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MacRumors
Jun 14, 2013, 09:04 AM
http://images.macrumors.com/im/macrumorsthreadlogo.gif (http://www.macrumors.com/2013/06/14/famed-mac-icon-designer-says-ios-7-icons-are-a-good-direction/)


http://images.macrumors.com/article-new/2013/06/happy_mac_icon-250x312.jpgSince its unveiling (http://www.macrumors.com/2013/06/10/apple-announces-ios-7-with-major-design-overhaul/) at the Worldwide Developers Conference keynote, Apple's new user interface for iOS 7 has proven somewhat controversial with pundits and fans debating whether the direction is a good or bad one. Earlier this week, it was reported that Jony Ive had put Apple's marketing team (http://www.macrumors.com/2013/06/12/jony-ive-put-apples-marketing-team-in-charge-of-ios-7-icon-design/) in charge of the look and color palette for the iOS 7 icons, bringing new blood and a fresh perspective to the operating system.

Network World spoke (https://www.networkworld.com/community/blog/susan-kare-thinks-apples-new-ios-icons-are-step-right-direction) to original Macintosh icon designer Susan Kare and was able to get her thoughts on the new design:Generally a good direction--am a fan of simple, meaningful symbols that fill a space, such as Music and Weather. It's better -- more iconic, less illustrative.Kare's thoughts somewhat echo Jony Ive's comments made during the iOS 7 introduction video (http://www.macrumors.com/2013/06/10/apple-posts-ios-7-intro-designed-by-apple-tv-ad-wwdc-keynote-video/), in which he noted that simplicity, clarity and efficiency are some of the goals behind iOS 7.

Kare created many of the original interface elements for the Apple Macintosh in the mid-1980s, including the Chicago sans-serif typeface (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chicago_(typeface)) and the "Happy Mac" symbol that greeted early Mac users at startup.*She now works as an independent artist (http://www.kare.com/).

Article Link: Famed Mac Icon Designer Says iOS 7 Icons Are a 'Good Direction' (http://www.macrumors.com/2013/06/14/famed-mac-icon-designer-says-ios-7-icons-are-a-good-direction/)



TouchMint.com
Jun 14, 2013, 09:11 AM
Idk some are ok but some are pretty ugly in my eyes. I know I'm not the best icon creator and I know what they were going for but they missed a few times here's hoping they change a few before release.

pgiguere1
Jun 14, 2013, 09:15 AM
The general concept/artistic direction isn't bad per se, I think it's the execution that's lacking.

I'm all for clean-looking, simple icons, as I think most of us are, the problem is more with the weird color palette, exaggerated gradients with an inconsistent direction and general lack of consistency between the complexity of shapes, the level of flatness and use (or not) of metaphors.

I think it's a good thing Apple has reacted and justified the current icons, it means they are "fixing" things as we speak. In fact, the internal build Apple had when they released the first beta was more advanced than what developers are using today.

The new icons on Apple's website are defenitely better exectuted while keeping the same original design language. I want to see more of that:

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/2042135/IconsiOS7.png

It's still far from perfect but changes are made on the right path.

RoboCop001
Jun 14, 2013, 09:17 AM
I think it's definitely the right direction. Kare seemed like she does still have some reservations, but definitely likes the direction they've begun. And that's definitely how I feel too.

I think we're going to see much better updates to iOS from now on. I don't know why, just a feeling. But I mean, they seemed so much more happier up there than with any other presentation since Jobs last took the stage. It's like they were no longer confined to something. They seemed to now have a real sense of where they want to take it, more of a vision for the future.

I really like how much more "alive" the OS seems now. One of the biggest things I felt with iOS was that it felt very static and stiff. While using it every day, and especially where there was heavy skeumorphism, I found myself wanting to use it in a way that seemed like it would/should work in that way, but did not. It felt very confined. For example, you HAVE to press the "back" button to go back. But a swipe makes so much sense, and after some apps started to have that kind of gesturing, I really started to want it in the OS as well and wondered why they never did that.

So even if there's a few crappy icons, I'm really excited about the future that iOS 7 is ushering in.

Time will tell of course, but under Forstal, things seemed to be going very slowly. Now I feel like things will be going faster, a focus on more important features, more gestures, and slowly perhaps even more openness.

gadgetguy03
Jun 14, 2013, 09:20 AM
Idk some are ok but some are pretty ugly in my eyes. I know I'm not the best icon creator and I know what they were going for but they missed a few times here's hoping they change a few before release.

I wouldn't actually mind if these icons were the final draft and we had new and improved icons in iOS 8

Forstall was kicked out in October of 2012 and since then they were scrambling to get iOS 7 out at WWDC. I believe that's why Jony placed the icon development in the hands of the marketing team while he worked on the other things such as app look and function. This was a last ditch effort to eradicate any trace of Forstall and I think it shows to those of us who pay close attention to these matters.

I don't think the general public will be too concerned. Shaken and put off initially? Sure. I think they'll get used to it over time and Jony has mind to tweak certain icons in future updates.

fullfirstalarm
Jun 14, 2013, 09:22 AM
Personally, I quite like the new semi-stripped down look of the icons. I think it reflects exactly what makes Apple work - simplicity. While the more detailed, or illustrative, look of today's icon designs is generally pleasing, there is nothing particularly holy about it, or the look. Agreed, good direction.

Porco
Jun 14, 2013, 09:27 AM
I have a feeling that there will many more comments in this thread praising the direction whilst questioning the execution of some of what we've seen so far… that's certainly how I feel about it too.

nagromme
Jun 14, 2013, 09:27 AM
Change always hurts.

People hated the original shift from OS 9 to OS X, but in hindsight the look was much better, and continued to improve from there. As will iOS 7: what we're seeing now is just 7 months old and already looks amazing. Don't lose sleep over small details yet.

And beyond the look, it has great new features, and tons of new stuff behind the scenes for developers to be making great apps with.

I don't mind the new icons. Looking between the old and the new is a bit jarring! Good.

peteullo
Jun 14, 2013, 09:29 AM
Right direction, wrong road.

jayducharme
Jun 14, 2013, 09:34 AM
This was a last ditch effort to eradicate any trace of Forstall

"Absolutely no virtual cows were harmed in the making of this interface." -- Craig Frederighi

Gulo
Jun 14, 2013, 09:34 AM
I'm glad somebody with experience finally expressed what I feel.

It amazes me how everybody is so ******* sure of themselves when it comes to design. Like their opinion is the de facto standard for beauty in the world. Get over yourselves. Design is hard. It's also something that one gets better at as one does it more. This is Apple's first stab at a different direction and I think too, that they are going in a cool direction.

To call something downright "ugly" based on your personal taste is bold and usually pretty arrogant, just saying.

Bathplug
Jun 14, 2013, 09:34 AM
Famed mac icon designer is wrong.

AQUADock
Jun 14, 2013, 09:34 AM
Theres nothing wrong with the concept of iOS 7s icons, its the execution and finish that is almost non existent thats the problem.

mayuka
Jun 14, 2013, 09:35 AM
I dislike the new icons. They look if Microsoft hired a guy that recently discovered a paint pot. The new icons are also meaningless. Or do you know what the colored blots stand for? The old icons may look boring, but at least I can suspect what's behind an icon with a photo or an icon with a camera...

peteullo
Jun 14, 2013, 09:40 AM
One thing I can truly appreciate here is I finally feel for the first time in 7 years that I have a different phone in my hands. :apple:

decimortis
Jun 14, 2013, 09:42 AM
To call something downright "ugly" based on your personal taste is bold and usually pretty arrogant, just saying.

Or you know, personal opinion.

Replace the word ugly with beautiful and read your post again.

D.

sirdir
Jun 14, 2013, 09:43 AM
Famed mac icon designer is wrong.

Well, back then, especially on a b&w screen, I guess she did the best possible. But those Icons were ugly back then, too.

Strange coinsidence, maybe icons started looking good when shadows and high resolution became available? ;)

Just because Windows 8 looks more like Windows 2 than Windows 7 Apple doesn't have to go the same direction…

Canubis
Jun 14, 2013, 09:43 AM
While the direction and idea behind may be right, what really shocked me was the missing constistency and love for details Apple is somehow known & loved for and which they also started to explicetly promote just now.

I really hate to stress this line, as it's more often wrong than true: but I strongly believe (and hope) that the state, in which they released the new icons, was much too early. I really believe that with Steve Jobs being still alive, this wouldn't have seen the light. There really seems to be somebody missing who dares to say: "Guys, this isn't ready for primetime yet. Get your asses back to the desks."

RobertMartens
Jun 14, 2013, 09:44 AM
Quoting another site does not make a rumor a fact

jony didn't say that he had assigned the marketing team to do the icons

you make it sound confirmed


btw if apple is all about simplicity how did they icons get so busy in the first place?

BJMRamage
Jun 14, 2013, 09:45 AM
I don't like them...seems like they are a bit all over the place. some are on-color icons, some are full bleed and others are multi-color illustrations and then there are some with blends of colors and then Game Center has some 3D effect going.


very strange and not consistent.


all that said, would this force me to jump ship? no.
Will I NOT upgrade to iOS 7? no.

i will use the apps and just know what the icons are. I didn't like when a few other apps changed their icons but didn't stop using them or delete the apps.

I liked the original Snapseed, not the Google version. I liked the Over icon before it is now....

myrtlebee
Jun 14, 2013, 09:47 AM
I don't like her smiling Mac icon, nor do I care for the current Finder icon in OSX. It's no surprise to me that she'd be for the current icons...

KALLT
Jun 14, 2013, 09:48 AM
Famed mac icon designer is wrong.

Well technically she did not express much on the new icons. She merely responded to the artistic direction taken by the designers ('generally a good direction'), which is focussed on having simple and to-the-point icons rather than complex illustrations. She never said that the icons are good.

Ryth
Jun 14, 2013, 10:11 AM
Famed mac icon designer is wrong.

Un-famous poster is also wrong.

Opinions on design cannot be right or wrong.

designs216
Jun 14, 2013, 10:16 AM
What's old is new again, which is why design history is interesting and relevant. Let's see where this goes...

wiz329
Jun 14, 2013, 10:16 AM
What the hell is he thinking.

Lesser Evets
Jun 14, 2013, 10:23 AM
I'm glad somebody with experience finally expressed what I feel.

It amazes me how everybody is so ******* sure of themselves when it comes to design. Like their opinion is the de facto standard for beauty in the world....

Damn straight!

I think it's great that people are voicing their opinions about how pointlessly obnoxious these new designs are.

Oh, wait, you were saying that your opinion is better than the others. Never mind.

cambookpro
Jun 14, 2013, 10:24 AM
What the hell is she thinking.

Corrected... ;)

Rogifan
Jun 14, 2013, 10:24 AM
Watch some of the developer videos in the WWDC app and you can clearly tell Apple software guys are exited. Makes you wonder how many of them have wanted change for a while now. And how much Forstall was holding it back, possibly due to slavish loyalty to Steve. There were rumors that he would frequently play the "Steve wouldn't want that" or "Steve wouldn't like that" card. I get the sense now that he's gone the rest of the executive team is doing what they think is right rather than being hamstrung by trying to do what they think Steve would want.

lolkthxbai
Jun 14, 2013, 10:29 AM
Alright guys, that settles it. If Karen is onboard then that means we're moving forward with this look and further refinements.

Well
Jun 14, 2013, 10:36 AM
..its just the horrid colour scheme I do not like. I want my phone to look cool not like a toy for a two year old.

shortcrust
Jun 14, 2013, 10:39 AM
I'm glad somebody with experience finally expressed what I feel.

It amazes me how everybody is so ******* sure of themselves when it comes to design. Like their opinion is the de facto standard for beauty in the world. Get over yourselves. Design is hard. It's also something that one gets better at as one does it more. This is Apple's first stab at a different direction and I think too, that they are going in a cool direction.

To call something downright "ugly" based on your personal taste is bold and usually pretty arrogant, just saying.

Wow. Talk about an absence of awareness!

musio
Jun 14, 2013, 10:46 AM
Colour scheme is for kids, icons look like they were designed for a toddler market. How does a white border around the safari icon constitute as 'good direction'. It looks like they couldn't think of anything or were scared of not having a border around it!

Tubamajuba
Jun 14, 2013, 10:47 AM
I get the sense now that he's gone the rest of the executive team is doing what they think is right rather than being hamstrung by trying to do what they think Steve would want.

Which, ironically, is what Steve would want.

Nem Wan
Jun 14, 2013, 10:59 AM
Of course this isn't what Apple would be doing if Steve Jobs is still there, but Apple can't guess what Steve Jobs would do and shouldn't try, and Jobs said as much before he died.

Scott Forstall was doing what Jobs wanted while Jobs was in charge. Forstall was behind not only the look of iOS but Mac OS X's Aqua as well. But Jobs is gone and nobody can guess how Jobs would steer through uncharted waters and how he would balance competing answers to new questions.

Going "forward" with only ideas that Jobs approved or "would" approve is not innovation, it's the opposite.

sparrky
Jun 14, 2013, 11:02 AM
The flat gray folders are the thing I dislike the most. Absolutely ugly.

Looks like jailbreak/winterboard is most definitely in my iPhone's future.

Casiotone
Jun 14, 2013, 11:24 AM
Apple should have only used blue, black and army green colors in iOS 7 to satisfy testosterone driven males who are afraid of those "emasculating" pastel colors.

Seriously, I've never understood how can anyone affirm that a color is "ugly".

BornAgainMac
Jun 14, 2013, 11:30 AM
My theory is that iOS 8 will support vector art icons and move towards a scalable screen resolution environment. It will look sharp at native resolutions no matter what size the display.

This is moving into that direction.

bushman4
Jun 14, 2013, 11:33 AM
We'll only know if its the right direction after the final draft comes out and we see the publics reaction.
After coming from 3D like fancy Apps the change to simple illustrations is huge It seemed that what we saw at the WWDC was more of a work on progress. It could be good if Apple gets it right by release time. Is it the right direction ? I would be more encouraged if there was more enthusiasm

blue22
Jun 14, 2013, 11:36 AM
As a graphic designer myself I actually don't mind a "flatter" design scheme overall, but Apple's execution of it as currently presented looks over simplified and juvenile at the moment, IMHO.

Taken at face value, I really don't like any of those new icons to be featured in iOS7, with the worst offender being "newsstand", WTF?! (The new icons for "safari", "settings", "notes", and "reminders" are pretty awful too.) And the new "camera" icon looks super generic as to be a blight on one's eyes to know it was somehow endorsed by Apple execs for prime-time unveiling.

Don't get me wrong, I'm all for the new approach of simplifying the look & feel of the next iOS system, but there's nothing "simple" about creating icons, let alone an aesthetic scheme for a unified UI system, and this is precisely why it looks "unfinished" and consequently unexciting to me.

redscull
Jun 14, 2013, 11:36 AM
"simple, meaningful symbols that fill a space ... more iconic, less illustrative"

This is exactly the correct mindset and approach for imagery used on buttons in app toolbars, on config panels, etc. You want a clean interface representing the actions the user may invoke. And where iOS 7 uses this approach within apps and system menus, it is admirably simple and elegant.

But the imagery used for the icon of an app itself represents much more than just the action of launching an app. It represents a whole app. It is the first thing which markets an app. It introduces a user to an app and helps the user find it in a sea of apps. It should be memorable. Unique. And this is where iOS 7 fails; it forgets that toolbar icons and app icons are not the same thing and should not follow the same design philosophy.

Gulo
Jun 14, 2013, 11:39 AM
Or you know, personal opinion.

Replace the word ugly with beautiful and read your post again.

D.

If you say something like "I think..." or "...to me" along with, you're making it clear the view is your personal opinion. It adds a bit of humility to your tone as well.

Calling something beautiful is positive, and this expression doesn't usually come from the same place as expressions more arrogant - like calling something or someone ugly.

Mince words all you want. Most all of the critics I'm seeing around here and elsewhere sound like a bunch of dicks to me. Not because of their opinion, but rather their execution.

lcmazza
Jun 14, 2013, 11:43 AM
Famed mac icon designer is wrong.

Sure... and the BATHPLUG is right.

morespce54
Jun 14, 2013, 11:44 AM
...
And beyond the look, it has great new features, and tons of new stuff behind the scenes for developers to be making great apps with.
...



Right but we should remember that we are talking about the icons/design/colors here, not about features. IMO, the new features looks great and opens up for great possibilities but the look doesn't impress me. Maybe they really wanted to show that they are going in a completely new direction and from now on things will only gets better (icons/design/colors wise).
At least, they sure got room for improvement in those fields! ;)



BTW, I really liked the OS 9 icons and those are classics but, as mentioned earlier, she seems to have some sort of reserve on the new ones. And saying that it's "going in the right direction" is not the same as saying "those are wonderful icons, they couldn't have done better"... ;)

iisdan
Jun 14, 2013, 11:45 AM
They are HIDEOUS!!!!

Brittany246
Jun 14, 2013, 12:05 PM
To call something downright "ugly" based on your personal taste is bold and usually pretty arrogant, just saying.

Then so be it.

moderngamenewb
Jun 14, 2013, 12:10 PM
I think it's definitely the right direction. Kare seemed like she does still have some reservations, but definitely likes the direction they've begun. And that's definitely how I feel too.

I think we're going to see much better updates to iOS from now on. I don't know why, just a feeling. But I mean, they seemed so much more happier up there than with any other presentation since Jobs last took the stage. It's like they were no longer confined to something. They seemed to now have a real sense of where they want to take it, more of a vision for the future.

I really like how much more "alive" the OS seems now. One of the biggest things I felt with iOS was that it felt very static and stiff. While using it every day, and especially where there was heavy skeumorphism, I found myself wanting to use it in a way that seemed like it would/should work in that way, but did not. It felt very confined. For example, you HAVE to press the "back" button to go back. But a swipe makes so much sense, and after some apps started to have that kind of gesturing, I really started to want it in the OS as well and wondered why they never did that.

So even if there's a few crappy icons, I'm really excited about the future that iOS 7 is ushering in.

Time will tell of course, but under Forstal, things seemed to be going very slowly. Now I feel like things will be going faster, a focus on more important features, more gestures, and slowly perhaps even more openness.

I agree, since Steve's passing, this was the best Apple Keynote I've watched. They seemed really energetic. I'm looking more forward to ios7 than I was ios6. I think the last time I was super excited about an ios was ios4 (although I loved in ios5 the iTunes match feature when it came out).

champ01
Jun 14, 2013, 12:11 PM
The icons are just as bad as the following song:

SRcnnId15BA

donutbagel
Jun 14, 2013, 12:19 PM
She's stuck in 1984.

oliversl
Jun 14, 2013, 12:43 PM
She only likes 2 icon FCOL

The Smyrk
Jun 14, 2013, 01:00 PM
Famed mac icon designer is wrong.

Hahaha, I read this in the Waterboy with Adam Sandler voice and almost spit lunch onto my screen.

Akuratyde
Jun 14, 2013, 01:31 PM
I'm glad somebody with experience finally expressed what I feel.

It amazes me how everybody is so ******* sure of themselves when it comes to design. Like their opinion is the de facto standard for beauty in the world. Get over yourselves.

Not only that, but it also amazes me how many people suddenly seem to be design experts, yet how many of these critics are actually professional designers? Well, I am a professional designer, and while I think there are some inconsistencies and flaws here and there, overall they are moving in the right direction and the sheer volume of hate leveled at these icons is unwarranted.

firedownunder
Jun 14, 2013, 01:39 PM
Much ado about nothing...

jonAppleSeed
Jun 14, 2013, 02:00 PM
Not only that, but it also amazes me how many people suddenly seem to be design experts, yet how many of these critics are actually professional designers? Well, I am a professional designer, and while I think there are some inconsistencies and flaws here and there, overall they are moving in the right direction and the sheer volume of hate leveled at these icons is unwarranted.

iOS is for the masses, not solely for graphic designers.
They can have their own opinions too.

RMo
Jun 14, 2013, 02:22 PM
My theory is that iOS 8 will support vector art icons and move towards a scalable screen resolution environment. It will look sharp at native resolutions no matter what size the display.

This is moving into that direction.

You can do vector art with any color palette...

In fact, I'd be quite surprised if many of the pre-iOS-7 icons weren't (also?) originally designed as vector, then rasterized to appropriate dimensions before inclusion in the final project.

blue22
Jun 14, 2013, 02:37 PM
Theres nothing wrong with the concept of iOS 7s icons, its the execution and finish that is almost non existent thats the problem.

Right direction, wrong road.

Change always hurts.

While the direction and idea behind may be right, what really shocked me was the missing constistency and love for details Apple is somehow known & loved for and which they also started to explicetly promote just now.

I really hate to stress this line, as it's more often wrong than true: but I strongly believe (and hope) that the state, in which they released the new icons, was much too early. I really believe that with Steve Jobs being still alive, this wouldn't have seen the light. There really seems to be somebody missing who dares to say: "Guys, this isn't ready for primetime yet. Get your asses back to the desks."

I don't like her smiling Mac icon, nor do I care for the current Finder icon in OSX. It's no surprise to me that she'd be for the current icons...

..its just the horrid colour scheme I do not like. I want my phone to look cool not like a toy for a two year old.

Colour scheme is for kids, icons look like they were designed for a toddler market. How does a white border around the safari icon constitute as 'good direction'. It looks like they couldn't think of anything or were scared of not having a border around it!

"simple, meaningful symbols that fill a space ... more iconic, less illustrative"

This is exactly the correct mindset and approach for imagery used on buttons in app toolbars, on config panels, etc. You want a clean interface representing the actions the user may invoke. And where iOS 7 uses this approach within apps and system menus, it is admirably simple and elegant.

But the imagery used for the icon of an app itself represents much more than just the action of launching an app. It represents a whole app. It is the first thing which markets an app. It introduces a user to an app and helps the user find it in a sea of apps. It should be memorable. Unique. And this is where iOS 7 fails; it forgets that toolbar icons and app icons are not the same thing and should not follow the same design philosophy.

I think these previous comments sum up accurately (and rightly) the initial first impressions of the new look icons in the upcoming iOS 7 this fall. Hopefully Apple gets to further refine them between now and the fall release of the new OS.

baryon
Jun 14, 2013, 02:59 PM
It's important to not confuse the design direction with the current state of the design. It's possible that one doesn't like the icons, but that doesn't mean Apple has taken the design in the wrong direction.

I feel that iOS 7, overall, have a better, more consistent and nicer-looking design. The use of shapes, colors and the layers all contribute to this. The main idea is this: simpler, less serious-looking and lighter. These are, in my mind, good things for iOS.

However, there are of course many things that don't yet fit. The camera icon, for example, is the most boring icon for one of the most important apps. There are many ways to depict a camera, or a lens, but the generic grey "camera icon" that just looks like Adobe Bridge's "camera import" icon just looks boring, especially for such an exciting app.

Apple tends to make ultra-detailed icons, with often photo-realistic details (look at the OS X icons for Pages, Safari and Mail), which is a huge difference from other companies (Adobe, MS Office, etc…). In OS X, this doesn't look strange or out of place, as OS X is a complex and varied system where inconsistency and varying degrees of detail is absolutely normal.

In iOS, however, things are different, and textures, details, shadows, shines, etc… seem a little too much, and "dishonest" since we're talking about a mobile system, which is meant to be simple, quick and light. Apple understood this and are giving iOS its own personality.

Some things don't yet work perfectly, but I think those things are in minority, and hopefully they'll fix them.

kurosov
Jun 14, 2013, 03:45 PM
I actually really like the new icons, mostly.

It's just that damn safari icon...

They should have either had the blue extend to the entire icon or done something with the white space. As it it it just doesn't look right at all.

tai.michael
Jun 14, 2013, 04:19 PM
Un-famous poster is also wrong.

Opinions on design cannot be right or wrong.

According to Steve Jobs, he believed that design was not subjective but universal, and could be taught.

TheQuestion
Jun 14, 2013, 05:36 PM
According to Steve Jobs, he believed that design was not subjective but universal, and could be taught.

Which is, in fact, an opinion. Just because Steve said it doesn't make it so.

phoenixsan
Jun 14, 2013, 05:47 PM
and nice to read. Finally somebody with knowledge to meaningfully weigh in...:D

:):apple:

bedifferent
Jun 14, 2013, 05:53 PM
Jony Ive had put Apple's marketing team in charge of the look and color palette for the iOS 7 icons, bringing new blood and a fresh perspective to the operating system.

Very smart idea, and it makes sense comparing the iOS 7 color palette and design with past marketing. The iPod banners and ads spring to mind. I would have not thought to bring in the marketing team, but as designers, that's very brilliant.

----------

I actually really like the new icons, mostly.

It's just that damn safari icon...

They should have either had the blue extend to the entire icon or done something with the white space. As it it it just doesn't look right at all.

Contrast is badly needed in iOS, one of the few issues I take with the design. I like the icons, however a little nuance and gradient wouldn't hurt. Using it for a few days, I lowered the brightness a great deal to distinguish lines, etc. from the white backgrounds. Some with bad eyesight have found it difficult to navigate. Overall, I'm loving it.

thekev
Jun 14, 2013, 06:01 PM
Very smart idea, and it makes sense comparing the iOS 7 color palette and design with past marketing. The iPod banners and ads spring to mind. I would have not thought to bring in the marketing team, but as designers, that's very brilliant.

I'm not so big on pastels. It's a personal thing.


Contrast is badly needed in iOS, one of the few issues I take with the design. I like the icons, however a little nuance and gradient wouldn't hurt. Using it for a few days, I lowered the brightness a great deal to distinguish lines, etc. from the white backgrounds. Some with bad eyesight have found it difficult to navigate. Overall, I'm loving it.

I like it when things like that are accomplished through color choices between icons and backgrounds or accompanying shades. You tend to need more contrast between them if the background is too busy, as the icons should stand out. I disliked the way they accomplished it with faked lighting and heavy gradients. In fact if real lighting hit the screen from the angle implied by the icons, it would not make for something very readable. I just prefer direct and distinct in that area, although I would find this perfectly usable.

Akuratyde
Jun 14, 2013, 06:09 PM
iOS is for the masses, not solely for graphic designers.
They can have their own opinions too.

Of course they can, that's not really what I said though, was it?

ScottishCaptain
Jun 14, 2013, 06:25 PM
Not only that, but it also amazes me how many people suddenly seem to be design experts, yet how many of these critics are actually professional designers? Well, I am a professional designer, and while I think there are some inconsistencies and flaws here and there, overall they are moving in the right direction and the sheer volume of hate leveled at these icons is unwarranted.

I happen to be a "professional" designer too.

As another designer said something along the lines of: "I feel as though my design vocabulary has been reduced to a hundred words". Apple has spent the past half decade building high quality software around textures and details. Did they go overboard a bit in iOS 6 and 10.7/10.8? Sure. Does this warrant stripping out EVERYTHING and going with a minimalistic design? No.

Personally, I feel iOS 7 is a seriously hostile move towards those of us who have made a career doing the exact kind of work Apple is now 100% determined to eliminate. Nice, professionally made full colour icons? Forget it, let's go with 5 minute vector icons instead. Nice, professionally made full colour textured applications and innovative user interfaces? Forget it, the future is in white and black with fonts that float around and an unnecessary amount of animation.

Apple will alienate their entire existing developer core with this stuff. Will those of us who leave be replaced with others? Sure. However, this minimalistic style will lead to applications that feel cheap and look cheap. iOS will then suffer as a whole, and this entire house of cards is going to come crashing down.

-SC

bedifferent
Jun 14, 2013, 06:26 PM
I'm not so big on pastels. It's a personal thing.



I like it when things like that are accomplished through color choices between icons and backgrounds or accompanying shades. You tend to need more contrast between them if the background is too busy, as the icons should stand out. I disliked the way they accomplished it with faked lighting and heavy gradients. In fact if real lighting hit the screen from the angle implied by the icons, it would not make for something very readable. I just prefer direct and distinct in that area, although I would find this perfectly usable.

Absolutely agree (esp on pastels :o ). I disliked iOS 5/6 as they were too busy and inconsistent (skeuomorphic design, blah). I prefer the new direction for its simplicity and removal of "gloss", although a little depth/character w/o losing simplicity is important to differentiate text, lines, etc. Example, Notes or Calendar, the white background is very indistinguishable from the subtle gray lines, bars, separators, etc proving difficult to read and enter info. A huge issue is the new keyboard; the subtle differentiation between keys and the keyboard background has made typing difficult, and I'm a fast typer in iOS.

Krevnik
Jun 14, 2013, 06:59 PM
Absolutely agree (esp on pastels :o ). I disliked iOS 5/6 as they were too busy and inconsistent (skeuomorphic design, blah). I prefer the new direction for its simplicity and removal of "gloss", although a little depth/character w/o losing simplicity is important to differentiate text, lines, etc. Example, Notes or Calendar, the white background is very indistinguishable from the subtle gray lines, bars, separators, etc proving difficult to read and enter info. A huge issue is the new keyboard; the subtle differentiation between keys and the keyboard background has made typing difficult, and I'm a fast typer in iOS.

Yeah, I would say that they stripped out a bit too much visual information from the UI, and some of the design has required fracturing the look in order to support it. Hate linen if you want, but it created a consistent background that you could overlay a particular type of text over. The frosted glass style used for the control center and notification center views, along with it's more subtle use elsewhere actually makes it harder to make sure the text is readable in all cases.

I do like the direction, but I would like the pendulum to swing a little back from where it wound up with iOS 7. I was actually thinking closer to something like Google's Maps app for iOS, or a refinement of iOS's roots, similar to how OS X has refined from 10.0-10.6.

juancarloz
Jun 14, 2013, 07:07 PM
The new icons are too simple and the color is too bright and over saturated color and the font is too skinny and harder to read

donutbagel
Jun 14, 2013, 07:17 PM
The new icons are too simple and the color is too bright and over saturated color and the font is too skinny and harder to read

I agree with this. The whole UI is also really inconsistent. In iOS 6, you can go into any part of an app expecting to know exactly what each button does. In iOS 7 beta 1, anything goes.

----------

According to Steve Jobs, he believed that design was not subjective but universal, and could be taught.

I don't agree with Steve Jobs that often, but he was pretty much right about this. Look at classic vs popular/trendy design. 1960s Ferraris are classic and look good to any generation, most people in general. They are objectively designed well. AMC Pacers, most 90s cars, and Priuses are/were trendy but just look terrible now and/or in the future. In fact, I think the Prius is supposed to look bad because futuristic, advanced concept cars always look bad.

Oh yeah, music too. I remember when most people thought that "Boots with the Fur" or whatever was the greatest song ever.

maxosx
Jun 14, 2013, 07:20 PM
"Famed Designer" so what?

My personal preference differs. That's what it's all about.

thekev
Jun 14, 2013, 08:52 PM
Absolutely agree (esp on pastels :o ). I disliked iOS 5/6 as they were too busy and inconsistent (skeuomorphic design, blah). I prefer the new direction for its simplicity and removal of "gloss", although a little depth/character w/o losing simplicity is important to differentiate text, lines, etc. Example, Notes or Calendar, the white background is very indistinguishable from the subtle gray lines, bars, separators, etc proving difficult to read and enter info. A huge issue is the new keyboard; the subtle differentiation between keys and the keyboard background has made typing difficult, and I'm a fast typer in iOS.

I haven't looked over it that closely. I'm just browsing photos. The old one with the glossy finishes reminded me of fake lens flare. I find extremely overt visual cues to be kind of cheesy. It's different with the calendar that you mentioned. Framing elements need to be distinct enough to be useful. They serve a functional purpose. The excess gradients are just to provide a sense of depth, which I dislike. I prefer good juxtaposition of colors, especially those that aren't hostile to common forms of color blindness or old people. Given the clarity of modern displays, things don't have to be terribly overt to be readable and intuitive.

I still hate typing on phones. My fingers aren't large, but it's annoying. Beyond that I don't like to get too sucked into my phone all the time. When they remade Tron, I thought it would have been funny if the main character was instead sucked into a smartphone or iPad:p.

ipedro
Jun 14, 2013, 09:17 PM
"Absolutely no virtual cows were harmed in the making of this interface." -- Craig Federighi

"We ran out of green felt" -- Craig Federighi

Craig has really turned a corner from his sweaty trembly self on his first couple of presentations. Looking forward to seeing him present again. :D

cmanderson
Jun 14, 2013, 09:35 PM
The general concept/artistic direction isn't bad per se, I think it's the execution that's lacking.

I'm all for clean-looking, simple icons, as I think most of us are, the problem is more with the weird color palette, exaggerated gradients with an inconsistent direction and general lack of consistency between the complexity of shapes, the level of flatness and use (or not) of metaphors.

I think it's a good thing Apple has reacted and justified the current icons, it means they are "fixing" things as we speak. In fact, the internal build Apple had when they released the first beta was more advanced than what developers are using today.

The new icons on Apple's website are defenitely better exectuted while keeping the same original design language. I want to see more of that:

Image (https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/2042135/IconsiOS7.png)

It's still far from perfect but changes are made on the right path.

I'm good with the icons, but the newsstand icon looks out of place. It just doesn't fit.

MNT
Jun 14, 2013, 11:37 PM
One person referred to Susan Kare a "he" and another called her "Karen" so this crowd's opinion carries a lot of weight.

a0me
Jun 15, 2013, 12:21 AM
I'm glad somebody with experience finally expressed what I feel.

It amazes me how everybody is so ******* sure of themselves when it comes to design. Like their opinion is the de facto standard for beauty in the world. Get over yourselves. Design is hard. It's also something that one gets better at as one does it more. This is Apple's first stab at a different direction and I think too, that they are going in a cool direction.

To call something downright "ugly" based on your personal taste is bold and usually pretty arrogant, just saying.
Note that she said "generally." I think that most people are also pleased with the new icons, even thought there's a couple of inconsistent, amateurish, ugly ones (yes Safari and Control Center, I'm talking about you).

JediBiker
Jun 15, 2013, 12:29 AM
Ok, so I realize I am just stupid. Yet, I don't understand the need to revert to basic icons for apps. The icons themselves have little impact on the OS, so I don't understand the visual simplification aspect of iOS 7. I have heard it referred to as "flat". I myself prefer graphically pleasing elaborate icons as opposed to super simple 8 bit icons. Why the change? what am i missing, and please accept that I already understand that I am obviously an imbecile, so reinforcement of that fact is unnecessary. Any additional revelations would be appreciated, however. Thank you.

weing
Jun 15, 2013, 12:29 AM
"simplicity, clarity and efficiency..." - Not exactly how I would describe the use of greyscale blacks on white backgrounds and clown-car colors.

petsounds
Jun 15, 2013, 01:47 AM
Ive should've just given the job of designing the icons to Kare. She wrote the book on designing icons that both communicate and entertain. She was being political, but it's obvious she thinks the icons need a lot more work. Hopefully we will see the designs iterate in future betas.

AppleMark
Jun 15, 2013, 04:13 AM
None of this really matters anyway. I am more interested in the functionality, which is an upgrade over the current iOS.

We will all buy the next generation phones and not give it a second thought.

buysp
Jun 15, 2013, 05:07 AM
I really believe that with Steve Jobs being still alive, this wouldn't have seen the light. There really seems to be somebody missing who dares to say: "Guys, this isn't ready for primetime yet. Get your asses back to the desks."

If Steve was still here so would Forstall and we'd be stuck with the best mobile operating system from 2007!
Sorry I think now Apple has a creative license to thrill!
The only way is up now!

thekev
Jun 15, 2013, 05:23 AM
Ok, so I realize I am just stupid. Yet, I don't understand the need to revert to basic icons for apps. The icons themselves have little impact on the OS, so I don't understand the visual simplification aspect of iOS 7. I have heard it referred to as "flat". I myself prefer graphically pleasing elaborate icons as opposed to super simple 8 bit icons. Why the change? what am i missing, and please accept that I already understand that I am obviously an imbecile, so reinforcement of that fact is unnecessary. Any additional revelations would be appreciated, however. Thank you.

I don't think elaborate is always graphically pleasing. It's not difficult to add that kind of faux sheen that many of the prior ones had. If anything overdoing that could be argued as treating their users like imbeciles. This isn't a new opinion for me. I've always been a fan of subdued designs. They're often built to promote obvious differentiation from competing products. I personally dislike it when it gets into weird gloss and excessive gradients. You can do so much through subtle visual cues based on the basic shapes and colors, assuming you account for some variation in cultural training.

Flat often implies lack of volumetric cues. Those aren't any harder to produce anyway. With the prevalence of 3d apps it's not difficult to produce renders for reference using each shape in 3 dimensions as a basis for producing the final artwork. Most younger graphic designers also have some 3d app experience, at the very least something like Cinema 4D.

iGrip
Jun 15, 2013, 06:57 AM
One of the biggest things I felt with iOS was that it felt very static and stiff. While using it every day, and especially where there was heavy skeumorphism, I found myself wanting to use it in a way that seemed like it would/should work in that way, but did not.

That has always been my biggest gripe with iOS. There is usually only one choice: the Apple way or the highway. Me, I chose the highway.

There re a zillion irritating aspects of iOS. Heck - you can't even put the icons where you want them - they always snap to grid.

Let's hope that you are right, and when things "seem like it would/should work in that way" they actually will. But I doubt it. Apple thinks that one way is best, they know what you should want, and if you don't like it, hit the road.

----------

Personally, I quite like the new semi-stripped down look of the icons. I think it reflects exactly what makes Apple work - simplicity. While the more detailed, or illustrative, look of today's icon designs is generally pleasing, there is nothing particularly holy about it, or the look. Agreed, good direction.

I think that their basic paradigm is often wrong. For example, the web browser has an icon showing a compass. WTF? A compass? A compass should be the icon for well, the compass! That's an app, right?

And you are not allowed to use an icon that makes more sense to you, the user. You are only allowed to use the icon that Apple or the dev picked out, no matter if it makes sense to you or not.

Again - Apple's way or the highway. And these days, most people choose the highway. iOS devices are quickly becoming smaller and smaller factors in overall sales. They are losing market share rapidly.

----------

I dislike the new icons. They look if Microsoft hired a guy that recently discovered a paint pot. The new icons are also meaningless. Or do you know what the colored blots stand for? The old icons may look boring, but at least I can suspect what's behind an icon with a photo or an icon with a camera...

Even the old icons were too often meaningless, like using a compass as the icon for a web browser.

----------

Un-famous poster is also wrong.

Opinions on design cannot be right or wrong.

"In my opinion, the best aspect of rococo design is its stark simplicity, while the best aspect of Bauhaus is the rich textures applied to every little detail of everything". Or not...

Webduo
Jun 15, 2013, 09:03 AM
Personally I am a fan of the new look and direction of iOS7 and the icons. Clean.

No5tromo
Jun 15, 2013, 09:37 AM
I'm glad somebody with experience finally expressed what I feel.

It amazes me how everybody is so ******* sure of themselves when it comes to design. Like their opinion is the de facto standard for beauty in the world. Get over yourselves. Design is hard. It's also something that one gets better at as one does it more. This is Apple's first stab at a different direction and I think too, that they are going in a cool direction.

To call something downright "ugly" based on your personal taste is bold and usually pretty arrogant, just saying.

So this lady whose "iconic" design is an icon that looks like a 5 year old did using MS Paint on Windows 3.1 is supposed to be the expert and the large amount of iOS users that are repelled by this Hello-Kitty/unicorn-barf theme are supposed to be clueless about what's aesthetically good?

Let me tell you, it doesn't take an expert to see the excessive use of gradient, the childish color pallet, the lack of uniformity, the confusing icons and the overall lack of character in iOS7. If they were going for "simple" well they did it wrong.

Apple should be more careful when they release something that you're pretty much stuck with and have to look at every day. They're not Fischer Price they're freakin Apple.

mayuka
Jun 15, 2013, 01:43 PM
Even the old icons were too often meaningless, like using a compass as the icon for a web browser.

That's because the webbrowser is called Safari and appeared long before iOS. It made sense to choose a compass as an icon back at the beginnings. The other icons (IE, chrome, netscape, etc.) were and are worse. It is easy to critize, but to come up with some better ideas is not. A surfboard would be nice, hence it symbolizes "surfing the internet"...

You chose a pretty bad example. Let me explain it with a more realistic example: What icon would you choose for an app that shows photos? Well. You would pick an iconic/symbolic view of photos or a photo book, or at least something that reminds you of photos. That's what Apple did with all versions of iOS and also Mac OS prior to iOS 7. Now they changed it to some color blobs. What the heck? How should I know what's behind those color blobs? My first guess would be an app that shows a color palette or an app that let me draw blobs. There are other nondescriptive icons. That of the camera for example.

Don't get me wrong. I'm a big fan of simple and elegant icons. However, they should be descriptive and profound.

cgk.emu
Jun 15, 2013, 03:50 PM
Famed mac icon designer is wrong.

My god, you are FULL of wisdom!! Lead us, oh great one!,


I really hope you never spawn.

sirdir
Jun 15, 2013, 04:10 PM
by the way, was drawing 3d macs and putting smileys on them 'flat' in the 80ies?

stefanski
Jun 15, 2013, 10:59 PM
Well, nothing will create more opinions than having new icons. It's the beauty of designing that it creates many different views as people look at it from all sort of angles. Whether that be personal taste, design principle and technique or simply taking the nay sayer approach to anything new. Nobody will ever create something that's going to be loved by everybody and that can hardly be the aim of it anyway. Designs and in particular NEW designs are always meant to push new boundaries and to introduce something new like we see with the new font being used in iOS7. In the end the user interface is just that. So it is important even though it doesn't offer any functionality itself. It is what makes or brakes it for the consumer.

I've installed it and I tried to like it but I somehow can't quite get my head around these icons either. They seem to lack a bit of consistency or the consistency they have is too wide for my taste. At least the icons produced by Apple should have a common theme so that the main screen on my phone looks somewhat "in tune". Yes, they are flat but that's about it. Somebody used the description "clown car colour" and that's not too far off the mark. I never liked the iOS6 icons either and the new ones are better but still a bit too wide spread across the colour pallet for my taste. Well, who knows. Things may still change. I would love to see a choice you can pick in the settings like the wallpapers. A set of flat & greyscale icons would probably be my choice compared to the current sea of colours.

Just keep in mind that satisfying millions of users will all sorts of wild tastes probably would take a looooong time whether Steve would still be alive or not. :)

iGrip
Jun 16, 2013, 06:46 AM
That's because the webbrowser is called Safari and appeared long before iOS. It made sense to choose a compass as an icon back at the beginnings.

The fact that the web browser has a bad name is hardly justification for giving it a bad icon, and how does a compass evoke "safari" anyways?

An elephant with a howdah would have been more evocative of a safari, eh bwana?

And yes, I agree with you about the others. One is a bunch of colored blobs. One is three colored dots, and another is a bunch of overlapping colored circles. I have no freaking idea of what any of thee three are supposed to be. They evoke noting. Bubbles? Dots? The NBC Peacock? Huh?

ValSalva
Jun 16, 2013, 07:01 AM
The fact that the web browser has a bad name is hardly justification for giving it a bad icon, and how does a compass evoke "safari" anyways?

An elephant with a howdah would have been more evocative of a safari, eh bwana?

And yes, I agree with you about the others. One is a bunch of colored blobs. One is three colored dots, and another is a bunch of overlapping colored circles. I have no freaking idea of what any of thee three are supposed to be. They evoke noting. Bubbles? Dots? The NBC Peacock? Huh?

I always thought Safari was a pretty good name. It's like Safari took you on a figurative safari through the big world wide web. It was your compass and guide through the morass of the internet.

NBC Peacock :D I thought the exact same thing. The bubbles, blobs, dots, and globules of jello do nothing for me either.

gnasher729
Jun 16, 2013, 07:26 AM
Watch some of the developer videos in the WWDC app and you can clearly tell Apple software guys are exited. Makes you wonder how many of them have wanted change for a while now. And how much Forstall was holding it back, possibly due to slavish loyalty to Steve. There were rumors that he would frequently play the "Steve wouldn't want that" or "Steve wouldn't like that" card. I get the sense now that he's gone the rest of the executive team is doing what they think is right rather than being hamstrung by trying to do what they think Steve would want.

iTunes 11.0 is the last Forstall version. And it was rubbish. Since then, every new version has been an improvement. It feels like a bunch of developers were given the single instruction "make it better".

iGrip
Jun 16, 2013, 08:36 AM
I always thought Safari was a pretty good name. It's like Safari took you on a figurative safari through the big world wide web. It was your compass and guide through the morass of the internet.

NBC Peacock :D I thought the exact same thing. The bubbles, blobs, dots, and globules of jello do nothing for me either.

And the one with the three colored stripes, one with an airplane, one with a movie camera and one with a teacup: what the heck is that supposed to be? What sort of a program is that associated with?

I think that the icons, for the most part, suck really bad. They are meaningless (which is exactly the opposite of what an icon is supposed to be) and ugly. The Easter-egg colors are questionable, at best, while the iconography is devoid of meaning.

----------

I get the sense now that he's gone the rest of the executive team is doing what they think is right rather than being hamstrung by trying to do what they think Steve would want.



Apple 2.0: The genius has left the building.

People can say all the nasty crap they want about Steve Jobs, how he was a failure as a human being, how he abandoned his infant daughter, how you could not believe a word he ever said. But you really have to give him credit as a masterful huckster: nobody knew how to take money out of the pockets of regular people and send it to the Hedge Funds like Steve Jobs. He was masterful at selling hunks of plastic and copper, for huge prices, to people who thought that shelling out dollars made them cool.

No CEO of any megacorporation in the history of the world could turn a buck like Steve Jobs. Nobody.

topper24hours
Jun 16, 2013, 09:02 AM
That has always been my biggest gripe with iOS. There is usually only one choice: the Apple way or the highway. Me, I chose the highway.

Let's hope that you are right, and when things "seem like it would/should work in that way" they actually will. But I doubt it. Apple thinks that one way is best, they know what you should want, and if you don't like it, hit the road.

----------



I think that their basic paradigm is often wrong. For example, the web browser has an icon showing a compass. WTF? A compass? A compass should be the icon for well, the compass! That's an app, right?

And you are not allowed to use an icon that makes more sense to you, the user. You are only allowed to use the icon that Apple or the dev picked out, no matter if it makes sense to you or not.

Again - Apple's way or the highway. And these days, most people choose the highway. iOS devices are quickly becoming smaller and smaller factors in overall sales. They are losing market share rapidly.

----------


So... since I had my Galaxy Nexus running Jelly Bean straight from Google there has been a change & now users can choose their own icons for Android apps?? Oh.. no? Ok, I thought maybe you had a point there for a second...

sunspot42
Jun 16, 2013, 05:17 PM
Contrast is badly needed in iOS, one of the few issues I take with the design. I like the icons, however a little nuance and gradient wouldn't hurt. Using it for a few days, I lowered the brightness a great deal to distinguish lines, etc. from the white backgrounds.

If the new interface looks better with reduced brightness, it's possible Apple designed it that way. Lowering screen brightness extends battery life, so designing the interface to look good at reduced brightness levels would be a pretty smart thing to do...

----------

So this lady whose "iconic" design is an icon that looks like a 5 year old did using MS Paint on Windows 3.1 is supposed to be the expert and the large amount of iOS users that are repelled by this Hello-Kitty/unicorn-barf theme are supposed to be clueless about what's aesthetically good?

You do realize she designed those icons a couple of years before any version of Windows even existed, right? The Mac was the first widely-available GUI-equipped computer, and everybody and their brother copied the Mac's icons for their own knockoff's of the Mac (GEM, Windows, GEOS, etc. etc.). Those icons are still perfectly functional to this day - in fact, the original Mac's desktop is a lot easier to navigate than the cluttered desktops of most modern systems, even though it's a monochrome display.

Jobs was actually responsible for two revolutions in desktop UI's. After the Mac came out a slew of operating systems followed that looked just like it. Then when he introduced the NeXT in 1988, sure enough within a few years every OS looked just like that, too (especially Windows 95, which was late to the party even by Micro$loth's pathetic standards - hell, Atari and Commodore had already gotten there by that point, and they were broke).

mayuka
Jun 16, 2013, 11:52 PM
Jobs was actually responsible for two revolutions in desktop UI's. After the Mac came out a slew of operating systems followed that looked just like it. Then when he introduced the NeXT in 1988, sure enough within a few years every OS looked just like that, too (especially Windows 95, which was late to the party even by Micro$loth's pathetic standards - hell, Atari and Commodore had already gotten there by that point, and they were broke).

Are you sure? Windows 95 borrowed heavily from Mac OS 8 (or was it version 7 then?). NeXTstep was quite different than the competitors. Minimizing a program produced an enourmous block for example, many menu entries and symbols were more a precursor to what has become Mac OS X 10.0.

benjalamelami
Jun 17, 2013, 12:23 AM
To be fair... kara.com has some logos on the website. Don't see anything that I would use for anything.

rGiskard
Jun 17, 2013, 12:56 AM
Totally agree about them being a good direction. I was never a fan of the photorealistic icons that started with OS X. An icon should be just that: iconic. A simple graphic representation. iOS 7 strives towards this, and it's a good thing IMO.

Unfortunatley I can believe that marketing was responsible for the icons, because many of them lack any functional meaning at all. They are pretty designs that catch the eye, but half of them I wouldn't bet any amount of money that I could figure out what pressing them will make happen. That's bad design regardless of how pretty the icon looks.

But the new direction is great since iOS 6 icons were nothing to write home about. Some were very good, some ok, most of them were too busy. I can't wait to try iOS 7 so I can form a better opinion of the new icons, but so far they look promising.

To nitpick, the colored blobs are meaningless, they have no place as icons. The one with the tiny icons within icons for airplanes, movies, and coffee is a weird mix of simple yet busy, needs too much squinting to ascertain its meaning. Steve Jobs would have said in his black/white way: "these are 5h1T, redo them". Apparently there is nobody at Apple to say "these aren't ready, keep working".

rGiskard
Jun 17, 2013, 01:08 AM
People can say all the nasty crap they want about Steve Jobs, how he was a failure as a human being, how he abandoned his infant daughter, how you could not believe a word he ever said. But you really have to give him credit as a masterful huckster: nobody knew how to take money out of the pockets of regular people and send it to the Hedge Funds like Steve Jobs. He was masterful at selling hunks of plastic and copper, for huge prices, to people who thought that shelling out dollars made them cool.

No CEO of any megacorporation in the history of the world could turn a buck like Steve Jobs. Nobody.

A huckster? Jobs's talent was in putting together teams of "A Players" and driving them to excell that their highest possible level. He had a amazing artistic sense for a non-artist, and his intuitive understanding of technology was rivaled by none. Yes, he made a crap-ton of money, but he was about much more than that.

In any event, other CEOs have probably surpassed Jobs when it comes to making a buck. Carnegi and JP Morgan come to mind. Today's oil companies can turn a buck in their sleep. And for most of Apple's history, making money was pretty much the opposite of what they were associated with, even with Jobs at the helm. Apple was plenty awesome then - perhaps even moreso than now.

I find it interesting that Jobs would always find true creative geniuses like Wozniak, Tevanian, and Lasseter, and use his social skills and marketing savvy to help them achieve greatness. Often he stuck with these people through business failures before finding success, which shows an incredible ability to judge the potetial of others. I believe Jobs was about as far from a huckster as one could be.

Northgrove
Jun 17, 2013, 04:11 AM
Idk some are ok but some are pretty ugly in my eyes. I know I'm not the best icon creator and I know what they were going for but they missed a few times here's hoping they change a few before release.
True, but she's only commenting on the direction. This isn't about what's in iOS 7 Beta 1 icon per icon, but the cleaner designs in general.

With the earlier comments from Apple that the Beta 1 icons aren't final work, I have high hopes for the final release of iOS 7. They're clearly listening (or they wouldn't make a defensive comment / reminder like that). I think I can see a good foundation here, although many icons are in need of polish.

mumph
Jun 17, 2013, 04:30 AM
"meaningful" ???!!!!

As well as looking crap, half of them are not descriptive at all. Gamecentre being one of them.

What is square, with rounded corners and quite clearly represents 'gaming' a freaking DICE!!!! C'mon Apple. You cant get any more simple than 3 or 5 dots to represent a dice. Instead we get 3D multi-coloured bubbles on a supposedly 'flat simplified' design.

attila
Jun 17, 2013, 04:49 AM
My theory is that iOS 8 will support vector art icons and move towards a scalable screen resolution environment. It will look sharp at native resolutions no matter what size the display.

This is moving into that direction.

The higher detail icons from iOS6 can easily be reproduced using 'vector art'.

I'm sure all icons actually were designed using vectors to more easily export variations for different screen resolutions.

bedifferent
Jun 17, 2013, 10:31 AM
If the new interface looks better with reduced brightness, it's possible Apple designed it that way. Lowering screen brightness extends battery life, so designing the interface to look good at reduced brightness levels would be a pretty smart thing to do.

That's something I considered, and makes sense. Yet even less than half the brightness it's still indiscernible in many area's. I let my mother use it, she's in her late 60's and has an iPhone. She had some difficulty, this could prove problematic for certain age demographics.

iGrip
Jun 17, 2013, 10:55 AM
A huckster? Jobs's talent was in putting together teams of "A Players" and driving them to excell that their highest possible level. He had a amazing artistic sense for a non-artist, and his intuitive understanding of technology was rivaled by none. Yes, he made a crap-ton of money, but he was about much more than that.

In any event, other CEOs have probably surpassed Jobs when it comes to making a buck. Carnegi and JP Morgan come to mind. Today's oil companies can turn a buck in their sleep. And for most of Apple's history, making money was pretty much the opposite of what they were associated with, even with Jobs at the helm. Apple was plenty awesome then - perhaps even moreso than now.

I find it interesting that Jobs would always find true creative geniuses like Wozniak, Tevanian, and Lasseter, and use his social skills and marketing savvy to help them achieve greatness. Often he stuck with these people through business failures before finding success, which shows an incredible ability to judge the potetial of others. I believe Jobs was about as far from a huckster as one could be.

I stand by what I said:

"nobody knew how to take money out of the pockets of regular people and send it to the Hedge Funds like Steve Jobs. He was masterful at selling hunks of plastic and copper, for huge prices, to people who thought that shelling out dollars made them cool. "


The things you mention, while true, were mere methods leading towards the real goal: making money.

Woz wanted to make a cool computer. Jobs wanted to sell it.

dBeats
Jun 17, 2013, 11:20 AM
I think some of the icons are a head fake. They'll be changed at the last minute so that all the new icons on Touch Wiz will look like the older ones. I'm sure a new internal memo is going out at Samsung and the photocopiers are set on turbo...

rGiskard
Jun 17, 2013, 02:05 PM
I stand by what I said:

"nobody knew how to take money out of the pockets of regular people and send it to the Hedge Funds like Steve Jobs. He was masterful at selling hunks of plastic and copper, for huge prices, to people who thought that shelling out dollars made them cool. "


The things you mention, while true, were mere methods leading towards the real goal: making money.

Woz wanted to make a cool computer. Jobs wanted to sell it.

No doubt he wanted to make money. I just took issue with him being characterized as a huckster, who by definition sells things of questionable value. Nothing could be further from the truth regarding Jobs.