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MacRumors
Aug 11, 2013, 06:04 PM
http://images.macrumors.com/im/macrumorsthreadlogo.gif (http://www.macrumors.com/2013/08/11/chinese-woman-suffers-eye-injuries-after-iphone-5-explodes/)


According to a report from Chinese news outlet Da Lian Evening News (http://news.dlxww.com/news/content/2013-08/09/content_1084738.htm) [Google Translate (http://translate.google.com/translate?js=n&sl=auto&tl=en&u=http://news.dlxww.com/news/content/2013-08/09/content_1084738.htm)] (via ZDNet (http://www.zdnet.com/cn/iphone-explodes-in-china-injures-users-eye-7000019231/)), a woman in China suffered eye injuries from her iPhone 5 after it exploded while she was on the phone.

The woman reportedly felt the device's screen become warm after talking for 40 minutes, and eventually it combusted after she tried numerous times to end the call by tapping on the screen. The explosion sent particles of the phone into her eyes and she was rushed to the hospital, where she was eventually treated. Previously, the woman stated that she had dropped the phone once which left a small crack in the upper right corner, but claims the phone was still useable.

http://images.macrumors.com/article-new/2013/08/exploded_iphone.jpgWhen she looked at the device to check it, Li then discovered the touchscreen was not responding when she tried to end the call. After a few more tries, the screen exploded.

Li said she felt some debris shooting into her eyes. "I could not open my eyes," she recalled. Her colleagues rushed her to the hospital where the doctor found her eyeball red and inflamed, and identified a scratch mark which suggested an object had scratched it. An Apple representative has responded to the report and said that the incident would require further investigation and would not typically be covered under product warranty. Earlier this year, a Chinese man was left in a coma (http://www.zdnet.com/cn/another-iphone-shock-case-in-china-leaves-man-in-coma-7000018276/) after receiving an electric shock while charging his iPhone 4, an incident which followed the death (http://www.macrumors.com/2013/07/18/chinese-woman-electrocuted-by-iphone-4-likely-used-unauthorized-charger/) of a Chinese woman under similar circumstances. Both incidents apparently involved the use of unauthorized third-party adapters.

Apple has responded to the incidents by establishing a special page (http://www.apple.com.cn/power-adapters/) [Google Translate (http://translate.google.com/translate?sl=auto&tl=en&u=http://www.apple.com.cn/power-adapters/&sandbox=0)] to its Chinese website informing customers about the identification and use of genuine USB power adapters for the iPad and iPhone, as well as launching (http://www.macrumors.com/2013/08/05/apple-launches-third-party-usb-charger-takeback-program/)a third-party USB charger "Takeback Program (http://www.apple.com/support/usbadapter-takeback/)" offering official replacement chargers for $10 to anyone who turns in a suspect adapter.

Article Link: Chinese Woman Suffers Eye Injuries After iPhone 5 Explodes (http://www.macrumors.com/2013/08/11/chinese-woman-suffers-eye-injuries-after-iphone-5-explodes/)



Michaelgtrusa
Aug 11, 2013, 06:05 PM
Just what china wanted! Apple will get burned big time for this!

GSPice
Aug 11, 2013, 06:06 PM
Why is it always the Chinese? I almost don't care about stories like this anymore.

jonnysods
Aug 11, 2013, 06:07 PM
Whoa. Not looking good. And there were witnesses by the looks of it?

macbeta
Aug 11, 2013, 06:12 PM
I'm willing to bet that many many accidents happen/caused by other manufactures phones, its just when it happens with an iPhone it gets pumped up by the media.:apple:

ffmed124
Aug 11, 2013, 06:15 PM
I'm willing to bet that many many accidents happen/caused by other manufactures phones, its just when it happens with an iPhone it gets pumped up by the media.:apple:



I call that statement BULL!

Ann P
Aug 11, 2013, 06:15 PM
Why is it always the Chinese? I almost don't care about stories like this anymore.

You're kidding me...

gnasher729
Aug 11, 2013, 06:15 PM
Just what china wanted! Apple will get burned big time for this!

According to the woman's own admission, she had dropped the phone before, which had left obvious damage on the screen. That's the first safety rule, don't use an electric device with obvious damage.

Mr D
Aug 11, 2013, 06:15 PM
Exploding Galaxy s4.... exploding iPhones...

These corporations just playing dirty.

MBHockey
Aug 11, 2013, 06:15 PM
Why is it always the Chinese? I almost don't care about stories like this anymore.

Yeah, because they aren't real people right?

frisken
Aug 11, 2013, 06:19 PM
I have to agree, it always seems to happen in China. I would say it's more akin to the fact that there are more counterfeit phones in China than in other countries, are the sources positive this was an authentic iPhone?

OriginalMacRat
Aug 11, 2013, 06:19 PM
Why is it always the Chinese? I almost don't care about stories like this anymore.

Because it has the highest concentration of fake iPhones and fake iPhone parts which have safety issues.

Gasu E.
Aug 11, 2013, 06:19 PM
Yeah, because they aren't real people right?

I assume (I hope!) he meant, "why don't we hear about this kind of thing elsewhere?"

johnplacement
Aug 11, 2013, 06:20 PM
It's happen like month ago I was charging my iPhone 4 I bought i like 3 years ago when they came the first iPhone 4 well anyways I burn my hand no kidding was really hot when i touch the screen seems the dock connector had a short circuit or something internal the speaker was totally melt also part of the motherboard turn sorta black but was working and still working for my surprise but everything was ok so I change the dock connector and the speakers.

HiRez
Aug 11, 2013, 06:20 PM
If the phone was clearly damaged, which she already admitted to, it's going to be difficult to prove the phone was defective. When you drop a phone you really don't know what kind of internal damage there is, even if it appears to be working correctly. Then again, it's China, so who knows. Wouldn't be surprised to see the courts stick it to Apple just because they love to do that.

Of course, it could actually be a defective iPhone, just going to be hard to show that with the pre-existing damage.

I'd be curious to know if the phone was plugged in while she was using it, and what charger was attached if so.

FirePhantom
Aug 11, 2013, 06:21 PM
"Previously, the woman stated that she had dropped the phone once which left a small crack in the upper right corner, but claims the phone was still useable."

No surprise that's where it "exploded".

JackieInCo
Aug 11, 2013, 06:22 PM
All bets are off on this one because the phone had been dropped. Anything can happen to a device once it's been dropped and shows signs of damage.

mentholiptus
Aug 11, 2013, 06:28 PM
If it were me, and my phone were overheating and not responding, I'd shut it off or do a hard reset, then shut it off. I also would have got a replacement phone or screen if I had dropped and damaged it. They sell a pretty decent warranty which affords two replacements from accidents.

noisycats
Aug 11, 2013, 06:28 PM
I call that statement BULL!

Ok.

Why?

glsillygili
Aug 11, 2013, 06:29 PM
what! its a phone your not supposed to talk to people on it. pssst idiots

dec.
Aug 11, 2013, 06:30 PM
All bets are off on this one because the phone had been dropped. Anything can happen to a device once it's been dropped and shows signs of damage.

If the iPhone wouldn't use conducting metal.. ehm, wrong story, I mean fragile glass as screen, then the accident wouldn't have happened!11!!1!

"/s"

There'll be plenty of idi.. people blaming Apple for this anyway.

dugbug
Aug 11, 2013, 06:31 PM
Whoa. Not looking good. And there were witnesses by the looks of it?

Dude apple does not have an exploding iphone problem. Chinese lawyers have discovered their version of hot coffee

tbrand7
Aug 11, 2013, 06:32 PM
Michael Bay would love these phones!

Maverick1337
Aug 11, 2013, 06:32 PM
Why is it always the Chinese? I almost don't care about stories like this anymore.

Never did care from the beginning. Always foul play involved that caused the incidents.

fubaracing7374
Aug 11, 2013, 06:34 PM
If it were me, and my phone were overheating and not responding, I'd shut it off or do a hard reset, then shut it off. I also would have got a replacement phone or screen if I had dropped and damaged it. They sell a pretty decent warranty which affords two replacements from accidents.

AppleCare is only offered in the States.

mavis
Aug 11, 2013, 06:38 PM
AppleCare is only offered in the States.

No, it's offered here in Japan as well. I know this because I bought it.

Chuck-Norris
Aug 11, 2013, 06:41 PM
first electrocuting chargers and now exploding iphones? these chinese

grue
Aug 11, 2013, 06:42 PM
They sell a pretty decent warranty which affords two replacements from accidents.

AppleCare+ is not offered in most markets. In fact as far as I'm aware it's not offered outside of the US and Canada.

chineseguy38
Aug 11, 2013, 06:43 PM
Maybe we should ban Chinese women from using iPhone!!:D

ihuman:D
Aug 11, 2013, 06:43 PM
AppleCare is only offered in the States.

No, you can get it here in Ireland and the UK.

grue
Aug 11, 2013, 06:44 PM
No, it's offered here in Japan as well. I know this because I bought it.

He means AppleCare+ with the physical damage coverage. He's still wrong, since Canada isn't part of the US, though.

anubis72
Aug 11, 2013, 06:44 PM
I have to agree, it always seems to happen in China. I would say it's more akin to the fact that there are more counterfeit phones in China than in other countries, are the sources positive this was an authentic iPhone?

I'm betting it was that or it was charged with a third party charger that caused the issue.

Phones exploding in China are like dashboard cams in Russia. A dime a dozen...

fubaracing7374
Aug 11, 2013, 06:47 PM
He means AppleCare+ with the physical damage coverage. He's still wrong, since Canada isn't part of the US, though.

Yeah, I meant AppleCare+. And yes it is available in Canada as well.

jsnuff1
Aug 11, 2013, 06:49 PM
That does not look like the iPhone or its screen "exploded." Seems like she dropped the phone was upset about it and made up this story.

FrankB1191
Aug 11, 2013, 06:52 PM
My wife works as a defense attorney for a corporation with more subsidiaries than I'd care to count. Product liability is her area of practice, and believe me when I say they have plenty of experts to tear a plaintiff's case apart enough that are generally willing to settle out of court. I'm not familiar with China's courts, but corruption is probably on Apple's side in such cases. Because of the amount of litigation in the U.S., both sides are almost always required to go to pre trial mediation, and judges often don't like plaintiff attorneys. Using a damaged product does not bode well for a plaintiff, although there are always exceptions.

GoCubsGo
Aug 11, 2013, 06:54 PM
Seems odd that this would happen and cause an eye injury. Any pics of the purported injury?

dagger01
Aug 11, 2013, 06:58 PM
I call that statement BULL!

Why his assertion based on speculation any worse than yours? Actually, your declarative is less substantial than his obvious speculation.

golf1410
Aug 11, 2013, 07:05 PM
All iPhones are assembled in China. :eek:

Ryth
Aug 11, 2013, 07:06 PM
I call that statement BULL!

Did you hear about the S4 that caught fire and burned down an apartment in China. True story.

Millionaire2K
Aug 11, 2013, 07:06 PM
All bets are off on this one because the phone had been dropped. Anything can happen to a device once it's been dropped and shows signs of damage.

This is nonsense. A phone is a device that MANY people drop. It should NOT explode just because it was dropped. Dropping a phone is considered by many as normal use. Heck there are millions of cases made to protect phone from drops. If dropping the phone poses such a danger the phone should lock itself when it detects such high G's and require the phone be checked for possible explosion risk before it can be used again. Its not like we're talking about dropping a TV... phones have been dropped for MANY YEARS.

If the risk of explosion goes up after a drop "alone" then there is a design problem that needs to be fixed.

Also I can't begin to tell you how many people I've seen using cracked iPhone screens. So again it is VERY common.

NOTE: I would suspect the cracked screen is not the sole cause of the explosion. I would guess maybe a faulty charger caused overheating and the screen exploded at its weak spot.

Ryth
Aug 11, 2013, 07:07 PM
According to the woman's own admission, she had dropped the phone before, which had left obvious damage on the screen. That's the first safety rule, don't use an electric device with obvious damage.

If that's the truth, then she's responsible and not Apple.

xraydoc
Aug 11, 2013, 07:07 PM
Typical. Only in China...

Ungibbed
Aug 11, 2013, 07:10 PM
The phone could have been a really good KIRF (in the land of fake Apple Retail stores) with a non genuine display or otherwise, things like that may happen with a cracked screen but that would be the first time that Gorilla Glass would behave in that manner that I've seen (I have seen my fair share of broken glass on the back of the iPhone 4/4s).

Any event of high internal temperature would have shut the phone down with a swollen battery bending the case. Any signs of swollen batteries do warp and can explode as seen years ago with some laptop batteries used in Dell, Toshiba and various Windows powered notebooks and even the PowerBook/iBook G4 which Apple had a battery exchange program all tracked by serial number and model number of the battery. Back to the iPhone, this would be the first time I've had seen or heard of something like this.

My iPhone 5 has gotten warm at times but nothing that would get to the point of burning my hand. If it did get any hotter, I'm sure the thermal circuit would have cut the power with the thermometer displayed. When you have KIRF parts, problems like that happen

When it comes to the time of inspecting the phone, technicians can easily spot some of the best KIRF's in the wild. Most of those repair places advertising on Craigslist are more likely to use such parts.

Beardad57
Aug 11, 2013, 07:11 PM
Because it has the highest concentration of fake iPhones and fake iPhone parts which have safety issues.

So True! The Chinese are by far the biggest Counterfeiters of Consumer goods in the world. I have seen many authentic looking products that turned to junk in rapid fashion. How the World Trade Organization allows Chinese companies to get away with this is astounding. :eek:

Millionaire2K
Aug 11, 2013, 07:15 PM
If that's the truth, then she's responsible and not Apple.

Right so if any of the 100's of thousands of people walking around with a damaged iphone screen loose and eye or die ***** on them..... wow!!

Damage to the iPhone screen is very common and can easily happen. Because of this Apple is still liable for the poor design of the a screen that can easily break from normal use and possibly cause user injury if the phone explodes as a result of the drop or broken screen.

Lawyer ask jury.... "How many of you dropped your phone?" "How may of you go a new one if the phone still worked" "how many of you saw people using a broken iphone" "how often did you think to your self...RUN that phone is gonna blow" "what if the broken screen on your teens phone blinded or killed them" "who is to blame"

Example: Next week you drop your phone. very little to no external damage. A week later your iphone explodes and kills you. What should your tombstone read? "I love Apple to death"

NOTE: As I said b4 I feel there is more to this case and I do NOT feel Apple has an exploding iphone problem. But if its found that she was using legit charger and legit iphone then id expect Apple to settle and issue a warning about using phones with broken screens.

daneoni
Aug 11, 2013, 07:16 PM
Another day, another user error. Hopefully she recovers.

Ryth
Aug 11, 2013, 07:27 PM
Right so if any of the 100's of thousands of people walking around with a damaged iphone screen loose and eye or die ***** on them..... wow!!

Damage to the iPhone screen is very common and can easily happen. Because of this Apple is still liable for the poor design of the a screen that can easily break from normal use and possibly cause user injury if the phone explodes as a result of the drop or broken screen.

Lawyer ask jury.... "How many of you dropped your phone?" "How may of you go a new one if the phone still worked" "how many of you saw people using a broken iphone" "how often did you think to your self...RUN that phone is gonna blow" "what if the broken screen on your teens phone blinded or killed them" "who is to blame"

Example: Next week you drop your phone. very little to no external damage. A week later your iphone explodes and kills you. What should your tombstone read? "I love Apple to death"

NOTE: As I said b4 I feel there is more to this case and I do NOT feel Apple has an exploding iphone problem. But if its found that she was using legit charger and legit iphone then id expect Apple to settle and issue a warning about using phones with broken screens.

Because Apple builds the phone to be used 'as is' out of box and with normal wear and tear. Dropping a phone and having significant screen damage is not normal. I'm sure there is more to the story then even what is reported but Apple won't be found liable at all.

TheRainKing
Aug 11, 2013, 07:29 PM
She was probably holding it wrong.

donutbagel
Aug 11, 2013, 07:32 PM
I'm guessing it's the battery.

----------

I'm betting it was that or it was charged with a third party charger that caused the issue.

Phones exploding in China are like dashboard cams in Russia. A dime a dozen...

Dashboard cams!!! Those Russian car crash videos are hilarious. Yes, like all the recorded car crashes happen in Russia, all the exploding/burning electronics are in China. In fact, if one more iPhone burns or explodes in China, I'm going to suspect something of the Chinese media.

----------

All bets are off on this one because the phone had been dropped. Anything can happen to a device once it's been dropped and shows signs of damage.

I hope that scratched iPhone 5 I got isn't going to blow up on me. Even more secretly dangerous is the iPhone 5 my mom got that came with a blemish on it straight from Apple.

JackieInCo
Aug 11, 2013, 07:33 PM
I'm guessing it's the battery.

----------



Dashboard cams!!! Those Russian car crash videos are hilarious.

----------



I hope that scratched iPhone 5 I got isn't going to blow up on me.

Well, if she sues Apple, I bet Apple wins in this case because of the extent of the damage to the phone. She freely admitted it had been dropped.

HiRez
Aug 11, 2013, 07:34 PM
This is nonsense. A phone is a device that MANY people drop. It should NOT explode just because it was dropped..

Dropping the phone didn't cause it to explode (if, in fact, it actually did explode). Continuing to use it after it was damaged may have caused an explosion. That's on the user, not the manufacturer. There are circuits built into the phone to protect against voltage surges, when the phone is physically damaged it's always going to be possible those circuits are damaged, there's not really any good way to prevent that, other than for the user to stop using the phone until they get it checked out.

The one thing I can think of to do would be for the phone to detect dropping and impact (which they can do with the accelerometers/gryroscopes, and completely disable the phone to make it inoperable. Shut it down. Of course, the damage may prevent that process from working correctly or completing, and it wouldn't work if the phone is turned off when the damage happens. And there are other ways to damage a phone that don't involve dropping/impact damage, for example dousing in a bucket of water (my wife did this one...ugh), shaking/vibrating, smoke damage, or using it in an extremely hot/cold/humid environment.

You can't prevent accidents, but as a consumer you have to be smart about using damaged goods where there is power or battery involved. That applies to mobile phones just as it does toaster ovens, cameras, or whatever.

prowlmedia
Aug 11, 2013, 07:37 PM
She was probably holding it wrong.

Ah ha ah ha ha duh.
[ slow hand clap ]

donutbagel
Aug 11, 2013, 07:37 PM
Well, if she sues Apple, I bet Apple wins in this case because of the extent of the damage to the phone. She freely admitted it had been dropped.

No, there could theoretically be a defect in the iPhone that makes it very susceptible to blowing up when dropped. You could even buy an iPhone from Apple that comes with a dent on it. Does Apple warn its users not to use a damaged iPhone?

0x0x0x0
Aug 11, 2013, 07:39 PM
"Previously, the woman stated that she had dropped the phone once which left a small crack in the upper right corner, but claims the phone was still useable."

No surprise that's where it "exploded".

And you never ever dropped you phone?.. I've dropped my old N95 so many times I've lost count, changed plastics covers (as they were "showing signs of damage") but never electronics, and the phone never exploded... nor has my new L920 and I've dropped that a few times now...

JackieInCo
Aug 11, 2013, 07:42 PM
And you never ever dropped you phone?.. I've dropped my old N95 so many times I've lost count, changed plastics covers (as they were "showing signs of damage") but never electronics, and the phone never exploded... nor has my new L920 and I've dropped that a few times now...

But was the glass broken and shattered in the corner as the photo in this case shows? I bet it wasn't.

I dropped two iPhones before and each time, there was no glass breakage or cracks. The only damage that happened was the metal band in one corner got bent just a bit. I sold the phones and bought new ones.

That small amount of damage bothered me.

0x0x0x0
Aug 11, 2013, 07:47 PM
But was the glass broken and shattered in the corner as the photo in this case shows? I bet it wasn't.


I suspect that was the aftermath of the explosion and not ante-event...

HiRez
Aug 11, 2013, 07:52 PM
And you never ever dropped you phone?.. I've dropped my old N95 so many times I've lost count, changed plastics covers (as they were "showing signs of damage") but never electronics, and the phone never exploded... nor has my new L920 and I've dropped that a few times now...

That's irrelevant. How many iPhones have been sold? Hundreds of millions, right? So the fact that your one non-iPhone was dropped and didn't explode has statistically absolutely no bearing on whether this one dropped iPhone exploded. That's like saying "I fell off my Harley motorcycle and didn't die, but I read about a guy who fell off his Honda motorcycle and died, therefore Honda motorcycles are way more dangerous than Harleys, and no one could ever die from falling off a Harley."

Besides, it's not like Nokia phones have never had issues (http://chimpreports.com/index.php/regional-news/rwanda/10131-nokia-phone-explodes-in-rwandan-man’s-pocket.html).

JackieInCo
Aug 11, 2013, 07:52 PM
I suspect that was the aftermath of the explosion and not ante-event...
I thought the story indicated that the damage shown in the picture happened when it was dropped.

Edit: I reread and it see where she said it left a small crack.

0x0x0x0
Aug 11, 2013, 07:57 PM
That's irrelevant. How many iPhones have been sold? Hundreds of millions, right?

I suspect far fewer than other (new generation) phones taken together... Wasn't there a story on MR about it recently?..

HiRez
Aug 11, 2013, 07:59 PM
No, there could theoretically be a defect in the iPhone that makes it very susceptible to blowing up when dropped. You could even buy an iPhone from Apple that comes with a dent on it. Does Apple warn its users not to use a damaged iPhone?

I'm glad you asked, because as it turns out, yes, Apple does in fact have a warning right in the iPhone user manual (http://manuals.info.apple.com/en_US/iphone_user_guide.pdf) (although a user really shouldn't need the warning, as it is common sense, they provide it anyway):

WARNING: Failure to follow these safety instructions could result in fire, electric shock, or other injuries, or damage to iPhone or other property. Read all the safety information below before using iPhone.

Handling Handle iPhone with care. It is made of metal, glass, and plastic and has sensitive electronic components inside. iPhone can be damaged if dropped, burned, punctured, or crushed, or if it comes in contact with liquid. Don’t use a damaged iPhone, such as one with a cracked screen, as it may cause injury. If you’re concerned about scratching, consider using a case.

And, the manual tells you in the very first sentence (highlighted) in Chapter 2 - Getting started:

WARNING: To avoid injury, read Important safety information on page 146 before using iPhone.

DShap5
Aug 11, 2013, 08:05 PM
I thought for a moment she might have a case until she admitted it had already had a small crack...

yeah
Aug 11, 2013, 08:16 PM
She was probably holding it wrong.

That is what every male in this world has said, will say and is saying right now.

:eek:;):cool:

DariusX
Aug 11, 2013, 08:24 PM
Why is it that these things always happen in China and not in the other 50 countries that apple sells the iPhone in?

Smartphones are only as smart as their users. If you aren't smart enough to not use a fake charger, or not use a damaged device, then you can only let natural selection do its work.

phoenixsan
Aug 11, 2013, 08:24 PM
woeful event. Hope that woman fully recovers and get well. But I will see how hard can be on Apple these kind of things....and more in China, where the goverment always want to have the upper hand with anybody....or just a bigger piece of the cake of the capitalist.......:(



:):apple:

Millionaire2K
Aug 11, 2013, 08:28 PM
I'm glad you asked, because as it turns out, yes, Apple does in fact have a warning right in the iPhone user manual (http://manuals.info.apple.com/en_US/iphone_user_guide.pdf) (although a user really shouldn't need the warning, as it is common sense, they provide it anyway):



And, the manual tells you in the very first sentence (highlighted) in Chapter 2 - Getting started:

Good advise. Now Apple should run a campaign with their billions of Dollars to inform people of this better. Every day MANY people use broken iPhones. Consumer safety should be top priority and it would not hurt putting this warning on the glass cover of a new phone. Or have a warning pop up on the phone when it detects an impact.

"Warning!! A physical impact has been detected on your iPhone. Please have your iPhone inspected at your local Apple store. Use of a damaged iPhone, such as one with a cracked screen, may cause injury."

Maybe include a phone number or link to Apple support.

I think this would be a smart thing to add to any phone.

roocka
Aug 11, 2013, 08:38 PM
Apple needs to invent a proprietary sensor that can detect if the device was EVER plugged into a third party charger that was not Apple approved. Then the damage caused at ANY time could be attributed to the faulty charger.

I honestly think this is in Apple's best interest. If China wants to counterfeit, then the Chinese need to be aware of the risks. The problem is that there are entire counterfeit APPLE STORES. The new middle class in China have likely never been into an actual Apple Store and don't know how to differentiate the two.

0x0x0x0
Aug 11, 2013, 08:43 PM
Apple needs to invent a proprietary sensor that can detect if the device was EVER plugged into a third party charger that was not Apple approved. Then the damage caused at ANY time could be attributed to the faulty charger.

I honestly think this is in Apple's best interest. If China wants to counterfeit, then the Chinese need to be aware of the risks. The problem is that there are entire counterfeit APPLE STORES. The new middle class in China have likely never been into an actual Apple Store and don't know how to differentiate the two.

I wouldn't be at all surprised if these "counterfeits" came off the same production line as the genuine parts...

Haserath
Aug 11, 2013, 08:46 PM
That's why they call it the eye phone.

Not surprising that some of the millions of phones out there would do this, especially after being damaged.

Seems like they could build a detection system for any serious damage to the phone and warn the user.

GSPice
Aug 11, 2013, 08:58 PM
You're kidding me...

Nope!

BHP41
Aug 11, 2013, 08:59 PM
Good advise. Now Apple should run a campaign with their billions of Dollars to inform people of this better. Every day MANY people use broken iPhones. Consumer safety should be top priority and it would not hurt putting this warning on the glass cover of a new phone. Or have a warning pop up on the phone when it detects an impact.

"Warning!! A physical impact has been detected on your iPhone. Please have your iPhone inspected at your local Apple store. Use of a damaged iPhone, such as one with a cracked screen, may cause injury."

Maybe include a phone number or link to Apple support.

I think this would be a smart thing to add to any phone.


So the whole population needs a ***** babysitter now?????

Millionaire2K
Aug 11, 2013, 09:00 PM
So the whole population needs a ***** babysitter now?????

If the phone will blowup then yes!

GSPice
Aug 11, 2013, 09:00 PM
Yeah, because they aren't real people right?

Lol you don't get it do you, so you go straight to emoting.

BHP41
Aug 11, 2013, 09:03 PM
If the phone will blowup then yes!

Has yours? How many of the millions of iPhones out there, have actually "blown up" ???

Please, don't use your iPhone anymore, it has a 0.00000000000001% chance of "blowing up". You need to rethink what your actually saying. And I say this in these words to you because we're of the same class.

kas23
Aug 11, 2013, 09:43 PM
Only in China, it seems. Wonder why? This is something that never appears to happen here in the land of litigation.

theheadguy
Aug 11, 2013, 09:49 PM
According to the woman's own admission, she had dropped the phone before, which had left obvious damage on the screen. That's the first safety rule, don't use an electric device with obvious damage.
LOL! Drop the phone, don't be surprised if it explodes. Stupid customer!!!

donutbagel
Aug 11, 2013, 09:52 PM
Apple needs to invent a proprietary sensor that can detect if the device was EVER plugged into a third party charger that was not Apple approved. Then the damage caused at ANY time could be attributed to the faulty charger.

Does Apple go around approving every single AC to USB DC charger out there that it considers safe?

----------

Lol you don't get it do you, so you go straight to emoting.

People online like to find stuff racist. I once got this guy really mad at me because I said that someone else's bad spelling was probably not due to not knowing English well (since he was using abbreviations like "bcuz"). It almost makes me want to outright troll.

Surreal
Aug 11, 2013, 09:55 PM
Does Apple go around approving every single AC to USB DC charger out there that it considers safe?

They sorta do. Any one that asks. [Made for iPhone/iPod]

FrankB1191
Aug 11, 2013, 09:55 PM
I asked my wife about this without going into detail. Her answer began with, "Well......" (they usually do). She said that if the design of the phone caused the incident, the the manufacturer shares a larger share of responsibility. The user assumed the risk when she chose to continue using the phone, so she would share responsibility as well. It then becomes an issue of how much each responsibility each party shares, and any settlement.

When looking at these cases, both sides bring in as many parties as possible. The glass manufacturer would be one. My wife had a case were one of the corporate subsidiaries manufactured screws for a Dodge minivan roof rack. Someone tied a mattress to the rack, the rack came off while the van driven down the highway, and a couple were killed on the motorcycle behind it. Every company that had any part in that roof rack was named in the suit. My wife flew down to Texas in a company jet, along with her engineering expert. I think there were about 6 other corporate jets that landed at roughly the same time, and the rack and parts were laid out on a table in a hangar. Each party sent an attorney and engineer to look at the rack. The funny thing was none of the different parties spoke to each other, and after staring at the rack, they all got back in their jets, and left..... CRAZY! These companies all have insurance for this sort of thing, but they have self retention that could cause them to pay the first $250,000 +/-, depending on which company it is.

donutbagel
Aug 11, 2013, 09:55 PM
fanboism--- a common disease.

Yep, and the  at the end is usually an indication.

Technarchy
Aug 11, 2013, 09:57 PM
Because it has the highest concentration of fake iPhones and fake iPhone parts which have safety issues.

Ya think.

But hey at least bootleg stuff it'd cheap. Just cost an eye on occasion.

donutbagel
Aug 11, 2013, 09:57 PM
They sorta do. Any one that asks. [Made for iPhone/iPod]

Yeah, that's true. Still, since they have Lightning going to USB, they're asking for any generic USB charger to work with it. They'd have to detect if people are using Apple knockoff chargers or maybe if they're using chargers not made by certain reputable companies, but I'm not sure if that's possible.

Technarchy
Aug 11, 2013, 10:02 PM
It's pretty simple. Morality has become a... Less important aspect in modern day life shall we say, thanks to communism, largely (it tends to have this effect on people). It's the only country that would try to stick antifreeze in toothpaste too. This kind of thing is not rare for China. Don't ask me for sources on the toothpaste thing; I'm sure plenty of articles about it are still up.

Or trying to pass cardboard off as meat. Anyone remember that story?

Just wait till an iPhone goes nuclear and destroys a city. Won't be New York or London. It'll be somewhere China.

gaximus
Aug 11, 2013, 10:30 PM
That does not look like the iPhone or its screen "exploded." Seems like she dropped the phone was upset about it and made up this story.

Here's what happened, she dropped it. It broke, made the screen unresponsive. Tried to end call, probably got mad and started hitting or pushing the screen really hard. Part of the crack screen popped out into her eye. No explosion

Plutonius
Aug 11, 2013, 10:39 PM
If they want something that will not explode, maybe they should build them better :D.

Millionaire2K
Aug 11, 2013, 10:39 PM
Has yours? How many of the millions of iPhones out there, have actually "blown up" ???

Please, don't use your iPhone anymore, it has a 0.00000000000001% chance of "blowing up". You need to rethink what your actually saying. And I say this in these words to you because we're of the same class.

Hey did you miss the 1st word of my sentence? I said IF. As in IF it happens they should warn you!! IF!! Do you get the meaning of IF.

"IF the phone will blowup then yes!" I want a warning.

rolsskk
Aug 11, 2013, 10:55 PM
I don't know about you, but after feeling a device that is normally cool to the touch, growing warmer over the time I'm using it, I'm not going to keep it anywhere near my face.

Apple...
Aug 11, 2013, 11:04 PM
Why is it always the Chinese that have problems? :confused:

Arfdog
Aug 11, 2013, 11:56 PM
Allow me to make some sensible explanations.

1) Is it genuine Apple? Are all parts genuine Apple?
2) The crack is in the corner. This is consistent with a large force hitting that corner, not heat nor a puffed up battery.
3) She states the screen exploded when making a call, presumably making it hot. The only heat source is the battery. The battery is located roughly in the middle of the phone. An overheated battery could expand and could cause the screen to crack.... but in the middle. That's where the most stress would be. The corners and edges would see no bending stress and therefore wouldn't originate a crack.
4) Glass screens, warm batteries are not unique to the iPhone.

The shards flying into her eye could not originate from a mid-screen crack. But an overheated battery can only cause a mid-screen crack. Therefore this corner crack was not the battery's fault.

JAT
Aug 11, 2013, 11:57 PM
This is nonsense. A phone is a device that MANY people drop. It should NOT explode just because it was dropped.
You sound like an accident waiting to happen. "Should"?? Reality might be a better place to live, try it out someday.

Lithium batteries that are damaged are a fire and even explosion hazard. Any damaged phone could have a damaged battery inside. You might not want to continue using them.

About the story...if that is an after-the-fact pic of the actual phone in question, I see no "explosion", like would be a battery issue, with fire. There would be more pieces missing, probably burn marks. Of course, we'll probably never have enough accurate facts to know, but that looks like a bent up corner that finally shot out a piece of glass that had been stressed from the prior accident.

MonstaMash
Aug 12, 2013, 12:04 AM
She was clearly holding it wrong.

Never a good idea to hold shattered glass against your face. Unfortunate situation.

mattyu007
Aug 12, 2013, 12:05 AM
I'm curious to know what caused such an explosion to occur in that awkward corner of the iPhone; it doesn't seem like there are any obviously dangerous components there.

Rajani Isa
Aug 12, 2013, 12:07 AM
Dude apple does not have an exploding iphone problem. Chinese lawyers have discovered their version of hot coffee

If they have discovered their version of hot coffee, then Apple does indeed have an exploding iPhone problem.

Apple needs to invent a proprietary sensor that can detect if the device was EVER plugged into a third party charger that was not Apple approved. Then the damage caused at ANY time could be attributed to the faulty charger.

I honestly think this is in Apple's best interest. If China wants to counterfeit, then the Chinese need to be aware of the risks. The problem is that there are entire counterfeit APPLE STORES. The new middle class in China have likely never been into an actual Apple Store and don't know how to differentiate the two.
I seem to recall the lightning cable kind of has one built in - and that it's been copied already.

mavis
Aug 12, 2013, 12:08 AM
He means AppleCare+ with the physical damage coverage. He's still wrong, since Canada isn't part of the US, though.
Yeah, I bought AppleCare+ for my iPhone 5. ;)

http://www.apple.com/jp/support/products/iphone.html

charlituna
Aug 12, 2013, 12:21 AM
Why is it always the Chinese? I almost don't care about stories like this anymore.

Because China is the land of knockoff parts. It's very possible that she had a non apple screen,battery or both.

Although given that the screen was admittedly damaged it is possible so was the battery which is under the right hand side of the display. An impact that would chip the screen could have led to a sliver of the display getting into the phone and somehow puncturing the battery soft cell exposing the lithium to air which makes it highly unstable. Since the glass was already compromised from being cracked it isn't hard to believe it would fully rupture etc

----------

It's happen like month ago I was charging my iPhone 4 I bought i like 3 years ago.

Which raises the possibility of worn out battery. If you keep charging a battery that is consumed it will heat up, expand etc.

----------

I'm willing to bet that many many accidents happen/caused by other manufactures phones, its just when it happens with an iPhone it gets pumped up by the media.:apple:

There is that to consider also. Same for why we don't hear about Samsung and Microsoft suing each other as much as we hear about either suing or being sued by Apple. Or why sites like this post articles that have nothing to do with Apple but drop something like 'iPad killer' in the headline to make it seem like it is connected.

macs4nw
Aug 12, 2013, 12:24 AM
Here's what happened, she dropped it. It broke, made the screen unresponsive. Tried to end call, probably got mad and started hitting or pushing the screen really hard. Part of the crack screen popped out into her eye. No explosion

Even though that is what could have happened, it may be an uphill battle for Apple, trying to prove that.

Good advise. Now Apple should run a campaign with their billions of Dollars to inform people of this better. Every day MANY people use broken iPhones. Consumer safety should be top priority and it would not hurt putting this warning on the glass cover of a new phone. Or have a warning pop up on the phone when it detects an impact.

"Warning!! A physical impact has been detected on your iPhone. Please have your iPhone inspected at your local Apple store. Use of a damaged iPhone, such as one with a cracked screen, may cause injury." Maybe include a phone number or link to Apple support. I think this would be a smart thing to add to any phone.

I'm not saying, this cannot be done, but where does a manufacturer's responsibility end, and where does our responsibility as consumers start, to use some good old fashioned common sense in the way we conduct ourselves? Most manufacturers provide their products with ample product use and safety instructions, but they are no substitute for a healthy dose of common sense we all need, in our daily lives.

I'm glad you asked, because as it turns out, yes, Apple does in fact have a warning right in the iPhone user manual (http://manuals.info.apple.com/en_US/iphone_user_guide.pdf) (although a user really shouldn't need the warning, as it is common sense, they provide it anyway):

WARNING: Failure to follow these safety instructions could result in fire, electric shock, or other injuries, or damage to iPhone or other property. Read all the safety information below before using iPhone.

Handling Handle iPhone with care. It is made of metal, glass, and plastic and has sensitive electronic components inside. iPhone can be damaged if dropped, burned, punctured, or crushed, or if it comes in contact with liquid. Don’t use a damaged iPhone, such as one with a cracked screen, as it may cause injury. If you’re concerned about scratching, consider using a case.

And, the manual tells you in the very first sentence (highlighted) in Chapter 2 - Getting started:

WARNING: To avoid injury, read Important safety information on page 146 before using iPhone.

Unfortunately, too many people don't read their manuals! When unpacking certain new products, you have probably come across one of those stickers, often with red lettering and large typeface, attached to a product in such a way, that you have to remove it, to be able to use the product for the first time. Almost always, that is a warning of some sort, that is also printed conspicuously somewhere in the user manual, yet manufacturers go to the trouble of putting that extra warning/caution on the product itself.

Some of those safety warnings, ominous as they may appear to be, have come into existence due to actual things that have happened to people.

Sadly (in this case), manufacturers can provide their products with the most readable and comprehensive manuals money can buy, but they are of no use, unless people actually read and follow them.

macbeta
Aug 12, 2013, 12:27 AM
I call that statement BULL!

Fact is apple only make up 13% of the global market, you telling me no one has ever suffered any injuries from the other 87%?

osaga
Aug 12, 2013, 01:04 AM
It's pretty obvious what happened... the battery got hot and expanded, putting pressure on the screen with enough force to send some debris 12" into someones eyes. Case closed. Whether or not the screen had already been cracked is a non-issue.

A friend's apartment in SF burned out because of a faulty ipod, true story.

If this had happened in the US, we might not even hear about it. But because the Chinese will jump all over anything Apple related, it's international news.

unagimiyagi
Aug 12, 2013, 01:06 AM
Smartphones are all about the same internally.
I doubt that the risk is very high for this to happen even with knockoff parts.
Still, China has got to learn that this quick money grab philosophy only hurts them in the longrun. Reputation is important. Ford makes great cars (per consumer reports) but b/c they truly used to suck, no one is buying them b/c it's going to take another 1-2 decades for them to recover, if they have that much time.

Chinese people won't buy anything that their own countrymen make. It doesn't take a genius to know that this erodes the very foundation of their economy long-term. There's cheaper and then there's outright crap. I'm betting that the aftermarket items are closer to outright crap.

weckart
Aug 12, 2013, 01:09 AM
Chinese people won't buy anything that their own countrymen make.

Chinese people don't have much choice when it comes to smartphones and computers because their own countrymen make pretty much all of them.

josh995
Aug 12, 2013, 01:23 AM
I'm wondering if some sort of new unauthorized cable has come out in china and that's what these iPhone problems are stemming from. It's just odd how all these things are happening in China. Doesn't China have some sort of anti-iPhone sentiment?

I'm not trying to suggest anything, I'm just curious. Again, I just find it odd how these incidents are all happening in china. You would totally hear about it if something like this happened in the US, the way our media is, it would be front page news.

Murphintosh
Aug 12, 2013, 01:33 AM
Dude apple does not have an exploding iphone problem. Chinese lawyers have discovered their version of hot coffee

Just so you know, Stella Liebeck v. McDonald's was a serious case.

To keep this short:
She suffered third-degree burns, was hospitalized for eight days, had skin grafting, and required two years of medical treatment.

She only wanted her medical expenses - $20,000 Mac offered $800.

Mac's coffee was served hotter than industry standards.

Mac had received more than 700 reports of coffee burns and paid $500,000 to settle claims from the previous 10 years.

There is much more to it including pictures if look. This was not an example of frivolous litigation.

benji888
Aug 12, 2013, 01:51 AM
I'm willing to bet that many many accidents happen/caused by other manufactures phones, its just when it happens with an iPhone it gets pumped up by the media.:apple:

that, and, we don't know what kind of standards there are in China...electrical standards...for suing people (sue happy US sues for anything, ugh), as already stated, imitation iphone parts, etc. ...plus, like macbeta says, most of these things don't get media attention from devices made by other manufacturers...but, I don't think media should give a ***t unless someone actually wins a lawsuit, as many of these CLAIMS (which is all it is at this point), are due to NEGLECT.

benji888
Aug 12, 2013, 02:05 AM
I'm glad you asked, because as it turns out, yes, Apple does in fact have a warning right in the iPhone user manual (http://manuals.info.apple.com/en_US/iphone_user_guide.pdf) (although a user really shouldn't need the warning, as it is common sense, they provide it anyway):



And, the manual tells you in the very first sentence (highlighted) in Chapter 2 - Getting started:

Good advise. Now Apple should run a campaign with their billions of Dollars to inform people of this better. Every day MANY people use broken iPhones. Consumer safety should be top priority and it would not hurt putting this warning on the glass cover of a new phone. Or have a warning pop up on the phone when it detects an impact.

"Warning!! A physical impact has been detected on your iPhone. Please have your iPhone inspected at your local Apple store. Use of a damaged iPhone, such as one with a cracked screen, may cause injury."

Maybe include a phone number or link to Apple support.

I think this would be a smart thing to add to any phone.

Millionaire2K, you need to read what HiRez already posted! (same page of thread). There already IS a warning about dropping the iPhone. ...Just because people are too lazy to read the manual, doesn't mean they can blame the person who wrote it! ...it states at the gas station not to light up a cigarette while pumping gas....

parish
Aug 12, 2013, 02:10 AM
Although given that the screen was admittedly damaged it is possible so was the battery which is under the right hand side of the display. An impact that would chip the screen could have led to a sliver of the display getting into the phone and somehow puncturing the battery soft cell exposing the lithium to air which makes it highly unstable. Since the glass was already compromised from being cracked it isn't hard to believe it would fully rupture etc

Quite feasible, plus there may have been other damage - was the back of the phone damaged when it was dropped? A damaged back is more likely to damage the battery too.

Remember that iPhone that burst into flames on an aircraft in Australia? Same sort of reaction as here but when it was examined (by independent people, the Australian Air Safety people) it turned out that a cowboy 3rd party repairer had left a rogue screw inside the case which punctured the battery.

To those who reckon this is Apple's fault (or, at least, Apple should have somehow made the phone 101% idiot-proof) let me ask you this:

Suppose you had a minor prang in your car that damaged the front wing. Looks a mess, but the car drives OK so you continue using it. Unknown to you however, with the suspension movement the damaged wing is rubbing on the tyre. At 70mph it eventually wears through, the tyre fails, you lose control and slam into a wall breaking both your legs. You'd claim the car manufacturer was at fault for failing to detect the potential danger and disable the starter motor to prevent you driving it until you'd had the car checked out, right?

JGRE
Aug 12, 2013, 02:44 AM
Why do these things only happen in China? :confused:

AdonisSMU
Aug 12, 2013, 03:43 AM
Good advise. Now Apple should run a campaign with their billions of Dollars to inform people of this better. Every day MANY people use broken iPhones. Consumer safety should be top priority and it would not hurt putting this warning on the glass cover of a new phone. Or have a warning pop up on the phone when it detects an impact.

"Warning!! A physical impact has been detected on your iPhone. Please have your iPhone inspected at your local Apple store. Use of a damaged iPhone, such as one with a cracked screen, may cause injury."

Maybe include a phone number or link to Apple support.

I think this would be a smart thing to add to any phone.
Or people should just take it upon themselves to read the instructions.

----------

I have been hearing these sort of news quite extensively these days..another incident where a woman died of the current that flowed through her i phone while talking from it and was connected to the charging pint..same sort of incidents are going on in Samsung as well.

sounds like an excuse to use Chinese phones instead....ohhh wait...

yusukeaoki
Aug 12, 2013, 03:56 AM
Everything in China explodes.
From phones to human waste.
I mean everything.

Millionaire2K
Aug 12, 2013, 04:21 AM
Or people should just take it upon themselves to read the instructions.

----------





I agree... But we all know people don't and still use their phones when they are damaged while not understanding the possible risk.

Brian Y
Aug 12, 2013, 04:42 AM
You know what, I really wouldn't be surprised if these stories were being pumped into the media by the Chinese government as a way of trying damage Apple's reputation out there.

And for the record, if an explosion is powerful enough to blow glass over a foot into your eye - do you think the (very soft) aluminium bezel would be perfectly intact/unscarred?

olowott
Aug 12, 2013, 05:03 AM
why must it be from someone in china, whats up with this :confused:

Mark Booth
Aug 12, 2013, 05:05 AM
My dog knocked our 50-inch TV off of the stand onto the hardwood floor. When I picked up the TV, there was a crack in the upper right corner of the screen. I decided to leave it plugged in and use it anyway (it still seemed to work fine). But, a week later, smoke started coming out of it and phhht, there was a big flash of flame which popped the circuit breaker (no fire, fortunately).

The above is not true. But using the TV after it was CLEARLY damaged would have been a stupid thing to do. Stupid is as stupid does.

Just sayin'!

Mark

Reason077
Aug 12, 2013, 05:10 AM
I have had several iPhones explode over the last 2-3 years. The iPhone 5 seems particularly vulnerable to this. These "explosions" aren't particularly violent or dangerous (IMO) - more like burning than an explosion - but certainly ruin the phone, and, in one case, a nice pair of pants.

In each case the Apple Store has been very quick to hide away the damaged phone and give me a replacement. In each case, the Apple store employees seem to go very quiet when they see the device and make very little comment. It seems to me as if they are aware that there is an issue but are under instructions not to talk about it.

NSeven
Aug 12, 2013, 06:10 AM
Question is.... Was she running the new Beta????? :O

Popeye206
Aug 12, 2013, 06:25 AM
Hummm.... drop phone and crack screen... phone starts heating up when in use.... decision, keep using phone. Sorry... not a very smart decision.

BHP41
Aug 12, 2013, 06:33 AM
Hey did you miss the 1st word of my sentence? I said IF. As in IF it happens they should warn you!! IF!! Do you get the meaning of IF.

"IF the phone will blowup then yes!" I want a warning.

Hahaha. Please do tell us all, how will the phone know "if" it's going to blow up. Stop trying to back peddle. Your original statement is wrong. You want a baby sitter and the reality is, people need to use common sense. Unfortunately, judges feel they need to award stupid behavior. So this women will probably get some undeserved money.

starbird
Aug 12, 2013, 06:36 AM
I dropped my palm Prē once. No noticeable damage. About a week later, it started getting very warm in my pocket. I took it out, and could literally watch the battery meter drop, about a percentage per second. So I waited until it was fully discharged and cooled down.

Out it back in the charger, and it would not take a charge. Took the back cover off, and you could see the battery blistered.

Took it to the Verizon store, they gave me a new battery.

This one chargedů then proceeded to "meltdown"

This told me two things.
1. Just because I didn't see damage, doesn't mean it wasn't there. A regulating sensor could have gone bad or been damaged. This is especially true in a phone like the iPhone where you can't remove the battery, therefore, not see the hidden damage.

2. This is possible on any device with a battery. I've had it happen on Logitech mice.

So we can be quick to judge, both sides, but the fact is that devices like iPhones are most certainly not made to be ok being dropped. They may, in fact, be ok, but that is not the expectation.

0x0x0x0
Aug 12, 2013, 06:44 AM
Suppose you had a minor prang in your car that damaged the front wing. Looks a mess, but the car drives OK so you continue using it. Unknown to you however, with the suspension movement the damaged wing is rubbing on the tyre. At 70mph it eventually wears through, the tyre fails, you lose control and slam into a wall breaking both your legs. You'd claim the car manufacturer was at fault for failing to detect the potential danger and disable the starter motor to prevent you driving it until you'd had the car checked out, right?

You'd know within a few minutes, trust me, mainly by a distinctive smell and white smoke pouring out from under the wheel arch... The reason- tyres are engineered to give all possible signs of early failure. The reason I know- something similar happened to me (and that was a non-reinforced, i.e. LI 88, tyre)...

----------

Hummm.... drop phone and crack screen... phone starts heating up when in use.... decision, keep using phone. Sorry... not a very smart decision.

Read the story- she was on the phone for 40 mins, once she noticed it started heating up she tried to turn it off but couldn't...

Intricacy
Aug 12, 2013, 06:54 AM
Noticed how this and all the previous reports of iPhone causing bodily harm in the last few month originate from China and not anywhere else in the world ?

Notice how there's a sudden and big influx of complaints from china about iPhone and how the media tries to portray Apple as evil. Remember that incident where the Chinese celebrities used social media to badmouth Apple?

Co-incidence? I think not!

Brian Y
Aug 12, 2013, 06:56 AM
I have had several iPhones explode over the last 2-3 years. The iPhone 5 seems particularly vulnerable to this. These "explosions" aren't particularly violent or dangerous (IMO) - more like burning than an explosion - but certainly ruin the phone, and, in one case, a nice pair of pants.

In each case the Apple Store has been very quick to hide away the damaged phone and give me a replacement. In each case, the Apple store employees seem to go very quiet when they see the device and make very little comment. It seems to me as if they are aware that there is an issue but are under instructions not to talk about it.

So you've had several iPhones explode/overheat/burn? Sorry but I don't for one second believe this.

mollyparrot
Aug 12, 2013, 07:09 AM
According to the woman's own admission, she had dropped the phone before, which had left obvious damage on the screen. That's the first safety rule, don't use an electric device with obvious damage.

This is scaring me. I am a high school teacher and at least 20-30% of my students have iphones with badly cracked screens. I have no idea what on Earth they do to them, but they even laugh about the damage and compare to see whose screen is most damaged.

My 3GS was still in mint condition (until I had to get a replacement in June), with no case, after all these years. Are the new models that much more fragile?

parish
Aug 12, 2013, 07:20 AM
You'd know within a few minutes, trust me, mainly by a distinctive smell and white smoke pouring out from under the wheel arch... The reason- tyres are engineered to give all possible signs of early failure. The reason I know- something similar happened to me (and that was a non-reinforced, i.e. LI 88, tyre)

Maybe you would, maybe you wouldn't. The point I was trying to illustrate is that once you damage something it no longer conforms to the manufacturer's design specification therefore to expect it to still conform to the manufacturer's performance and safety specifications is, IMHO, completely unreasonable.

Plus, as others have asked, why do all these problems turn up in China? Is the US not Apple's largest market so, statistically, you'd expect the largest number of exploding/self-igniting iPhones to be in the US?

Shearwater
Aug 12, 2013, 07:35 AM
Why is it always the Chinese? I almost don't care about stories like this anymore.


I don't think we should ever stop caring about someone being hurt!!

ValSalva
Aug 12, 2013, 07:43 AM
Was it attached to the same type of charger (counterfeit) that cause the electrocution in China? Probably not. Man, if something is going to happen it's going to happen in China :eek:

rdlink
Aug 12, 2013, 07:56 AM
Yeah, I meant AppleCare+. And yes it is available in Canada as well.

And since we only let the Canadians think they're a sovereign nation...

Just kidding, hosers. Don't get all up in arms.. :p

Terrin
Aug 12, 2013, 08:13 AM
Yeah, because they aren't real people right?

Maybe it is because 1) the iPhone has nothing significant to do with the story, 2) these stories only seem to happen in China, and 3) the Chinese have a history of trying to smear Apple's reputation to advance the sale of its own cellphone companies.

----------

It's happen like month ago I was charging my iPhone 4 I bought i like 3 years ago when they came the first iPhone 4 well anyways I burn my hand no kidding was really hot when i touch the screen seems the dock connector had a short circuit or something internal the speaker was totally melt also part of the motherboard turn sorta black but was working and still working for my surprise but everything was ok so I change the dock connector and the speakers.

Newbie, let me guess you are in China.

----------

Dude apple does not have an exploding iphone problem. Chinese lawyers have discovered their version of hot coffee

Yes, except with the hot coffee story the lady actually had a case. With MacDonalds they had hundreds of complaints the coffee was too hot, the coffee was hotter than it should have been, and the like 90 year old women suffered third degree burns and was hospitalized for several days.

----------

AppleCare is only offered in the States.

Yes, except that is not true.

Shane1905
Aug 12, 2013, 08:30 AM
AppleCare is only offered in the States.

I wonder what I paid for in the uk then o_O

MacDarcy
Aug 12, 2013, 08:37 AM
Okay. A Chinese lady already got electrocuted by an iPhone, now another Chinese lady is injured by an exploding iphone? Something smells fishy in Shanghai.

jameskatt
Aug 12, 2013, 09:16 AM
Why do these "accidents" only happen to the Chinese when Apple has only 5% of marketshare in China?

1. Sabotage by a disgruntled Chinese manufacturer employee.

2. Thousands of fake Apple knockoffs that cause electrocutions.

3. Fake story submitted by Samsung.

KeeneDC
Aug 12, 2013, 09:21 AM
but is the original photo of a broken iphone4? Regardless, let's see what actually happened. Maybe Apple will replace counterfeit iPhones with real Apple ones for $10?

Battlefield Fan
Aug 12, 2013, 09:30 AM
Why is it always the Chinese? I almost don't care about stories like this anymore.

Your ignorance is scary...

ScottishDuck
Aug 12, 2013, 09:34 AM
Oh boy I'm a massive racist and a big Apple fan so I can't wait to comment on this article!

PracticalMac
Aug 12, 2013, 09:38 AM
correct me if I am wrong, but the battery is in the middle of the phone, not the corner?

I bet investigators find the iPhone is fully functional and battery is sealed and fine, but the charger is unauthorized.

everything-i
Aug 12, 2013, 09:47 AM
No, there could theoretically be a defect in the iPhone that makes it very susceptible to blowing up when dropped. You could even buy an iPhone from Apple that comes with a dent on it. Does Apple warn its users not to use a damaged iPhone?

If there was a general defect it would have already been spotted by now, there are millions of these devices out there and you regularly see damaged phones being used. It could be anything, a botched repair for instance, like the iPhone that exploded on a plane a couple of years back because whoever repaired it botched the job and puncturing the battery. I got to say though that holding a piece of shattered glass next to your face doesn't sound like the smartest thing to do yet you see a lot of people using phones with shattered screens doing just that.

GSPice
Aug 12, 2013, 09:47 AM
I don't think we should ever stop caring about someone being hurt!!

So between caring about the "product" part of the news and the "human" part of the news, you decide that I don't care about the human part? Nice. :rolleyes:

FirePhantom
Aug 12, 2013, 09:48 AM
And you never ever dropped you phone?.. I've dropped my old N95 so many times I've lost count, changed plastics covers (as they were "showing signs of damage") but never electronics, and the phone never exploded... nor has my new L920 and I've dropped that a few times now...
No, I never have. What does that have to do with anything, though?

I never said anything about the electronics. We're talking about an advanced tempered glass, here. Sounds to me like the fractured glass failed catastrophically when heated by the antenna after 40 minutes of use.

Glass is a fascinating and sometimes scary (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UyhdMa1ikKM) material.

GSPice
Aug 12, 2013, 09:54 AM
Your ignorance is scary...

Care to elaborate? Are you, too, deciding that I'm racist, and by definition, ignorant?

Gosh it's so funny to see what people decide to read into comments. :rolleyes:

----------

Oh boy I'm a massive racist and a big Apple fan so I can't wait to comment on this article!

It's funny how you think racism is anywhere around here. Have you not read about Chinese markets, ad nauseum?

gnasher729
Aug 12, 2013, 09:58 AM
This is scaring me. I am a high school teacher and at least 20-30% of my students have iphones with badly cracked screens. I have no idea what on Earth they do to them, but they even laugh about the damage and compare to see whose screen is most damaged.

You just take your chances. If you buy a brand new iPhone and use it, there is a chance that it will explode. That chance is very, very low (or with way over a hundred million phones sold, we would hear about it all the time). If you drop the phone, especially if you drop the phone so hard that the screen is damaged, obviously the chance of something going wrong will increase. It's still not a very high chance because it is still rare that we hear about exploding phones that were damaged before, but the chance is higher. In this unfortunate case, not only was the screen damaged long before the incident, but there was malfunctioning just preceding the incident. If you dropped the phone so hard that the screen is damaged, _and_ you have actually malfunctioning, the chance of something going wrong is higher again than with a phone that has no visible malfunction.

----------

I'm wondering if some sort of new unauthorized cable has come out in china and that's what these iPhone problems are stemming from.

Only if that unauthorised cable somehow caused the woman to drop her phone. You didn't by any chance read the article? Anyway, the cables are not the problem. It is the charger. If you buy a rubbish charger that puts 220 Volt into a genuine Apple cable connected to a genuine iPhone, chances are that you will get fried. If you plug a rubbish cable into a genuine Apple (or other good quality) charger, connect to a fake iPhone, you'll be safe.

GSPice
Aug 12, 2013, 10:07 AM
People online like to find stuff racist. I once got this guy really mad at me because I said that someone else's bad spelling was probably not due to not knowing English well (since he was using abbreviations like "bcuz"). It almost makes me want to outright troll.

Double true. I guess part of it is human nature to assume that you're morally superior to the next guy, and it feels good to post online because of that.

Oh well. Your comment was a breath of fresh air, anyway.

tlevier
Aug 12, 2013, 10:10 AM
Not really but yes. I've dropped my iPhone 5, maybe 6 times, since launch day. Still works great and no cracks across the screen. But you can see where it's been damaged and most notably, in the upper right hand corner. You might not notice the damage without a close look, but if you pinch the top corner (front and back) you can hear a little click, suggesting that there's no longer a good seal.

Soo...I better not talk on the phone for 40 mins or get too mad at it when it overheats. I guess that's the lesson here?

bushido
Aug 12, 2013, 10:12 AM
According to the woman's own admission, she had dropped the phone before, which had left obvious damage on the screen. That's the first safety rule, don't use an electric device with obvious damage.

tell that to 50 % of all iPhone users :p

waltand07
Aug 12, 2013, 10:12 AM
These things are always happening China. It's probably a HiPhone on some other fake iPhone.

benpatient
Aug 12, 2013, 10:18 AM
She was holding it wrong!

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_O0h61kl5hik/TCTrk531_FI/AAAAAAAAEXg/SDnpAMIeKiM/s400/iphone4.jpg

theluggage
Aug 12, 2013, 10:19 AM
This is scaring me.

The risk of your phone blowing up is probably on a par with getting struck by lightning or winning 100 million on the lottery. The only reason most people ever hear about it happening is that there are hundreds of millions of people around the world buying lotto tickets, going out in thunderstorms and dropping their phones, and when it does happen it tends to make the news - especially if the phone has an Apple on it.

If it's cracked, maybe the risk is more like getting struck by lightning while playing golf: significantly raised but still nothing to worry about.

Otherwise - you work in a school with hundreds of kids using damaged phones. How often is your lesson interrupted by the sound of someone's iPhone cooking off?

charlituna
Aug 12, 2013, 10:26 AM
I have had several iPhones explode over the last 2-3 years. The iPhone 5 seems particularly vulnerable to this. These "explosions" aren't particularly violent or dangerous (IMO) - more like burning than an explosion - but certainly ruin the phone, and, in one case, a nice pair of pants.

In each case the Apple Store has been very quick to hide away the damaged phone and give me a replacement. In each case, the Apple store employees seem to go very quiet when they see the device and make very little comment. It seems to me as if they are aware that there is an issue but are under instructions not to talk about it.

On the contrary, there may not be an issue with the phones at all. It could be you, your house wiring or such

They go quiet and say nothing because anything they do say could be used by you if you decided to take it to court and they don't have authority to be in that kind of position. Regarding there being an issue, that it might be your fault or anything else. Many companies have similar rules

----------

correct me if I am wrong, but the battery is in the middle of the phone, not the corner?

.

You're wrong.

The battery runs down the right hand (as you are looking at display) 1/3 to 1/2 of phone, beginning just below the missing chip from the photo. Not far fetched to imagine a chip getting inside and poking the soft cell

Huracan
Aug 12, 2013, 10:29 AM
Sounds like a bogus claim. At least from the picture it doesn't look like it has any signs of explosion. It seems to have sighs of the glass having been shattered, perhaps due to blunt force.

AppleWarMachine
Aug 12, 2013, 10:33 AM
was it a genuine iPhone or a knockoff, like that charger story?

mark.knowles
Aug 12, 2013, 10:36 AM
Why is it always the Chinese? I almost don't care about stories like this anymore.

A number of people have taken offense to this sweeping comment, including myself. And even though I have no clue of your age, I'm going to chalk up your statement to an error of youth.

Greene1123
Aug 12, 2013, 10:42 AM
hehe eyePhone

GSPice
Aug 12, 2013, 10:51 AM
A number of people have taken offense to this sweeping comment, including myself. And even though I have no clue of your age, I'm going to chalk up your statement to an error of youth.

And guess what, an vastly greater number of people actually see objectivity beyond reactive emotion. Your inability to do so may be an error of youth or old age, depending on your world view.

waveboreale
Aug 12, 2013, 10:56 AM
Why is it always the Chinese? I almost don't care about stories like this anymore.

how racist can you be ?

tzeshan
Aug 12, 2013, 10:58 AM
I am guessing this story is a scam. The reason is only a corner of the phone is shown in the picture.

mseth
Aug 12, 2013, 11:05 AM
AppleCare is only offered in the States.

You forgot Canada and a dozen other countries.

GSPice
Aug 12, 2013, 11:07 AM
how racist can you be ?

ROFL! Have you even read the comments on this thread? :rolleyes: Not even gonna bother...

Emotion, reaction = easy.
Reason, objectivity = a bit harder, not as fun, doesn't feel as good.

0x0x0x0
Aug 12, 2013, 11:17 AM
Only in China, it seems. Wonder why?

Going on a whim here- maybe it's one of the few countries where people having forked out a lot of money (even if by way of a committal to a long term contract and paying that money by instalments) expect a product of a good quality, where as in the Western world we've all grown to expect to be fleeced for money and get **** products and equally "amazing" customer care in return?..

KdParker
Aug 12, 2013, 11:36 AM
I call that statement BULL!

Not complete bull, there are always stories of cell phone doing odd things that gets reported, but leading with 'iPhone eplodes' gets you more attention that simply 'Cell phone explods'

Solomani
Aug 12, 2013, 11:39 AM
Why is it always the Chinese? I almost don't care about stories like this anymore.

The largest population in the world would correlate with the largest number of opportunistic scammers and liars?

kkat69
Aug 12, 2013, 11:44 AM
Ok, I'm gonna go ahead and call the next one;

"Chinese <insert gender here>'s genitals burned after iPhone explodes after being dropped in toilet, individual states it didn't get wet and was using an official Apple iToilet."

J.acks
Aug 12, 2013, 11:50 AM
Lol. China again....

JAT
Aug 12, 2013, 11:53 AM
This is scaring me. I am a high school teacher and at least 20-30% of my students have iphones with badly cracked screens. I have no idea what on Earth they do to them, but they even laugh about the damage and compare to see whose screen is most damaged.

My 3GS was still in mint condition (until I had to get a replacement in June), with no case, after all these years. Are the new models that much more fragile?
You're a teacher. Teach them something about lithium batteries.

Oh, also, the cracked screens have become a cool thing, like torn jeans in various years. Some of them are probably intentional.

appleisking
Aug 12, 2013, 12:00 PM
This is scaring me. I am a high school teacher and at least 20-30% of my students have iphones with badly cracked screens. I have no idea what on Earth they do to them, but they even laugh about the damage and compare to see whose screen is most damaged.

My 3GS was still in mint condition (until I had to get a replacement in June), with no case, after all these years. Are the new models that much more fragile?

iPhone 4 is because the back is glass, so it will crack for sure. iPhone 5 is more resistant due to aluminum, but also consider teens are far more haphazard about their belongings than adults.

skinned66
Aug 12, 2013, 12:02 PM
That obviously isn't a picture of the phone in question...it belies a phone with a screen that "exploded."

----------

Ok, I'm gonna go ahead and call the next one;

"Chinese <insert gender here>'s gentiles burned after iPhone explodes after being dropped in toilet, individual states it didn't get wet and was using an official Apple iToilet."

I think most Chinese are gentiles. ;)

JAT
Aug 12, 2013, 12:04 PM
Just so you know, Stella Liebeck v. McDonald's was a serious case.

Serious INJURY, not so sure about "case", she did really stupid actions with her coffee. Legal liability can be on the victim, too.

Also, McD's coffee temp went back up after a brief drop due to her case, because most people apparently like it that way, so some of their stores could still be serving it at a temp you feel is too hot. As a comparison to the recent iPhone issues in China, I'm pretty sure Apple will continue to have glass surfaces and the phone will still need electricity.

Sardonick007
Aug 12, 2013, 12:14 PM
Is it just me, or do Chinese women seem to be magnets for exploding Apple products?

kkat69
Aug 12, 2013, 12:20 PM
Just so you know, Stella Liebeck v. McDonald's was a serious case.

I never considered this a serious case and won't discuss it much beyond the obvious,

Coffee was HOT (hotter than "standards" who cares, it's still HOT!)
Driving with said HOT coffee in one hand, steering wheel in another
Putting a cup of HOT coffee between your legs while you drive
Driving with HOT coffee in hand
Bumps in road with HOT coffee

Get the picture? Sure millions do it, and they do it at their own risk as do I. If the cup feels hot, that's because the coffee is HOT.

I always wanted to find this woman and smack her. The coffee was hot, she knew better. I mean I'm not gonna sue Mickey D's because their quarterpounder oozed ketchup on my expensive suit just because they used more ketchup than the industry standard. If I spill coffee on my legs because of carelessness while drinking and driving then ooops, I'm at fault. We don't sue the ABC store for our loved ones getting hurt in a drunk driver accident... or maybe we should?

i4m
Aug 12, 2013, 12:24 PM
A number of people have taken offense to this sweeping comment, including myself. And even though I have no clue of your age, I'm going to chalk up your statement to an error of youth.


You can always ask for clarification before expressing your offense...

Gasu E.
Aug 12, 2013, 12:32 PM
My dog knocked our 50-inch TV off of the stand onto the hardwood floor. When I picked up the TV, there was a crack in the upper right corner of the screen. I decided to leave it plugged in and use it anyway (it still seemed to work fine). But, a week later, smoke started coming out of it and phhht, there was a big flash of flame which popped the circuit breaker (no fire, fortunately).

The above is not true. But using the TV after it was CLEARLY damaged would have been a stupid thing to do. Stupid is as stupid does.

Just sayin'!

Mark

Shaggy dog story.

----------

I never considered this a serious case and won't discuss it much beyond the obvious,

Coffee was HOT (hotter than "standards" who cares, it's still HOT!)
Driving with said HOT coffee in one hand, steering wheel in another
Putting a cup of HOT coffee between your legs while you drive
Driving with HOT coffee in hand
Bumps in road with HOT coffee?

She wasn't the driver. In fact the car wasn't moving. The jolt that caused the spillage was solely due to her pulling the lid off the coffee.

sna
Aug 12, 2013, 12:35 PM
Why only in china ?

Are you kidding me? Apple always had exploding problems , remember the Macbooks exploding?

This raises an Alarm , I wonder if Apple Products sold in china has "to be sold in China only" Label !!!

Once I was trying to buy products from Micron in the 1990's The manager asked me : do you want the Safety tests or not ? it will cost you cheaper If we ship you "only for you" products.

yes this happens in the business. and it was a shipment to a third world country , I canceled Micron and orderd from DELL. they never said such horrible thing .

GSPice
Aug 12, 2013, 12:54 PM
Why only in china ?

Are you kidding me? Apple always had exploding problems , remember the Macbooks exploding?

This raises an Alarm , I wonder if Apple Products sold in china has "to be sold in China only" Label !!!

Once I was trying to buy products from Micron in the 1990's The manager asked me : do you want the Safety tests or not ? it will cost you cheaper If we ship you "only for you" products.

yes this happens in the business. and it was a shipment to a third world country , I canceled Micron and orderd from DELL. they never said such horrible thing .

Oh wow. :rolleyes: There's a sky and it's falling. Or should I say it's already fallen and you've wisely avoided it. :rolleyes:

gnasher729
Aug 12, 2013, 01:11 PM
I never considered this a serious case and won't discuss it much beyond the obvious,

Coffee was HOT (hotter than "standards" who cares, it's still HOT!)
Driving with said HOT coffee in one hand, steering wheel in another
Putting a cup of HOT coffee between your legs while you drive
Driving with HOT coffee in hand
Bumps in road with HOT coffee

Get the picture? Sure millions do it, and they do it at their own risk as do I. If the cup feels hot, that's because the coffee is HOT.

I always wanted to find this woman and smack her. The coffee was hot, she knew better. I mean I'm not gonna sue Mickey D's because their quarterpounder oozed ketchup on my expensive suit just because they used more ketchup than the industry standard. If I spill coffee on my legs because of carelessness while drinking and driving then ooops, I'm at fault. We don't sue the ABC store for our loved ones getting hurt in a drunk driver accident... or maybe we should?

What a totally ignorant post. Totally, totally ignorant. The picture that you try to paint is wrong from the start to the end.

The woman was not driving. The car wasn't moving, the engine wasn't running.
She didn't have the steering wheel in one hand. No need to hold the steering wheel, because the car wasn't moving, the engine wasn't running.
She didn't put a cup of hot coffee between her legs, because she wasn't driving.
She wasn't driving with hot coffee in hand, because she wasn't driving at all. The car wasn't moving.
Which is why there were no bumps in the road, because the car wasn't moving.

McDonald's was selling coffee that was much too hot. They knew it was much too hot, because they had already settled 700 cases. Even though they new it was much too hot, they continued making it much too hot to safe money: They offered free coffee refills, but by making the coffee much too hot they made sure that people couldn't drink their coffee for ages, and wouldn't take McDonald's up on their free coffee refills offer.

So really, if you want to smack someone, why don't you smack yourself?

----------

The risk of your phone blowing up is probably on a par with getting struck by lightning or winning 100 million on the lottery.

Actually, much lower than the risk of being struck by lightning, and a lot higher than the chance of winning 100 million on the lottery.

Chances of being struck by lightning during your lifetime are estimated around 1 in 6,250. Chances of being struck in a year about one in 500,000.

MN7119
Aug 12, 2013, 01:44 PM
Was it an iPhone or a HiPhone?:eek:

sna
Aug 12, 2013, 01:46 PM
Oh wow. :rolleyes: There's a sky and it's falling. Or should I say it's already fallen and you've wisely avoided it. :rolleyes:

I avoided cheating the consumers .. by buying a Product with Micron name on it , while they have untested power supplies , and not proper Shielding .. these things in 1990's were easy not to notice .

anyways .. I am Just talking that this should raise an Alarm. not say why china and not other places .. ASK APPLE WHY

GoCubsGo
Aug 12, 2013, 01:48 PM
Even though they new it was much too hot, they continued making it much too hot to safe money: They offered free coffee refills, but by making the coffee much too hot they made sure that people couldn't drink their coffee for ages, and wouldn't take McDonald's up on their free coffee refills offer.


Very curious about this statement. It is easy enough to throw ice in coffee to cool it down. It isn't delicious watered down, but it serves the purpose. Point I am trying to get at is whether this is a personal opinion or fact. Do you just assume hotter than average coffee was being served to save money or was it hotter than average because it just was?

My coffee brews at 192║; so says my Keurig.

macchiato2009
Aug 12, 2013, 01:57 PM
Will Tim take a flight to China to go apologize to this woman ? :rolleyes:

Gasu E.
Aug 12, 2013, 02:09 PM
Very curious about this statement. It is easy enough to throw ice in coffee to cool it down. It isn't delicious watered down, but it serves the purpose. Point I am trying to get at is whether this is a personal opinion or fact. Do you just assume hotter than average coffee was being served to save money or was it hotter than average because it just was?

My coffee brews at 192║; so says my Keurig.

Well, it's even easier to stop buying McD's coffee, which is what I did after I incurred 2nd degree burns on my mouth on two separate occasions. But I'm very curious exactly how your preecription would work, exactly. For example, do you carry around a thermometer for the purpose of testing coffee before you drink it? Or do you actually use your mouth/ lips to test it, adding the ice AFTER your skin starts peeling? Also, where do you get the ice? You can get it from the McD's soda machine; but then, you first have to make sure you test the coffee before you leave the restaurant-- but of course, if it happened to have been the right temperature in the first place, than you would have made it too cool by lifting the lid before you planned to drink it. Of course, you could drive away, and start to drink it while in the car-- then you could drive back to McD's to get the ice. Not very convenient.
Or, finally, McD's could put notes on the coffee recommending you test it before you leave the premises.

Goodness, drinking coffee safely at McDonald's is really, really complicated; it certainly seems to require a lot of planning! Maybe they should put that in their ads! "Not recommended for people who want a quick, simple, safe cup of coffee."

skinned66
Aug 12, 2013, 02:20 PM
Good advise. Now Apple should run a campaign with their billions of Dollars to inform people of this better. Every day MANY people use broken iPhones.

They still wouldn't stop. Getting it fixed is expensive. AppleCare+ isn't available everywhere but it's also not that popular from my personal anecdotal experience. I have about 20 or so friends with different iPhone models. Only one ever bought AppleCare (not even +) and I can name 4 right now that have cracked or shattered screens.

I remember paying $220 total at an Apple store (Canada) to get my 4S swapped after it debuted because of a shattered screen to keep the warranty. The way things are now if that happened to my phone tomorrow, I couldn't afford that repair for a while.

kenetic
Aug 12, 2013, 02:55 PM
China will have a high concentration of iPhone products. There is no way to avoid the publicity.

When was the last time you see a person with a crack screen and they stop using the iPhone? Not a lot! I have seen people continue using his iPhone when the front and back screen crack. They used tape to temporary fix the screen.

I want to know the result investigation. Who fault was it?

chr1s60
Aug 12, 2013, 04:14 PM
This is why I text message. Just another way of keeping myself safe.

rdlink
Aug 12, 2013, 04:25 PM
This is why I text message. Just another way of keeping myself safe.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=paveysEZsy8

iHateMacs
Aug 12, 2013, 04:48 PM
This is not restricted to iPhone5

I am pretty sure that ANYTHING exploding will be injurious to your eyes.

If your dog exploded, your eyes would still be at risk.

JAT
Aug 12, 2013, 05:13 PM
Well, it's even easier to stop buying McD's coffee, which is what I did after I incurred 2nd degree burns on my mouth on two separate occasions. But I'm very curious exactly how your preecription would work, exactly. For example, do you carry around a thermometer for the purpose of testing coffee before you drink it? Or do you actually use your mouth/ lips to test it, adding the ice AFTER your skin starts peeling? Also, where do you get the ice? You can get it from the McD's soda machine; but then, you first have to make sure you test the coffee before you leave the restaurant-- but of course, if it happened to have been the right temperature in the first place, than you would have made it too cool by lifting the lid before you planned to drink it. Of course, you could drive away, and start to drink it while in the car-- then you could drive back to McD's to get the ice. Not very convenient.
Or, finally, McD's could put notes on the coffee recommending you test it before you leave the premises.

Goodness, drinking coffee safely at McDonald's is really, really complicated; it certainly seems to require a lot of planning! Maybe they should put that in their ads! "Not recommended for people who want a quick, simple, safe cup of coffee."
My god, I'm so glad I don't drink coffee. Didn't realize your lives were so complicated. :rolleyes:

egoistaxx9
Aug 12, 2013, 05:21 PM
although i feel sad for the lady, but this is...funny(because apple is screwed) , apple, you seem to be jealous of chinese people, why do only chinese people get hurt from apple's products, you really need to work on this, apple.

Nunyabinez
Aug 12, 2013, 06:21 PM
If (and that's a pretty big if) there was a manufacturing defect that caused this then there is a 100,000,000:1 defect ratio. Figure out how many "9s" that is (.9999999...). Same holds true if it's a design defect. I have a hard time calling a 1 in a hundred million event a defect, and it doesn't make any sense to call it a true defect if it took more than a hundred million events before it happened.

Whatever led to it, it is a freak event and blaming anyone is ridiculous. The odds of this are less than being hit by a train in your 10th story apartment.

Speedy2
Aug 12, 2013, 06:37 PM
Why is this even news?

Millionaire2K
Aug 13, 2013, 12:09 AM
Millionaire2K, you need to read what HiRez already posted! (same page of thread). There already IS a warning about dropping the iPhone. ...Just because people are too lazy to read the manual, doesn't mean they can blame the person who wrote it! ...it states at the gas station not to light up a cigarette while pumping gas....

I think you should read what I wrote. I was replying to his post and I said "Good advise" about how Apple already warns us. BUT I went on and wrote of a possible way they could warn us better... for Apple's and general consumer knowledge sake. that's all. I'm not saying the current warning is to little. Just commenting on how it might be improved.

Kind of how the warnings for SUV rollovers went from the owners manual to the sun visor.

Seems kind of obvious that if you turn a car/truck fast it will rollover. But the feds still require the warning in your face.

If the tech exists to warn you that your phone is no longer safe no that it malfunctioned I see no harm in adding it to the phone. Its just a safety warning. Think of it as a "check engine light"

sclarksons
Aug 13, 2013, 01:08 AM
How could someone actually have a 40 minute conversation on an iPhone?

They must not have AT&T in china.

robertosh
Aug 13, 2013, 01:57 AM
She used a chinese charger...

Macneck
Aug 13, 2013, 04:11 AM
Why is it always the Chinese? I almost don't care about stories like this anymore.

Well, there are MANY Chinese people in China. On the other hand, I wonder if electrical systems in Chinese houses don't have protection after shortcuts... One thing is the phone to explode, another thing is people being electrocuted to death

gnasher729
Aug 13, 2013, 04:14 AM
Well, it's even easier to stop buying McD's coffee, which is what I did after I incurred 2nd degree burns on my mouth on two separate occasions.

Logged in just to vote you up. There are so many examples of stupid lawsuits and companies trying to cover their ass, there is really no reason for people to make fools of themselves by dragging out at the best example of a lawsuit that was actually totally justified, ignoring all the facts, and making big claims that personal responsibility doesn't apply to company employees.


Very curious about this statement. It is easy enough to throw ice in coffee to cool it down. It isn't delicious watered down, but it serves the purpose. Point I am trying to get at is whether this is a personal opinion or fact. Do you just assume hotter than average coffee was being served to save money or was it hotter than average because it just was?

"Hotter than average" was shown in the court case.
"Company knew it was dangerous" was shown in the court case.
"Hotter to save money" was shown in the court case.
"So hot that it caused severe burns upon short contact with skin" was shown in the court case.

The last one is really what is unacceptable. Accidents happen all the time, that's unavoidable. It happens that coffee gets spilled, and with a bit of bad luck it gets spilled on people. Unavoidable. If a company makes coffee that is so hot that an unavoidable spill isn't just annoying or maybe painful but causes third degree burns, then they have to take responsibility.

The exact same thing could happen when you bought your coffee, picked up your ice cubes, sat down at a table, remove the lid to throw in the ice cubes, and just at that moment some clumsy customer falls over his own feet, hits your coffee, and it all spills into your lap.

BTW. I don't think they leave space in their mugs to throw in ice cubes without the coffee overflowing.

Macneck
Aug 13, 2013, 04:18 AM
How could someone actually have a 40 minute conversation on an iPhone?

They must not have AT&T in china.

In any case, if the phone cannot stand 40 minutes of conversation it should have a sign on its back saying something like: "WARNING! This phone may explode after 40 minutes of continuous use. Talk at your own risk".

Very likely the crack it had before the accident has a lot to do with those injuries, but the question is why it -supposedly- overheated to that point.

4D4M
Aug 13, 2013, 04:58 AM
She was probably holding it wrong.

http://t.qkme.me/3ss948.jpg

gnasher729
Aug 13, 2013, 07:43 AM
In any case, if the phone cannot stand 40 minutes of conversation it should have a sign on its back saying something like: "WARNING! This phone may explode after 40 minutes of continuous use. Talk at your own risk".

Very likely the crack it had before the accident has a lot to do with those injuries, but the question is why it -supposedly- overheated to that point.

An undamaged phone has no problems with this. A damaged phone may have problems.

First, there may be internal damage from the earlier drop that cracked the screen which might make the phone produce more heat, so there might be overheating caused by the previous drop.

Second, it might produce some heat in a 40 minute call that is just normal and causes no trouble with an undamaged phone, but might cause problems with a screen that is already cracked. So the phone may not be overheating at all, but the normal heat that the phone is designed for might cause problems with a cracked screen.

And since we don't here of that kind of problem very often, it might be that both problems have to come together to cause actual damage. Quite possible that an undamaged screen has no problems with a bit of overheating, and a cracked screen has no problems with the normal heat, but cracked screen and overheating, both caused by a previous drop, might be the problem.

----------

She used a chinese charger...

So does almost everyone. I suppose some might use a Samsung charger made in South Korea, if that's where they make their chargers, but most chargers are made in China. If you want to claim that she used a low-quality non-Apple charger, there are two questions: How would you know? And what does that have to do with this case?

litmag01
Aug 13, 2013, 08:09 AM
Botched hit.

benji888
Aug 13, 2013, 12:03 PM
I think you should read what I wrote. I was replying to his post and I said "Good advise" about how Apple already warns us. BUT I went on and wrote of a possible way they could warn us better... for Apple's and general consumer knowledge sake. that's all. I'm not saying the current warning is to little. Just commenting on how it might be improved.

Kind of how the warnings for SUV rollovers went from the owners manual to the sun visor.

Seems kind of obvious that if you turn a car/truck fast it will rollover. But the feds still require the warning in your face.

If the tech exists to warn you that your phone is no longer safe no that it malfunctioned I see no harm in adding it to the phone. Its just a safety warning. Think of it as a "check engine light"

that warning came from problems with SUVs that were top heavy and had no stabilizer bars to keep them from rolling over...the typical car will not roll over if your turn fast:rolleyes:, and most of today's SUVs have been built properly to prevent rollover in most driving conditions.

people seem to think you should be able to drop your smart phone and it shouldn't be an issue...only if you have an otterbox or something that will protect it! It is a computer that fits in your hand, while they are trying to make them as durable as possible, electronics are still somewhat fragile. ...if you were to drop your laptop from a high point, you wouldn't expect it to not be damaged would you?? ...smart phones are not handled like a piece of fragile computer equipment as laptops are, so it is more likely we will see more reports of things like this, which is more likely due to a person's neglect than anything else.

dysamoria
Aug 13, 2013, 01:36 PM
Consumer safety should be top priority ...

Have you met capitalism yet? It regards consumer safety only as much as it is legally compelled to. And even then, it gets away with as much as it can, including to the point of crime and corruption. When profit is at stake, nothing else matters to a sociopathic entity like a big corporation.

Safety SHOULD matter, but the system allows it not to.

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Yes, many people use non-Apple chargers. In my car is a Belkin car charger used every time I drive. Does Apple make one of those? Is Belkin product considered legit?

HoopTrundler
Aug 21, 2013, 07:27 PM
According to the woman's own admission, she had dropped the phone before, which had left obvious damage on the screen. That's the first safety rule, don't use an electric device with obvious damage.

What is it with people on these forums victim-blaming so that Apple doesn't have to take responsibility for anything? If your screen got a crack in it, would you really assume that you'd be in danger if you don't get it fixed immediately? I know plenty of people with cracked screens on their phones, and they leave it that way and nothing like this happens.

Marsontherocks
Nov 13, 2013, 03:15 AM
Dude apple does not have an exploding iphone problem. Chinese lawyers have discovered their version of hot coffee

I think you should check up on that story. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pCkL9UlmCOE

blipper
Nov 13, 2013, 07:45 AM
I never considered this a serious case and won't discuss it much beyond the obvious,

Coffee was HOT (hotter than "standards" who cares, it's still HOT!)
Driving with said HOT coffee in one hand, steering wheel in another
Putting a cup of HOT coffee between your legs while you drive
Driving with HOT coffee in hand
Bumps in road with HOT coffee



Not true. She was burned immediately after buying the coffee while sitting in the passenger seat in a stationary car. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stella_Liebeck_v._McDonald%27s_Corporation#Burn_incident

aarond12
Nov 13, 2013, 08:34 AM
I was thinking about the "Hot Coffee" mod to GTA... :rolleyes: