PDA

View Full Version : iOS 7 Beta Warns Users When Using Unauthorized Lightning Cables and Accessories




MacRumors
Jun 12, 2013, 09:19 AM
http://images.macrumors.com/im/macrumorsthreadlogo.gif (http://www.macrumors.com/2013/06/12/ios-7-beta-warns-users-when-using-unauthorized-lightning-cables-and-accessories/)


As noted by Life On My Mobile (http://lifeonmymobile.com/2013/06/11/ios-7-set-to-crackdown-on-unauthorized-lightning-cables/), the first beta version of iOS 7 includes a system for warning users when they are using unauthorized cables or accessories with their devices. The software does not, however, prevent the cables or accessories from functioning.Apple has added a warning when you plug an unauthorized charge / sync Lightning cable into your iPhone 5. The popup message states "This cable or accessory is not certified and may not work reliably with this iPhone."http://images.macrumors.com/article-new/2013/06/ios_7_unauthorized_cable_accessory.jpg
Unauthorized Lightning cables and docks quickly entered the market (http://www.macrumors.com/2012/10/09/apples-lightning-authentication-reportedly-cracked-unauthorized-third-party-cables-coming/) after the new connector standard was introduced in the iPhone 5, driven by shortages of Apple's official Lightning cables and slow progress in bringing official third-party manufacturers on board. Availability of certified Lightning cables and accessories has since broaden significantly through Apple's MFi Program (https://developer.apple.com/programs/mfi/), but unauthorized parts remain on the market.

Apple's Lightning connectors use several chips (http://www.macrumors.com/2012/10/16/apples-lightning-cable-contains-ti-chip-likely-to-have-security-features/) to manage dynamic pin assignment (http://www.macrumors.com/2012/09/25/apples-lightning-connector-uses-adaptive-technology-to-dynamically-assign-pin-functions/) for the diminutive connector, chips which also allow Apple to recognize whether the connectors come from authorized channels.

Article Link: iOS 7 Beta Warns Users When Using Unauthorized Lightning Cables and Accessories (http://www.macrumors.com/2013/06/12/ios-7-beta-warns-users-when-using-unauthorized-lightning-cables-and-accessories/)



ENduro
Jun 12, 2013, 09:23 AM
Can't keep fleecing customers my ass!

I've got 4, including two great travel/car retractable cables and got some for a lot of the people at work. No problems. Stop being so greedy, it's enough you're hoarding money overseas.

McFreggle
Jun 12, 2013, 09:24 AM
Nice notification box. Hadn't seen a screenshot yet. :cool:

Unggoy Murderer
Jun 12, 2013, 09:27 AM
Good, should make some users think twice about buying a $1.99 cable that might fry their device, or burn down their house.

You paid $400+ for your device, a $20 cable is hardly being robbed.

BlueHedgehog
Jun 12, 2013, 09:28 AM
Seven iOS versions...and we still have notification popup boxes. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

DrJohnnyN
Jun 12, 2013, 09:29 AM
Good, good.

stan1028
Jun 12, 2013, 09:30 AM
Will that message appear on non-authorised 30-pin connectors running iOS 7?

jahsavi
Jun 12, 2013, 09:30 AM
Yeah it's very annoying.. I have two "Apple" lighting cables and 3 non-apple. It's even doing it on my one officially licensed cable as well. Not happy, hope I can turn it off on the final version.

akm3
Jun 12, 2013, 09:34 AM
I see this same message in iOS 6 with my knockoff lightning cable, from time to time.

I don't think this is new for iOS7.

street.cory
Jun 12, 2013, 09:34 AM
I couldn't remember if iOS 6 had warned me about my cable or not, but with iOS 7 I am reminded each and every time I plug it in.

I wonder if this will have any warranty implications if you have battery life issues in the future. Will iOS 7 generate a report of how many times non-MFI cables were used?

Blorzoga
Jun 12, 2013, 09:37 AM
Seems unnecessary and rather obnoxious in my opinion. If you buy a cheap cable, why should you be warned. I hope they remove it.

inlinevolvo
Jun 12, 2013, 09:39 AM
Good, should make some users think twice about buying a $1.99 cable that might fry their device, or burn down their house.

You paid $400+ for your device, a $20 cable is hardly being robbed.

I think it's akin to the genetic vs monster hdmi cables. Yea, it's highway robbery.

For the record I use micro usb lightning adaptor that I got from china for 4 bucks shipped. Works great to charge my phone in the car.

This is also no different than my honda dealer telling me to use genuine honda oil filters, which are re labeled fram filters. No thanks.

Blorzoga
Jun 12, 2013, 09:40 AM
Good, should make some users think twice about buying a $1.99 cable that might fry their device, or burn down their house.

You paid $400+ for your device, a $20 cable is hardly being robbed.

That's a ridiculous comment. If someone buys a cheaper cable, they do it at their own risk. No need for Apple to scold them. Just another way to get people to overpay for Apple accessories.

street.cory
Jun 12, 2013, 09:41 AM
Good, should make some users think twice about buying a $1.99 cable that might fry their device, or burn down their house.

You paid $400+ for your device, a $20 cable is hardly being robbed.

The two Lighting cables I've purchased from Apple have performed worse than the two third party MFI and non MFI cables I've purchased ($10 and $15).

The rubber shield just below the connector starts to wrinkle, and on one cable it started to get really hot when it was plugged in :/


(Non MFI cable was purchased before any third party could actually get certified and works perfectly fine)

iSamurai
Jun 12, 2013, 09:41 AM
Don't worry, someone in China is probably coming up with a workaround and will be on eBay in a few months time...

ArmCortexA8
Jun 12, 2013, 09:42 AM
Seems unnecessary and rather obnoxious in my opinion. If you buy a cheap cable, why should you be warned. I hope they remove it.

I suggested this idea myself and Im glad they put it in, because I am sick to death of people buy fake Lightning cables that may not be guaranteed to work properly beyond charging and may short out the phone as well. This naturally won't be covered under warranty. Its well known if the make of the cable is not MFI certified, these may cause damage to the phone, especially with voltage. All these fools buying $2 cables which are obvious fakes and don't have the genuine authentication chip, should be immediately excluded from any technical support in any manner if not using genuine cables.

litmag01
Jun 12, 2013, 09:45 AM
Safety first.

pnoyblazed
Jun 12, 2013, 09:46 AM
Apple's way of telling you to stop being cheap

samcraig
Jun 12, 2013, 09:48 AM
Translation:

We know the cable you are using isn't one of ours. We won't prevent you from using it - but we might have added some special fun code to whack out your device from time to time which will get you to buy an official cable form us "just to be sure."

maxosx
Jun 12, 2013, 09:50 AM
Apple's way of telling you to stop being cheap

Oh my, how can we possibly get through life without Apple guiding us?

Simplicated
Jun 12, 2013, 09:50 AM
That's a ridiculous comment. If someone buys a cheaper cable, they do it at their own risk. No need for Apple to scold them. Just another way to get people to overpay for Apple accessories.

Yes, because everyone who buys cheaper cables understands the risks. :rolleyes:

roadbloc
Jun 12, 2013, 09:51 AM
A cable is a cable. But I guess Apple prefer it if you buy their £20 ones.

Codyak
Jun 12, 2013, 09:59 AM
Now we just need the inevitable jailbreak setting to stop this. ;)

Blorzoga
Jun 12, 2013, 10:00 AM
I suggested this idea myself and Im glad they put it in, because I am sick to death of people buy fake Lightning cables that may not be guaranteed to work properly beyond charging and may short out the phone as well. This naturally won't be covered under warranty. Its well known if the make of the cable is not MFI certified, these may cause damage to the phone, especially with voltage. All these fools buying $2 cables which are obvious fakes and don't have the genuine authentication chip, should be immediately excluded from any technical support in any manner if not using genuine cables.
You're "sick to death" of people buying fake cables? Why do you care? How does it affect you?

smithrh
Jun 12, 2013, 10:01 AM
A cable is a cable.

No.

roadbloc
Jun 12, 2013, 10:05 AM
No.

Yes.


See I can post one word answers too!

bkribbs
Jun 12, 2013, 10:05 AM
Does the cable really matter? Or is it the plug adapter part that matters? In terms of safety for device.

ghostface147
Jun 12, 2013, 10:07 AM
Does the cable really matter? Or is it the plug adapter part that matters?

It's most likely the authentication chip inside the Apple cable.

swordfish5736
Jun 12, 2013, 10:07 AM
it also brings up a dialogue when you connect to a new computer, ask's if you want to give it access to the phone.

JayCee842
Jun 12, 2013, 10:09 AM
Can't keep fleecing customers my ass!

I've got 4, including two great travel/car retractable cables and got some for a lot of the people at work. No problems. Stop being so greedy, it's enough you're hoarding money overseas.

lol dude, chill out a bit. :)

Jsameds
Jun 12, 2013, 10:11 AM
A jailbreak tweak will fix this.

subsonix
Jun 12, 2013, 10:14 AM
That's a ridiculous comment. If someone buys a cheaper cable, they do it at their own risk.

What if they do not know about any risks, that's what the popup informs them about. But pretty annoying, yeah.

losthorse
Jun 12, 2013, 10:16 AM
Can't keep fleecing customers my ass!

I've got 4, including two great travel/car retractable cables and got some for a lot of the people at work. No problems. Stop being so greedy, it's enough you're hoarding money overseas.

Fail.

Apple is not "fleecing" you, or anyone else (in this case). Apple is simply notifying its costumers that an accessory has not been through the authorized quality assurance program, and as a result, may not work correctly.

It would have been just as easy to disable the connector, forcing you to go buy 4 more authorized cables.

Furthermore, Apples financial practices make sense. Apple is going to make sure the profit margin is where it needs to be. Making Apple pay more in taxes just makes you pay more for your next iDevice.

If you don't like that Apple did not pay as much as you think they should, feel free to donate some of your money to the IRS (they need it to send federal employees to more conferences (http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/2013/06/06/irs-conferences-oversight-hearing/2395337/)).

spazzcat
Jun 12, 2013, 10:18 AM
Seven iOS versions...and we still have notification popup boxes. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

Windows is how old, OS X is how old and they still have popup notification, when are they systems going to get with the times and just beam information info into my brain :rolleyes:

bkribbs
Jun 12, 2013, 10:19 AM
It's most likely the authentication chip inside the Apple cable.

I meant in terms of device safety.

APlotdevice
Jun 12, 2013, 10:21 AM
Obviously the warning is intended to remove any liability should you fry your device with a faulty cable.

A cable is a cable. But I guess Apple prefer it if you buy their £20 ones.

If it were just wires going to connectors, that would probably be true. However a lot more can go wrong once you put chips inside cables. For instance a whole heap of solder could really ruin your day. (http://www.pocketables.com/2013/01/this-is-why-you-should-always-disassemble-cheap-chinese-charging-accessories-before-use.html)

jahsavi
Jun 12, 2013, 10:25 AM
What about the battery cases that have a built in lightning connector? Will we see this message for those? Anyone have a iPhone 5 battery case with iOS7 beta?

spazzcat
Jun 12, 2013, 10:26 AM
What about the battery cases that have a built in lightning connector? Will we see this message for those? Anyone have a iPhone 5 battery case with iOS7 beta?

Not if they are licensed through Apple.

ChrisA
Jun 12, 2013, 10:30 AM
The problem with un-certified cables is that the cable is reconfigurable. Whoever made it can not possibly have tested it with future ISO systems. So they at best only tested with devices Apple already had on the market at the time the cable was designed.

These cables are active devices with processor inside that accept some set of commands. The uncertified cable might not know to accept certain commands. I think it is reasonable for Apple's IOS 7 to test the cable to see if it accepts some set of commands and put up a notice if the test fails

But not reasonable to simply query the manufacturer's name out of the cable. They should be testing FUNCTION not maker's name. (For example a power up self test.) But we don't know what they are doing.

I suspect they just might be doing the right thing. Notice some one said their Apple brand cable failed. This could mean it failed a power up self test.

SgtPepper12
Jun 12, 2013, 10:38 AM
It's reasonable.
If they wanted people to buy their cables, they would completely block those cables. But they don't.
They just don't want people to blame Apple if something happens. And because these cables seem to be rather complicated, it seems pretty likely that something's gonna happen someday.

benstanton
Jun 12, 2013, 10:38 AM
I noticed this today. I have a fake lightening cable in my office and a genuine apple cable at home. Home works fine, charges, syncs etc. etc..

The work one plugs in, displays a slightly different message to the grab already posted, the 'Z' for charging pulses...but it doesn't charge. It will sync with iTunes etc, but not charge.


Odd huh.

ENduro
Jun 12, 2013, 10:45 AM
lol dude, chill out a bit. :)

Dude, stop being okay with being ripped off.

----------

The problem with un-certified cables is that the cable is reconfigurable. Whoever made it can not possibly have tested it with future ISO systems. So they at best only tested with devices Apple already had on the market at the time the cable was designed.

These cables are active devices with processor inside that accept some set of commands. The uncertified cable might not know to accept certain commands. I think it is reasonable for Apple's IOS 7 to test the cable to see if it accepts some set of commands and put up a notice if the test fails

But not reasonable to simply query the manufacturer's name out of the cable. They should be testing FUNCTION not maker's name. (For example a power up self test.) But we don't know what they are doing.

I suspect they just might be doing the right thing. Notice some one said their Apple brand cable failed. This could mean it failed a power up self test.

Here's the only command you need to send the phone from a cable in 2013: Charge my phone and maybe send music to my car.

rmwebs
Jun 12, 2013, 10:47 AM
I suggested this idea myself and Im glad they put it in, because I am sick to death of people buy fake Lightning cables that may not be guaranteed to work properly beyond charging and may short out the phone as well. This naturally won't be covered under warranty. Its well known if the make of the cable is not MFI certified, these may cause damage to the phone, especially with voltage. All these fools buying $2 cables which are obvious fakes and don't have the genuine authentication chip, should be immediately excluded from any technical support in any manner if not using genuine cables.

Sorry but this is crazy. You may as well remove all the USB ports from the laptops and make it so you have to get an Apple certified adaptor. This really is no different. There is no need for 'official' cables and locking it down. A simple clause in the warranty (which already exists) states that if your phone is damaged due to a surge, its not covered - simple as that.

Locking it down isnt the answer, its insulting. If I buy a product I expect to be able to do what the hell I like with it. You'd be royally pissed if they changed the ports on your Air so that you had to buy $60 worth of adaptors to make stuff work.

tann
Jun 12, 2013, 10:47 AM
As long as it doesn't block them from working, who cares. It's probably better a consumer is notified that poor cables can actually result in a negative effect on their device. At least then they can't get angry at Apple if something were to happen.

Doesn't Amazon and other companies now make cheaper official lightning cables anyway.

rmwebs
Jun 12, 2013, 10:51 AM
Doesn't Amazon and other companies now make cheaper official lightning cables anyway.

Yep they are everywhere. They are also unofficial.

ENduro
Jun 12, 2013, 10:52 AM
Fail.

Apple is not "fleecing" you, or anyone else (in this case). Apple is simply notifying its costumers that an accessory has not been through the authorized quality assurance program, and as a result, may not work correctly.

It would have been just as easy to disable the connector, forcing you to go buy 4 more authorized cables.

Furthermore, Apples financial practices make sense. Apple is going to make sure the profit margin is where it needs to be. Making Apple pay more in taxes just makes you pay more for your next iDevice.

If you don't like that Apple did not pay as much as you think they should, feel free to donate some of your money to the IRS (they need it to send federal employees to more conferences (http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/2013/06/06/irs-conferences-oversight-hearing/2395337/)).

Sheep.

Borrowing money to pay shareholders so they can avoid their US taxes on "re-patriotizing" it? Just because all the other evil companies do it doesn't make it okay.

That IRS story isn't nearly as offensive as GE, Apple and their contemporaries tax maneuvering but I'm sure it will all trickle down one of these days.

mj1108
Jun 12, 2013, 10:53 AM
Translation: Please buy OUR cable. We will continue to harass you with this message until you do.

cameronjpu
Jun 12, 2013, 10:58 AM
At the VERY least now that supply issues are fixed, I should be able to trade in the 4 chargers I have for old iPhones for new charging cables. Someone at Apple really dropped the ball on this one. The widespread availability of charging cables (ie you can always find a charge for your iPhone nearly anywhere you are) WAS a great asset for apple and they turned it into a liability by not spreading these cables far and wide for FREE.

QCassidy352
Jun 12, 2013, 11:01 AM
Yes.


See I can post one word answers too!

Actually, the evidence suggests you can't.

;-)

BurningJah
Jun 12, 2013, 11:05 AM
ha well,
you will learn to live with it, I guess.

Blorzoga
Jun 12, 2013, 11:06 AM
Fail.

Apple is not "fleecing" you, or anyone else (in this case). Apple is simply notifying its costumers that an accessory has not been through the authorized quality assurance program, and as a result, may not work correctly.

It would have been just as easy to disable the connector, forcing you to go buy 4 more authorized cables.

Furthermore, Apples financial practices make sense. Apple is going to make sure the profit margin is where it needs to be. Making Apple pay more in taxes just makes you pay more for your next iDevice.

If you don't like that Apple did not pay as much as you think they should, feel free to donate some of your money to the IRS (they need it to send federal employees to more conferences (http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/2013/06/06/irs-conferences-oversight-hearing/2395337/)).

Certainly, Apple should be allowed to warn you that your cable is not official, but you should be able to disable the warning and not have to see it each and every time you attach your cable.

epmatsw
Jun 12, 2013, 11:09 AM
Seven iOS versions...and we still have notification popup boxes. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

29 versions of Chrome, and we still have notification popup boxes. :rolleyes:

parish
Jun 12, 2013, 11:18 AM
Will that message appear on non-authorised 30-pin connectors running iOS 7?

Well I've seen a similar warning on a 3GS and 4S so I don't know what the big deal is as it's not some wonderful new feature in iOS 7 :rolleyes:

Tiger8
Jun 12, 2013, 11:22 AM
Good, should make some users think twice about buying a $1.99 cable that might fry their device, or burn down their house.

You paid $400+ for your device, a $20 cable is hardly being robbed.

LOL, hillarious. You remind me of people who pay $100 to get a 'certified' HDMI cable for their TV at BestBuy, while they are sold for $5 online. The BestBuy guy will give you unbias advice right?

Plutonius
Jun 12, 2013, 11:25 AM
Seems unnecessary and rather obnoxious in my opinion. If you buy a cheap cable, why should you be warned. I hope they remove it.

Maybe, if your device fails due to the cheap cable, Apple doesn't want to pay for the repairs.

theanonymousbob
Jun 12, 2013, 11:25 AM
Fail.

Apple is not "fleecing" you, or anyone else (in this case). Apple is simply notifying its costumers that an accessory has not been through the authorized quality assurance program, and as a result, may not work correctly.


The fleecing happens when you go to replace your charger and you have to buy the plug and the cable separately. It's not the $20 cable that pisses me off, it's the $50 for the whole thing that actually makes charging it possible.

MrNomNoms
Jun 12, 2013, 11:29 AM
I think it's akin to the genetic vs monster hdmi cables. Yea, it's highway robbery.

For the record I use micro usb lightning adaptor that I got from china for 4 bucks shipped. Works great to charge my phone in the car.

This is also no different than my honda dealer telling me to use genuine honda oil filters, which are re labeled fram filters. No thanks.

You do realise that you can purchase generic cables that have been certified by Apple and cheaper than the official ones? I've got a generic third party one here that was half the price and certified by Apple thus there really art excuses other than penny pinchers who will whine about a $20 cable but then go out and do something extraordinarily expensive like having a child without even considering the costs. Heck, reminds me of that Oatmeal comic of people who penny pinch over spending $0.99 on an app but don't think twice when buying a $400 smart phone.

parish
Jun 12, 2013, 11:29 AM
LOL, hillarious. You remind me of people who pay $100 to get a 'certified' HDMI cable for their TV at BestBuy, while they are sold for $5 online. The BestBuy guy will give you unbias advice right?

The difference is that things like HDMI are published specifications, the Apple dock connectors aren't so unauthorized ones are made by reverse-engineering. As the manufacturers don't know the specs the components could easily be out of tolerance, e.g. the resistance, capacitance, inductance etc., which could cause them to draw too much current and damage your device.

Plutonius
Jun 12, 2013, 11:30 AM
LOL, hillarious. You remind me of people who pay $100 to get a 'certified' HDMI cable for their TV at BestBuy, while they are sold for $5 online. The BestBuy guy will give you unbias advice right?

The cable that Apple is referring to includes electronics that could theoretically damage your device if not designed properly.

TouchMint.com
Jun 12, 2013, 11:33 AM
Its not really that hard to hit dismiss...

mchart
Jun 12, 2013, 11:34 AM
Good, good.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xi_3v-FpKFg

OldSchoolMacGuy
Jun 12, 2013, 11:35 AM
Happens in iOS 6 too. Pops up on my girlfriend's phone from time to time.

mchart
Jun 12, 2013, 11:42 AM
The OK box method that Apple chooses is inept. As stated, there should be a way in the options to basically shut the box off. I remember this stupid notification back in my 3G days when I was using an 'unsupported accessory' (my car stereo). It was -really- annoying as i'd have to hit the stupid OK button every time I plugged my 3G into my car to then use it to play music.

I understand and appreciate the notification. It's the fact that it NEVER subsides that is the issue.

Smartass
Jun 12, 2013, 11:45 AM
eh these warnings for "non official apple cables" existed even in iOS 4.X, i had that iphone to fm adapter from belkin and everytime i connected it i got a warning saying that it may not work properly since its not "legit" or whatever the word was...

Tiger8
Jun 12, 2013, 11:48 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xi_3v-FpKFg

Have you seen the family guy spoof of that ? HIllarious!

acorntoy
Jun 12, 2013, 11:49 AM
I used one of the scariest cables ever after asking a friend to borrow his. It barely fit into my 5 and it was falling apart in my hands. Good on Apple to do this. If you want to cheap out on your $600 device then fine, but don't complain if something goes wrong.

DTphonehome
Jun 12, 2013, 11:54 AM
Can't keep fleecing customers my ass!

I've got 4, including two great travel/car retractable cables and got some for a lot of the people at work. No problems. Stop being so greedy, it's enough you're hoarding money overseas.

If they can detect third-party cables, they could easily disable them from working altogether. That they don't suggests to me that Apple is more interested in preserving a reliable user experience than "fleecing customers". If a junky cable causes problems with charging or data syncing, and Apple didn't warn the user, they might think something was wrong with their device.

Nickpocalypse
Jun 12, 2013, 12:00 PM
That's a ridiculous comment. If someone buys a cheaper cable, they do it at their own risk. No need for Apple to scold them. Just another way to get people to overpay for Apple accessories.

You're absolutely correct, they do it at their own risk and Apple shouldn't scold them.

The problem is that 99% of consumers might find it more difficult to know which accessories come from Apple, and which ones come from third party manufacturers. Apple isn't scolding anyone with this message, they're simply letting them know that the cable their using isn't made by Apple, and that they use it at their own risk. Exactly as you said.

If someone who isn't tech-knowledgeable has an iPhone and buys a $3 lightning cable off eBay, and the worst happens, albeit highly unlikely, the phone is damaged through use of the cable, you can absolutely bet the consumer will chase down Apple, instead of whoever manufactured the cable. This message is there purely so Apple doesn't have to pay for the damages maybe caused by potentially shoddy products any one of a thousand other cable manufacturers provide.

clibinarius
Jun 12, 2013, 12:10 PM
I suggested this idea myself and Im glad they put it in, because I am sick to death of people buy fake Lightning cables that may not be guaranteed to work properly beyond charging and may short out the phone as well. This naturally won't be covered under warranty. Its well known if the make of the cable is not MFI certified, these may cause damage to the phone, especially with voltage. All these fools buying $2 cables which are obvious fakes and don't have the genuine authentication chip, should be immediately excluded from any technical support in any manner if not using genuine cables.

Why exactly do you care what OTHER people do?

djdj
Jun 12, 2013, 12:19 PM
Good, should make some users think twice about buying a $1.99 cable that might fry their device, or burn down their house.

You paid $400+ for your device, a $20 cable is hardly being robbed.

A USB port can't deliver anywhere near enough current to start a fire.

iThinkIt
Jun 12, 2013, 12:24 PM
makes you wonder if apple is tracking the number of times a user plugs in an unauthorized cable... tracking how you use the device.. if it pops up a message it can be tracked. :mad:

bkribbs
Jun 12, 2013, 12:25 PM
You're absolutely correct, they do it at their own risk and Apple shouldn't scold them.

I disagree to a certain extent. When I was maybe 13, I bought a cord and adapter for my ipod touch 3g. Within a few months, my accelerameter (however you spell it...) quit working. I'd assume due to those things.

While every time a cord is plugged in is too much, they at least should be warned.

Primejimbo
Jun 12, 2013, 12:25 PM
I had a cheap cable with my old 3G and it gave my iPhone issues. I wonder if the phone will keep track of these pop ups so when you go into the Apple Store for warranty repairs they can look and see "well your phone warned you 300 times this isn't an authorized cable, so your phone isn't covered under warranty"

I just buy Apple cables now and just be done with it.

Botts85
Jun 12, 2013, 12:29 PM
Yeah it's very annoying.. I have two "Apple" lighting cables and 3 non-apple. It's even doing it on my one officially licensed cable as well. Not happy, hope I can turn it off on the final version.

Get that Apple cable swapped. Usually if a Mac pops up a cable warning, or the iPhone pops up a message it can be indicative that the cable is failing. This is extremely common on even "Apple" lightning cables.

djdj
Jun 12, 2013, 12:42 PM
If they can detect third-party cables, they could easily disable them from working altogether. That they don't suggests to me that Apple is more interested in preserving a reliable user experience than "fleecing customers". If a junky cable causes problems with charging or data syncing, and Apple didn't warn the user, they might think something was wrong with their device.

Historically we get notifications first, then in a future software update the devices just quit working altogether (for no technical reason whatsoever). I've never seen a non-Apple device complain about a USB cable, let alone for one to not work.

----------

This wouldn't bug me so much if Apple produced a wide range of cables that actually met people's needs at a fair price. For example, in my living room we like to plug in iPhones/iPods/iPads to charge while we're sitting on a couch. But the closest outlet is more than 3 feet away. So I bought a 10-foot cable so we can actually reach the nearest power strip from any of the seating positions. Apple, of course, does not sell a 10-foot lightning cable.

So now I'm getting a warning each time I plug in my iPhone because Apple doesn't even produce the cable that I need. Their fault, not mine.

If cables were destroying their devices, I could understand them caring. But considering that that is not the case here, they are being rather belligerent about a non-issue. It is annoying.

blacktape242
Jun 12, 2013, 12:48 PM
As annoying as it is and id rather buy the cheap cables, ill have to live with it.
I never had problems with the 30 pin connectors, the 8 pins seem to be a LOT more hit and miss.

Did apple not authorize any 3rd parties to make cables?

If not thats to bad. :mad:

geenosr
Jun 12, 2013, 12:51 PM
makes you wonder if apple is tracking the number of times a user plugs in an unauthorized cable... tracking how you use the device.. if it pops up a message it can be tracked. :mad:

The real problem I foresee is if I use an unauthorized cable, get the pop-up message, and later have something unrelated go wrong with my iPhone. Then of course I take it to the genius bar who deny me any warranty coverage because I used an unauthorized cable and it shows in the log of my phone that they would obviously check, which would immediately void my warranty.

Ouch.

This is based on fact....because I had a 3GS which never ever was around water, and when I took it in for a crack in the case at the dock connector, they looked at the water sensor and voided my warranty because it was pink. They have since turned around (after a lawsuit) and said that some of the sensors were faulty, and it was a policy that failed. But even though it is wrong and has been proved so, doesn't change the fact that I was accused of something I didn't do....and my warranty was voided. It was a low point for me as an apple customer, but I still love their products and buy them when I can afford them.

And to the ding-a-ling that commented that everyone should just 'buy the $20 cable' and get over it, not everyone has $20 to spend on a cable. Wake up and go out into the world and see how many people barely get by in life. What an arrogant thing to say, but mostly just ignorant.

reden
Jun 12, 2013, 12:57 PM
makes you wonder if apple is tracking the number of times a user plugs in an unauthorized cable... tracking how you use the device.. if it pops up a message it can be tracked. :mad:

Maybe not Apple, but the NSA is.

AppleDude
Jun 12, 2013, 01:13 PM
Sheep.

Borrowing money to pay shareholders so they can avoid their US taxes on "re-patriotizing" it? Just because all the other evil companies do it doesn't make it okay.

That IRS story isn't nearly as offensive as GE, Apple and their contemporaries tax maneuvering but I'm sure it will all trickle down one of these days.

So you don't take the greater of the standard or itemized deduction?:rolleyes:

You don't choose to make certain expenditures by Dec 31 or defer to Jan 1 to minimize your taxes?

You don't hold on to your investments for 5 more days do be taxed at a lower rate, etc?

Individuals don't have an exclusive right or social obligation to minimize taxes. Corporations have the same right to minimize taxes.

I can think of one situation when your comment would make sense--if you believe the government would use your voluntary taxes (e.g. taxes that exceed the minimum legally required) to provide more social welfare than you would. However, given how inefficient the government is, a person would have to be a very poor financial steward for that to be the case.

If you feel that strongly about paying to society more than required (which is a good thing), your money would go a lot further if you donated it to the B&M Gates Foundation, the, Rotary Club, or one of thousands of responsible charities that know how to obtain the most social welfare per dollar--just not the government.

Pay the government its due and pay society what you want without using the government as a middleman. And most importantly, please don't encourage others to donate to the government over a responsible charitable organization.

lunarworks
Jun 12, 2013, 01:20 PM
Seems unnecessary and rather obnoxious in my opinion. If you buy a cheap cable, why should you be warned. I hope they remove it.

Not everyone who buys a cheap cable knows they're buying a cheap cable. Those kiosks in malls foist all kinds of cheap crap on unsuspecting people.

Anonymous Freak
Jun 12, 2013, 01:23 PM
Will that message appear on non-authorised 30-pin connectors running iOS 7?

Yeah, 30-pin cables have done that, too.

My car adapter has a slightly loose connection, and regularly pops up a warning message (yet works fine,) even though it is officially certified.

tgara
Jun 12, 2013, 01:25 PM
I believe Apple is warning customers about non-certified cables to limit warranty claims. As others have mentioned, there are third-party cables certified by Apple, such as from Griffin and Monoprice, among others. These cables are certified by Apple and are generally less expensive than purchasing a Lightning cable directly from the Apple Online Store. However, there are also plenty of non-certified lightning cables available, e.g., on eBay and elsewhere. These are not likely constructed to the same standards as the certified cables, and as such may not function properly or do damage to the device. Either way, Apple would be deluged with complaints and warranty claims all based on non-certified cables, to say nothing of the fact that the customer would be angry that their iPhone was damaged or did not function properly. To reduce some of this, Apple is informing customers that for optimum performance and safety, use a certified cable. That's all. If one wishes to ignore the message, fine, but overall this seems like a reasonable warning for all involved.

TC25
Jun 12, 2013, 01:37 PM
I've got 4, including two great travel/car retractable cables and got some for a lot of the people at work. No problems.
Then why are you complaining?

Stop being so greedy,
If you don't like their prices, buy something different. Problem solved.

it's enough you're hoarding money overseas.
No, they are not.

----------

Not everyone who buys a cheap cable knows they're buying a cheap cable. Those kiosks in malls foist all kinds of cheap crap on unsuspecting people.

'Unsuspecting'? Hardly.

ikir
Jun 12, 2013, 01:37 PM
Can't keep fleecing customers my ass!

I've got 4, including two great travel/car retractable cables and got some for a lot of the people at work. No problems. Stop being so greedy, it's enough you're hoarding money overseas.
Not true I work in a reseller and we stopped to sell unofficial cables because they keep returning to us broken. Also I bought 3 lighting cables in dx.com and 2 of them are broken after 2 weeks an one of these 2 transmit ghost input to iPhone blocking touch often. If you think about that, the problem is just users like you who think Apple do this only for money. They care about users experience.

TC25
Jun 12, 2013, 01:40 PM
Borrowing money to pay shareholders so they can avoid their US taxes on "re-patriotizing" it? Just because all the other evil companies do it doesn't make it okay.

That IRS story isn't nearly as offensive as GE, Apple and their contemporaries tax maneuvering but I'm sure it will all trickle down one of these days.

Apple is following the tax laws.

How much extra in taxes do you pay?

DTphonehome
Jun 12, 2013, 01:43 PM
Historically we get notifications first, then in a future software update the devices just quit working altogether (for no technical reason whatsoever).


Example?

I've never seen a non-Apple device complain about a USB cable, let alone for one to not work.


A plain USB cable doesn't have a chip dynamically assigning pin function. That chip is important, and if it doesn't work, there will be problems with the cable. USB is a dumb cable, so it's much harder to make a bad one.


This wouldn't bug me so much if Apple produced a wide range of cables that actually met people's needs at a fair price. For example, in my living room we like to plug in iPhones/iPods/iPads to charge while we're sitting on a couch. But the closest outlet is more than 3 feet away. So I bought a 10-foot cable so we can actually reach the nearest power strip from any of the seating positions. Apple, of course, does not sell a 10-foot lightning cable.


But Apple has many authorized manufacturing partners who DO make all sorts of lightning cables. See Monoprice, Amazon, etc. They are cheaper than Apple's and are guaranteed to work.

King Bowser
Jun 12, 2013, 01:44 PM
I bought a couple of 3 dollar chargers from amazon a month back and now I don't have my iPhone 4s. I don't have any other explanation for this but to believe that the wires messed up my phone. Granted the phone didn't die on me while it was plugged but before these cables teh iPhone was fine. Now I'm rocking a piece of crap Windows phone and can't wait for this weekend to get my girl a 5 while I keep her 4s. Throwing those cables away ASAP and buying apple cables.

TC25
Jun 12, 2013, 01:49 PM
People who rant and rave about how Apple is greedy, knock off cables are just as good, etc. remind me of the saying that went something like, "The problem is not that people are ignorant. The problem is so much that they think they know is wrong."

Poisednoise
Jun 12, 2013, 01:59 PM
Given that there's recently been news of it being possible to inject malware directly into the phone via the dock, I would imagine that Apple considered this an essential precaution. If you're using an authorised cable and charger, you know you're safe. Of course, the chances of you NOT being safe with a 3rd party cable and charger are very small (particularly as my understanding is this malware was only proof of concept) but still, at least they've addressed a potential issue in a timely manner.

I agree the Apple cables could be cheaper though.

cclloyd
Jun 12, 2013, 02:07 PM
I suggested this idea myself and Im glad they put it in, because I am sick to death of people buy fake Lightning cables that may not be guaranteed to work properly beyond charging and may short out the phone as well. This naturally won't be covered under warranty. Its well known if the make of the cable is not MFI certified, these may cause damage to the phone, especially with voltage. All these fools buying $2 cables which are obvious fakes and don't have the genuine authentication chip, should be immediately excluded from any technical support in any manner if not using genuine cables.

Probably one of the most oblivious comments I've ever seen.

gavcur
Jun 12, 2013, 02:25 PM
Got a number of 3rd party cables and all work perfect however

Got one of the battery cases as the battery is pants. All worked fine in os 6 put on ios 7 and now the battery will not charge the iphone. Great!!! Why would they disable that?

Gjwilly
Jun 12, 2013, 02:51 PM
I bought two 3-packs of generic cables from Saveology back when they were pre-order only before they'd reverse-engineered them and I haven't seen this message once.

tbrinkma
Jun 12, 2013, 03:21 PM
Sheep.

Borrowing money to pay shareholders so they can avoid their US taxes on "re-patriotizing" it? Just because all the other evil companies do it doesn't make it okay.

That IRS story isn't nearly as offensive as GE, Apple and their contemporaries tax maneuvering but I'm sure it will all trickle down one of these days.

If money is earned outside the US, why *should* anyone bring it into the US to be taxed if they don't need to? :confused: If the interest on the loan was less expensive than the taxes that would need to be paid on foreign-earned money brought into the US, why *not* use the loan? :confused:

If money has never *been* inside the US, how can it be "re-patriotizing" to bring it into the US for the first time?

----------

A USB port can't deliver anywhere near enough current to start a fire.

********.

Pardon my french, but it most certainly can. It doesn't take much for a short in a badly made cable to start a fire if the right materials are nearby. (And I'm talking about materials that aren't unusual to have near a computer or charger.)

MagnusVonMagnum
Jun 12, 2013, 04:21 PM
Fail.

Fail? :confused:

Is that what people say instead of writing complete sentences these days? It's pretty sad how horrible education has gotten in this country where all people know how to do is type short-hand and post slang all the time. No wonder today's kids can't find a job. Companies expect actual communication skills.


Apple is not "fleecing" you, or anyone else (in this case).


What makes you qualified to decide what is and what is not fleecing for everyone else? :rolleyes:


It would have been just as easy to disable the connector, forcing you to go buy 4 more authorized cables.


It would have been easy for you to not hit reply with your condescending unsolicited comments, but that didn't stop you. :rolleyes:

It continually amazes me how many of the same people who think every government agency and employee is out to screw them over and shouldn't be making decisions in their lives are 100% OK with private corporations and their upper management making the same types of decisions that affect their lives by telling them what they can and cannot do or use with the things they buy. It's a kind of reverse hypocrisy. To me, it doesn't matter if Big Brother is the government, a shadow government agency (like the NSA and its own subsidiaries) or some giant mega-corporation like Apple, NONE of them should be telling me what I can and cannot do with and on my own property when it doesn't harm anyone else.


Furthermore, Apples financial practices make sense. Apple is going to make sure the profit margin is where it needs to be. Making Apple pay more in taxes just makes you pay more for your next iDevice.


So hooray for all the mega-rich corporations? They need to fleece some more money out your wallet. But hey, you're happy to give them 10x the value what they're worth so why don't you go do that instead of telling us what to think?

People who rant and rave about how Apple is greedy, knock off cables are just as good, etc. remind me of the saying that went something like, "The problem is not that people are ignorant. The problem is so much that they think they know is wrong."

This all reminds me of those people on the Star Trek Next Generation episode that thought because a storm was approaching with some "scary" lightning that "The Picard" must be angry with them. What does The Picard want? It's still raining so he must want a sacrifice since we've prayed for the scary thunder to stop and yet the storm continues! :eek:


trag·e·dy /ˈtrajidē/ Noun - 1. An event Democrats, liberals, Socialists, and others who worship at the trough of govt, exploit to reduce liberty & grow govt. See also; Borg, Communists, Useful Idiots.

Hey, if you cannot win an argument through intelligence and logical arguments, just throw the "idiot" word around as if that somehow makes you appear smarter, when in fact it does just the opposite. :rolleyes:

Right, Left, Center; it makes no difference. If you have to resort to name calling, you've already lost. If you let some party do your thinking for you, then you've lost your right to free speech as far as I'm concerned as you've become little more than someone who parrots someone else's ideas. Frankly, I find your use of the word "Borg" to be very ironic. :cool:

fredaroony
Jun 12, 2013, 04:53 PM
Good, should make some users think twice about buying a $1.99 cable that might fry their device, or burn down their house.

You paid $400+ for your device, a $20 cable is hardly being robbed.

Sure they are, the cable is $30 here...what a ripoff.

JayCee842
Jun 12, 2013, 06:10 PM
Dude, stop being okay with being ripped off.

----------



Here's the only command you need to send the phone from a cable in 2013: Charge my phone and maybe send music to my car.

What do you want me to do? Go mad every time I get ripped off? I hope you know all consumers including you always get ripped off. Not a big deal. You buy Apple products, you got ripped off. Again. :D

Carlanga
Jun 12, 2013, 06:10 PM
Yeah it's very annoying.. I have two "Apple" lighting cables and 3 non-apple. It's even doing it on my one officially licensed cable as well. Not happy, hope I can turn it off on the final version.

Maybe that official one is actually a really good fake?

ijohn.8.80
Jun 12, 2013, 09:30 PM
Yes.

Really? I can haz the last piece of cheesecake? :cool:

slapple
Jun 12, 2013, 09:57 PM
Apple obviously needs a way to get their stock back to $700.

SlCKB0Y
Jun 12, 2013, 10:56 PM
Yes, because everyone who buys cheaper cables understands the risks. :rolleyes:

In the decades I have been using electronic devices, I've never had a device fail because of a third party cable.

The power is being delivered by either the USB port or a wall adaptor - both of which output at a very low A and V. The cable itself can't create power so at worst it's just not going to deliver enough power, causing charging to slow or stop. Even Apple's own warning does not try to claim these cables will cause damage - just that they might be unreliable.

Stop spreading FUD about things you clearly do not understand. :rolleyes:

----------

Obviously the warning is intended to remove any liability should you fry your device with a faulty cable.


Firstly, this would be unlawful in the country I am in - secondly the warning makes absolutely no mention of damage to equipment so how would they then use this as a basis for limiting their liability?

----------

The cable that Apple is referring to includes electronics that could theoretically damage your device if not designed properly.

At those power levels, how? Can you provide details as to how this would occur?

----------

I disagree to a certain extent. When I was maybe 13, I bought a cord and adapter for my ipod touch 3g. Within a few months, my accelerameter (however you spell it...) quit working. I'd assume due to those things.


An unofficial cord caused no damage to your iPod except to the accelerometer? This is what you are claiming?

*sigh*

----------

because I had a 3GS which never ever was around water, and when I took it in for a crack in the case at the dock connector, they looked at the water sensor and voided my warranty because it was pink.

Yep, and in many regions and in many cases, Apple denying warranty claims like this was found to be unlawful.

slapple
Jun 12, 2013, 11:38 PM
Even the official Apple accessories are not always reliable:

http://support.apple.com/kb/ts4127

https://www.apple.com/support/usbadapter/exchangeprogram/

ArmCortexA8
Jun 13, 2013, 12:10 AM
Translation:

We know the cable you are using isn't one of ours. We won't prevent you from using it - but we might have added some special fun code to whack out your device from time to time which will get you to buy an official cable form us "just to be sure."

Apple can tweak the software to check the Cable ID and various other identifiers to see if the cable is genuine, otherwise it can be rejected completely from working at all. I support this idea, because if fake cables cause electrical issues or damage the device, Apple cannot be held responsible. Use a genuine cable, don't have the issues - pretty damn simple.

----------

You're "sick to death" of people buying fake cables? Why do you care? How does it affect you?

Sick of people being stingy thats why. If you paying AU$900 for a phone and upwards, why would you be so stingy on cables for your expensive phone? The genuine ones function as designed, they have the correct authentication chip as well which manages the data, device iD, and other internal data to verify its genuine. I think Apple should take this further and lock out connection if not using a genuine cable. This prevents fools buying cheap cables, that may cause an electrical fault and then the customer tries to claim this under the device warranty / hardware which will be rejected because of a third party (el cheapo) cable.

brunnernathan
Jun 13, 2013, 12:38 AM
I think it is a good thing to get notified. I had a connectors that was virus. It copied all my emails contacts and sent me spams...

bkribbs
Jun 13, 2013, 02:00 AM
I think it is a good thing to get notified. I had a connectors that was virus. It copied all my emails contacts and sent me spams...

uh... I don't really think that's true...

roadbloc
Jun 13, 2013, 03:41 AM
If it were just wires going to connectors, that would probably be true. However a lot more can go wrong once you put chips inside cables. For instance a whole heap of solder could really ruin your day. (http://www.pocketables.com/2013/01/this-is-why-you-should-always-disassemble-cheap-chinese-charging-accessories-before-use.html)

So wait... they're putting mini computers in their cables? Does this have any benefits over a standard cable?

mrxak
Jun 13, 2013, 04:27 AM
Has anyone considered this may be a beta-only feature to warn developers that if they're testing their software on iOS 7, it may be affected by an unauthorized cable?

Remember, this is a beta. Apple doesn't want to sort through a whole lot of bug reports because developers are using weird, possibly faulty cables, and Apple doesn't want iOS developers to have problems either.

alent1234
Jun 13, 2013, 05:14 AM
So wait... they're putting mini computers in their cables? Does this have any benefits over a standard cable?

How else did they make it so the pins are dynamic?

Doesn't matter which way you plug it in, the pins assignments are always right

samcraig
Jun 13, 2013, 06:38 AM
Apple can tweak the software to check the Cable ID and various other identifiers to see if the cable is genuine, otherwise it can be rejected completely from working at all. I support this idea, because if fake cables cause electrical issues or damage the device, Apple cannot be held responsible. Use a genuine cable, don't have the issues - pretty damn simple.

----------



Sick of people being stingy thats why. If you paying AU$900 for a phone and upwards, why would you be so stingy on cables for your expensive phone? The genuine ones function as designed, they have the correct authentication chip as well which manages the data, device iD, and other internal data to verify its genuine. I think Apple should take this further and lock out connection if not using a genuine cable. This prevents fools buying cheap cables, that may cause an electrical fault and then the customer tries to claim this under the device warranty / hardware which will be rejected because of a third party (el cheapo) cable.

It's none of your business what other people do with their phones.

That pretty much sums up my response to your judgmental complaining.

And I do use Apple cables. But that's irrelevant. If someone wants to make their own cable, buy a generic one or see how many drops of water they can get away with dropping into their earphone jack - don't care - that's their problem.

AnonMac50
Jun 13, 2013, 06:40 AM
I suggested this idea myself and Im glad they put it in, because I am sick to death of people buy fake Lightning cables that may not be guaranteed to work properly beyond charging and may short out the phone as well. This naturally won't be covered under warranty. Its well known if the make of the cable is not MFI certified, these may cause damage to the phone, especially with voltage. All these fools buying $2 cables which are obvious fakes and don't have the genuine authentication chip, should be immediately excluded from any technical support in any manner if not using genuine cables.

What's it to you what people buy and use?

Jack97
Jun 13, 2013, 06:46 AM
even the notifications are flat :cool:

Code cookies
Jun 13, 2013, 07:18 AM
Maybe its because of this? http://www.forbes.com/sites/andygreenberg/2013/06/02/researchers-say-they-can-hack-your-iphone-with-a-malicious-charger/

Where hackers have found a way to run malicious code using a off the shelf board BeagleBoard that could be potential housed into modified dock or portable battery?

Gemütlichkeit
Jun 13, 2013, 07:35 AM
Get the real thing or go home. The cable is cool tech and cutting corners to save a buck is lame.

BvizioN
Jun 13, 2013, 09:22 AM
Can't keep fleecing customers my ass!

I've got 4, including two great travel/car retractable cables and got some for a lot of the people at work. No problems. Stop being so greedy, it's enough you're hoarding money overseas.

Bought 2 on amazon, both ended in the bin after 1 and 3 weeks. So just because it worked for you (or not worked for me) it doesn't mean the same for everybody else.

Id rather pay £15 and keep my £700 device safe then try and save few quids.

XboxMySocks
Jun 13, 2013, 09:26 AM
I think it's akin to the genetic vs monster hdmi cables. Yea, it's highway robbery.

For the record I use micro usb lightning adaptor that I got from china for 4 bucks shipped. Works great to charge my phone in the car.

This is also no different than my honda dealer telling me to use genuine honda oil filters, which are re labeled fram filters. No thanks.

You clearly have no idea what goes on in the cables. Move on :rolleyes:

CylonGlitch
Jun 13, 2013, 10:02 AM
Bought 2 on amazon, both ended in the bin after 1 and 3 weeks. So just because it worked for you (or not worked for me) it doesn't mean the same for everybody else.

Same thing happened to me, I picked up 2 on amazon and used them for a month and BOTH of them ended up shorting out. Tossed them and purchased 2 replacement at Apple and they have been good for months. Odd thing is, I barely used the ones from Amazon, really they fell apart fast.

What Apple SHOULD do is release a $10 CHARGE ONLY cable. No syncing capabilities, no fancy switching of pins and such, just charges. That would do away with most cheap knock offs.

----------

You clearly have no idea what goes on in the cables. Move on :rolleyes:

I agree with you on this, these lightning cables are super fancy, there are electronics inside to make them do some cool things. It's much more akin to buying a Porsche vs a Hyundai.

ArmCortexA8
Jun 13, 2013, 10:18 AM
Same thing happened to me, I picked up 2 on amazon and used them for a month and BOTH of them ended up shorting out. Tossed them and purchased 2 replacement at Apple and they have been good for months. Odd thing is, I barely used the ones from Amazon, really they fell apart fast.

What I have been saying all along - common sense. The fake ones are obviously knock-offs and let me guess if one of these cables shorts the device or causes a technical issue, the customer will talk it to Apple and expect Apple to save them. Apple will kindly say you used a fake cable, this caused the fault - pay up. Its not Apple's responsibility. Apple know these are fake because of the electronics in them, and the phone gets a Cable iD from the cable and reports it to the phone and this is store in the phone for technical reference. Apple KNOW. If you pay hundred of dollars for a phone why be stingy on genuine cables? Only MFI manufacturers have the license / ability to made these cables.

CylonGlitch
Jun 13, 2013, 10:27 AM
If you pay hundred of dollars for a phone why be stingy on genuine cables?

I'll tell you why. Money. If it was one cable, it's not an issue. But Here is what I buy (for mine and my wife's phones) :
2x primary charging area in the house
2x computers to sync / charge (although becoming less needed, but are now used mostly in the brief case to carry when I visit clients)
3x one for each car
2x for the office

That's 9 cables. 9x30 = $270, vs 9x5 = $45. Buying cheap cables I save $225. That's more than I paid for the iPhone. At $5 per cable even if they fail every 6 months, I can buy almost 6 times as many as I did with the original cables.

Thus my suggestion, Apple, make me a $10 CHARGE only cable. No fancy electronics, just a cable to charge the phone and I'd be more than happy to buy only Apple cables. Although, I have ended up using mostly Apple cables now. My extra car and my travel bags still have generics.

inlinevolvo
Jun 13, 2013, 10:55 AM
You clearly have no idea what goes on in the cables. Move on :rolleyes:

It's magically digital. :blows mind:

everything-i
Jun 13, 2013, 11:30 AM
I would say this is more for alerting people who have paid full price for cables they think are genuine. If you have paid $1.99 and get a popup when you plug it in who cares, it still works and you have saved money.

XboxMySocks
Jun 13, 2013, 12:04 PM
It's magically digital. :blows mind:

Right. You do realise that there's actually massive technology just in the cable that allows it dynamically assign the pins of it to certain functions? Part of why it's so expensive.

cRuNcHiE
Jun 13, 2013, 12:41 PM
I hope they remove this as I have installed an iPod touch 5th in my car but HAD to use a Chinese right-angle, short lightning cable to get it to fit nice and clean.

When I update the ipod, if it shows this message every time I turn in the ignition I will be very annoyed!

Apple dont make a suitable cable

SeenJeen
Jun 13, 2013, 12:48 PM
Good, should make some users think twice about buying a $1.99 cable that might fry their device, or burn down their house.

You paid $400+ for your device, a $20 cable is hardly being robbed.

Let me guess, you're one of those fools that think that a $100 HDMI cable shows better picture than a $15 one.

alexkywalker
Jun 13, 2013, 01:27 PM
Now my USB tethering ability is gone, thanks to iOS 7 beta's finicky-ness about 3rd party products.

Gotta go find the one original cable now...

inlinevolvo
Jun 13, 2013, 01:30 PM
Right. You do realise that there's actually massive technology just in the cable that allows it dynamically assign the pins of it to certain functions? Part of why it's so expensive.

Yes. Leave it to Cupertino to reinvent the wheel. Your concerns with generic Chinese knock offs are understood. However, I'm not much concerned considering both parts are assembled in China. And with China's complete disregard for intellectual property (combined with my disdain for expensive nonsense), I feel confident that my generic part is just as good as Apples. To each their own. I did however spend a considerable sum of money on a MacBook.

inlinevolvo
Jun 13, 2013, 01:52 PM
Same thing happened to me, I picked up 2 on amazon and used them for a month and BOTH of them ended up shorting out. Tossed them and purchased 2 replacement at Apple and they have been good for months. Odd thing is, I barely used the ones from Amazon, really they fell apart fast.

What Apple SHOULD do is release a $10 CHARGE ONLY cable. No syncing capabilities, no fancy switching of pins and such, just charges. That would do away with most cheap knock offs.

----------



I agree with you on this, these lightning cables are super fancy, there are electronics inside to make them do some cool things. It's much more akin to buying a Porsche vs a Hyundai.

I think you will be pleasantly surprised how a Hyundai genesis can smack a few of porches offerings...

XboxMySocks
Jun 13, 2013, 02:16 PM
Yes. Leave it to Cupertino to reinvent the wheel. Your concerns with generic Chinese knock offs are understood. However, I'm not much concerned considering both parts are assembled in China. And with China's complete disregard for intellectual property (combined with my disdain for expensive nonsense), I feel confident that my generic part is just as good as Apples. To each their own. I did however spend a considerable sum of money on a MacBook.

Ah you're right, the distinction is minuscule. However, the ones created by Apple are coded correctly and assembled properly, which is not even remotely guaranteed to work correctly. You'll probably end up binning them anyway and wasting more money hahahaha

inlinevolvo
Jun 13, 2013, 02:25 PM
Ah you're right, the distinction is minuscule. However, the ones created by Apple are coded correctly and assembled properly, which is not even remotely guaranteed to work correctly. You'll probably end up binning them anyway and wasting more money hahahaha

I've been using mine for about 4 months now. It cost me $4. Now I don't need more than one adaptor, but when you need to get 4 or 5 of these things, you are looking at triple digits going with apple. But should mine fail, I'll keep you appraised. And you can tell me "I told you so."

P.s. I wouldn't hold my breath.

themoffster
Jun 13, 2013, 03:43 PM
I suggested this idea myself and Im glad they put it in, because I am sick to death of people buy fake Lightning cables that may not be guaranteed to work properly beyond charging and may short out the phone as well.
You need to stop playing with computers, go out, talk to women and get yourself laid

lucasgladding
Jun 13, 2013, 04:24 PM
As others have said, this is not new. I had a Griffin car charger that caused this message to appear every time it was plugged in. This was about 3 years ago with an iPhone 4 and iOS 5. I don't think they're crippling unofficial cables any time soon.

Beyond the need to criticize Apple for something, I don't understand why users are complaining about the notification. Perhaps it could be less intrusive (maybe something as simple as an icon in the status bar), but there are several good reasons to have it. The most obvious reason is markets where counterfeit cables are sold for the same price. I'm sure the desire to collect licensing fees fits into the design decision somewhere, but nobody can ignore the legitimate reasons for alerting users.

----------

I've been using mine for about 4 months now. It cost me $4. Now I don't need more than one adaptor, but when you need to get 4 or 5 of these things, you are looking at triple digits going with apple. But should mine fail, I'll keep you appraised. And you can tell me "I told you so."

P.s. I wouldn't hold my breath.

Where did you get the cables? I'm looking for some, but keep seeing them for $10+.

epphllps
Jun 13, 2013, 07:01 PM
My Maxboost defender battery case no longer works. Worked on ios 6, but now I get the not supported warning. Pretty lame. Anyone else have this issue with a battery case?

ArmCortexA8
Jun 13, 2013, 10:46 PM
I'll tell you why. Money. If it was one cable, it's not an issue. But Here is what I buy (for mine and my wife's phones) :
2x primary charging area in the house
2x computers to sync / charge (although becoming less needed, but are now used mostly in the brief case to carry when I visit clients)
3x one for each car
2x for the office

Learn to manage what you use and where, you don't need a cable every single location - learn to take a cable or two with you, its ridiculous no wonder its costing you a fortune. I have two cables in total (genuine) and I take an iPhone power supply and Lightning cable with me everywhere thats is. I would not have a cable at every single location. I use the same cable for my iPhone and iPod touch and synching and charging - one cable not 9. Learn to use one or two cables max for everything (yourself and wife) and organise things better, not tell Apple to make cables cheaper because it appears you don't use an organised method which is costing you a fortune. Your own "convenience" is causing this expense.

terraphantm
Jun 14, 2013, 01:57 AM
Good, should make some users think twice about buying a $1.99 cable that might fry their device, or burn down their house.

You paid $400+ for your device, a $20 cable is hardly being robbed.

Apple cables are notoriously fragile. You're not getting $20 quality with their cables. So why not buy the cheapies? You can get 10 for the same price, and they'll likely each work as long or longer

hchung
Jun 14, 2013, 02:00 AM
In the decades I have been using electronic devices, I've never had a device fail because of a third party cable.


Then either you don't have enough experience with electronic devices, or luckily managed to get 3rd party cables which were reasonably well-made.

I've had connectors melt because the wires used were too thin to carry the current expected.
I've seen connectors deformed because crappy microUSB were manufactured slightly larger. People tried forcing them in because they thought the resistance was from the retention clips, not the connector deforming.
I've had connector parts break off in other connectors, leaving metal pieces shorting the lines.


At those power levels, how? Can you provide details as to how this would occur?[COLOR="#808080"]


At the voltage and current levels seen over a USB port, you can easily damage electronics circuits. Let's start with basic examples.

USB's 5V 500ma mode is past the rated spec for basic LEDs.
USB's 5V 500ma mode is also much higher than the charge current for a bluetooth headset's lithium battery, putting you in "my battery set on fire" danger zone should regulation fail.
The venerable 2n2222 transistor can get burnt over 1 amp, so that'd take a higher wattage USB charger, but still much less than the 2 amps of the iPad charger.
Electromigration can open efuses at half the voltage of a USB port, and also less current.

Want to know more? Most people know USB's power lines at 5V.
But most people don't know that the data lines max out at 3.3V.
A USB transceiver typically has two power inputs: One for 5V for power, and then another for 3.3V-3.6V to drive the IO/data lines.
Sure each power input can take a little more than their normally expected voltage level.... but the specsheets happen to tell you how much more.
I've seen specsheets where the 3.3v lines have a max limit of 4.6v. So there's actually a lot of USB transceivers where if you accidentally short the 5V to the 3.3V lines, you'll fry it because 5 is bigger than 4.6.
And guess what two terminals are next to each other on USB connectors.

http://www.ti.com/lit/ds/symlink/tusb2551.pdf
http://pdf.datasheetcatalog.com/datasheet/philips/ISP1106W.pdf
Open the PDF, search "absolute maximum" and then look at VCC-IO.

terraphantm
Jun 14, 2013, 02:03 AM
Then either you don't have enough experience with electronic devices, or luckily managed to get 3rd party cables which were reasonably well-made.

I've had connectors melt because the wires used were too thin to carry the current expected.
I've seen connectors deformed because crappy microUSB were manufactured slightly larger. People tried forcing them in because they thought the resistance was from the retention clips, not the connector deforming.
I've had connector parts break off in other connectors, leaving metal pieces shorting the lines.



At the voltage and current levels seen over a USB port, you can easily damage electronics circuits. Let's start with basic examples.

USB's 5V 500ma mode is past the rated spec for basic LEDs.
USB's 5V 500ma mode is also much higher than the charge current for a bluetooth headset's lithium battery, putting you in "my battery set on fire" danger zone should regulation fail.
The venerable 2n2222 transistor can get burnt over 1 amp, so that'd take a higher wattage USB charger, but still much less than the 2 amps of the iPad charger.
Electromigration can open efuses at half the voltage of a USB port, and also less current.

Want to know more? Most people know USB's power lines at 5V.
But most people don't know that the data lines max out at 3.3V.
A USB transceiver typically has two power inputs: One for 5V for power, and then another for 3.3V-3.6V to drive the IO/data lines.
Sure each power input can take a little more than their normally expected voltage level.... but the specsheets happen to tell you how much more.
I've seen specsheets where the 3.3v lines have a max limit of 4.6v. So there's actually a lot of USB transceivers where if you accidentally short the 5V to the 3.3V lines, you'll fry it because 5 is bigger than 4.6.
And guess what two terminals are next to each other on USB connectors.

http://www.ti.com/lit/ds/symlink/tusb2551.pdf
http://pdf.datasheetcatalog.com/datasheet/philips/ISP1106W.pdf
Open the PDF, search "absolute maximum" and then look at VCC-IO.


I don't know why one would hook up an LED directly to a USB cable.
for charging, the current drawn will depend on the charge level of the battery. Having excess current available doesn't mean it gets forced into the battery -- otherwise you couldn't use an iPad charger on an iPhone, nor could you plug in anything less into the 10-20A breakers of your house.
so what if a 2n2222 transistor can get burnt over 1 amp? It's not hard to limit current.
It really should go without saying that the likelyhood of observing electronmigration due to the freaking USB cable is astronomically low. I assure you that Apple's engineers know the basics of electronic design -- they certainly take into account that input voltage will likely fluctuate when designing the CPU power circuitry

It's really not that hard to make a decent quality cable. It can certainly be done for less than the $20 Apple wants, and at better quality. Even a crappy one probably will not have power wires hooked up to the data lines.


You strike me as the type of person who has a little bit of knowledge, but doesn't actually know what the implications are.

gnasher729
Jun 14, 2013, 05:34 AM
Yes, because everyone who buys cheaper cables understands the risks. :rolleyes:

Not everyone buying rubbish cables actually bought cheap cables :mad:

You buy an "original Apple" cable at a price that would be good if it was in fact original, plug it in your phone, get this warning, go back to the seller and find he has gone to find mugs like you elsewhere :D

----------

I think you will be pleasantly surprised how a Hyundai genesis can smack a few of porches offerings...

If you buy a car with a "porche" sticker I can guarantee it's just as fake as your Rolox watch :D

----------

Yes. Leave it to Cupertino to reinvent the wheel. Your concerns with generic Chinese knock offs are understood. However, I'm not much concerned considering both parts are assembled in China. And with China's complete disregard for intellectual property (combined with my disdain for expensive nonsense), I feel confident that my generic part is just as good as Apples. To each their own. I did however spend a considerable sum of money on a MacBook.

If they sell you a cheap part, and they know you wont come to China to complain if it doesn't work, why would they make a quality cable? The cost of building a good cable isn't just the design which can be copied; actually making it is expensive too.

Dangerous Theory
Jun 14, 2013, 06:38 AM
Good, should make some users think twice about buying a $1.99 cable that might fry their device, or burn down their house.

You paid $400+ for your device, a $20 cable is hardly being robbed.

Out of all the technology that's worth $400 in an iPhone, there's no way that a cable is worth 5% of that.

saha-med
Jun 14, 2013, 07:27 AM
Well I've seen a similar warning on a 3GS and 4S so I don't know what the big deal is as it's not some wonderful new feature in iOS 7 :rolleyes:

U've got to be kidding me. My 3 years of using tons of "unauthorized" cables with my IP4 hasnt shown me any warnings.

Im surprised that such a warning system exist

Unggoy Murderer
Jun 14, 2013, 09:19 AM
Apple cables are notoriously fragile. You're not getting $20 quality with their cables. So why not buy the cheapies? You can get 10 for the same price, and they'll likely each work as long or longer
EVERY Apple cable I've ever owned has lasted the lifespan of the device. You must be holding it wrong.;)

lucasgladding
Jun 14, 2013, 10:48 AM
U've got to be kidding me. My 3 years of using tons of "unauthorized" cables with my IP4 hasnt shown me any warnings.

Just because it's unauthorized doesn't mean you'll see this warning. If you didn't get the warning under iOS 6, I suspect won't get it under iOS 7 either. The warning isn't new, though I suppose they could have made the check more thorough.

parish
Jun 14, 2013, 02:58 PM
U've got to be kidding me. My 3 years of using tons of "unauthorized" cables with my IP4 hasnt shown me any warnings.

Im surprised that such a warning system exist

Nope, no kidding. It was a battery charger for the cigarette lighter in the car bought off fleabay :rolleyes:

Nickpocalypse
Jun 14, 2013, 03:00 PM
I disagree to a certain extent. When I was maybe 13, I bought a cord and adapter for my ipod touch 3g. Within a few months, my accelerameter (however you spell it...) quit working. I'd assume due to those things.

While every time a cord is plugged in is too much, they at least should be warned.

I agree with you, this is what the rest of my post you quoted went on to say.

We're on the same page :)

bkribbs
Jun 14, 2013, 04:32 PM
I agree with you, this is what the rest of my post you quoted went on to say.

We're on the same page :)

My apologies then! Glad we agree!

CylonGlitch
Jun 14, 2013, 05:58 PM
Your own "convenience" is causing this expense.

But is there any reason they can't produce a CHARGE only cable? Seriously, am I the only one who sees this as a viable product? Most people I know don't sync that often, but want to charge everywhere.

Yes, I know I don't need so many cables, but it makes my life easier. Yes it is expensive, and not necessary. Do I wish it to be cheaper, sure, but I'll deal with the price.

Alchemis
Jun 14, 2013, 07:56 PM
What eggs me most about this is that I have several non-gen cables at different places, car, home, work etc and now with 7 installed it is actually draining the battery with these cables plugged in whereas they used to charge it. Apple really lose some points here!

VoR
Jun 15, 2013, 11:32 AM
But is there any reason they can't produce a CHARGE only cable? Seriously, am I the only one who sees this as a viable product? Most people I know don't sync that often, but want to charge everywhere.

There's no reason they couldn't, but I don't think it would be viable - What's the point in it? Why would I spend $10 on a 'cheap, branded charge-only' cable when I could get 5x full featured 3rd party cables?

I'm still using the 30pin connector, I don't think I've ever bought a cable that hasn't been better quality than apple's - Their strain relief is pretty poor quality, especially considering the connector naturally wants/needs you to pull it out by the cable itself.

bkribbs
Jun 15, 2013, 05:16 PM
Similar to the concept of not knowing when generic cords are ok, can I get a generic USB Ethernet adapter for my Mac?

thisisdallas
Jun 17, 2013, 12:30 PM
I see this same message in iOS 6 with my knockoff lightning cable, from time to time.

I don't think this is new for iOS7.

Yeah, the notification itself isn't new, but the fact that you can dismiss it and allow the charger to continue to work is new. In iOS 6, my knockoff lightning cable always completely quit working after about 4 minutes of charging.

APlotdevice
Jun 17, 2013, 12:59 PM
There's no reason they couldn't, but I don't think it would be viable - What's the point in it? Why would I spend $10 on a 'cheap, branded charge-only' cable when I could get 5x full featured 3rd party cables?

I'm still using the 30pin connector, I don't think I've ever bought a cable that hasn't been better quality than apple's - Their strain relief is pretty poor quality, especially considering the connector naturally wants/needs you to pull it out by the cable itself.

I've never had to put it out by the cable. If for some reason you have trouble gripping the connector, just slide your nail into the gap between it and your device.

hchung
Jun 25, 2013, 01:53 AM
I don't know why one would hook up an LED directly to a USB cable.
for charging, the current drawn will depend on the charge level of the battery. Having excess current available doesn't mean it gets forced into the battery -- otherwise you couldn't use an iPad charger on an iPhone, nor could you plug in anything less into the 10-20A breakers of your house.
so what if a 2n2222 transistor can get burnt over 1 amp? It's not hard to limit current.
It really should go without saying that the likelyhood of observing electronmigration due to the freaking USB cable is astronomically low. I assure you that Apple's engineers know the basics of electronic design -- they certainly take into account that input voltage will likely fluctuate when designing the CPU power circuitry

It's really not that hard to make a decent quality cable. It can certainly be done for less than the $20 Apple wants, and at better quality. Even a crappy one probably will not have power wires hooked up to the data lines.

You strike me as the type of person who has a little bit of knowledge, but doesn't actually know what the implications are.

The simple discrete components were mentioned only to bring in basic voltage/current levels an electronics hobbyist might understand. The question was whether or not the power levels seen at a USB port is enough to damage electronics. Many people don't think so, because they have no familiarity with electronic circuits in general.

I said that electromigration can be observed at voltage/current levels that can be observed at a USB port. Not due to the cable. And the CPU power regulation wouldn't even be directly connected to the USB port. If you misunderstand me, it doesn't make me incorrect.

Besides, the problem isn't about making a decent quality cable; it's about making a decent quality CONNECTOR.

terraphantm
Jun 27, 2013, 11:07 AM
My understanding is that electromigration is only a practical concern with modern ICs. With everything else (I would imagine even cheap cables), there is enough metal to not worry about it.

Realistically, the connector would have to be really badly made for anything else to go that wrong. The most common problem I've seen was poor soldering at the dock end. But that was in the $0.50 cables. Step it up to ~$5, and they're better made than the apple cables. Better rubber and better reliefs. If the actual electrical part is not up to the same standard, then the difference is not enough to cause a problem.

tech4all
Jun 27, 2013, 11:49 PM
Leave it to the iPhone/iOS that warns you that the cable isn't "good enough" for it. :rolleyes:

Get the real thing or go home. The cable is cool tech and cutting corners to save a buck is lame.

Someone needs to stop drinking the Apple Kool Aid...

MastahRiz
Sep 21, 2013, 08:08 PM
I just got a lenmar meridian for my 5S, the charging works, but it won't sync to the computer via the micro USB. Their cable and battery is MFI approved so I don't get what the problem is.

pirateyarrr
Sep 21, 2013, 08:10 PM
The problem is that Apple wants you to buy their $35 charger, and you didn't.

Gjwilly
Sep 21, 2013, 08:13 PM
The three articles you posted all link back to the same article as the source.
And it's wrong.
I'm sorry but it sure doesn't sound like you have either a Lightning port device or a 3rd-party cable so how about you yield to the people who do have both?

The article is wrong.
I have 3rd-party Lightning cables and they do work just fine with my iOS 7 device.
If anyone is genuinely having a problem I think the most likely answer is that their 3rd-party cable is unreliable.

pirateyarrr
Sep 21, 2013, 09:06 PM
Ah, so because your cable happens to work, everyone that's saying their cables aren't working, are wrong.

Makes total sense.

ChristianJapan
Sep 22, 2013, 03:24 AM
We spend a solid amount of money on iDevices; I don't even want to use 3rd party cable/charger anymore. I did in the past; some of them got hot like hell; even more compared to the original one I use for my iPad. I just feel more confident without 3rd party.
Remember the story of exploding 3rd party charger killing a person ... It not coming from nowhere.

firstapple
Sep 22, 2013, 07:35 AM
The problem is that Apple wants you to buy their $35 charger, and you didn't.

Incorrect. Apple wants you to purchase AUTHORIZED lightning cables. Not all authorized cables are $35. There are plenty in the $10 - $20 price range that are not made by Apple but are authorized through Apple's MFi program.

Micaya
Sep 22, 2013, 02:23 PM
I had issue with a splitter I had got but ordered the cable below and works like a charm with no errors.

http://wirelessliquidators.com/p-1207-aftermarket-iphone-5-lightning-usb-data-cable-8-pin-sync-and-charging-cable-for-apple-iph.aspx