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evilgEEk
Feb 15, 2006, 02:59 PM
Great photos! Empire State Building?
Yep! :)

Here's two landmarks in Newport, Rhode Island. The first is probalby the most famous mansion along "mansion row". It's a pretty cool place, right along the Atlantic. There's a little walkway along the coast bording the backside of all the mansions.

Anyway, this first one belonged to Cornellius Vanderbilt II, it's called The Breakers. The Vanderbilts were extremely weathly at the turn of the 19th century due to their involvment with the New York Central Railroad. This house was originally a wooden cottage but in 1893, Vanderbuilt commissioned architect Richard Morris Hunt to rebuild the cottage (which had been destroyed by fire) in to an Italian Renaissance- style palazzo. This is the outcome.

The second one I'm not sure of the history, but I liked it so I thought I would include it. :)

watcher2001
Feb 20, 2006, 10:23 PM
Took this one last summer on vacation. I have been 5 times now and am looking forward to going back.

~Shard~
Feb 20, 2006, 10:44 PM
I have been 5 times now and am looking forward to going back.

That's neat, but why not go some place different for a change? There's a million amazing places to see and a diverse array of cultures, history, people and geography to experience! I've been to many awe-inspiring places around the world that I would simply love to visit again, but there are far too many other places I've never been that I want to see first. :cool:

Chip NoVaMac
Feb 20, 2006, 11:03 PM
That's neat, but why not go some place different for a change? There's a million amazing places to see and a diverse array of cultures, history, people and geography to experience! I've been to many awe-inspiring places around the world that I would simply love to visit again, but there are far too many other places I've never been that I want to see first. :cool:


Depends on the goals of the visitor/photographer. Some of us go back the same location time and again to capture just that right image.

And now as I near the eve of my "Great First International Trip" I can see your point. I should be a sleep right now. But the thrill is making it hard.

Also this past weekend I had a chance to go back to SF. There was a great "fellowship" gathering that I would have loved being part of. It would have also given me a chance to see the city in a new way perhaps.

But instead I chose to go off to Iceland and London this weekend. For the three days in Iceland, I think that I may have to go back. And with only 2 days in London, I know I will have to go back!

The issue is how to balance the desire of the "wander" and the "photographer". Do I plan on a longer trip to Iceland later, or do I do Barcelona and Amsterdam?

For a final answer to my question, ask me maybe on 2Mar after my return. If I can get my head of the clouds that soon!

watcher2001
Feb 20, 2006, 11:06 PM
That's neat, but why not go some place different for a change? There's a million amazing places to see and a diverse array of cultures, history, people and geography to experience! I've been to many awe-inspiring places around the world that I would simply love to visit again, but there are far too many other places I've never been that I want to see first. :cool:
I travel extensively with work and have been to a lot of different places but San Fran keeps calling me back again.

~Shard~
Feb 20, 2006, 11:08 PM
Depends on the goals of the visitor/photographer. Some of us go back the same location time and again to capture just that right image.

And now as I near the eve of my "Great First International Trip" I can see your point. I should be a sleep right now. But the thrill is making it hard.


Fair enough. :) I guess for myself I've never been as much into the photographs as I have been into the experiences. There is only so much a photo can capture, and from my many world travels I have found it too often where a picture simply does not do something justice. So, I keep my "mental pictures", my memories, and remember the experiences themselves. I still take pictures to serve as mementos and such but I definitely don't waste my travels by being behind a camera lens for 50% of the trip. ;)

Photograph is a powerful medium, but it has its limits. It is but a small part of the complete experience of world travel for me. :cool:

Oh, and have an amazing trip Chip NoVaMac! :)

~Shard~
Feb 20, 2006, 11:10 PM
I travel extensively with work and have been to a lot of different places but San Fran keeps calling me back again.

Hey, nothing wrong with that! Sometimes familiarity is a good thing. It also gives you the opportunity to experience things in a different way or light than perhaps you hadn't seen it before. :cool:

Chip NoVaMac
Feb 20, 2006, 11:20 PM
Fair enough. :) I guess for myself I've never been as much into the photographs as I have been into the experiences. There is only so much a photo can capture, and from my many world travels I have found it too often where a picture simply does not do something justice. So, I keep my "mental pictures", my memories, and remember the experiences themselves. I still take pictures to serve as mementos and such but I definitely don't waste my travels by being behind a camera lens for 50% of the trip. ;)

Photograph is a powerful medium, but it has its limits. It is but a small part of the complete experience of world travel for me. :cool:

As a photographer I have returned many times to the same subject.

But as I embark on a whole new experience this week my views may change. For the great people I have met in my travels in the US, we were still citizens of the same country.

I hope to learn more first hand how others view us. Even in reading as a Gay male, that Gay life in Iceland is different than here in the US. First is that the society as a "whole" has "accepted" that people are "different".

Evidently in Reykjavik, they do not have the "Gay Ghettos" or areas that the Gay/Lesbian community focuses in on like the Dupont Circle area in DC or the Andersonville or "Boystown" areas in Chicago.

But that was not to say that my travels to SF or Chicago were "Gay centric". But it was nice to have a place to "come home to".

Also keep in mind that no matter how we budget, it is hard for many of us to travel in the US, let alone outside of the US on a regular basis.

w_parietti22
Feb 20, 2006, 11:25 PM
http://img88.imageshack.us/img88/1229/img07678wq.jpg (http://imageshack.us)
Space Needle/Seattle Skyline/Mt. Ranier in Oct.

w_parietti22
Feb 20, 2006, 11:27 PM
Yep! :)

Here's two landmarks in Newport, Rhode Island. The first is probalby the most famous mansion along "mansion row". It's a pretty cool place, right along the Atlantic. There's a little walkway along the coast bording the backside of all the mansions.

Anyway, this first one belonged to Cornellius Vanderbilt II, it's called The Breakers. The Vanderbilts were extremely weathly at the turn of the 19th century due to their involvment with the New York Central Railroad. This house was originally a wooden cottage but in 1893, Vanderbuilt commissioned architect Richard Morris Hunt to rebuild the cottage (which had been destroyed by fire) in to an Italian Renaissance- style palazzo. This is the outcome.

The second one I'm not sure of the history, but I liked it so I thought I would include it. :)

I've been to the Breakers. Its amazing. Can you believe they only live there 6-8 weeks of the year! =o

Clix Pix
Feb 20, 2006, 11:42 PM
Even as I was boarding the plane to return home from San Francisco last month, I was already thinking, "I've got to come back here!" Why? Because i felt I had only just lightly touched on the experiences and the sights there and because, yes, there IS that urge to photographically record them, too. I want to go back to have another crack at seeing the things I missed out on this last time, doing the things I didn't have time to do, and taking photographs of everything along the way....

But, hey, I live in the DC area, and I'm sure that there are a lot of people who get on planes at Dulles, Reagan National or BWI who are thinking the very same thing.....they want to return here in order to see and experience more of this city and to capture it all on their cameras, too.... I LIVE here and I haven't really done that. One thing I'd like to do this spring when the weather gets nice is to hop on our Metro and go downtown and do the "tourist thing," camera in hand, as this is something I haven't really done before, although I've lived here for over 35 years....

Getting back to returning to SF. Yes, I want to do so (which I'm already planning for the 2007 MacWorld Expo), but I agree that it also would be neat to be able to travel to other places as well, both within the US and beyond our borders. Travel IS expensive and time-consuming, though, and it's not always possible for some of us to do.... I think in many cases Europeans and Canadians seem to have an easier time of traveling than we Americans do, much to our detriment. When someone is working full-time and is tied down by family and job responsibilities, too, it's not all that easy to slip away for a few weeks, either....

If nothing else, there's always the vicarious "traveling" we get to do by reading posts and viewing images on MR! I have really learned a lot and enjoyed this so much.

watcher2001
Feb 21, 2006, 12:52 AM
<SNIP> But, hey, I live in the DC area, <SNIP>

<SNIP>One thing I'd like to do this spring when the weather gets nice is to hop on our Metro and go downtown and do the "tourist thing," camera in hand, as this is something I haven't really done before, although I've lived here for over 35 years....<SNIP>



Do it, you will love it. I lived in Laurel, MD for a couple of years when I was at Meade. I had the honor of being the Tour guide into DC for all my friends and relatives that would come and visit. I would always catch the metro at Greenbelt to L'enfant Plaza and spend the day in town doing the tourist stuff. Can't tell you how many times I have been up the Washington monument... and then to the Air and Space Museum. I must of walked the Mall 100 times or more. God I want to come back now...

Another fun thing you might want to do (If you haven't already) is take a day trip into Baltimore and visit the Inner Harbor. Good shopping and just enough touristy stuff to keep you entertained for a day.

~Shard~
Feb 21, 2006, 08:58 AM
But as I embark on a whole new experience this week my views may change. For the great people I have met in my travels in the US, we were still citizens of the same country.

Yes, it's truly a completely diferent ballpark - actually no, it's a different sport ;) - when comparing traveling within your own country to traveling internationally. You really can't compare the two. It really broadens your mind and views of the world, something you can't get within your own country.

I remember a few years ago when I was in New Orleans - although seeing the Cajun/Creole culture and roots was neat, I found it interesting how the tour guide was completely playing off the whole "Spanish and French influences" in architecture, and so forth. For other people on the tour, it was mind-blowing - for me, it was like, "Um, I've been to Spain and France and seen the real thing, so this isn't as big of a deal as you're making it out to be". Obviously it is still different and unique, as I said above, but you see my point. ;)

I hope to learn more first hand how others view us.

I think this will be an interesting experience for you as well. To speak to one side of things, from all of my world travels, many places do not like Americans - it is pretty much the main reason I wear a big Canadian flag on my pack, so that I do not get mistaken. Sorry, but it's true. :o So yes, your experiences in this manner will no doubt be interesting as well, as give you an outside perspective on things, specially, as you were referring to, the acceptance of gays and so forth.

Also keep in mind that no matter how we budget, it is hard for many of us to travel in the US, let alone outside of the US on a regular basis.

Why is that? I realize there are lots of factors at play, such as your job, salary, financial situation, etc., but in general, is there another reason?

Actually, I probably know one of them - holiday time. Again, it depends on your job, as every place is different, but that's one benefit we enjoy here in Canada - on average we get more holiday time than the USA. It varies, of course, but I have only been working at my present position for 4 years and have 7.5 weeks of fully paid vacation. That's the way it should be - people work too much as it is, and no one ever says at the end of their life, "I wish I would have worked more". I fel very fortunate to have a decent amount of time off and that I am able to use it. And I'll add to that, to use it wisely - I would never take a week off and sit around the house - the world is a big place with so much to experience, I always make a point to go see more of it every chance I get. :cool:

Once again, good luck on your trip, I know it will be an enjoyable one for you! :)

Applespider
Feb 21, 2006, 11:13 AM
You really can't compare the two. It really broadens your mind and views of the world, something you can't get within your own country

Again I'd disagree slightly. Any form of travel that forces you away from your usual sphere can broaden your mind. There can be a tendency from those of us in smaller countries (or those considered less diverse) to ignore travelling in your own country and to consider 'abroad' as the only place to go.

Each region/city has its own identity and culture and it's probably more useful to most to understand the rhythms that drive your own country rather than have a vague idea of those that drive the world. I think that's particularly true in a country the size of the US. I have friends who say they've been the US when they've visited Disneyworld and Orlando. They have no idea of the difference between California, the Midwest and the South. They haven't seen the changes in attitudes between big cities and tiny 'cities' than are only accessible from cross-country freeways. I've probably visited more US cities and world cities than UK ones in the last 10 years. I'm not so sure that's a good thing when I'm trying to figure out the state of the UK's economy and culture when thinking politically or socially.

I'd say it's particularly not true when you only go to the 'tourist traps' of your country of choice. You're not going to particularly broaden your mind there; going to a different area of your own nation, sitting in a bar and chatting to the locals will probably give you an entirely different concept of some attitudes and make you think more about how such disparate views can be held within one nation.

To speak to one side of things, from all of my world travels, many places do not like Americans - it is pretty much the main reason I wear a big Canadian flag on my pack, so that I do not get mistaken. Sorry, but it's true. :o

I'm not entirely convinced that's true either. I'll say that outside the US, you won't find many Bush supporters but I don't think I've ever seen Americans vilified just because they're Americans- and living in London, I see a lot of tourists! Sure, when you tell us you're Canadian, we might say 'Lucky you' but it would be a joke rather than a serious sentiment. Most people are well aware of the importance of tourist dollars and will act accordingly.

I go back to San Francisco a lot too ;) While there's a joy in discovering new places, there's another joy in getting to know another place reasonably well. My mother laughs at how I can orient myself there now on the two occasions I have gone with her. I also have friends in the Bay Area who I enjoy visiting and over the years, I've found many places that I wouldn't have got to in the course of a single trip. I don't generally go the same places each year unless I'm particularly fond of them - but the same general area can be fun.

~Shard~
Feb 21, 2006, 12:19 PM
First of all, I agree with what you're saying, ust so you don't think I'm trying to argue or anything. :)

Again I'd disagree slightly. Any form of travel that forces you away from your usual sphere can broaden your mind. There can be a tendency from those of us in smaller countries (or those considered less diverse) to ignore travelling in your own country and to consider 'abroad' as the only place to go.

Agreed. In my case, I live in the second largest country on Earth, with a wide variety of culture, geography, history, etc., and I acknowledge this, and have visited a lot of my own country. I have found whitewater rafting in Alberta which is better than any other place on Earth (as instructors/guides from those other international places have verified themselves!). I have found rainforests on Vancouver Island which rival and sometimes better what I've seen in Australia and New Zealand, and the list goes on and on. My point is, you can find many amazing places right in your backyard, so I would like to "correct" my initial statement with respect to this. That being said, I have still found a significant "difference" if you will, between traveling within my own country and traveling abroad. I like culture shock. :D :cool:

I'd say it's particularly not true when you only go to the 'tourist traps' of your country of choice. You're not going to particularly broaden your mind there; going to a different area of your own nation, sitting in a bar and chatting to the locals will probably give you an entirely different concept of some attitudes and make you think more about how such disparate views can be held within one nation.

Totally agree - I avoid tourist traps like the plague. ;) You're not truly seeing the "real" country/city/whatever if you're just hopping on a generic tour bus and riding past them. There is much more to experience. :cool:

I'm not entirely convinced that's true either. I'll say that outside the US, you won't find many Bush supporters but I don't think I've ever seen Americans vilified just because they're Americans- and living in London, I see a lot of tourists! Sure, when you tell us you're Canadian, we might say 'Lucky you' but it would be a joke rather than a serious sentiment. Most people are well aware of the importance of tourist dollars and will act accordingly.

I'm not saying it's everywhere, but I have experienced it enough to know it exists in many forms, in many levels. And maybe it's just a comparison thing too - I know Canadians seems to get along with Audssies and Kiwis a lot better (in general of course) than Americans - it's like there's some bond there, which is very cool. ;) :)

Clix Pix
Feb 21, 2006, 12:53 PM
Do it, you will love it. I lived in Laurel, MD for a couple of years when I was at Meade. I had the honor of being the Tour guide into DC for all my friends and relatives that would come and visit. I would always catch the metro at Greenbelt to L'enfant Plaza and spend the day in town doing the tourist stuff. Can't tell you how many times I have been up the Washington monument... and then to the Air and Space Museum. I must of walked the Mall 100 times or more. God I want to come back now...

Yep, one of these nice days I am going to "play tourist" and see DC as though I were a visitor..... even though I have seen most of the sights before it's usually just in passing or when doing some activity nearby. I remember years ago when we lived in Crystal City, we were driving across the 14th St bridge to take my parents into the city for dinner. I drove over that bridge every day to go to work at the Library of Congress, so it was no big deal. My mother, looking out a window, exclaimed, "ooh! What monument is that? Is that the tidal basin?" My father, looking out, too, said, "hey, is that the Lincoln Memorial?" I said, "oh, yeah...." in a bored tone and then realized that because I saw these sights every day I had become quite jaded. It was neat to see and hear my parents' reactions to them.

So, yep, I want to revisit some of these sights with camera in hand and really "do" DC as though I were a tourist here for a limited stay. We have so many wonderful and unique monuments and sights here that are not to be found anywhere else. Each of the museums on the Mall could easily take a day in themselves! I love the Air & Space museum in particular and definitely plan to devote some time to browsing around there to see what's new since my last visit. I definitely want to see if I can go to the top of the Washington Monument now that it's finally reopened after some repair work.

Indeed another nifty place at which I have spent a little time is Baltimore's Inner Harbor. That's another destination again, too, as a friend and I want to go through the aquarium. We didn't have enough time when we were there a while ago.

Back in the fall I had intended to go to the National Zoo, too, after school had started up again for the kiddies and there wouldn't be large crowds,but time got away from me. Maybe this spring....

Clix Pix
Feb 21, 2006, 01:00 PM
Definitely ANY sort of travel broadens one's horizons and adds to one's understanding of other ways of life, whether in another city or state within one's own country or in another country altogether. I remember many, many years ago being so charmed by Paris and its beauty, but the one thing which really made an impression on me was the age of the city and its buildings, reminding me that in reality the US is not that old. People still spoke of "the war," meaning WWII, as though it had just happened, and of course the impact of that war on the French people was enormous.

That was my first (and to date only) trip to Europe and we were fortunate to be able to spend some time with friends of my husband's family so that I was able to get a true sense of what living in France really was all about. We even were able to attend a wedding in Lille, which was a very different experience than the American weddings I'd seen and participated in.

One day I want to go back....

kungfu
Feb 21, 2006, 02:40 PM
from october 2003... passed while sailing. modified the color (was taken in daylight).

-hh
Feb 21, 2006, 10:24 PM
Why is that? I realize there are lots of factors at play, such as your job, salary, financial situation, etc., but in general, is there another reason?

Actually, I probably know one of them - holiday time. Again, it depends on your job, as every place is different, but that's one benefit we enjoy here in Canada - on average we get more holiday time than the USA. It varies, of course, but I have only been working at my present position for 4 years and have 7.5 weeks of fully paid vacation.

Having that much time off is a very European perspective on life. I do pretty well with getting 5 weeks off (plus holidays), which is probably around double the Holiday time off that many (possibly most) Americans get. In balance, it took 15 years on the job to get up to that level of benefit.

That's the way it should be - people work too much as it is, and no one ever says at the end of their life, "I wish I would have worked more".

Philisophically, I agree. Unfortunately, the old adage is that you generally have 'time OR money'. Even though there are ways of making the money stretch (such as by taking camping holidays, etc), there's always more and more discretionary spending "things" nibbling away at your wallet...Cable TV, ISP, Cellphone, NetFlix, .Mac, Comic Books, Telephone, Electric, Heat, Mortgage, Water, Sewer, Beer, Taxes, Childcare, etc, etc, etc. Doing an expense summary to see where your money actually gets spent is a good way to start to see if your spending lines up with your life priorities and how to reprioritize your budget...and set aside part of it for travel to landmarks.

http://www.huntzinger.com/photo/cayman_banner.jpg
http://www.huntzinger.com/photo/castle_banner.jpg
http://www.huntzinger.com/photo/eagle_banner.jpg
http://www.huntzinger.com/photo/galapagos_banner.jpg


-hh

~Shard~
Feb 21, 2006, 11:01 PM
Philisophically, I agree. Unfortunately, the old adage is that you generally have 'time OR money'. Even though there are ways of making the money stretch (such as by taking camping holidays, etc), there's always more and more discretionary spending "things" nibbling away at your wallet...Cable TV, ISP, Cellphone, NetFlix, .Mac, Comic Books, Telephone, Electric, Heat, Mortgage, Water, Sewer, Beer, Taxes, Childcare, etc, etc, etc. Doing an expense summary to see where your money actually gets spent is a good way to start to see if your spending lines up with your life priorities and how to reprioritize your budget...and set aside part of it for travel to landmarks.

Yes, quite true - you do have to be realistic about things and realize that money doesn't grow on trees. ;) As you say though, you need to prioritize your life and see what things you put importance on. For me, traveling is indeed one of those things. So, in my case, spending $5000 on a backpacking trip is worth far more than spending $5000 on a new plasma TV. But to other people, it's not - sitting on the couch watching TV is what they enjoy, so by all means, that's what they should spend their money on. :)

But you do have to keep it in perspective too. I have zero debt, and never plan on having any debt whatsoever. Many people I know live beyond their means, want a bit of everything, and can't afford the lifestyles to which they have become accustomed, which is very bad. I enjoy things even more when I know I can truly and honestly afford them. :cool:

Excellent points -hh, thanks for that. :)

Clix Pix
Feb 21, 2006, 11:42 PM
...And as has already been mentioned, but doesn't hurt to reinforce the point, there is the aspect of having sufficient time in which to travel. In the US, most jobs do NOT provide all that much in the way of "annual leave," and if someone is lucky they may have two weeks or maybe three.... In the case of a person who has family responsibilities, well, often the money just isn't going to be available because it's already had to be allocated to other, more urgent needs, or the time isn't available because if the spouse is also working, he or she may not be able to get off for annual leave at the same time or may not have the same amount of time available.... and if there are significant priorities such as buying a house or financially covering things which need to be done such as home repair projects or other critical things, well, there goes the travel vacation....

But, yes, Shard, you do make an important point that everyone has different priorities about how they want to spend their money and their time. Me, I'd rather put a few thousand dollars into a new computer system or into adding a couple of lenses to use with my camera than into a new television or "media center," but friends have different priorities and they have the latest TVs or very sophisticated media setups in their homes..... It's what they enjoy. It's their money.... :Shrug: Me, I'm happy to have a new lens so that I can go out shooting with it or a having a great computer in which to download and work on those photographic images.

I think that for many Americans traveling is not quite as much a priority or a natural concept as it is for people in other countries, and of course a lot of times when Americans do venture abroad they really don't do it right, thereby earning the title, "Ugly American" as they stomp around historic areas dressed inappropriately and talking too loudly and firing their point-and-shoot cameras at anything and everything....

xsedrinam
Feb 22, 2006, 12:00 AM
The Equator in Ecuador.

Chip NoVaMac
Feb 22, 2006, 07:26 AM
In the case of a person who has family responsibilities, well, often the money just isn't going to be available because it's already had to be allocated to other, more urgent needs, or the time isn't available because if the spouse is also working, he or she may not be able to get off for annual leave at the same time or may not have the same amount of time available.... and if there are significant priorities such as buying a house or financially covering things which need to be done such as home repair projects or other critical things, well, there goes the travel vacation....

Add to that the general idea is now to "live large" here in the US. Homes way to big, with cars way to big and expensive. Living life on the edge in some cases. Also in areas like ours (DC), affordable housing is hard to come by. In some cases over 50% just going to rent (after taxes)!

I know that I could stretch my budget by having a roommate, but at 47 and all the past, I like having a place to myself.

I think that for many Americans traveling is not quite as much a priority or a natural concept as it is for people in other countries,....

I think it is also the way we like to travel too as Americans. I am different, i that I look for the best accommodations at the best price. It might mean a room with no room service, cable TV, or a pool. IMO we want to be pampered.

~Shard~
Feb 22, 2006, 08:07 AM
I think it is also the way we like to travel too as Americans. I am different, i that I look for the best accommodations at the best price. It might mean a room with no room service, cable TV, or a pool. IMO we want to be pampered.

I would agree with that - many Canadians are the same, although I am the opposite, similar to you. I look for the best overall deals (not just the cheapest of course) and I have no problems sleeping in an airport on an 8-hour layover, sleeping in the middle of the Outback or on a beach as I did in Australia, in a train station in Krakow etc. etc. - if I have to rough it, no problem at all, it's all part of the experience for me. Being pampered, staying in a cushy hotel in a highly commercialized tourist trap of a place, no, that's no way to experience another city/country/culture. I don't understand people who travel like that - they're getting about 10% out of their trip which could be so much more, and it's essentially a waste of money in my books. Reminds me of a friend of mine who went to New Zealand. Whereas I did unbelieveably cool activities and all that, he sat in a pub all day, every day (practically) drinking and watching NFL. Well, guess what, I could have saved you $2000 in airfare if all you wanted to do was sit around like a lazy fool and drink in a pub - you can do that back home! I don't get people like that. :cool:

Of course, I admit I can be very opinionated when it comes to things like this. ;) :cool:

-hh
Feb 22, 2006, 06:08 PM
The Equator in Ecuador.

Nice presentation.

Now someone from the USA's going to have to follow that up with a photo from "4 Corners".


-hh

whocares
Feb 23, 2006, 12:06 PM
Nice presentation.

Now someone from the USA's going to have to follow that up with a photo from "4 Corners".


-hh

What's "4 Corners"? :o :o

~Shard~
Feb 23, 2006, 12:08 PM
What's "4 Corners"? :o :o

It's a historical site where New Mexico, Colorado, Utah and Arizona all join. There are lots of ancient Indian ruins there and it is quite a fascinating place. :cool:

Duff-Man
Feb 23, 2006, 12:41 PM
Duff-Man says.....here's one of the Dreilšndereck in Basel, Switzerland - a monument to where 3 countries (France, Germany, Switzerland) converge on the Rhein....Oh yeah!

Marky_Mark
Feb 24, 2006, 03:56 PM
A few pictures I took in London in November 2004 at about 7pm:

1. London Eye and City Hall

2. Charing Cross Station (with the BT Tower behind)

3. St. Stephen's Clocktower (Big Ben is only the name of the bell, y'know)

Then a couple more local sights:

4. Clifton Suspension Bridge, Bristol (designed by Isambard Kingdom Brunel - he died before it was completed, unfortunately). This picture was taken at about 6.30am during the dawn ascent at the Bristol Balloon Fiesta 2005, the largest balloon meet in Europe. over 120 balloons took off within about half an hour and floated across Bristol - very cool, and very peaceful way to wake up.

5. Port Talbot Steelworks, S. Wales - a grinding edifice, but quite awe-inspiring, especially at night, where it can be seen for miles - August 2005, around 11.30pm.

All my own work :)

adamb100
Feb 24, 2006, 04:07 PM
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/58/Us_four_corners_msspider.jpg


The 4 corners monument.
This is from wikipedia

~Shard~
Feb 24, 2006, 05:06 PM
The 4 corners monument.
This is from wikipedia

Hey, now now, you can't post a landmark pic unless you actually took the picture yourself! Otherwise that defeats the purpose of the thread! :p :D

mad jew
Feb 24, 2006, 05:09 PM
It's okay because it has been made to look like an oil painting, not a photo. Forgiven. :p

Y'all got it wrong. Four Corners is actually a current events program along the same lines as Sixty Minutes but with a more factual basis.

~Shard~
Feb 24, 2006, 05:11 PM
It's okay because it has been made to look like an oil painting, not a photo. Forgiven. :p

Well, I don't know about that, that's pushing it - it sounds pretty mad to me.... ;)

Marky_Mark
Feb 24, 2006, 06:19 PM
OK last one for now.

Pont Valentre in the town of Cahors, in the Lot valley, SW France. Taken last August on the way back from Dordogne to Toulouse airport.

encephalon
Feb 24, 2006, 07:10 PM
Not far from the four corners is Monument Valley (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monument_Valley). Pictured here are the East and West Mittens.

http://forums.macrumors.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=41762&stc=1&d=1140829728

steve jr.
Feb 24, 2006, 07:57 PM
The Pro Football Hall of Fame and Fawcett Stadium in Canton, Ohio.

And on the other side of the stadium is my high school. My school district owns the field, and on really nice days in the spring and summer, my "boss" at the performing arts hall attached to the school will let me and my friends (also crew) go out on the field and toss a football around. What a feeling!

http://i13.photobucket.com/albums/a292/future_ceo/fawcett.jpg

http://www.tailgating.com/Tour%2004/Images/HOF%20003.jpg

yg17
Feb 26, 2006, 12:38 AM
From my vacation to NYC in June :D

evilgEEk
Feb 26, 2006, 01:44 AM
I'm sure the Seattle skyline has been posted before, but I really like this shot.

This was taken about 20 minutes after the sun set with a one second exposure.

imac abuser
Feb 26, 2006, 04:22 PM
This is the coolest thread ever. I really enjoyed the pictures here, and can't wait to add some myself. What are the criteria to add? Do they have to be manipulated in photoshop some how, or just of interesting places? Plus what are good sizes to post?

Thanks,
Chris

w_parietti22
Feb 26, 2006, 04:49 PM
I'm sure the Seattle skyline has been posted before, but I really like this shot.

This was taken about 20 minutes after the sun set with a one second exposure.

Go you have a bigger res on that pic?

evilgEEk
Feb 26, 2006, 10:55 PM
Go you have a bigger res on that pic?
The original is 2592x1944 at 180 dpi, taken on a Canon Elph 3.2mp. The file size is 1.1mb

w_parietti22
Feb 26, 2006, 11:33 PM
The original is 2592x1944 at 180 dpi, taken on a Canon Elph 3.2mp. The file size is 1.1mb

Can you upload at least a 1600x1200 to www.imageshack.us ?

Abstract
Feb 27, 2006, 04:34 AM
I still take pictures to serve as mementos and such but I definitely don't waste my travels by being behind a camera lens for 50% of the trip. ;)


I don't consider it a waste to take some photos, especially when you just quoted Chip who loves his photography...... hmmmmm

And I've been to London 3 times now, and now it's my home away from home. I can also easily say that you don't experience anything within a city/country unless you have lived there for 3-4 months (minimum), but I don't bother. I'm lucky to be able to say that I can go to 5 completely separate countries and feel right at home, and I can look at others, maybe even yourself, and wonder why you've never experienced anything "more".

Different strokes for different folks. I also think photos are great and want to take more, not less.

Abstract
Feb 27, 2006, 04:44 AM
You're not going to particularly broaden your mind there; going to a different area of your own nation, sitting in a bar and chatting to the locals will probably give you an entirely different concept of some attitudes and make you think more about how such disparate views can be held within one nation.

Completely agree.

Yes, it's truly a completely diferent ballpark - actually no, it's a different sport ;) - when comparing traveling within your own country to traveling internationally. You really can't compare the two. It really broadens your mind and views of the world, something you can't get within your own country.

Actually, travelling around your own country can broaden your view of the world, and maybe more importantly, your view of the society you live in. Talking to someone from Nova Scotia might give you a very different idea of how others view your own government. You won't get such different views when talking to other middle class folk in Regina, I'm sure.


Yes, it's truly a completely diferent ballpark - actually no, .....I found it interesting how the tour guide was completely playing off the whole "Spanish and French influences" in architecture, and so forth. For other people on the tour, it was mind-blowing - for me, it was like, "Um, I've been to Spain and France and seen the real thing, so this isn't as big of a deal as you're making it out to be". Obviously it is still different and unique, as I said above, but you see my point. ;)

The architecture in New Orleans is influenced by the Spanish and of course the French. They're not the same as the architecture in Spain or France at all. It's like a combination of two styles, with their own added twist, making it completely unique. If you went to France and saw a city with lots of Spanish and New Orleans influenced architecture, you'd say it's unique. You just don't think that way about New Orleans because it's not in Europe.

imac abuser
Mar 2, 2006, 01:12 PM
I thought this was cool I took this in Key West, Fl.

imac abuser
Mar 2, 2006, 01:28 PM
#1 Bell Rock
#2 Overlook

Chip NoVaMac
Mar 2, 2006, 10:24 PM
I don't consider it a waste to take some photos, especially when you just quoted Chip who loves his photography......

Thanks Abstract, I do love my photography. Though my week in Reykjavik and London gave me an appreciation of where Shard came from.

I went on this trip with great expectations of between 800 to 1000 images shot during my stay in these two great European capitals. I might have 200 tops. A day sick in London probably could account for my either taking less or more. Haven't decided yet.

Instead my time in Reykjavik was spent with the people of that city. In fact it was thought that I was more European than American by a couple of people I met. I can only guess at the reasons, surely it wasn't my accent .:D

Maybe it was I was not in "cool" printed t-shirts or sweat shirts, but dressy casual. Or maybe it was answering "afsaki?, (af-sah-kith) ensku" (sorry,english). It could be that I was not afraid of approaching someone to talk - to compliment them on their fine dog, to simply ask for suggestions on where to go for food or drink. Or maybe it was realizing that the world does not revolve around the US only - having an understanding of a little of what was going on with their country, both at home and abroad in conversations.

For a variety of reasons, I did not make it out out the city of Reykjavik during my stay. So no great landscape shots coming soon from this trip.

For many of my US travels I like to capture the people going about their day to day lives. Maybe it was the cold, efficient service on the flight over that gave me pause on getting in "their faces" with my camera. Or it could have been the eye contact that the locals made in my passing. But I felt that I was intruding in some way by lifting my camera.

So in some ways Shard is right. For some in my situation would have gone and done what they have done before (as I have done to) and spend time behind the lens. Missing the opportunity that I think was the greatest so far in my travels last week.

For I met some that I may meet again (we exchanged email addresses). In other cases, just the memories of seeing people interact with each other was enough.

I was asked t work today on my return what was my greatest experience for my first overseas adventure. It took a moment; but I responded that it was maybe meeting the people - but the thrill was flying over Iceland on my way to London and flying over the UK, Ireland, Iceland (again), the Arctic Circle, and Greenland on the way back.

I guess in some ways it is like my trip this past summer to SF. There are two high points that I have no pictures from. The first was on my arrival for my connecting flight at Chicago. Seeing the farm lands give way to villages, then to small towns, on to industry and the city. It was like watching a film in school as to how our nation developed.

The other was meeting the SF twins (they are two older women that have been used in advertising for the likes of Virgin Atlantic, among others. I confused them for subjects of Diane Arbus' "Twins" series. Some came up wanting photographs with them, I left with great stories of their going through WW II and their living their lives together in SF.

whocares
Mar 3, 2006, 12:03 PM
This rather run-off-the-mill post a photo thread is turning it to a very enjoyable discussion obout travel philosophy and ethic (and obviously a nice series of great photos).

It's a very enjoyable read, and great to see how other's like to travel.



I always take a camera on my travels (the rare times I didn't I *really* regretted it). However, using of the camera depends on how the travel turns out: more of a meeting people thing, or more of a landscape/cityscape/etc experience.
The best way IMHO is just to pack a versatile photo bag, and leave all expectations at home.

~Shard~
Mar 3, 2006, 01:43 PM
Thanks Abstract, I do love my photography. Though my week in Reykjavik and London gave me an appreciation of where Shard came from.

Thanks Chip, and for the record, I was by no means trying to downplay the importance of photography - I know what a passion it is for you, and that's great. As Abstract said, different strokes for different folks. I love taking photos as well, however I don't take many. I see far too many people on my travels who are simply experiencing their vacation through their viewfinder, taking no doubt thousands of shots, and that's just wrong - they are missing out on so much. Take a lot of photos if you like, but don't let that rob you from the actual experience.

And thanks for the update on your travels, it is much appreciated! I love reading about other people's adventures, as it always acts as a catalyst to go travleing again myself. ;) :cool:

Clix Pix
Mar 3, 2006, 01:58 PM
In the past, I've done that, spent most of a vacation or most of an event behind the viewfinder and then after I've gotten home find that (1) I have a zillion images to process and little time to do so and (2) that I've really missed out on the actual experience of the vacation or event. When I went to SF for this last vacation I tried to make it a point to have the camera at hand, yes, but not always at my eye. Still shot an awful lot of images but I also actually did take the time to experience SF, too.

A couple of years ago I attended an event, a gathering of a lot of people, and I spent most of the time shooting away like mad. Got some great photos, but then later, friends were talking about various aspects of the event or meeting different people and what they'd chatted about and I'd think, "huh? Gee, I missed that!" That brought it home to me that my initial purpose in attending the event was not really to have been the "photographer," official or otherwise, but to have enjoyed the opportunity of meeting a lot of people I'd known from online. Yet somehow I'd totally missed out on a huge chunk of that experience because of my obsession with taking photos to record the event for posterity. Sad part of that is that of course I came home with a zillion images, many of which still to this day remain unprocessed....

m-dogg
Mar 3, 2006, 10:46 PM
Here's a pic from 4 Corners:

Bibulous
Mar 3, 2006, 10:57 PM
w

m-dogg
Mar 3, 2006, 11:01 PM
And some other pics from that region:

1) Canyon de Chelly - Spider Rock

2) Taos Pueblo

3) Canyon de Chelly - White House

4) Bandelier Nat'l Mounument

5) Arches Nat'l Park - Delicate Arch (as seen on UT license plates)

Bibulous
Mar 3, 2006, 11:05 PM
a

m-dogg
Mar 3, 2006, 11:11 PM
1) Mmmm, Guinness!

2) Edinburgh Castle

Bibulous
Mar 3, 2006, 11:13 PM
4

m-dogg
Mar 3, 2006, 11:17 PM
Last one - Traversing out across Mineral Basin for some freshies a couple weeks ago @ Snowbird in Utah:

xsedrinam
Mar 3, 2006, 11:49 PM
Mannequin Pis, Brussels:

todd2000
Mar 4, 2006, 01:09 AM
I really would like to get into photography a bit more. I need to get a good camera first, anyway here are my contributions.

1. Obviously The Empire State Building at night
http://i51.photobucket.com/albums/f384/todd2000/HPIM0639.jpg

2.Heres one I bet no ones heard of... Lambert Castle in West Paterson, NJ, built in 1823 renovated in the late 90s
http://i51.photobucket.com/albums/f384/todd2000/HPIM0666.jpg

http://i51.photobucket.com/albums/f384/todd2000/HPIM0667.jpg

This is a seperate "lookout tower" or something for the castle, it is on the side of the mountain a few hundred feet from the castle
http://i51.photobucket.com/albums/f384/todd2000/HPIM0651.jpg

3. Not really a landmark, but thought it was a really cool picture when I took it :)
http://i51.photobucket.com/albums/f384/todd2000/HPIM0342.jpg

Sorry their kinda small Photobucket resized them, because I didn't really feel like doing it at 2 in the morning :)

todd2000
Mar 4, 2006, 01:12 AM
P.S. xsedrinam, that lighthouse pic is very nice, I love lighthouses, you would happen to have a larger version would ya, would love to print a nice 8x10.

cyberddot
Mar 4, 2006, 01:27 AM
Since St James has already been displayed...

The Cliffs of Moher:
42439

and Poulnabrone dolmen:
42440

both found in County Galway (http://www.galway.net/galwayguide/visit/burren/), Ireland

imac abuser
Mar 14, 2006, 01:59 PM
Here is one of 3 Basilica's in the USA this one is downtown Minneapolis, Mn

dralfonzo
Mar 19, 2006, 11:57 AM
Milwaukee Art Museum. Going there tomorrow. :D

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/7/79/Milwaukee_Art_Museum.jpg/800px-Milwaukee_Art_Museum.jpg


looks.....popular.

Clix Pix
Mar 30, 2006, 01:10 PM
and we get these views by Dawn's Early Light:

http://clixpix.smugmug.com/photos/62226063-L.jpg

http://clixpix.smugmug.com/photos/62226079-L.jpg

http://clixpix.smugmug.com/photos/62226102-L.jpg

Chip NoVaMac
Mar 30, 2006, 08:58 PM
Just an amazing place!

zagato27
Apr 1, 2006, 11:19 PM
looks.....popular.

I love this picture. Glad that it was posted. I use it for the background on Adium. Oh, I see we're being funny:rolleyes: . I'm bad. Still like the picture. Wish I was in Milwaukee, I'd go see the real thing. Cheers

bluegill31
Apr 11, 2006, 09:50 PM
heres some places ive been in the past year...

ground zero

my wife on Twin Peaks SF

the UN buildin NYC

Warden's residence, Alcatraz

apple store SF

chriswan
Apr 17, 2006, 09:05 AM
South Tokyo in the Hot Springs Resort

http://static.flickr.com/36/76863426_8ea6273e56.jpg?v=0

Rainbow Bridge in Central Tokyo New Years Eve

http://static.flickr.com/37/76863542_3b67075e1a.jpg?v=0

-Chris

imac abuser
Apr 18, 2006, 06:41 PM
Here are some pics from my vacation

1.) Atlantis Resort & Casino (Paradise Island, Bahamas)
2.) Sun Sculpture in Atlantis Casino
3.) St. Maarten Map
4.) Saphire Beach, St. Thomas U.S.V.I.
5.) Magans Bay Beach, St. Thomas U.S.V.I. (one of top 10 beaches in the world)

imac abuser
Apr 18, 2006, 06:43 PM
This staircase "street," built by the Danes in the 1700s, leads to the residential area above Charlotte Amalie and Blackbeard's Castle. The castle's tower, built in 1679, was once used by the notorious pirate Edward Teach. If you count the stairs as you go up, you'll discover, as have thousands before you, that there are more than 99.

adamb100
Apr 18, 2006, 09:00 PM
I love this picture. Glad that it was posted. I use it for the background on Adium. Oh, I see we're being funny:rolleyes: . I'm bad. Still like the picture. Wish I was in Milwaukee, I'd go see the real thing. Cheers
Being inside the building has a beautiful view too. Theres Windows all over facing lake michigan. :) :)

freeny
Apr 18, 2006, 09:13 PM
View from my bus stop waiting for the downtown 103.

groovebuster
Apr 26, 2006, 06:43 AM
Kaiser Wilhelm Memorial Church:
http://www.kleberg-album.de/album/slideshow1/slideshow1-Bilder/59.jpg

The castle church in Wittenberg where Martin Luther nailed his 95 Theses to the door:
http://www.kleberg-album.de/album/slideshow1/slideshow1-Bilder/150.jpg

http://www.kleberg-album.de/album/slideshow1/slideshow1-Bilder/154.jpg

http://www.kleberg-album.de/album/slideshow1/slideshow1-Bilder/155.jpg

kittynka
Apr 27, 2006, 09:30 AM
The feeling was great.

Stormyguy
Apr 27, 2006, 01:39 PM
This is one of the biggest landmarks in the world I guess! Love this photograph :)

http://www.dreamtime-uk.com/danny/canyon_best.jpg

puckhead193
Apr 27, 2006, 01:45 PM
this thread is making me really anxious about going to china in a few weeks :D

Chip NoVaMac
Apr 27, 2006, 09:38 PM
Just thought I would share a blast from my past, circa 2000.

Chip NoVaMac
Apr 27, 2006, 09:51 PM
Thought I would do some perspective control in PS on this one.

AlBDamned
May 19, 2006, 06:44 PM
My god this thread's enormous!

I'm not sure if anyone's posted any shots of Venice, Italy but we had a fantastic time there last weekend.

In order, we have the Bridge of Sighs, the canal-level view from a Gondola, Santa Maria della Salute, the beautiful, colourful island of Burano and finally The Doge's Palace.

~Shard~
May 20, 2006, 02:13 AM
Here are a few from Auschwitz, near Krakow, Poland, from my Eastern Europe backpacking adventure a year and a half ago... :cool:

http://img56.imageshack.us/img56/8324/auschwitzgate7wr.jpg (http://imageshack.us)

http://img56.imageshack.us/img56/7532/guardtower0sp.jpg (http://imageshack.us)

http://img56.imageshack.us/img56/2546/birkenaurailroad8gc.jpg (http://imageshack.us)

imac abuser
May 20, 2006, 12:21 PM
man, some of these photos area heavy, but I love this thread. Great shots!

shadowmoses
May 20, 2006, 04:25 PM
from a few weeks back....taken with K750i
http://img458.imageshack.us/img458/1078/dsc000956ca.jpg

ShadoW

~Shard~
May 20, 2006, 04:28 PM
from a few weeks back....taken with K750i

I didn't realize they changed the angle of the Eiffel Tower like that - hmph, you learn something new every day... :p :D

AlBDamned
May 21, 2006, 03:53 AM
I didn't realize they changed the angle of the Eiffel Tower like that - hmph, you learn something new every day... :p :D

LOL :)

The tower looks amazing when it's lit up. We never were that close when we went but when the lights switch to glitter mode it's fantastic.

UberMac
May 21, 2006, 04:25 AM
Ayers rock a couple of years ago...I really like the clouds in this for some reason :)

Uber

~Shard~
May 21, 2006, 10:56 AM
Ayers rock a couple of years ago...I really like the clouds in this for some reason :)

Yeah, that truly is a magical place. I remember sleeping under the stars just outside of the park (it got down to a low of 30 degrees Celsius that night! :eek: ), watching the shooting stars, and then waking up at 4 AM to hike the Rock for sunrise. One of the best experiences of my life actually, and one of the top highlights of all of my world travels (which is saying a lot!) :cool:

kretzy
May 21, 2006, 11:02 AM
I'm ashamed to admit it but I haven't gotten around to going to Uluru (formally Ayer's Rock) yet. :o It's definitely on my "local" (if you call a couple of 1000kms away local) sites to visit.

~Shard~
May 21, 2006, 05:27 PM
I'm ashamed to admit it but I haven't gotten around to going to Uluru (formally Ayer's Rock) yet. :o It's definitely on my "local" (if you call a couple of 1000kms away local) sites to visit.

That's alright, there are many places in my ""backyard" as well which I haven't got around to visiting yet myself - I've always been too busy jetting off around the world! ;) Taking some time this summer though to drive out the the West Coast and hopefully see some things I haven't seen on my previous visits though. :cool:

Nuks
May 21, 2006, 07:44 PM
I suppose I'll add some from my neck of the woods (St. John's, Newfoundland):

1) & 2) Signal Hill- Guglielmo Marconi sent the first transatlantic signal from here to England. (2 also shows the harbour and waterfront).

3) The Narrows- Not much to say about this one other than some ships used to have a hard time entering the St. John's harbour becuase the entrance was so narrow (and shallow as well).

4) & 5) Cape Spear- The most easterly point in North America (in other words, the closest place to Europe). I onced climbed over a fence there to stand on the furthest bit of land... making me the most easterly person in North America.

~Shard~
May 21, 2006, 09:55 PM
I suppose I'll add some from my neck of the woods (St. John's, Newfoundland):

1) & 2) Signal Hill- Guglielmo Marconi sent the first transatlantic signal from here to England. (2 also shows the harbour and waterfront).

3) The Narrows- Not much to say about this one other than some ships used to have a hard time entering the St. John's harbour becuase the entrance was so narrow (and shallow as well).

4) & 5) Cape Spear- The most easterly point in North America (in other words, the closest place to Europe). I onced climbed over a fence there to stand on the furthest bit of land... making me the most easterly person in North America.

Beautiful! A trip down East is definitely on my list of places to visit these days. We(s)t Coast this year, perhaps East Coast next year... ;) :cool:

Nuks
May 21, 2006, 10:05 PM
I don't feel like I really appreciate it (having lived here all my life), but I know I should. Now that I've fallen in love with other countries and cities, I'm trying my hardest to love mine as well. Shard, I am fascinated by Eastern Europe, and I'm going to backpack through the area after I finish my degree. I'd love it if we could talk sometime and you could tell me about your trip sometime. I'm probably going to start in Estonia, go through Poland, Czech Republic, Hungary, Romania, Croatia, and as many other countries as possible. So we should definitely talk sometime. But for sure, come to NF sometime, it's a pretty neat place.


EDIT: I found a nicer picture of Signal Hill.

~Shard~
May 21, 2006, 10:17 PM
I don't feel like I really appreciate it (having lived here all my life), but I know I should. Now that I've fallen in love with other countries and cities, I'm trying my hardest to love mine as well. Shard, I am fascinated by Eastern Europe, and I'm going to backpack through the area after I finish my degree. I'd love it if we could talk sometime and you could tell me about your trip sometime. I'm probably going to start in Estonia, go through Poland, Czech Republic, Hungary, Romania, Croatia, and as many other countries as possible. So we should definitely talk sometime. But for sure, come to NF sometime, it's a pretty neat place.


You got it! Just PM me whenever and we can definitely chat. :cool:

I found Eastern Europe to be much nicer than Western Europe, but that's just me - it seems like everyone always goes to Italy, Spain, France, etc. etc. and as a result they are far more touristy and commercialized than the Eastern countries. The Eastern countries are more "untouched" and the history there is just as amazing if not more so than in Western Europe - the Holy Roman Empire, the Hapsburgs, the effects of the Wars and Communism, the list goes on and on... :cool:

I backpacked throughout Austria, Czech Republic, Poland, Slovak Republic, Croatia and Hungary on my trip, so I can definitely give you some tips on what to do, where to go and what to see depending where all you go. I'd love to go back, however there are far too many places I haven't been yet which I have to experience before I start doing repeats... ;) :cool:

puckhead193
May 30, 2006, 09:16 PM
pic i took a few days ago... its the forbidden city in Beijing.

srf4real
Oct 14, 2006, 09:50 PM
One of my honeymoon pics.

http://img221.imageshack.us/img221/3461/pemmiquidlightvh1.jpg

Chip NoVaMac
Oct 15, 2006, 09:20 AM
One of my honeymoon pics.

Great shot! I have seen pics of this same place- and yours is up there with some of the best I have seen.

Just got back from a Caribbean cruise yesterday, need to sort through the pics (not many that are really worthy of posting - long story for another post). :D

Yakamoto
Oct 15, 2006, 02:38 PM
Ok, heres a couple of mine.

count chocula
Oct 15, 2006, 03:15 PM
One of my honeymoon pics.
i love the reflection of the buildings in the water, great photo.

Chip NoVaMac
Oct 15, 2006, 04:40 PM
In honor of Yakamoto here is a shot from July 2005 of the Ferry Building in SF.

Yakamoto
Oct 15, 2006, 10:07 PM
In honor of Yakamoto here is a shot from July 2005 of the Ferry Building in SF.
Awesome! I loved the ferry building (Big time Foodie)
Heres a B&W of the Bay Bridge to compliment it.

KfackC
Oct 16, 2006, 09:51 AM
Tel aviv beach,Israel(left):

Haifa,Israel:

eyemacg5
Oct 31, 2006, 01:24 PM
:) Pompei with vesuvius in the background

http://img350.imageshack.us/img350/3118/italyoct2006389be5.th.jpg (http://img350.imageshack.us/my.php?image=italyoct2006389be5.jpg)