PDA

View Full Version : What chip do YOU think apple will put in their intel powermacs




Macmadant
Jan 28, 2006, 02:06 PM
what intel chip will apple use in their intel powermac i can't guess i don't have a clue what intel chips are out there the only one i've heard the name of is pentium, any ideas:)



ChrisBrightwell
Jan 28, 2006, 02:08 PM
Intel has some dual-core hyperthread-enabled chips coming down the pipe this year. I wouldn't be surprised at all to see those show up in the new PowerMac.

Imagine having four cores, each with two threads.

FireArse
Jan 28, 2006, 02:17 PM
Intel has some dual-core hyperthread-enabled chips coming down the pipe this year. I wouldn't be surprised at all to see those show up in the new PowerMac.

Imagine having four cores, each with two threads.

It's only gonna be useful if you can split your program into threads. The software needs to take advantage of all this multi-core business - unless its programmed to - the code will only use one core. rendering the others to do jack.

F

risc
Jan 28, 2006, 02:41 PM
Intel Woodcrest

solaris
Jan 28, 2006, 02:50 PM
Intel "Conroe" - 64-bit desktop processor.
Expected late 2006

risc
Jan 28, 2006, 02:55 PM
Intel "Conroe" - 64-bit desktop processor.

The Woodcrest is the SMP version of the Conroe, I hope they go with the Woodcrest over the Conroe I'd hate to see no more dual CPU (whatever they end up calling the) Power Macs. The Woodcrest is the Server/Workstation version of the Conroe, like the Xeon compared to the Pentium IV at the moment.

Laser47
Jan 28, 2006, 02:56 PM
Dual Intel Core Quattro :D.

ChrisBrightwell
Jan 28, 2006, 03:02 PM
It's only gonna be useful if you can split your program into threads. The software needs to take advantage of all this multi-core business - unless its programmed to - the code will only use one core. rendering the others to do jack.Software can all run on one thread, but the OS can balance different processes on different threads.

Additionally, stuff like Final Cut is already multi-processor aware. I'm not sure that it would scale to 8 threads, but you never know.

Catfish_Man
Jan 28, 2006, 03:47 PM
I'll be curious to see if it's Woodcrest or Conroe. Intel has historically artificially overpriced their SMP capable chips, at least when selling them directly to consumers. A dual woodcrest system will be crazy-fast, though :D

DVK916
Jan 29, 2006, 12:21 AM
I see the new Powermacs getting Conroe, as well as the next iMac revision. The next MacBook Pro will get the 4MB Cache Merom, and the new iBook will see a 2MB Cache Merom with a lower clock.

Chundles
Jan 29, 2006, 01:31 AM
Pentium with MMX. Pentium II in the xServe. ;)

MacTruck
Jan 29, 2006, 02:16 AM
what intel chip will apple use in their intel powermac

a jalepeno pringle

toneloco2881
Jan 29, 2006, 02:30 AM
I see the new Powermacs getting Conroe, as well as the next iMac revision. The next MacBook Pro will get the 4MB Cache Merom, and the new iBook will see a 2MB Cache Merom with a lower clock.
The iMac and MacBook will maintain parallelism with regards to chips. I expect both of them to get upgraded to Merom once it becomes available. Conroe has an estimated 65w TDP which is probably too high for the iMac's form-factor, which I expect to get even smaller.

matix
Jan 29, 2006, 02:44 AM
I kinda think there will be Conroe - slow, conroe - fast, and for the top line, possible the conroe XE, which will be like a Pentium Extreme edition. I'm not sure if i can see apple using server grade chips from intel in their power mac. Just exhorbiantly expensive for what you get. .02

DVK916
Jan 29, 2006, 05:15 AM
The iMac and MacBook will maintain parallelism with regards to chips. I expect both of them to get upgraded to Merom once it becomes available. Conroe has an estimated 65w TDP which is probably too high for the iMac's form-factor, which I expect to get even smaller.

Using Merom will drive up the cost of the iMac. Conroe will allow for lower cost. Using Merom could make the iMac more costly to produce than a Powermac.

howesey
Jan 29, 2006, 07:02 AM
It's only gonna be useful if you can split your program into threads. The software needs to take advantage of all this multi-core business - unless its programmed to - the code will only use one core. rendering the others to do jack.

FMac OS uses Mach kernal, unlike Windows, it can balance tasks and calculations up between processors. It goes, "cool two processors, I'll get one to do some calculations, and get the other one to do some others, I'll get their results and put them together to come out with the outcome". NT kernal just goes "who's the second processor?".

yankeefan24
Jan 29, 2006, 07:08 AM
Intel Woodcrest

i agree 100%. Woodcrest will be Intel's most powerfull chip this year which is designed for multiple processors linked together. Conroe is for single processor solutions.

dr_lha
Jan 29, 2006, 09:48 AM
Mac OS uses Mach kernal, unlike Windows, it can balance tasks and calculations up between processors. It goes, "cool two processors, I'll get one to do some calculations, and get the other one to do some others, I'll get their results and put them together to come out with the outcome". NT kernal just goes "who's the second processor?".

Exactly. Not to mention the fact that Apple have have dual processor machines in their main line up for ages now, so most software companies should be writing code to make use of it. Using multiple threads in code is very common these days, for example my Safari is currently using 34 threads.

Catfish_Man
Jan 29, 2006, 12:13 PM
Mac OS uses Mach kernal, unlike Windows, it can balance tasks and calculations up between processors. It goes, "cool two processors, I'll get one to do some calculations, and get the other one to do some others, I'll get their results and put them together to come out with the outcome". NT kernal just goes "who's the second processor?".

Oh please. NT runs just fine on dual dual-core hyperthreaded boxes (gasp! 8 threads!). Mach is a nice enough kernel, but it ain't magic. 10.4 has improved the situation a great deal with regard to multithreading in the kernel, actually. It used to be pretty ugly in places. Still has a ways to go to catch up to the commercial *nixes and linux, but I wouldn't be surprised if it's as good or better than NT now.

DarkAdept
Jan 29, 2006, 01:19 PM
Mac OS uses Mach kernal, unlike Windows, it can balance tasks and calculations up between processors. It goes, "cool two processors, I'll get one to do some calculations, and get the other one to do some others, I'll get their results and put them together to come out with the outcome". NT kernal just goes "who's the second processor?".

Mac OS X is a perfectly fine OS, but it isn't magic. Both NT and OS X are limited to scheduling one thread on a single processor core at a time - the basic concepts of these modern OSes are identical. Apple's advantages have more to do with the way they apply modern technology, not inherent advantages in the technology itself.

The real breath of fresh air with OS X is that Apple is no longer behind the technology curve the way they were with OS 9 - in essence they're no longer competing with one hand tied behind their back.

RichP
Jan 29, 2006, 01:45 PM
a jalepeno pringle

made with the new 45nm process...

Peace
Jan 29, 2006, 01:48 PM
Pentium with MMX. Pentium II in the xServe. ;)

Hey! don't laugh but a long time ago I had a dual P-2 400 MB and it was pretty darn strong for puters back then.;)

iDM
Feb 1, 2006, 11:18 PM
What speeds are these Woodcrest and Conroe chips? Ghz Wise?

Maybe a link pointing me in the right direction with info?

Kelson
Feb 2, 2006, 12:07 AM
It will be a combination of Conroe and Woodcrest. The single processor, dual core will be Conroe. Then if you need some serious computing power, you can get the dual dual based on Woodcrest. Woodcrest will then go into the xServes.

- Kelson

ChrisA
Feb 2, 2006, 01:35 AM
what intel chip will apple use in their intel powermac i can't guess i don't have a clue what intel chips are out there the only one i've heard the name of is pentium, any ideas:)

I was very much surprized when Apple said they were going to Intel. I expected the move would be to "Intel Architecture" which would have allowed for AMD chips. Had they done that it would be easy to guess.

I expected the new MacPros to look just like this:
http://tinyurl.com/8cyoq
It even looks like a clunkly version of a power mac

The above is just an "entry level" Sun desktop machine
For more money they offer an four chip, eight core Opteron 880
based system. It comes with 16GB RAM and 10,000rpm SCSI
disks for about $28k

Could Apple sell these at a lower price than Sun? I doubt it.
So at hose prices there'd be a pretty small market

All that said I'd guess Itel is trying hard to design an "opteron killer" and it will that yet un released chip that Apple will use. The only other option is a dual oe quad Xeon system.

Catfish_Man
Feb 2, 2006, 01:51 AM
What speeds are these Woodcrest and Conroe chips? Ghz Wise?

Maybe a link pointing me in the right direction with info?

Apparently the highest end engineering samples are running at 3.33GHz. I'd expect about 3GHz for what Apple uses. I'm also predicting similar performance/clock to Core Duo. This is pessimistic, but I'd prefer to be impressed than disappointed.

So, my prediction as of Feb. 1st for what top end Intel Mac performance will be by Jan. 1st 2007: 4 cores, each pair of which is 50% faster than the Core Duo in the 20" iMac. Also, less power usage than the current quad.