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View Full Version : I thought I had it figured out (Bluetooth, Rendez, Airport) !


Fender2112
Jan 19, 2003, 02:40 PM
I thought I had this wireless stuff figured out. But after some reading on these boards, I'm a bit confused.

Can someone give a simple explaination of the the relation between Bluetooth, Airport, and Rendezvous. I thought it was something like this: Bluetooth = wireless USB (low speed), Airport = wireless Firewire (high speed), Rendezvous is the software that pulls it all together.

Thanks

arn
Jan 19, 2003, 02:42 PM
Originally posted by Fender2112
I thought I had this wireless stuff figured out. But after some reading on these boards, I'm a bit confused.

Can someone give a simple explaination of the the relation between Bluetooth, Airport, and Rendezvous. I thought it was something like this: Bluetooth = wireless USB (low speed), Airport = wireless Firewire (high speed), Rendezvous is the software that pulls it all together.

Thanks

I think that's as good an explanation as you can expect.

Rendezvous is not needed for the other two and is not related to Bluetooth or Airport specifically.... but will help things out a lot - by allowing devices to find each other (via Bluetooth or Airport)

arn

MacsRgr8
Jan 19, 2003, 03:03 PM
Bluetooth = wireless USB
Airport = wireless Ethernet
Rendezvous = network (TCP/IP) made a lot easier (made to look alot like AppleTalk)

Bluetooth: connect low-speed peripherals (mouse, keyboard, cellphone, scanner, printer)
Airport: connect networking devices (Macs, PCs, Hubs)
Rendezvous: Attempt to make networking easy enough to use at home. No problems setting up IP network. Just hook 'em up, and go! (Macs, printers, file sharing)

rainman::|:|
Jan 19, 2003, 03:14 PM
Yeah, Rondevouz is a technology that promises to connect things like printers, cell phones, PDAs, and other peripherals without the need for drivers, or even configuration-- it will figure out which service (USB, Bluetooth, Firewire, Airport, Ethernet) it's using, and automatically set up your computer to work optimally. It makes plug-and-play technology look passive by comparison. In the near future, look for things like PDAs that, when in Bluetooth range, automatically connect and sync with your computer. Or cars that automatically transfer the built-in phone system to your handheld cell-phone. Or car strereos that automatically access your MP3 player when it's in range.

Someone correct me if i'm wrong, because i've never played with Rondevouz at all, and it's applications are probably best seen first-hand.

As you said, bluetooth is very similar to wireless USB. it has a range of a few feet, and can connect slower transfer devices like input, PDAs, etc. Airport has a much larger range and is faster, so it's good for things like personal and commercial networking, it's ideal for sharing files and internet connections. Airport (or 802.11b, as it's known to PC's) is starting to show up in places like airports (get it?), city parks, and coffeehouses. With rondevous, your computer would automatically detect Airport connections and try to establish connections. So you might soon carry your iBook to the park on a nice day, open it up, and surf the web immediately.

802.11b is also being used for larger applications, like establishing city-wide networks for ISP's... instead of worrying about buying a cable modem, and wiring your computer up, you can just plug in a card, and aim an antenna towards the nearest tower. These services are generally not free; it costs approx. the same as a cable modem...

Lastly, as you may have heard, there is a new technology called Airport Extreme, which in PC lingo is 802.11g. It's about 5 times faster, which is currently only useful for large file transfers between computers (internet connections simply aren't fast enough to take advantage of speed improvements here). It's backwards-compatable with 802.11b, simply reducing the connection to the slower speed.

:)
pnw

jaguarx
Jan 19, 2003, 03:17 PM
Rendezvous is meant to be transparant - that is the entire point, thus if you haven't seen it, it's probably doing a good job ;)

MacsRgr8
Jan 19, 2003, 03:25 PM
:confused: What does Rendezvous have to do with USB, or Bluetooth etc?

Rendezvous is Apple's interpretation of the open source Zero Conf. Zero Conf enables you to create a TCP/IP network without any kind of manual configuration (=0-configuration).
So every TCP/IP device gets an IP address in the 169.254.xxx.xxx range (if default configurered via DHCP = out of the box), with a 255.255.0.0 subnet. So these devices will "see" eachother on a network, without you having to know how it works! Just like AppleTalk did: just hook it up, and you will be able to see the other device in your chooser.
It really is a great piece of software engineering.

strider42
Jan 19, 2003, 03:30 PM
Originally posted by MacsRgr8
Bluetooth = wireless USB
Airport = wireless Ethernet
Rendezvous = network (TCP/IP) made a lot easier (made to look alot like AppleTalk)

Bluetooth: connect low-speed peripherals (mouse, keyboard, cellphone, scanner, printer)
Airport: connect networking devices (Macs, PCs, Hubs)
Rendezvous: Attempt to make networking easy enough to use at home. No problems setting up IP network. Just hook 'em up, and go! (Macs, printers, file sharing)

Just to be difficult, bluetoth is probably closer to being a wireless version of the old ADB connection than USB, since bluetooth is more than 11 times slower than USB.

And comparing airport to wireless ethernet is probably the closest analogy. its certainly nowhere near being anything like firewire, either in terms of speed or what it can do.

MacsRgr8
Jan 19, 2003, 03:40 PM
Originally posted by strider42


Just to be difficult, bluetoth is probably closer to being a wireless version of the old ADB connection than USB, since bluetooth is more than 11 times slower than USB.

And comparing airport to wireless ethernet is probably the closest analogy. its certainly nowhere near being anything like firewire, either in terms of speed or what it can do.

Exactly.
Even more so: Bluetooth works in "pairs", so I'm not sure what will happen if you have one Bluetooth adapter but multiple Bluetooth devices. USB alows the use of hubs (I'm not sure about ADB), but Bluetooth? dunno... :rolleyes: