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Laure
Feb 1, 2006, 05:36 PM
I've been playing around trying to make my own web site and I've run into the same problem. I am having trouble saving the document the right way. I am using Panther and typing my html in TextWrangler. When I go to save it I am titling it "mypage.html" and then it saves as a word file. I open my browser and click on open file and select my file, and instead of an html file it displays as, file:///Users/name/Desktop/untitled%20folder/mypage.html. How can I fix this?



Doctor Q
Feb 1, 2006, 06:12 PM
I'm not sure what you are saying is wrong. Does the page content display as you intended, and you are just concerned about the URL shown in the address bar, or does it not display the formatted HTML at all?

Laure
Feb 1, 2006, 07:04 PM
It displays as a web page but is file:///Users/bombanti/Desktop/untitled%20folder/LaLaLand.html
a url?

zimv20
Feb 1, 2006, 07:14 PM
It displays as a web page but is file:///Users/bombanti/Desktop/untitled%20folder/LaLaLand.html
a url?
yes. or are you asking of it's a url accessible from the internet?

Doctor Q
Feb 1, 2006, 07:22 PM
It displays as a web page but is file:///Users/bombanti/Desktop/untitled%20folder/LaLaLand.html
a url?It's one form of address of a web page. The "file" part is the protocol, which means "directly accessing a file on your disk or network".

The protocol you were expecting was "http", the hyper-text transport protocol that you see on the Web.

There are other protocols for fetching pages/files as well, including "ftp" for file transfer, "https" for secure http.

As you build and test your website, the address you see does not matter.

Under Mac OS X, in System Preferences, Sharing pane, turn on "Personal File Sharing". Then, if you put a copy of file LaLaLand.html in the Sites folder under your home folder (where your "personal web site" lives), you can get to it by either of these two addresses:

file:///Users/bombanti/Sites/LaLaLand.html
http://yourcomputername/~bombanti/LaLaLand.html

If you put a copy of file LaLaLand.html in the Macintosh HD/Library/WebServer/Documents folder (your computer's system-wide web site), you can get to it with either of these addresses:

file:///Library/WebServer/Documents/LaLaLand.html
http://yourcomputername/LaLaLand.html

If and when you publish your web pages to wherever other people will see them (somewhere on the public Web), the addresses they use will have the form

http://somehostname/LaLaLand.html

Laure
Feb 1, 2006, 08:05 PM
Ok Thanks....I get it now...as you can see I'm not very good at this.:)

Doctor Q
Feb 1, 2006, 08:17 PM
Ok Thanks....I get it now...as you can see I'm not very good at this.:)Pssst. Don't boast about it, but I think you now know more than a lot of Mac users.

Good luck with your web pages.

Laure
Feb 1, 2006, 08:39 PM
I have another question...if I download a web template how do I customize it? Is that a complex question or is it simple?

Doctor Q
Feb 1, 2006, 08:54 PM
I have another question...if I download a web template how do I customize it? Is that a complex question or is it simple?Some templates are in the form of interviews, where you fill in a few sentences here and a picture there, and you get a ready-to-use web page. ISPs often offer those types of templates.

However, the following is probably what you are referring to...

Templates you find for downloading often consist of a web page and its pieces, namely a main HTML file and other files that are referenced in the HTML, particularly gif or jpeg (sometimes png) image files and often a CSS stylesheet file. Sometimes the collection will be zipped together for downloading, in which case you unzip it to get the files.

You can put the files in the same folder where you put other web pages (or in a folder inside that folder) and look at the main page (it might be named index.html) in both a web browser and in TextWrangler.

The web page is probably a complete page, with text, graphics, and a particular layout, and all you have to do is edit the text and/or change the pictures to your own pictures. If you keep the pictures the same size, you may not need to touch the layout information in the HTML at all. You can then use the page as is, without really knowing "how it works".

So it's really more of a "sample" web page than a "template".

If you know more about HTML, image editing, stylesheets, etc., you can edit the tags and change more about the page.

If you are trying to learn more about web pages, you can examine the HTML and/or stylesheet as a way of learning how it fits together. That's a technique I often use: study a web page as a way to improve my skills building my own pages.

Laure
Feb 2, 2006, 09:55 AM
If you know more about HTML, image editing, stylesheets, etc., you can edit the tags and change more about the page.

If you are trying to learn more about web pages, you can examine the HTML and/or stylesheet as a way of learning how it fits together. That's a technique I often use: study a web page as a way to improve my skills building my own pages.



Thats what I am trying to learn....how do I get started????? I can do plain and boring things but I want to learn how to do more fun stuff....where's a good starting place?

Doctor Q
Feb 2, 2006, 05:43 PM
Thats what I am trying to learn....how do I get started????? I can do plain and boring things but I want to learn how to do more fun stuff....where's a good starting place?Some people like to learn to use high-level tools, such as Dreamweaver, while others like to get down and dirty editing their web code directly. I'm in the latter group.

You can find many free tutorials on HTML and CSS/styles (and Javascript too if you want to get into that) simply by Googling. HTML and CSS are different languages, however, so you might want to learn HTML first, ignoring styles, until you feel comfortable, and then learn about styles afterwards.

Note that styles can be specified in STYLE tags in your HTML, in a STYLE section in the header of a web page, or in a separate CSS file, but the concepts and syntax are basically the same.

One way to get started is to draw, on paper by hand, a simple web page layout you'd like to create. Avoid curved lines. Then experiment with creating that page in HTML.

About tables: Tables are a basic building block in HTML. Although the basic layout of a web page can be created using CSS without tables, for beginners it's often much easier to use tables in HTML instead. By nesting one table within another, you can adjust how things look on the page and move the pieces around. Keep table borders on (<table borders="1">) while you are working so you can see where the edges are.

If you find this kind of experimenting fun, you will gradually learn your way around and get good at it. If you find it to be tedious and annoying, then you should switch to a higher-level web design tool and forget how the nuts and bolts work.

If you want to use higher-level tools in the first place, that's fine. In that case, you should look for tutorials about that specific product, not about HTML in general. And use the product's help system too!