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Altis
Sep 20, 2013, 09:47 AM
Reviewers keep saying it, users keep saying it, now even Federighi at Apple is saying that iOS has been out for 7 years.

It was released in June 2007. We're September 2013. 2013-2007 = 6 years (6.25 including the months).

7 years ago was 2006. When iOS 2 came out, iOS was 1 year old.

Am I missing something?

darngooddesign
Sep 20, 2013, 09:49 AM
You're right. I'm also guilty of saying that.

virginblue4
Sep 20, 2013, 09:50 AM
Reviewers keep saying it, users keep saying it, now even Federighi at Apple is saying that iOS has been out for 7 years.

It was released in June 2007. We're September 2013. 2013-2007 = 6 years (6.25 including the months).

7 years ago was 2006. When iOS 2 came out, iOS was 1 year old.

Am I missing something?

2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013. That's 7 years if you include 2007.

darngooddesign
Sep 20, 2013, 09:53 AM
2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013. That's 7 years if you include 2007.

You count it this way:

2007-2008 - Year 1
2008-2009 - Year 2

etc.

madsci954
Sep 20, 2013, 09:55 AM
2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013. That's 7 years if you include 2007.

Still 6 years. Even at it's January '07 announcement, it's still 6 years, unless you round up. Jan/June 2014, depending how you look at it, will be 7 years.

psylence2k
Sep 20, 2013, 09:55 AM
2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013. That's 7 years if you include 2007.

not really , it was released in June of 2007, so you dont count the whole years, you go

June 07 to June 08 = 1 Year

that makes it around 6.25 years like he said.

If you counted the way you're doing then by June of 2008 it would've already been two years old.

Altis
Sep 20, 2013, 09:59 AM
I just wanted to check if I was losing my mind.

chrf097
Sep 20, 2013, 10:23 AM
I just wanted to check if I was losing my mind.

People are going by the year each version was introduced, not each subsequent year after iOS 7

iOS 1: 2007
iOS 2: 2008
iOS 3: 2009
iOS 4: 2010
iOS 5: 2011
iOS 6: 2012
iOS 7: 2013

Thus, for the past 7 years we've gotten a new version of iOS. iOS itself however, is only 6.25 years old.

Kind of warped, but oh well.

Altis
Sep 20, 2013, 10:31 AM
It's still wrong to say 7 years ago when it's been 6. 7 years ago was 2006.

Saying "for the past 7 years" means 2006...

If you look at the years you listed, the duration is 6.

sakau2007
Sep 20, 2013, 10:46 AM
it's just a common mistake humans make. i recently celebrated my 28th birthday. someone toasted me to have a great 29th year of my life. it was sad to see how many college graduates tried to correct him saying i was beginning the 28th year of my life. even when explained as "when you turn 1, are you starting your first year or second year of life?" some people (that i used to have intellectual respect for) didn't get it.

From A Buick 8
Sep 20, 2013, 11:20 AM
Got It.... So we are on our 5th iphone and 6th year of iOS
:p

darngooddesign
Sep 20, 2013, 11:22 AM
Got It.... So we are on our 5th iphone and 6th year of iOS
:p

Both the 5S and 5C are the seventh generation of iPhones.

roadbloc
Sep 20, 2013, 11:22 AM
6 years. 7 years. Who cares?

FamiliaPhoto
Sep 20, 2013, 11:22 AM
They are rounding to whole years a very common business practice. Why does it matter?

Peace
Sep 20, 2013, 11:28 AM
This thread is an excellent example of why the US is low on math .

:cool:

Altis
Sep 20, 2013, 11:54 AM
They are rounding to whole years a very common business practice. Why does it matter?

I think they're just mistaken.

It does matter because it's false information. If someone said the iPhone 5 was 2 years old (by your same logic), people would correct it saying it's been out for 1 year.

The thread title is very descriptive... If it doesn't interest you, please disregard.

chrf097
Sep 20, 2013, 12:00 PM
It's still wrong to say 7 years ago when it's been 6. 7 years ago was 2006.

Saying "for the past 7 years" means 2006...

If you look at the years you listed, the duration is 6.

Again, they're going by when iOS was first introduced. Basically they're considering iOS 1's announcement the first year of iOS's existance. It's a weird way of looking at it, but that's how they're doing it.

Altis
Sep 20, 2013, 12:15 PM
Again, they're going by when iOS was first introduced. Basically they're considering iOS 1's announcement the first year of iOS's existance. It's a weird way of looking at it, but that's how they're doing it.

If that's the case, it's still incorrect to say "7 years ago". That phrase has a meaning and in this case, it's incorrect. As does "7 years old".

Anybody hearing that phrase would immediately know it refers to a time around 7 years ago.

I'm not 27 because I just turned 26. iOS 1 was not 1 year old when it was released.

chrf097
Sep 20, 2013, 04:55 PM
If that's the case, it's still incorrect to say "7 years ago". That phrase has a meaning and in this case, it's incorrect. As does "7 years old".

Anybody hearing that phrase would immediately know it refers to a time around 7 years ago.

I'm not 27 because I just turned 26. iOS 1 was not 1 year old when it was released.

No, they're not saying iOS is one year old, they're saying for the past 7 years there has been an iOS release, which is correct, since for the last 7 years, each one saw a release of iOS.

iOS is 6 years old, in the definition of a full calendar year before the next version, but there has been an iOS release for the last 7 years (counting 2013), which is what they are referring to.

It's kind of a sneak tactic but they aren't wrong.

C DM
Sep 20, 2013, 05:03 PM
No, they're not saying iOS is one year old, they're saying for the past 7 years there has been an iOS release, which is correct, since for the last 7 years, each one saw a release of iOS.

iOS is 6 years old, in the definition of a full calendar year before the next version, but there has been an iOS release for the last 7 years (counting 2013), which is what they are referring to.

It's kind of a sneak tactic but they aren't wrong.Bingo, that's pretty much it. Over the last 7 calendar years (2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013) we've had iOS.

FamiliaPhoto
Sep 20, 2013, 05:13 PM
I think they're just mistaken.

It does matter because it's false information. If someone said the iPhone 5 was 2 years old (by your same logic), people would correct it saying it's been out for 1 year.

The thread title is very descriptive... If it doesn't interest you, please disregard.

No worries and I'm not attacking. Its a common business practice to round years to whole numbers. Remember when you buy a new car it is already considered a year old. Its a strange practice, and a common one.

Altis
Sep 22, 2013, 11:59 AM
Bingo, that's pretty much it. Over the last 7 calendar years (2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013) we've had iOS.

Except that he said "seven years ago".... which is 2006, no matter how you try to view it.

Using that logic (counting each year during which it was present) is incorrect. By that logic, something could be 2 years old after 10 minutes if it was released December 31st at 11:55 PM. :rolleyes:

"seven years ago" and "seven years old" means precisely 2006. It's just a mistake people are making because it's the 7th iteration of iOS.

braddick
Sep 22, 2013, 12:12 PM
This thread is an excellent example of why the US is low on math .

:cool:

Really.
'Cause in Russia or India they're getting this right each and every time.

darngooddesign
Sep 22, 2013, 12:13 PM
Bingo, that's pretty much it. Over the last 7 calendar years (2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013) we've had iOS.

I can't tell how old you think iOS is.

The phone came out on June 29, 2007. Would you say it was one year old on June 30, 2007 or June 29, 2008?

DollaTwentyFive
Sep 22, 2013, 12:15 PM
Both the 5S and 5C are the seventh generation of iPhones.

Maybe the 5c is the 6 1/2 generation.

HenryDJP
Sep 22, 2013, 12:18 PM
To be truthful about it, everybody is wrong here. "iOS" didn't come out in 2007. It was originally called, "iPhone OS". Later years it was changed to iOS to accommodate the iPod Touch and iPad. ;)

In terms of it being called "7", that is correct. Apple is not naming the OS after how many years it's been in existence, they are naming it after each version that year. So 2007 has to be counted because that's when the OS for the iPhone came out.

darngooddesign
Sep 22, 2013, 12:23 PM
Maybe the 5c is the 6 1/2 generation.

While you could argue that the C should be considered the same generation as the 5, I think history will see the S and C as seventh gen devices.

hafr
Sep 22, 2013, 12:24 PM
Could someone please post a few exact quotes?

irDigital0l
Sep 22, 2013, 12:25 PM
Can people please use common sense/basic math skills in this thread?

Or is that just not possible for some?

darngooddesign
Sep 22, 2013, 12:26 PM
To be truthful about it, everybody is wrong here. "iOS" didn't come out in 2007. It was originally called, "iPhone OS". Later years it was changed to iOS to accommodate the iPod Touch and iPad. ;)

In terms of it being called "7", that is correct. Apple is not naming the OS after how many years it's been in existence, they are naming it after each version that year. So 2007 has to be counted because that's when the OS for the iPhone came out.

What's being discussed is how old iOS/iPhone OS is. While something released in both Jan and December of 2007 existed during that calendar year, one is almost a year older than the other. Even though they changed the name calling iPhone OS iOS is correct when looking at its lifespan.

Altis
Sep 22, 2013, 12:34 PM
Could someone please post a few exact quotes?





"This is the first post-Retina (Display) UI (user interface), with amazing graphics processing thanks to tremendous GPU (graphics processing unit) power growth, so we had a different set of tools to bring to bear on the problem as compared to seven years ago (when the iPhone first launched)," he says. "Before, the shadowing effect we used was a great way to distract from the limitations of the display. But with a display that's this precise, there's nowhere to hide. So we wanted a clear typography."

Ive jumps in. "Yes, we wanted to defer to the content, and just get out of the way."


Article Link: Apple's Jony Ive and Craig Federighi Discuss Their Design and Engineering Partnership (http://www.macrumors.com/2013/09/19/apples-jony-ive-and-craig-federighi-discuss-their-design-and-engineering-partnership/)

Which quote? The one of Craig Federighi saying the iPhone was released 7 years ago? The rest are scattered all over forums and reviews alike.

HenryDJP
Sep 22, 2013, 12:50 PM
What's being discussed is how old iOS/iPhone OS is. While something released in both Jan and December of 2007 existed during that calendar year, one is almost a year older than the other. Even though they changed the name calling iPhone OS iOS is correct when looking at its lifespan.

Right, I was just making a point that everyone here is being too nitpicky about the release year and naming scheme of iOS. Sorry you didn't pick up on the slight sarcasm. The truth of the matter is Apple is not naming iOS7 incorrectly. Also either you made a typo or you've got your dates wrong. I don't recall iOS being released in January and December of 2007.
iPhoneOS/iOS was announced in January 2007 and released in June 2007. What are you talking about?

hafr
Sep 22, 2013, 12:52 PM
Which quote? The one of Craig Federighi saying the iPhone was released 7 years ago? The rest are scattered all over forums and reviews alike.

Well, the way I interpret that quote is that he's talking about when they were working on the original iteration of iOS (I.e., before the general public were able to purchase an iPhone), the parenthesis is added by the journalist to point out it was for the first iPhone. Not that he's saying iOS was released exactly seven years ago.

darngooddesign
Sep 22, 2013, 12:54 PM
Right, I was just making a point that everyone here is being too nitpicky about the release year and naming scheme of iOS. Sorry you didn't pick up on the slight sarcasm. The truth of the matter is Apple is not naming iOS7 incorrectly. Also either you made a typo or you've got your dates wrong. I don't recall iOS being released in January and December of 2007.
iPhoneOS/iOS was announced in January 2007 and released in June 2007. What are you talking about?

I was using Jan/Dec as an example which us why I said "something"; should gave chosen a diff year. No worries about the sarcasm. I forget to use the /S sarcasm tag as well.

Cheers.

ziggie216
Sep 22, 2013, 12:54 PM
same idea as your age. you would tell people of when you were born, not how long you have lived.

darngooddesign
Sep 22, 2013, 12:56 PM
same idea as your age. you would tell people of when you were born, not how long you have lived.

Depends on what someone wants to know. "When were you born?" and "How old are you?" produce different answers. If someone wants to know your age they don't ask for the year you were born, they ask for your age.

Altis
Sep 22, 2013, 01:05 PM
Well, the way I interpret that quote is that he's talking about when they were working on the original iteration of iOS (I.e., before the general public were able to purchase an iPhone), the parenthesis is added by the journalist to point out it was for the first iPhone. Not that he's saying iOS was released exactly seven years ago.

You interpret "seven years ago (when the iPhone first launched)" as the year before the iphone was launched?

I'm kind of surprised people are trying to rationalize an honest mistake that's easily made as some other form of counting duration/referencing time.

Depends on what someone wants to know. "When were you born?" and "How old are you?" produce different answers. If someone wants to know your age they don't ask for the year you were born, they ask for your age.

This is true. If they ask when you were born, and you say 7 years ago (from now), that would be 2006. If they ask how old you are, and you were born June 2007, the answer is 6.

hafr
Sep 22, 2013, 01:24 PM
You interpret "seven years ago (when the iPhone first launched)" as the year before the iphone was launched?

I'm kind of surprised people are trying to rationalize an honest mistake that's easily made as some other form of counting duration/referencing time.

No, I don't. But I don't interpret it as anyone saying the original iPhone/iOS was available for the general public seven years ago to the day either.

HenryDJP
Sep 22, 2013, 01:26 PM
I'm kind of surprised people are trying to rationalize an honest mistake that's easily made as some other form of counting duration/referencing time.



I'm kinda having an issue with your post here. Why is it that your theory is the only one that is correct? That's just you saying it was a mistake? I don't agree and I'm not alone. Truthfully iOS came in year 2007 and each year following up to iOS7 there has been a version of iOS. So since there are 7 versions during those calendar years 2007 can be counted.

Yeah, you can say "technically" it's 6 years but saying 7 years is not a mistake nor is it wrong. As someone earlier mentioned about the birthday. It depends on what question is being asked, when the person was born or how long they have been living.

darngooddesign
Sep 22, 2013, 01:30 PM
I'm kinda having an issue with your post here. Why is it that your theory is the only one that is correct? That's just you saying it was a mistake? I don't agree and I'm not alone. Truthfully iOS came in year 2007 and each year following up to iOS7 there has been a version of iOS. So since there are 7 versions during those calendar years of 2007 can be counted.

Yeah, you can say "technically" it's 6 years but saying 7 years is not a mistake nor is it wrong. As someone earlier mentioned about the birthday. It depends on what question is being asked, when the person was born or how long they have been living.

Not Technically, six is the only correct answer. Are you one year old on the day you are born or one year after the day you are born?

It doesn't matter because by the time this is settled iOS will be seven years old.

Altis
Sep 22, 2013, 01:36 PM
No, I don't. But I don't interpret it as anyone saying the original iPhone/iOS was available for the general public seven years ago to the day either.

That's what "released" means.

I'm kinda having an issue with your post here. Why is it that your theory is the only one that is correct? That's just you saying it was a mistake? I don't agree and I'm not alone. Truthfully iOS came in year 2007 and each year following up to iOS7 there has been a version of iOS. So since there are 7 versions during those calendar years 2007 can be counted.

Yeah, you can say "technically" it's 6 years but saying 7 years is not a mistake nor is it wrong. As someone earlier mentioned about the birthday. It depends on what question is being asked, when the person was born or how long they have been living.

2007 is still 6 calender years ago.

2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007 (6).

Same with duration..

2007-2008, 2008-2009, 2009-2010, 2010-2011, 2011-2012, 2012-2013 (6)

Counting calender years within which something existed is not how we reference time or age.

By your logic, the 5S and 5C are already a year old, because they've existed in 2013 (one calender year). In 2014, they will be 2 years old because they existed in 2013 and 2014. Yet, we know this to be untrue, correct?

To say that iOS 7 is in its seventh year is correct, because it has passed its 6 year mark. But that's not what's been said.

Sometimes, there are things are that correct and incorrect... telling time and age isn't a matter of opinion... else, how would we reference the age or duration of anything if we all use different methods?

hafr
Sep 22, 2013, 01:51 PM
That's what "released" means.



2007 is still 6 calender years ago.

2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007 (6).

Same with duration..

2007-2008, 2008-2009, 2009-2010, 2010-2011, 2011-2012, 2012-2013 (6)

Counting calender years within which something existed is not how we reference time or age.

By your logic, the 5S and 5C are already a year old, because they've existed in 2013 (one calender year). In 2014, they will be 2 years old because they existed in 2013 and 2014. Yet, we know this to be untrue, correct?

To say that iOS 7 is in its seventh year is correct, because it has passed its 6 year mark. But that's not what's been said.

Sometimes, there are things are that correct and incorrect... telling time and age isn't a matter of opinion... else, how would we reference the age or duration of anything if we all use different methods?

The person being interviewed never said the iPhone was released exactly seven years ago, and a clarifying/explanatory parenthesis in this situation isn't meant to be taken as anything as exact and specific as you're making it out to be. It really is as simple as that.

I'd absolutely love to see you rant over the fact that in French, eight days is synonymous to one week, but I'm done here. Take care.

pdqgp
Sep 22, 2013, 02:00 PM
Reviewers keep saying it, users keep saying it, now even Federighi at Apple is saying that iOS has been out for 7 years.

It was released in June 2007. We're September 2013. 2013-2007 = 6 years (6.25 including the months).

7 years ago was 2006. When iOS 2 came out, iOS was 1 year old.

Am I missing something?

It was introduced in
2007 = Year 1 of it's existance
2008 = Year 2
2009 = Year 3
2010 = Year 4
2011 = Year 5
2012 = Year 6
2013 = 7th year of it's existance

darngooddesign
Sep 22, 2013, 02:54 PM
It was introduced in
2007 = Year 1 of it's existance
2008 = Year 2
2009 = Year 3
2010 = Year 4
2011 = Year 5
2012 = Year 6
2013 = 7th year of it's existance

Are you one year old on the day you are born or one year after the day you are born?

HenryDJP
Sep 22, 2013, 03:02 PM
That's what "released" means.



2007 is still 6 calender years ago.

2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007 (6).

Same with duration..

2007-2008, 2008-2009, 2009-2010, 2010-2011, 2011-2012, 2012-2013 (6)

Counting calender years within which something existed is not how we reference time or age.

By your logic, the 5S and 5C are already a year old, because they've existed in 2013 (one calender year). In 2014, they will be 2 years old because they existed in 2013 and 2014. Yet, we know this to be untrue, correct?

To say that iOS 7 is in its seventh year is correct, because it has passed its 6 year mark. But that's not what's been said.

Sometimes, there are things are that correct and incorrect... telling time and age isn't a matter of opinion... else, how would we reference the age or duration of anything if we all use different methods?

You didn't even read my post properly.
EDIT: I looked it up and there are conflicting answers to what a "calendar" year is. But once again OP, interesting thread. Thanks again.

pdqgp
Sep 22, 2013, 03:03 PM
Are you one year old on the day you are born or one year after the day you are born?

I'd be in the first year of my life. Hence the reason I selected the wording I did. iOS is in its 7th year of existence.

darngooddesign
Sep 22, 2013, 03:08 PM
I'd be in the first year of my life. Hence the reason I selected the wording I did. iOS is in its 7th year of existence.

Whoops. You're right. I misunderstood you as the basis of this thread is whether iOS is six or seven years old.

C DM
Sep 24, 2013, 02:47 PM
Except that he said "seven years ago".... which is 2006, no matter how you try to view it.

Using that logic (counting each year during which it was present) is incorrect. By that logic, something could be 2 years old after 10 minutes if it was released December 31st at 11:55 PM. :rolleyes:

"seven years ago" and "seven years old" means precisely 2006. It's just a mistake people are making because it's the 7th iteration of iOS.If that's the phrasing, then that's wrong, as you said. If the phrasing is more along the lines of "during the last 7 years" or something along those lines (as it seems some have alluded to), then there's some room for it to be interpreted the way the poster that I agreed with expanded on.I can't tell how old you think iOS is.

The phone came out on June 29, 2007. Would you say it was one year old on June 30, 2007 or June 29, 2008?I didn't say anything about hold old iOS is, I simply commented on the the phrasing (or what seemed like the phrasing) someone referred to.

----------

I'd be in the first year of my life. Hence the reason I selected the wording I did. iOS is in its 7th year of existence.Yup, that's pretty much what goes along with my original comment, that was in support of another one like this one.

sparkyms
Sep 24, 2013, 02:54 PM
The things people think about whilst they're waiting for their new iPhone, eh?