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NovemberWhiskey
Jun 12, 2013, 05:24 AM
Is it just me or do the HDR pics look better? Seems richer and higher quality.

I am thinking either placebo or the white background in photos is enhancing the perceived colors.

HDR pics also seem to snap faster.

Camera does crash a lot and respring my phone though...

zhandri
Jun 12, 2013, 05:37 AM
on ios 6 pics were just pimped with an HDR filter. i think now with ios 7 the phone really takes 2 images and creates a real HDR like ProHDR

MacReloaded
Jun 12, 2013, 05:44 AM
on ios 6 pics were just pimped with an HDR filter. i think now with ios 7 the phone really takes 2 images and creates a real HDR like ProHDR

Nope.

JUiCEJamie
Jun 12, 2013, 06:00 AM
Interesting! It'd be nice to see if someone can post a comparison.

zhandri
Jun 12, 2013, 06:20 AM
Nope.

ofc :) the shutter always only went off once in iOS6 those were never real HDR pics. for a real HDR pic you will see the screen go from dark to bright because the phone takes 2 photos

Menel
Jun 12, 2013, 06:36 AM
ofc :) the shutter always only went off once in iOS6 those were never real HDR pics. for a real HDR pic you will see the screen go from dark to bright because the phone takes 2 photosThat is what we call an animation.

A software developer designs the animation however he wants. What they conjure up for you to see on the screen, is whatever they want, and it isn't necessarily connected to the real world.

E.g. the filters. The color filters are software. The camera isn't really capturing those shades, it's capturing normal colors, the color shifts are done in software for your eyes.

watchthisspace
Jun 12, 2013, 06:37 AM
ofc :) the shutter always only went off once in iOS6 those were never real HDR pics. for a real HDR pic you will see the screen go from dark to bright because the phone takes 2 photos

The on screen animated shutter only goes off once, which doesn't indicate what the camera itself is doing.

Every HDR photo I've taken, you can see the ghosting of the image because I haven't got a steady hand.

EDIT: Damn, too slow.

MacReloaded
Jun 12, 2013, 06:47 AM
ofc :) the shutter always only went off once in iOS6 those were never real HDR pics. for a real HDR pic you will see the screen go from dark to bright because the phone takes 2 photos

Steve Jobs explained the feature back in 2010 with iOS 4.1.

http://youtu.be/KMFC56Bu-Lc?t=8m8s

critic81
Jun 12, 2013, 08:32 AM
The HDR does look pretty good on iOS 7 Beta 1 when exposing for the underexposed part of the image. A little edit with snapseed and it comes out pretty nice.

http://i648.photobucket.com/albums/uu209/critic81/Attachment-1.jpeg (http://s648.photobucket.com/user/critic81/media/Attachment-1.jpeg.html)

seble
Jun 12, 2013, 09:18 AM
The HDR does look pretty good on iOS 7 Beta 1 when exposing for the underexposed part of the image. A little edit with snapseed and it comes out pretty nice.

Image (http://s648.photobucket.com/user/critic81/media/Attachment-1.jpeg.html)

And thatttt is why I usually detest HDR, looks for too overdone

critic81
Jun 12, 2013, 09:49 AM
This is the HDR straight from the camera, no editing, for those who prefer it.

http://i648.photobucket.com/albums/uu209/critic81/Attachment-1-1.jpeg (http://s648.photobucket.com/user/critic81/media/Attachment-1-1.jpeg.html)

jlnr
Sep 27, 2013, 10:20 AM
I often take pictures when it's dark, and HDR mode used to be pretty good at brightening up the dark areas of a photo (like, people).

Since upgrading to iOS 7, all my HDR shots are one indiscernible dark mess; at best, they look exactly the same as the non-HDR shots. Is this simply the downside of HDR getting better at daylight shots? Am I really the only one with this problem? :confused:

I'll get my hands on another iPhone 5 running iOS 6 tomorrow and take some HDR photos for comparison...

Nevaborn
Sep 27, 2013, 01:55 PM
The quality of HDR was actually worse in iOS 7 beta than iOS 6.

In old iOS 6 it would overlay images however you always had a level of ghosting. The colours and definition were and improvment over a standard image. Skies did stand out more with no sacrifice in detail.

In iOS 7 betas it seems HDR only took one picture due to no signs of overlapping or ghosting and simply increased the brightness as I would find constantly sky detail.

Parise
Sep 27, 2013, 03:39 PM
The quality of HDR was actually worse in iOS 7 beta than iOS 6.

In old iOS 6 it would overlay images however you always had a level of ghosting. The colours and definition were and improvment over a standard image. Skies did stand out more with no sacrifice in detail.

In iOS 7 betas it seems HDR only took one picture due to no signs of overlapping or ghosting and simply increased the brightness as I would find constantly sky detail.

I personally think the HDR in iOS 6 is better than the current iteration.

bluedukies8
Sep 27, 2013, 04:00 PM
I often take pictures when it's dark, and HDR mode used to be pretty good at brightening up the dark areas of a photo (like, people).

Since upgrading to iOS 7, all my HDR shots are one indiscernible dark mess; at best, they look exactly the same as the non-HDR shots. Is this simply the downside of HDR getting better at daylight shots? Am I really the only one with this problem? :confused:

I'll get my hands on another iPhone 5 running iOS 6 tomorrow and take some HDR photos for comparison...

I'm not sure if it did this in iOS 6, but I have noticed that in iOS 7 if you turn on your flash the HDR feature is turned off. You can't have flash and the HDR on at the same time. I have a iPhone 4S running iOS 6 at home....I can test it after work.

rattler
Sep 27, 2013, 04:17 PM
I've found that HDR pics turn out MUCH better when you tap to expose on the dark part of the scene. Otherwise, it just looks the same as a non HDR image.

Nevaborn
Sep 27, 2013, 06:34 PM
I personally think the HDR in iOS 6 is better than the current iteration.

I agree as far as colour and contrast

Parise
Nov 28, 2013, 11:12 AM
Don't get why this isn't a bigger issue. IMO the HDR in iOS 7 is absolutely horrible.

Menneisyys2
Nov 29, 2013, 12:13 PM
on ios 6 pics were just pimped with an HDR filter. i think now with ios 7 the phone really takes 2 images and creates a real HDR like ProHDR

Nope, unfortunately. It's still the old quasi-HDR only able to increase the dynamic range of photos by about 1-1.5 EV's. ProHDR (or any other, decent HDR stitcher) can easily extend it by even 8 EV's - as I've also pointed out in the Exposure Compensation and Bracketing Bible (http://forums.macrumors.com/showthread.php?t=1621351).

But, at least, this has its upsides too. For example, ProHDR - and all other "true" stitchers that make three true, full shots one after each other - is much-much more sensitive to stitching problems.

I myself, therefore, prefer using the built-in HDR of the Camera app but, again, it's in no way as good as decent third-party stitchers, assuming you can use a tripod with the latter.

EDIT: in the comment below, I've posted a direct comparison of the dynamic (EV) range each approach allows for.


----------

Don't get why this isn't a bigger issue. IMO the HDR in iOS 7 is absolutely horrible.

It's exactly the same as in iOS 6.

Menneisyys2
Nov 29, 2013, 12:32 PM
I've found that HDR pics turn out MUCH better when you tap to expose on the dark part of the scene. Otherwise, it just looks the same as a non HDR image.

Just keep in mind it'll still seriously over-expose the bright areas, should be there more than 5-6 EV difference between the dark and bright areas.

Let me show some examples I've initially made for my iOS HDR Bible.

The following shot is the HDR result of exposing for the outer area (that is, the opposite of what you're recommended):

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/81986513/112013/30HDR/HE.jpeg

Full-res and -quality original: http://www.flickr.com/photos/33448355@N07/9365925353/in/set-72157634791582799
Non-HDR original: http://www.flickr.com/photos/33448355@N07/9365924031/in/set-72157634791582799

This (HDR result) shows exposing the inner area:

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/81986513/112013/30HDR/LE.jpeg

Original: http://www.flickr.com/photos/33448355@N07/9365924279/in/set-72157634791582799
Non-HDR original: http://www.flickr.com/photos/33448355@N07/9365924993/in/set-72157634791582799

All in all, if there are truly drastic differences in light levels (like in the above scene), try finding a middle point. It, of course, won't work with drastic light differences as the sensor of even the iPhone 5s' is pretty small and has pretty bad dynamic range. (Unfortunately, not even Apple can beat the laws of physics, no matter how they advertise their stuff.) In those situations, try using real HDR apps like below.

This is an in-iPhone 5 stitching done with Top Camera, one of the best HDR apps:

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/81986513/112013/30HDR/TC.jpeg

Original: http://www.flickr.com/photos/33448355@N07/9365924661/in/set-72157634791582799

Note that you don't need to use an app that not only shoots 3+, in addition to normal, under/overexposed images, but also stitches them on the iPhone. You can just shoot the photo series and stitch on a desktop to hve sometimes significantly better results. In my Exposure Compensation and Bracketing Bible (http://forums.macrumors.com/showthread.php?t=1621351), I've explained this all, particularly in the chapter "3. Bracketing with pre-setting the brightest and the darkest areas".

PNutts
Nov 29, 2013, 06:31 PM
Nope.

OT: MacRumors' forum auto-bot coming to spank you for a one word response (like it did to me last week) in 3... 2... 1... :D

marf1million
Nov 29, 2013, 07:20 PM
done with Top Camera, one of the best HDR apps:

Image (https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/81986513/112013/30HDR/TC.jpeg)

Original: http://www.flickr.com/photos/33448355@N07/9365924661/in/set-72157634791582799
.

That is a horrible result to be honest. In that situation you'd be better off just exposing for the outside and putting the flash on to expose the inside. It won't look great but it'll look better than that mess.

Menneisyys2
Nov 30, 2013, 12:42 AM
That is a horrible result to be honest. In that situation you'd be better off just exposing for the outside and putting the flash on to expose the inside. It won't look great but it'll look better than that mess.

Those kinds of "artificial" results are typical for on-iPhone stitching - all the other HDR apps produce very similar results.

This is why on-iPhone stitching can be disadvantageous at times and desktop stitching should be preferred.

Nevertheless, they (on-iPhone stitchers) still have a significant advantage over the built-in semi-HDR mode of the Camera client: they have vastly better dynamic range, even on the expense of "artificial" look and, of course, the far more proneness to stitching artifacts.

m1key
Nov 30, 2013, 01:07 AM
Pro HDR def takes better HDR pics if you can keep your hands still. :D

ToddH
Nov 30, 2013, 05:05 AM
The best HDR apps available are HDR3, TrueHDR, and then followed by pro HDR. Values TrueHDR which will only combined to move photos, the HDR3 will actually take three photos and blend together and it actually blends flawlessly. Some photos however will show some vignetting when blending, but for the most part average scenes will blend flawlessly but you have to hold your phone very steady because it does take three photographs. In my opinion those are the best two apps available.

T

Menneisyys2
Nov 30, 2013, 09:09 AM
Values TrueHDR which will only combined to move photos

What did you exactly mean by that? True HDR also takes two separate exp. bracketed photos in all its three modes. Many other HDR apps allow for taking three - and some even saving all of the three. (This is why I also recommend using HDR apps for "plain" automatic exposure bracketing shooting, even if you don't need the combined HDR photo.

the HDR3 will actually take three photos

As with most other HDR apps (with some exceptions like the above-discussed True HDR.)

PNutts
Nov 30, 2013, 10:43 AM
That is a horrible result to be honest.

Agreed, but lots of folks love the over-processed, over-manipulated, artificial look. Not me. Technology tries to make up for bad photo decisions a.k.a. overreaching amateur creativity.

The iPhone my primary camera and camera improvements are the reason I upgrade iPhones. So I say as a compliment that it is a reasonable point-and-shoot camera on a phone. And according to third party evaluations one of the better camera phones.

With that said, the HDR of the iPhone is great at what it's designed for. It sharpens pictures and gives you a bump where you need it or takes a bit out. At the park the other day I took a picture of my regrets, er, kid on the play equipment. The HDR made the solid block that was a chunk of the sky into a blue sky with some clouds. A 100% better picture and closer to what the eye sees.

So if you want to use your iPhone take a picture of your lucky lump of coal on a black velvet pedestal with a shaft of sunlight next to it shining on a snow globe then you're out of luck. Or you can get an app to create a Franken-photo. At that point you might as well include x-rays and long radio waves.