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MacRumors
Jul 9, 2013, 04:51 PM
http://images.macrumors.com/im/macrumorsthreadlogo.gif (http://www.macrumors.com/2013/07/09/dropbox-announces-sync-api-for-third-party-developers/)


http://images.macrumors.com/article-new/2013/07/NewImage3.pngDropbox has announced a new advanced syncing API (https://www.dropbox.com/developers/blog/43/the-datastore-api-a-new-way-to-store-and-sync-app-data) for developers that uses Dropbox technology to sync app data across devices.

The Datastore API is an extension of the existing Dropbox Sync API that allows developers to save files on Dropbox. With Datastore, developers can sync databases -- game saves or custom levels, for example -- across multiple devices and platforms, saving developers from needing to develop their own sync platforms.
Today, we're excited for you try out the beta release of the Datastore API -- simple databases for your apps with Dropbox sync built-in! Use datastores to save your app's data -- settings, contacts, or any other content that users create -- and Dropbox will take care of all the syncing for you. People who use your Datastore-enabled app can be sure their information will always be up-to-date and available, no matter what device or platform they use.Dropbox CEO Drew Houston said during a Q&A with reporters (http://techcrunch.com/2013/07/09/dropbox-says-it-has-no-plans-to-charge-developers-or-otherwise-change-its-business-model/) that there is no plan to change its business model, and it doesn't want to charge developers to use its sync platform.
"We've never taken money from developers and we don't have any plans to," Houston said. That doesn't necessarily mean that Dropbox will never, ever do it ("It's conceivable that there would be services in the future where there would be some cost associated with the developer"), but he added, "Because we have a strong core business model, I don't think that monetizing developers will be an important thing for us for the foreseeable future."

Article Link: Dropbox Announces Sync API for Third-Party Developers (http://www.macrumors.com/2013/07/09/dropbox-announces-sync-api-for-third-party-developers/)



wsc9005
Jul 9, 2013, 04:54 PM
It's nice to have iCloud alternative :p

Radio
Jul 9, 2013, 05:10 PM
Great news

Cross platform functionality and will no doubt work better than iCloud.


iCloud has been a failure for app makers.

JGIGS
Jul 9, 2013, 05:24 PM
Great now finish creating an android app and mac app or web based app (prefer web based) so I can consider going back to an Android device again. Ooops was that out loud?

donutbagel
Jul 9, 2013, 05:55 PM
Nice pressure on iCloud so it gets into shape. When I first heard of Dropbox when it first came out, I thought it was too good to be true. Dropbox is the king of cross-platform! It's saved me so much time over using flash drives that I feel a little bad for using the free version.

Razeus
Jul 9, 2013, 06:05 PM
Great now finish creating an android app and mac app or web based app (prefer web based) so I can consider going back to an Android device again. Ooops was that out loud?

Dropbox already has an Android app.

ValSalva
Jul 9, 2013, 06:05 PM
IMHO, over the past five years the biggest advances in desktop computing have been Dropbox, Quad-core processors, and SSDs. Dropbox has changed the way I manage my data in a profound way. It's great to see them succeed.

HiRez
Jul 9, 2013, 06:17 PM
Confused on how this works. Is it using the developer's account, or the user's account? How do you (the user of my app) sign in to use it? Is the user required to download the Dropbox app? Do they need a Dropbox account? What about multiple users on the same device?

This sounds great if it's something that works transparently with no user action, but somehow the user needs to be identified so you can sync their stuff across devices, right? With iCloud, that's pretty easy since pretty much everyone using an iOS device has an iCloud account which is logged in full-time on the device.

----------

iCloud has been a failure for app makers.
Well, it depends on what you're doing with it. I found iCloud works very well for storing and syncing simple game data. It's when you're trying to use it to sync CoreData-enabled databases that things fall apart.

nutmac
Jul 9, 2013, 06:34 PM
It is worth noting that app can store up to 10MB data and 1,000 entries on each Dropbox user's datastore. Data will count toward user's storage limit and user can remove and clear app's data as desired.

And their new drop-in API should help developers use Dropbox as a file system, although I find search to be rather lacking.

All in all, Dropbox's datastore API seems cleaner than iCloud (while being cross platform), but it remains to be seen how much more reliable it will be.

Skika
Jul 9, 2013, 07:02 PM
Great now finish creating an android app and mac app or web based app (prefer web based) so I can consider going back to an Android device again. Ooops was that out loud?

Am i missing something but doesn't Dropbox already have all of those for quite a while :confused:

BlaqkAudio
Jul 9, 2013, 07:19 PM
Great now finish creating an android app
Already exists.
and mac app
Already exists.
or web based app (prefer web based)
Already exists.
so I can consider going back to an Android device again. Ooops was that out loud?
These have all existed for years. Maybe you should do basic research before you complain.

jonnysods
Jul 9, 2013, 07:41 PM
Dropbox is superior to icloud IMO.

kirky29
Jul 9, 2013, 08:27 PM
IMHO, over the past five years the biggest advances in desktop computing have been Dropbox, Quad-core processors, and SSDs. Dropbox has changed the way I manage my data in a profound way. It's great to see them succeed.

Couldn't agree anymore with Dropbox. Couldn't imagine not having it.

gotluck
Jul 9, 2013, 08:58 PM
Mailbox app also now has dropbox integration in iOS. Yes, dropbox is awesome.

SilverWiz
Jul 9, 2013, 09:16 PM
It is worth noting that app can store up to 10MB data and 1,000 entries on each Dropbox user's datastore. Data will count toward user's storage limit and user can remove and clear app's data as desired.


Where did you find the information about those limits? It's interesting, but I can't find it on their website...

SandPebble
Jul 9, 2013, 09:32 PM
For my needs, Google drive suffices.

JGIGS
Jul 9, 2013, 10:50 PM
Already exists.

Already exists.

Already exists.

These have all existed for years. Maybe you should do basic research before you complain.

My bad. Could have sworn this article was originally about their mailbox app now being able to attach directly from your Dropbox account which came out today. I was referring to the Mailbox app.

ThunderSkunk
Jul 9, 2013, 11:52 PM
I love dropbox, but man is the iOS app ever useless.

And if they're gonna disable sharing links to your files once you actually start using the service, I wish there were an intermediate purchase option.

But I look forward to seeing this API implemented.

nutmac
Jul 10, 2013, 12:11 AM
Where did you find the information about those limits? It's interesting, but I can't find it on their website...

I was at the Dropbox Developer Conference where the announcement was made.

Terrin
Jul 10, 2013, 06:05 AM
IMHO, over the past five years the biggest advances in desktop computing have been Dropbox, Quad-core processors, and SSDs. Dropbox has changed the way I manage my data in a profound way. It's great to see them succeed.


I honestly do not see it being much different than Apple's original iDisk minus the automatic syncing. IDisk allowed you to share files among multiple platforms.

ValSalva
Jul 10, 2013, 06:57 AM
I honestly do not see it being much different than Apple's original iDisk minus the automatic syncing. IDisk allowed you to share files among multiple platforms.

I used to exclusively use (and still do for backups) Amazon S3 and Jungle Disk. It's like iDisk in a way except it's faster and more reliable.

But when faster, almost completely reliable, and push syncing are combined in Dropbox, it is truly transformative. At least it is for me.

numlock
Jul 10, 2013, 07:19 AM
I honestly do not see it being much different than Apple's original iDisk minus the automatic syncing. IDisk allowed you to share files among multiple platforms.

that description of dropbox is about as vague as the ones found in apples patents

bpcookson
Jul 10, 2013, 06:28 PM
This is really exciting. The last thing I need, as a noob developer, is to have to figure out how to set up a server.

I'll be curious to know if the data stored through this API can be communicated between unique Apple ID accounts, or if it is only available to the data owner.

skippymac
Jul 11, 2013, 08:14 AM
I am under the (possibly incorrect) impression that currently I can't set up a dropbox folder on my headless raspberry pi running raspbian (ARM debian). Am I right in thinking that this may make it possible/easier?

roadbloc
Jul 11, 2013, 08:22 AM
Too bad iCloud dropped the ball. Dropbox, Google Drive and SkyDrive are all lightyears ahead.

jr1089
Jul 15, 2013, 12:08 AM
I am under the (possibly incorrect) impression that currently I can't set up a dropbox folder on my headless raspberry pi running raspbian (ARM debian). Am I right in thinking that this may make it possible/easier?

Have you tried installing the Debian 32 bit version ?
https://www.dropbox.com/install?os=lnx

alent1234
Jul 15, 2013, 07:31 AM
Too bad iCloud dropped the ball. Dropbox, Google Drive and SkyDrive are all lightyears ahead.


Can you back up your iPhone to Dropbox?
No?

Renzatic
Jul 15, 2013, 07:33 AM
Can you back up your iPhone to Dropbox?
No?

What does that have to do with anything?

alent1234
Jul 15, 2013, 07:34 AM
What does that have to do with anything?


Dropbox is nice, but its not better than iCloud
Two different kinds of services

roadbloc
Jul 15, 2013, 08:39 AM
Can you back up your iPhone to Dropbox?
No?

If Apple allowed a visible filesystem on the iPhone then people probably could. Hardly a Dropbox limitation.