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View Full Version : Giving robots the gift of three-dimensional sight


vniow
Dec 30, 2002, 08:20 PM
A Carnegie Mellon University professor known for predicting the evolution of super-capable robots says he's just given robots better eyesight.

Hans Moravec has completed work on a three-dimensional robotic vision system he says will allow machines to make their way through offices and homes. The technology is "more than good enough to reliably navigate robots through a general environment," he said.

Moravec's system consists of stereoscopic digital cameras and a 3D grid set up in the robot's computer brain. The system determines the robot's distance from objects by noticing the different placement of the object in the two camera images and applying a geometric equation. The grid, which is made up of 32 million digital cells, is used to help handle incomplete or potentially misleading visual data. For example, an object visible in one camera lens might be blocked from the view of the other, or a blank wall may lack distinct features that can be used for triangulation. (http://zdnet.com.com/2100-1103-978854.html)

Mr. Anderson
Dec 30, 2002, 09:58 PM
And just think, the human brain does this all and more without even realizing it half the time...

It will be nice to see robots being able to move independently - but this is still a work in progress. Through work I've had practical experience with robots and 3D, and you basically have to still do a lot of work for them before they actually get it right.

Pretty cool though - even better if LEGO comes out with their own autonomous version - that would be slick.

D

cubist
Dec 31, 2002, 10:11 AM
Actually, humans can walk around even with sight in only one eye. I think the brain uses motion parallax to judge distance of objects in these cases.

The human body is an incredibly sophisticated thing. I doubt that humans will ever be able to duplicate much of its functionality.

skunk
Dec 31, 2002, 10:26 AM
Originally posted by cubist
The human body is an incredibly sophisticated thing. I doubt that humans will ever be able to duplicate much of its functionality.
The same applies to an amoeba....I mean, try telling the average mathematician that you have to divide in order to multiply! 1/2=2 :)

MrMacMan
Dec 31, 2002, 07:30 PM
Originally posted by Mad Scientist
Score One for Taking over the world! First we get smart robots, then we give them weapons and now we give then real vision. Yay!
Next Step includes giving some insane scientist resorces to add these together and a sinister mind

me hate windows
Jan 1, 2003, 01:34 PM
I think Davron from Dr. Who would be a perfect mad scientist for the job. Create a few Daleks and take over the world.

bobindashadows
Jan 3, 2003, 02:33 PM
Originally posted by skunk

The same applies to an amoeba....I mean, try telling the average mathematician that you have to divide in order to multiply! 1/2=2 :)
An amoeba divides into two ameoba half the size of the original at the time of division, if i'm not mistaken. 1 amoeba spread over 2 amoeba means .5 of the original amoeba in each. meaning 1/2=0.5. ;-) How could a new amoeba grow from a parent without taking anything out of the parent? Obviously it isn't going to be 50/50 spread over each but obviously the amoeba takes something out of the original amoeba to bud off. Excuse me if I'm wrong, and amoeba simply start growing out the side of the original, taking in nutrients from the first second as if it were fully born.

skunk
Jan 3, 2003, 05:10 PM
You're right, of course: to start with each is 0.5 of the original in volume. However, in another sense, each is an integral whole, i.e. 1.