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l0zo
Nov 13, 2005, 04:15 AM
I always seem to use photoshop, but it isn't very good for vector images, or having see through background im never sur ehow to save my logo without it have a white background!

Help please!



redeye be
Nov 13, 2005, 04:25 AM
I always seem to use photoshop, but it isn't very good for vector images, or having see through background im never sur ehow to save my logo without it have a white background!

Help please!
use illustrator for vector images

gif files preserve transparency

The app you should use depends on the result you want to get...

Blue Velvet
Nov 13, 2005, 04:51 AM
Illustrator or Freehand are the two apps best for logo designing.

An EPS produced from either of those two programs will not have a white background unless you put one in yourself.

It's best to work on it in B&W first, then introduce colour when you're sure all elements will work on different media and in different sizes.

Seasought
Nov 13, 2005, 10:27 AM
I'll also cast my vote for Illustrator.

I'm not sure if I'm quite understanding your post properly, but if you're having issues with saving images with a transparent background you'll want to look at File--->Save for Web, select GIF, select white (or whatever color you want transparent) then select the transparency icon (will update your image when you hit it).

If you weren't asking about this, feel free to ignore my advice :) .

ipacmm
Nov 13, 2005, 07:27 PM
I also vote Illustrator, it works really good for creating logos.

Mr. Anderson
Nov 13, 2005, 07:34 PM
What Blue Velvet said :D

B&W allows you to get the *icon* effect for the logo without worrying about what the colors are. And at some point most logos will end up B&W or limited color, so its good to know what it looks like in a simple graphic.

The other thing is that Macromedia (Freehand) was bought out by Adobe (Illustrator) so Freehand's future is somewhat questionable. If you haven't used either app, go with Illustrator.

D

speleoterra
Nov 13, 2005, 07:43 PM
Freehand is WAY more intuitive that Illustrator, as i was trained on both. It is more "Mac" in interface that Illustrator is more PC in thought. Both are good though, too bad Adobe will probably kill Freehand.

Lacero
Nov 13, 2005, 07:48 PM
You can use the Path tools in Photoshop to design logos. Export as an EPS file. Problem solved. :)

ATD
Nov 13, 2005, 10:44 PM
For me it's always Illustrator first. Even if the logo is only going to be used in animation and/or 3D, it still starts with a B&W Illustrator file first.

cgratti
Nov 15, 2005, 09:30 PM
Illustrator.. never photoshop...

p0intblank
Nov 18, 2005, 12:57 AM
Definitely Illustrator; there's no better application. :)

XNine
Nov 18, 2005, 11:46 AM
Illustrator or Freehand are the two apps best for logo designing.

An EPS produced from either of those two programs will not have a white background unless you put one in yourself.

It's best to work on it in B&W first, then introduce colour when you're sure all elements will work on different media and in different sizes.


Ah, and so the old saying goes: "If it doesn't look good in black and white it won't look good in color."

makisushi
Nov 18, 2005, 11:53 AM
Freehand is WAY more intuitive that Illustrator, as i was trained on both. It is more "Mac" in interface that Illustrator is more PC in thought. Both are good though, too bad Adobe will probably kill Freehand.
DING! DING!
I prefer Freehand over Illustrator. In college, we used Illustrator. I didn't really even know much about freehand. When I got out of school and into the "real" design world, the firm I worked for used Freehand. It didn't take me long to learn it, and I was suprised at how much easier it was to do things. If Adobe decides to can Freehand, I only hope they have the foresight to reconize the short comings of Illustrator and meld the Freehand features into it.

joepunk
Nov 18, 2005, 12:33 PM
I like Freehand as I can have many pages in one document. I actually use both Freehand and Illustrator.

fradac
Nov 18, 2005, 01:54 PM
illustrator all the way, here is one i made recently. its png format so transparent background

xli_ne
Nov 18, 2005, 02:08 PM
illustrator on the mac. if pc then i really like corel draw as well, but you can't go wrong with illustrator.

OutThere
Nov 18, 2005, 02:53 PM
Stay away from saving as GIF files...they're lossy and ugly, and while they're small, they can't touch PNG or EPS (both with transparency). If you're going to print, most of the time you'll be going to EPS, and if you're going online you'll probably want to use PNG.

eclipse
Nov 18, 2005, 10:12 PM
Illustrator because you get it in CS2. ;)

I mean, does CS2 have everything you need or what?

Sirus The Virus
Nov 18, 2005, 10:20 PM
Illustrator.

eclipse
Nov 18, 2005, 10:26 PM
Is Sirus the Virus a novel character?

Anyway, I agree. Go Illustrator!

Err
Nov 18, 2005, 10:39 PM
crayons and napkins are where my best work comes from

eclipse
Nov 18, 2005, 10:42 PM
Ha! You remind me of my wife.

She's the designer, my "Master"... I am her sworn apprentice and so have to learn Quark even though I like buying CS2 and knowing I have EVERYTHING NECESSARY! :mad:

I am still going to have to buy Quark... and it's even more expensive here in Australia. :(

radiantm3
Nov 20, 2005, 02:39 PM
Stay away from saving as GIF files...they're lossy and ugly, and while they're small, they can't touch PNG or EPS (both with transparency). If you're going to print, most of the time you'll be going to EPS, and if you're going online you'll probably want to use PNG.

You are somewhat wrong. PNG files are great, but they still don't have complete support. The colors shift on older browsers and alpha channels don't work in IE (natively). GIFs and JPGs are still the way to go until PNG becomes widely accepted. I only use png if I need an alpha channel or if a gif doesn't look good enough. Most of the time it is sufficient.

iGary
Nov 20, 2005, 02:57 PM
Corel Draw, definitely. :p :eek:

eclipse
Nov 20, 2005, 05:26 PM
You are somewhat wrong. PNG files are great, but they still don't have complete support. The colors shift on older browsers and alpha channels don't work in IE (natively). GIFs and JPGs are still the way to go until PNG becomes widely accepted. I only use png if I need an alpha channel or if a gif doesn't look good enough. Most of the time it is sufficient.

Sorry, I'm very new to all this and would love to learn some of the terminology to impress my designer wife. What on earth are you talking about? In English please? :o

eclipse
Nov 20, 2005, 05:33 PM
oops... how do I delete this?

joe_gibb
Nov 23, 2005, 07:53 AM
Another vote for Illustrator from me. However they're much of a muchness so if you can use one vector drawing package its pretty easy to swap to another.

Joe.

YS2003
Jan 31, 2006, 05:56 AM
I have CS2 Standard for my PowerBooks. Since I have a new Tablet PC, I am interested in installing some graphics/design program on that PC as well. I like CS2 (I have been going through many instruction books as I have completed the Adobe's book while back). But, the price for CS2 is rather high (around $700 to $900 depending on the vendor).

I heard Corel Draw Graphics Suites 12 provides the similar features and capabilities as Adobe CS2. Can someone comment on the main difference on CS2 and Corel Draw Suites 12 from the perspective of the daily practical usage. Also, how is the learning curve to get the hang of Corel Draw 12 (if you are using CS2).

Blue Velvet
Jan 31, 2006, 06:08 AM
I heard Corel Draw Graphics Suites 12 provides the similar features and capabilities as Adobe CS2.


Just as a side-note, there's a new version out: CorelDraw Graphics Suite X3

I'm just doing a promo flyer at the moment for Corel and have just had to amend it for the new products. The other is WordPerfect Office X3.

Of course, I'm doing this flyer with Quark 6.5 and Adobe CS. :p

But to quote their inflated blurb:

CorelDRAW is used as a standard tool in education for all sorts of drawing and artwork. Users can confidently tackle a variety of projects from logo creation and web graphics, to multi-page marketing brochures and signs. With enhanced illustration, page layout, photo editing, powerful bitmap-to-vector tracing, and new learning tools, this integrated suite delivers the ultimate combination of superior design capabilities, speed, ease-of-use and affordability that cannot be matched by any other graphics software.

:D

YS2003
Jan 31, 2006, 06:26 AM
Good find, Blue Velvet. Does CorelDraw Graphics Suite X3 work well with CS2 (Photoshop, Illustrator, and InDesign)?

I am thinking about using the graphics programs such as CorelDraw X3 for my Tablet PC/Win XP Pro Tablet Edition (using a digitizer pen to write directly on the screen); then, I will transfer that graphics works to my Mac (running OS X 10.4.4) to imbed into the InDesign works. Or, for one page poster or flyer, then, I think I can just use CorelDraw X3 (possibly after importing a few Photoshops files from my Mac).

PS. I wanted to get the Tablet Mac if Apple makes it..... Since no Tablet from Apple, I had to go with this tablet PC.....Cross platforms are getting complicated (Windows, Mac, Adobe, Corel...... to make one graphics/design work)

Blue Velvet
Jan 31, 2006, 06:59 AM
Good find, Blue Velvet. Does CorelDraw Graphics Suite X3 work well with CS2 (Photoshop, Illustrator, and InDesign)?

I have no idea I'm just involved in doing some of their UK promotions.

I wouldn't dream of using something other than Adobe CS. Painter looks slightly intriguing though.

reh
Jan 31, 2006, 12:51 PM
Inkscape (http://www.inkscape.org/) is a decent free vector application. (requires X11)

CanadaRAM
Jan 31, 2006, 01:05 PM
I heard Corel Draw Graphics Suites 12 provides the similar features and capabilities as Adobe CS2. Can someone comment on the main difference on CS2 and Corel Draw Suites 12 from the perspective of the daily practical usage. Also, how is the learning curve to get the hang of Corel Draw 12 (if you are using CS2).
You know that the Corel suite is Windows only, right? They discontinued Mac support on Corel Draw some years ago. So add Windows to the 'ease of use' curve.

eclipse
Jan 31, 2006, 02:29 PM
Blargh!
There's just no way something like Corel appeals to me.
Surely open source must be better by now than Corel?

frankblundt
Jan 31, 2006, 03:18 PM
Freehand definitely. I find Illustrator very counter-intuitive to work with in comparison but mainly because i use it mostly for laying up cd artwork and being able to have five pages in three different sizes in the same document is invaluable.

stevep
Jan 31, 2006, 03:36 PM
Although I use Illustrator, I find it hard to forgive the stupidly unclear display of paths, nodes and handles when drawing curves with the pen tool. Illustrator needs a massive 'usability' overhaul - and the Adobe developers need to look at Xara to see how the pen tool should be implemented.
Its such a shame when Adobe can make such a good job with InDesign after only 3 or 4 versions, and Illustrator is now on v.10 (11? 12? lost count!).

evilernie
Jan 31, 2006, 04:05 PM
I've been using Illustrator since Illustrator 88 (as in 1988). It is the only way to go for me. I was trained on Freehand in college and it was horrible, Illustrator was so much better. I switched and never looked back.

aboutthat
Jan 31, 2006, 04:19 PM
Chalk up another vote for Illustrator. Back in the day, before I knew any better, I used to use Photoshop for *everything*...whoops...

eclipse
Jan 31, 2006, 04:58 PM
Freehand definitely. I find Illustrator very counter-intuitive to work with in comparison but mainly because i use it mostly for laying up cd artwork and being able to have five pages in three different sizes in the same document is invaluable.

Doesn't Illustrator do that?

frankblundt
Jan 31, 2006, 06:03 PM
Doesn't Illustrator do that?
i started using version 88 and have had reasonable contact with it off an on through all the versions up to CS2 but i've never noticed that feature coming in, i'm probably just not experienced enough with (and too confused by) it to get the best out of it..
but then my needs are pretty simple, mostly laying up images and type rather than logo design etc, which is why i always liked Freehand (esp. v.8), it just worked, didn't cloud what you were trying to do in feature bloat or a whole lot of filters that caused more pain than joy (working in pre-press, Corel was always a nightmare for this).
I still can't work out what Illustrator is on about with its two node tools, and although it's got better in recent versions, working with imported images has always seemed easier and better supported in Freehand.
Not to mention that Ills 9 and 10 were such a dog's breakfast that most of the people i know who used it went back to v.8!

frankblundt
Jan 31, 2006, 06:22 PM
and there's more... i think Ill was (and still is) intended more as an app for doing things like logos and graphic elements in, which you then saved/exported and layed up or incorporated into your documents using another program, like Quark or InDesign (anyone remember Pagemaker?). Which is why its layup and pre-press functions were always so crap (like Photoshop).

Freehand was more standalone in its approach, which is why i expect now that Adobe has bought Freehand, they'll kill it off and keep Ill, forcing you in effect to buy the suite of apps so you can do your layup in InDesign.
Which i'd find upsetting. Still maybe someone else will buy the rights and keep it on, like last time when Adobe bought Aldus, dumped Freehand, which was then carried on by Macromedia, who've now been bought by Adobe....

a little off-topic, but does anyone know if Ill/InDesign lets you do pages of differing sizes in a single document? cd's are a pain like this with the booklet, tray and disc all having different specs but usually also sharing design elements.

Blue Velvet
Jan 31, 2006, 06:39 PM
...a little off-topic, but does anyone know if Ill/InDesign lets you do pages of differing sizes in a single document? cd's are a pain like this with the booklet, tray and disc all having different specs but usually also sharing design elements.


Don't entirely know about InDesign but this is where Quark 6.5 is perfect.

It has a feature called 'synchronised layouts' where you can have different-sized layouts within the same file and repeating elements can be synchronised so that if you change the text in one box, all its synchronised partners simultaneously change as well.

Very handy for corporate stationery as well.

If InDesign 4 (CS2) doesn't yet have this feature, they're bound to have it before too long.

Don't panic
Jan 31, 2006, 06:52 PM
does anybody use canvas?
i prefer it to both illustrator or freehand.

frankblundt
Jan 31, 2006, 07:23 PM
Don't entirely know about InDesign but this is where Quark 6.5 is perfect...
brilliant. i knew you'd have the answer :)
now just need to re-mortgage the house to buy it...

sintaxi
Jan 31, 2006, 07:30 PM
Im an Illustrator guy,

But I am happy to see so much support for freehand. It is a shame that it will probably be left behind.

I like how Illustrator by default treats vectors with "Non-Zero Winding Fill rule". All other programs (including Photoshop CS2 and Freehand) handle vectors with "Odd Even Fill rule".

Illustrator is a Powerhouse!

Very imortant thing about Gif. if you use the transparancy feature. You must specify the background color before saving (defult is white). Typical sign of an ameture is when someone uses a gif on black background and get a halo around the image. it looks terrible.

If you dont know what you are doing stick with jpg

cgratti
Jan 31, 2006, 07:40 PM
I always seem to use photoshop, but it isn't very good for vector images, or having see through background im never sur ehow to save my logo without it have a white background!

Help please!


Illustrator...

Save as .gif

mvc
Feb 1, 2006, 01:42 AM
Illustrator...

Save as .gif

.gif?

MADNESS!

You only use gif if you want a web graphic, its crap otherwise.

The program you want to use is illustrator (mainly because Freehand is about to be deep-sixed, rather than any big differences between them)

And you save your artwork as an .eps. Then it can be imported into any other page layout program like indesign or quark and it will float transparently over any text or image or background, or it can even be imported into photoshop and scaled to whatever size you want rather than using photoshop's painful vector tools to actually create art.

Once it's in photoshop you can dress it up with glows and drop shadows and other spack like that if you really want. But the best thing about eps is wherever you use it you get no undesirable white backgrounds or whatever to ruin your art, just the logo you made.

And the other best thing about eps is that it remains vector art i.e you can enlarge it to the size of a baseball pitch and the edges will remain smooth and tidy (unlike using any raster format like gif, jpg, tif, etc)

I won't confuse you with an in-depth discussion of RGB vs CMYK or Process vs Spot colours at this point, as your brain would explode.

I'll just say - Remember this basic generalised rule, if it's intended for most press or printed type work like business cards, letterheads or brochures, you probably want CMYK process colours, if its for Web use RGB colours.

sintaxi
Feb 1, 2006, 10:35 AM
its important to remember that Gif is only an 8 bit graphic (256 colors total). ^ he is right, it should be used for web only.

Fukui
Feb 1, 2006, 05:34 PM
its important to remember that Gif is only an 8 bit graphic (256 colors total). ^ he is right, it should be used for web only.
What about SVG? Safari and Firefox support it. And windows with an auto-installing plugin from adobe...

Has anyone tried it for a production site?

cb911
Feb 1, 2006, 06:42 PM
Is Sirus the Virus a novel character?

Anyway, I agree. Go Illustrator!

I had to think about this for a second... first i thought that Sirus the Virus was from the Matrix, but that was Cypher. Then I thought of a few other movies, and realised it was Con Air, right? He was the big bad crim play by John Malkovich, i think. :o

Anyway, I'm an Illustrator person. Unless I'm doing a sort of logo that has textures, or gradients beyond what Illustrator can provide. Basically - if you want a sharp, clean look - go Illustrator (or Freehand if that's your cup of tea). You can also get a 'sharp & clean' look in PhotoShop I guess, just that it's not the ideal tool for the job. :)

iris_failsafe
Feb 2, 2006, 07:07 PM
freehand is dead go for illustrator better tools

i.Feature
Feb 3, 2006, 07:17 PM
Illustrator is definately the way to go... take from someone stuck using freehand at work!:(

cleanup
Feb 5, 2006, 06:17 AM
illustrator all the way, here is one i made recently. its png format so transparent background

Just the white "petals" in between would be nice... or, keep the rectangles, but lose the gradient... gradients in logos = no.

I vote Illustrator. It created this:

rugonnaeatthat
Feb 5, 2006, 09:35 AM
Another vote for Illustrator here - I find it handles colours better than Freehand.

Computer apps aside, the best way to design a logo is with a pen and a sheet of paper :)

i.Feature
Feb 13, 2006, 02:47 PM
Computer apps aside, the best way to design a logo is with a pen and a sheet of paper :)

I find pee in he snow also works well. I kid you not, one of my clients logos was the result of a late winter night and alot of beers.

eclipse
Feb 13, 2006, 05:47 PM
I find pee in he snow also works well. I kid you not, one of my clients logos was the result of a late winter night and alot of beers.
What the? :) :confused: :eek:

cwedl
Feb 13, 2006, 05:58 PM
Freehand is WAY more intuitive that Illustrator, as i was trained on both. It is more "Mac" in interface that Illustrator is more PC in thought. Both are good though, too bad Adobe will probably kill Freehand.

Yeah I know what you mean! I have used it before a bit but normally use illustrator, Be great if now adobe and macromedia are the same country combine all the good bits of each program.

Saliwa
Apr 7, 2008, 06:36 PM
As of 2008, are there any alternatives to Illustrator?

mperkins37
Apr 7, 2008, 07:20 PM
Illustrator for making logos, Photoshop for making logos look better .:D

mcavjame
Apr 7, 2008, 07:26 PM
As of 2008, are there any alternatives to Illustrator?

Corel Draw is a vector based program with a similar tool set to that of Illustrator. We teach both applications at our school.

timimbo85
Apr 8, 2008, 08:29 AM
If your going vector then yes AI, if your gonna do some Photo manipulation / effects us PS. Or if your feeling spicy you can us both. Learn your file formats and find the best one, I am a fan of .EPS as i feel its the cleanest IMO

Nicolecat
Apr 8, 2008, 09:01 AM
Illustrator has really come a long way.

It really shows in the CS3 suite.

I would have to say, being in the industry
...being proficient in illustrator is hands down not only better but more desirable to employers. It's almost become an industry standard.

Much like InDesign is to Quark for me. :)

tobefirst
Apr 8, 2008, 09:45 AM
Illustrator for making logos, Photoshop for making logos look better .:D

Out of curiosity, how are you making logos better in Photoshop?

Jim Campbell
Apr 8, 2008, 03:21 PM
Out of curiosity, how are you making logos better in Photoshop?

Lens flares. Fuzzy drop shadows. Bevels! Gradients! Glass effects!

Difference Clouds! Texture Fills!

Comic Sans!

Any more questions?

Cheers

Jim

IgnatiusTheKing
Apr 8, 2008, 03:38 PM
gradients in logos = no

Tell that to the folks at Adobe. The logo/icon for every product they have features a gradient rather prominently.

As does the latest incarnation of the Apple logo.

rlnhrt
Apr 8, 2008, 05:15 PM
Lens flares. Fuzzy drop shadows. Bevels! Gradients! Glass effects!

Difference Clouds! Texture Fills!

Comic Sans!

Any more questions?

Cheers

Jim

That's not making logos better, that's making logos tacky (and no offense, but often used by people who don't know how to make good logos and add craptastic effects trying to compensate)

Edit: Oh, sorry, you're being sarcastic. I thought you were the one who said that uses photoshop to make logos better :o

Java
Apr 8, 2008, 07:07 PM
MacPaint...all the way!

Nicolecat
Apr 9, 2008, 05:11 PM
Lens flares. Fuzzy drop shadows. Bevels! Gradients! Glass effects!

Difference Clouds! Texture Fills!

Comic Sans!

Any more questions?

Cheers

Jim

Right...but if the logo was vector prior to Photoshop 'enhancement'...once you hit 'save as' (whatever) it becomes raster based...and can only be scaled to a certain size. So, you haven't had a client complain yet?...or are you only doing logos for website design? Because in print, that would almost be unacceptable. (There are a few exceptions.)

Jim Campbell
Apr 9, 2008, 05:32 PM
So, you haven't had a client complain yet?...or are you only doing logos for website design?

Hello? Hello? *taptaptaptap* Is this thing on?

Sorry, it appears this sarcasm broadcaster isn't working. Please retune to another channel, where the intended mockery of my post will come through loud and clear ...

Cheers!

Jim

ezekielrage_99
Apr 9, 2008, 07:02 PM
Lens flares. Fuzzy drop shadows. Bevels! Gradients! Glass effects!

Difference Clouds! Texture Fills!

Comic Sans!

Any more questions?

Cheers

Jim

I much prefer Paint on my P100 with Windows 95, the quality is brilliant and I have found any good printer prefers a logo at 250x250 in a 256 colour GIF format.

And I'm not really a fan of Comic Sans that's why I use Papyrus.

thehuhman
Apr 10, 2008, 07:13 AM
I think of a logo as having a "life" of its own, regardless of its intended use (low res for the internet or high res for printing). I always start by sketching the idea on paper. I then recreate it with the drawing tools in Illustrator CS3. I work in black and white, and add color as the final step. If there is something to be added to the design, such as a scanned image, I work on that part in Photoshop CS3, converting it to a bitmapped shape that I can import into Illustrator, where I "trace" it. Once it is traced, it becomes a vector image, and a vector graphic is what I usually strive to end up with. Vector images are scalable to any size, in perfect resolution, and always have a transparent background. Colors are easily separated for printing commercially. And it can be used for practically any purpose, in any medium.:)

PHX-Locksmith
May 9, 2008, 01:11 PM
I used Freehand back in the day but have happily transitioned to Illustrator.

andypullen
May 9, 2008, 03:11 PM
And I'm not really a fan of Comic Sans that's why I use Papyrus.

yuck.

ruskiwi
Jun 7, 2008, 08:08 AM
I much prefer Paint on my P100 with Windows 95, the quality is brilliant and I have found any good printer prefers a logo at 250x250 in a 256 colour GIF format.

And I'm not really a fan of Comic Sans that's why I use Papyrus.

Haha!! Too much!! (was that out loud?)

Illustrator for sure, save as EPS.

Krebstar
Jun 7, 2008, 06:14 PM
That's not making logos better, that's making logos tacky (and no offense, but often used by people who don't know how to make good logos and add craptastic effects trying to compensate)

Edit: Oh, sorry, you're being sarcastic. I thought you were the one who said that uses photoshop to make logos better :o

"Comic Sans" should of been a dead giveaway, haha.

wallaby
Jun 10, 2008, 01:57 AM
You are somewhat wrong. PNG files are great, but they still don't have complete support. The colors shift on older browsers and alpha channels don't work in IE (natively). GIFs and JPGs are still the way to go until PNG becomes widely accepted. I only use png if I need an alpha channel or if a gif doesn't look good enough. Most of the time it is sufficient.
Yes, but if we continue to rely on old formats, then the new one's don't get pushed...I used PNG as much as possible unless it's a very photographic image, then of course jpeg is necessary. And IE7 supports alpha channels in PNGs; people still using IE6 need to get on the wagon train.

Never used Freehand, but Illustrator is godly.

CMD is me
Jun 10, 2008, 09:16 AM
Sorry, don't have time to read through all the posts, but wanted to help....

Illustrator. Save as vector EPS for print GIF for web. End of discussion.

MacBoobsPro
Jun 10, 2008, 09:26 AM
Sorry, don't have time to read through all the posts, but wanted to help....

Illustrator. Save as vector EPS for print GIF for web. End of discussion.

Well actually you've started it again. :D

covisio
Jun 10, 2008, 09:53 AM
Freehand is WAY more intuitive that Illustrator, as i was trained on both. It is more "Mac" in interface that Illustrator is more PC in thought. Both are good though, too bad Adobe will probably kill Freehand.

Not sure why you think that Illustrator is 'More PC' and Freehand is 'More Mac'. Illustrator debuted on Mac way before PC, it's basic behaviour hasn't changed that much since about Version 6 if we ignore transparency that came along in Version 9 and confused the hell out of most print-orientated users. Macromedia didn't help themselves when they decided to align the UI of Freehand with that of Dreamweaver, which alienated a lot of existing users.

I used both, many years ago most of my new artwork was created in Freehand but it's use in the UK gradually tailed off, with Creative Suite being the nail in the coffin (after all, why would you have bought Creative Suite and Macromedia Freehand if you didn't need to?). Same will eventually happen to Quark.

What I do remember about Freehand though was its superior accuracy - paths and objects really did accurately snap to guides and to each other, unlike Illustrator which is still vague to this day.

Anyway, to answer your question, go for Illustrator if you want to make a career out of this kind of thing.

Switz213
Jun 10, 2008, 10:11 AM
Illy definitely

jonspeaks22
Jun 10, 2008, 04:48 PM
i use photoshop and illustrator

Rab Simpson
Jun 11, 2008, 01:53 PM
It's got to be AI. I can't stand FH.

BillyBobBongo
Jun 11, 2008, 02:46 PM
I use Flash or Illustrator!

RainForRent
Jun 11, 2008, 03:59 PM
Freehand is WAY more intuitive that Illustrator, as i was trained on both. It is more "Mac" in interface that Illustrator is more PC in thought. Both are good though, too bad Adobe will probably kill Freehand.

I thought Freehand died when Adobe bought out Macromedia? I miss the days of multiple crop marks. Stupid Adobe.

peterdevries
Jun 16, 2008, 02:54 AM
I find pee in he snow also works well. I kid you not, one of my clients logos was the result of a late winter night and alot of beers.

Show us the stuff man!

candyman
Jun 24, 2008, 03:30 PM
I think Illustrator is the way to go. Freehand will get the job done as well. Just make sure it is a vector program. Then if you want to add fancy effects to it, take it into a raster program like Photoshop and go to town!

Illustrator gets my vote here!

ezekielrage_99
Jun 24, 2008, 07:06 PM
It's got to be AI. I can't stand FH.

I didn't think Freehand was still officially supported...

(I am aware this thread started 2005)

zephyrnoid
Jun 24, 2008, 09:26 PM
Oh gosh! This thread still alive. I've been a Freehand and Illustrator user since 1990. Two have jockeyed around for 'best vector tool' in much the same manner that Apple OS and Windows have Jockeyed around. There's a lot of lore around FH & IL . Used to be said that designers that operated from the West Coast/Silicon valley, Bay Area were die hard Freehand and everyone else used Illustrator. I was a FH Beta team user ( AKA the FH Evangelists) since V2 and so I am an expert and have taught it and Illustrator to others. I'm not sure about how Illustrator has evolved since I really stopped teaching it around '95. But I was very disappointed with some specific Tool Box UI changes in Freehand MX so I'm still using V10.
In truth, it's never so much the actual software or version thereof, but rather the time that you put in to mastering it. :D

qtpie36963
Jul 3, 2008, 12:55 PM
You can use the Path tools in Photoshop to design logos. Export as an EPS file. Problem solved. :)


l0zo: If you choose this method....Be careful with saving/exporting as an EPS file. If you don't have a printer that recognizes the EPS Script then your logos will only print as code/script.. not as what you see on the screen!

thehuhman
Jul 24, 2008, 06:19 AM
As a graphic designer, I use all of the CS3 products, in both platforms. And I have paid a LOT of $$$ to Adobe over the years. The CS3 products are so tightly woven into the graphic design world, that I can hardly imagine my life without them. Yet, if my goal was to simply "create a logo", I would consider giving a "new name" a try. I'm talking about LineForm (http://www.freeverse.com/apps/app/?id=6020). It is simple. Only $79 retail, and there is a free trial! It can produce vector art, just like the big guys, so you might want to at least give it a try!:) Failed to mention, it is MAC only, at this point.

Sorry Adobe. You just can't have it ALL!:D

Shoesy
Jul 24, 2008, 06:02 PM
I create all my design using Word art in MS Word.

Oh yes! In comic sans. :p

a cat *miaow*
Jul 26, 2008, 04:15 PM
Much as I love Illustrator I've always find it gets in the way when trying out variations.. Photoshop is better to get the logo right and then trace it in AI to get the final product.. with a bit of tightening up of course

thehuhman
Oct 4, 2008, 06:55 AM
Adobe Illustrator (for MAC or PC):)

larapumkin
Oct 6, 2008, 05:03 PM
if you'd take a graphic design class, you'll be taught as
Photo and painting works : with photoshop
Logo, Icons, and print works : with illustrator.
illustrator is for the clean and neat print graphic works..
i heard that InDesign works better with logo than illustrator..haven tried InDesign yet tho..
but i see many design firms are looking for people who works with indesign when they are hiring.

LeviG
Oct 6, 2008, 05:15 PM
Painter looks slightly intriguing though.

Painter is an ok program if you like to 'paint' images etc with a tablet pc although I personally prefered using alias sketchbook pro as the layout just seemed a bit more natural to me.