limited audience, but that's not the same as pointless.

Its pointless because you could buy a universally usable USB drive for a fraction the price, or , get a proper external Thunderbolt SSD if you want performance, This seems to be the device that sits in the middle, not as good as an SSD, and not as universally usable across multiple systems as a USB key.

Also, doesn't a thunderbolt display have to be the LAST in the chain for it to work ? so this key cant be used if you only have one Tbolt port and an External display because it has no pass through

alexgowers
Jun 7, 2013, 04:31 AM
Now if only apple and other laptop makers could use this idea to make expandable ssd drives inside the chassis. Maybe this tech could be small enough for all these stupidly thin "ultrabooks"? God I hate that label it's crap.

Also how is it that Intel didn't have these at launch of the port? It seems like madness that it's been so long without any particulary good devices. USB 3.0 will become USB 4.0 eventually (it'll be an ugly pin) but it'll probably mean thunderbolt is never adopted the way it should be for everything.

theluggage
Jun 7, 2013, 04:59 AM
Its pointless because you could buy a universally usable USB drive for a fraction the price, or , get a proper external Thunderbolt SSD if you want performance

True for most people, but if you're regularly shuttling 100GB files around (e.g. for video work) you could use these to store projects, and work directly from the 'key' with no performance loss (imagine video) rather than continually copying to/from your main drive. Or, as others have suggested, you could effectively carry your whole computer around on a keyring.

OK, you could still use a small TB drive instead - but, as with the Apple Firewire and Ethernet adapters they can shave a bit off the cost by having the plug integrated or on a very short cable,


Also, doesn't a thunderbolt display have to be the LAST in the chain for it to work ? so this key cant be used if you only have one Tbolt port and an External display because it has no pass through[/QUOTE]

paulrbeers
Jun 7, 2013, 08:00 AM
I would love to have one of these. My wife and I each have a macbook (I have an Air, she has a Pro). We rarely use them at the same time. I could easily load my Air onto one of these and when I want to use my "air", I could just plug it into her Macbook Pro and have my setup at my finger tips. We could consolidate our two macbooks into one. Her Macbook Pro is a 2011 so we don't have USB 3.0 on it so this would be perfect for that purpose. Ah well, Instead I will just be buying a 2013 Macbook Air for myself whenever they are released.

Hellhammer
Jun 7, 2013, 08:12 AM
Exactly what I was wondering. The new XQD-S memory cards can do sustained read/write transfer speeds of 168 MBps, thats MBps, so the bottleneck is still with the Flash Nand. Not sure about the speed of the SANDISK memory they're using, but it's probably less than this state-of-the-art XQD-S, that's meant to replace CF for professional applications.

"The company says that its new cards offer sustained read/write transfer speeds of 168 MBps (actual speed)"
Source: http://www.gizmag.com/sony-xqd-s-series-media-cards-launched/23189/

http://www.sony.net/Products/memorycard/en_us/xqd/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/XQD_card

At any rate, good to see more TB products released; that can only help adoption of the standard, and eventually, lower prices.

Most likely this is SanDisk iSSD (http://www.sandisk.com/products/embedded/issd/) based.

Damn, when Thunderbolt's price goes down, why have SATA at all then? :d

Thunderbolt is just fancy and expensive external PCIe. SATA is also moving to PCIe with SATA Express (we'll see the standard shipping later this year) and the consumer spec will provide speeds of up to 16Gbps.

subsonix
Jun 7, 2013, 09:20 AM
Thunderbolt is just fancy and expensive external PCIe. SATA is also moving to PCIe with SATA Express (we'll see the standard shipping later this year) and the consumer spec will provide speeds of up to 16Gbps.

Updating eSATA as well will most likely require a hefty controller, strict spec and likely a new connector, meaning a far higher price than USB and yet anothere interface. SATA Express is for internal use afaik.

Gemütlichkeit
Jun 7, 2013, 09:31 AM
Nothing beats the aesthetics of the Kingston

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/31mQC25RHqL._SX342_.jpg

just give me this with thunderbolt.

tbrinkma
Jun 7, 2013, 09:44 AM
Also, doesn't a thunderbolt display have to be the LAST in the chain for it to work ? so this key cant be used if you only have one Tbolt port and an External display because it has no pass through

No. A Thunderbolt display can be at any point in the chain (so long as it has a pass-thru port). For proof of this, just look at Apple's current display.

A DisplayPort or mini DisplayPort display has to be the last in the chain. (Because it doesn't have a Thunderbolt pass-thru.)

lunarworks
Jun 7, 2013, 09:50 AM
Prototype of amazing new tech shown off.

Macrumours Forum whines and complains.

Nothing new here.

PinkyMacGodess
Jun 7, 2013, 09:58 AM
Only $1,499.

Wouldn't that be the sale price? I mean, the price after they figure they have millions of them lying around and have to move them somehow...

----------

Nothing beats the aesthetics of the Kingston

Image (http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/31mQC25RHqL._SX342_.jpg)

just give me this with thunderbolt.

That is sexy. I haven't seen it out there yet. I've got the Lexar green ones with USB 3. Nice... Little support for full speed.

Repo
Jun 7, 2013, 10:00 AM
Nothing beats the aesthetics of the Kingston

Image (http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/31mQC25RHqL._SX342_.jpg)

just give me this with thunderbolt.

I've had trouble getting those to fit in some USB ports, but they are pretty.

That Intel prototype though - ... ugly.

mikeheenan
Jun 7, 2013, 10:20 AM
How much is your time worth, though?

If you need to transfer a lot of data, and you value your time highly, this price may not seem as crazy as I imagine you thought it was when you wrote your post.

It's probably nowhere near that price, though. I'd estimate it's no more than $500, based on the price of flash storage and lightning connectors.


How much time would this save one as compared to a USB 3 stick? I mean sure if the cash is no big deal, go for it, but it seems like you can transfer stuff in the background while you're doing other tasks.

zorinlynx
Jun 7, 2013, 10:31 AM
That drive looks like it's been through war. WTF?

----------

It is not, actually, the most expensive thumb drive on the planet. See here:

http://news.yahoo.com/blogs/technology-blog/world-most-expensive-flash-drive-37-000-sparkly-172140917.html

That doesn't really count. They only made it expensive by adding a ton of expensive decorations to it.

I can do that right now with a cheap 1GB USB thumb drive by krazy-gluing a Krugerrand to it.

nekonari
Jun 7, 2013, 12:51 PM
TB1 already is faster than SATA III.



TB prices will probably never go down to the point of being as cheap as SATA. Heck, just look at the price of cables, much less the price of devices themselves. And TB is intended as an external standard, they could potentially do an internal version but that doesn't seem likely at this point.

What a product is intended for doesn't really matter. If it's viable or better alternative, then why not?? Wonder how much faster it'll be..

naurmel
Jun 7, 2013, 01:16 PM
This stick is a kind of "just one minute Jack"-Stick. With the right software on it you are able to copy the whole RAM and Parts of the users home directories. In seconds. That is the reason why it is Thunderbolt.
And why do we see this stick now? Maybe Intel has closed this door with the last firmware update.

MrNomNoms
Jun 8, 2013, 11:24 PM
The big question is what kind of flash is being used - if the flash is just the cheap low end slow variety then it really won't matter how much bandwidth is piped to the device if the bottleneck is the chip itself. IMHO although flash is a great technology now I'm more interested in the future technologies that are coming down the pipe which don't have the limitations of flash such as the limited number of writes, the cost relative to the size when compared to traditional rotating media etc. For me I've used flash in the past (on a Lenovo Thinkpad X1 Carbon) and don't get me wrong it was great in terms of responsiveness but I always felt as though the promise of flash has been greatly overhyped when it came to speed when compared the downsides.

cmanderson
Jun 9, 2013, 11:08 AM
Nothing beats the aesthetics of the Kingston

Image (http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/31mQC25RHqL._SX342_.jpg)

just give me this with thunderbolt.

Design award for a svelte bottle opener. I can go along with that.

Rossatron
Jun 9, 2013, 11:19 AM
wouldnt mind getting one of these if they go on to production

milo
Jun 9, 2013, 08:12 PM
Its pointless because you could buy a universally usable USB drive for a fraction the price, or , get a proper external Thunderbolt SSD if you want performance

Maybe it's not the best choice for some uses, but that doesn't make it pointless. And while we all assume it would be expensive, at this point we don't know specifics. If it's somewhat more expensive and somewhat faster, it just depends what those specific numbers are and what it's worth to a user.

Nightarchaon
Jun 10, 2013, 01:04 AM
No. A Thunderbolt display can be at any point in the chain (so long as it has a pass-thru port). For proof of this, just look at Apple's current display.

A DisplayPort or mini DisplayPort display has to be the last in the chain. (Because it doesn't have a Thunderbolt pass-thru.)

ahh, that makes WAY more sense than how i was reading it..

carestudio
Jun 10, 2013, 02:13 AM
Not sure if the Thunderbolt thumb drive would make sense to me or actually USB 3 Thumb drive would make even more sense to me considering the pricing and others.
Found some good tear-down pictures of this Intel thunderbolt flash drive.
http://www.thunderbolt4mac.com/Intel/Thunderbolt-Flash-Drive/index.asp?C=0

A 128G flash memory on the board and the other side is thunderbolt connector and chip.