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eyeluvmyimac
Jan 19, 2003, 04:41 PM
I was just curious if any of you are currently in college, have recently graduated, or are soon attending, what kind of computers you are using?

I've been debating between several ideas myself--

1) Get a new 12" PB and use it along side my 15" Flatscreen iMac 800mhz

2) Get a 17" PB and only use it

3) Wait for the 15" PB to upgrade and get it and either use it solo or with my iMac


Not sure what is best. I guess the biggest question I have is whether or not to depend on my laptop most or my iMac most ....

thanks


PS - BTW I'm going to PSU. if anyone else is, give me a shout

chibianh
Jan 19, 2003, 04:48 PM
hey, i'm a sophomore in college and all I have is my Tibook. That's all I use, whether it be in my dorm room or anywhere else. I think you should get a 15" or a 12" pb and just use that. You won't have time to sync information all the time if u go with the imac/pb combo.

alex_ant
Jan 19, 2003, 04:49 PM
Why would you need 2 computers? Use a laptop, sell the iMac and donate the money you've saved to charity.

eyeluvmyimac
Jan 19, 2003, 05:05 PM
thanks for your input guys, but i have a followup question.

if you think a laptop is teh answer, do you think the 12" PB is too portable/small? should I wait for the 15" to upgrade or go with the 12"?

idkew
Jan 19, 2003, 05:09 PM
Originally posted by eyeluvmyimac
thanks for your input guys, but i have a followup question.

if you think a laptop is teh answer, do you think the 12" PB is too portable/small? should I wait for the 15" to upgrade or go with the 12"?

it matters what you use it for. what will you use it for?

eyeluvmyimac
Jan 19, 2003, 05:12 PM
ill obviously use it in class for all my notes, papers, projects, net, chatting, etc...but I'll also be using it for movie editing and DVD burning and the like which I currently do on my iMac. (especially after the new versions of imovie and idvd are released =) 1 week)

idkew
Jan 19, 2003, 05:17 PM
then the 12" will be fine. more than powerful enough. 15" would be nice if you don't mind waiting. 17" is too much for your uses.

go with the 12" (or 15") and donate the iMac to your old high school. they will love it and get a lot of use out of it.

MacAztec
Jan 19, 2003, 05:22 PM
You sell your iMac, wait for the 15" PB to be upgraded, and get that. Max it out with RAM and stuff too.

benixau
Jan 19, 2003, 05:36 PM
or how about he waits until the pb 15" is ugraded and then he sells the imac :D

just a thought

IndyGopher
Jan 19, 2003, 05:38 PM
Originally posted by eyeluvmyimac
ill obviously use it in class for all my notes, papers, projects, net, chatting, etc...but I'll also be using it for movie editing and DVD burning and the like which I currently do on my iMac. (especially after the new versions of imovie and idvd are released =) 1 week)

I'm not going to say what you will or won't do.. you would be the only one to know that. HOWEVER.. I will tell you that I literally make a living buying and selling notebooks that people buy for themselves or their kids to take to school thinking they will use them in class. Unless you need the money gained by selling the desktop machine in order to purchase the notebook, I would SERIOUSLY recommend you keep both for a semester and see how much you really use the notebook.

orthodoc
Jan 19, 2003, 05:42 PM
I would consider getting the 12 inch PB and keeping your iMac for a couple of reasons.
1) the 12 inch PB is very portable, yet powerful
2) a 12 inch screen may get a little cramped for video editing, or even surfing; so you would have your imac for these tasks, or for when you feel like using a full size keyboard, etc.

Otherwise, I would get the 15 inch PB. I use my 15 inch PB almost exclusively. I use it at work and at home; however, I don't have to carry it all over a college campus, so the extra weight (vs. the 12 inch) is not an issue for me.

Hope this helps.
:)

WinterMute
Jan 19, 2003, 05:48 PM
I'm a lecturer in Music tech, I use a Ti PB (400Mhz, 512Mb ram, 10gig HD) and nothing else, over the summer I edited a video in final cut, composed, recorded and mixed music to 5.1 surround in Logic 5 and ProTools, authoured and burned a DVD in Studio Pro (external burner...) and I only needed one machine.

Bottom line: any new Mac will do all this and more, I wouldn't give up the Ti for it's portability and capability, I recorded a sax in college in one morning and a guitar in a friends house at midday, it's the traveling life for me.

The 17" PB is a portable A/V workstation, if the dual processor rumours are true, then Avid better watch out.

Go with the Ti, it's a bit more pricey to run but worth it.

RBMaraman
Jan 19, 2003, 05:53 PM
I'm a college sophomore majoring in Mass Communication with emphasis on TV and Film production. I go to a small, private university, and my 12" iBook is perfect for what I use it for. My professor is requiring us to edit using the school's editing lab (which is fine by me. The more time I get to spend with a dual 1.25 PM and dual 23" Cinema displays, the better), so I use iMovie to have fun.

Here's my advice to you. Get an iBook or the 12" PowerBook. They are both very portable, and very capable of performing the tasks you describe you will be using it for.

When I graduate in 2.5 years, I'm going to buy whatever is the top of the line PowerBook at that time. I figured, why spend $3000 on an editing computer when it's going to be out of date by the time I get out and get a job. Plus, most Universities have great editing equipment on hand.

jkojima
Jan 19, 2003, 06:16 PM
In the past 3 months I have used 2 Macs at school: first a 12" iBook, and then an 867mhz 15.2" PowerBook. The 12" iBook, from a usability standpoint, is very similar to the 12" PowerBook so I'll give you my thoughts:

The 12" iBook was extremely portable. It was so tiny that in a standard-sized Targus bag I could fit the computer, the power adapter, a Canon G2 digital camera, and a mouse all in the main compartment. It was great for taking notes in class because of the small size. BUT, the damn ports on the side of the unit meant that if you had it plugged in to AC power, and/or used an external mouse, the cables would get in the way of any books/ papers/ etc. you'd have sitting on your desk beside you. This was more of an annoyance than you may think. The 12" screen started to feel a little too small to be comfortable after extended periods of use too, and that made working more tiring than it should have been.

The 15.2" PowerBook is considerably less portable because of its awkward dimensions. That is to say, though the unit is only marginally heavier than the 12" iBook, in that same compartment I mentioned I can now only comfortably fit the computer, and the power box has to ride in another compartment (I don't even carry the camera or mouse anymore), making the bag bulkier. That's a small price to pay though, because the 15.2" screen is so much more of a joy to use than the 12" one. And at least for now the ports are all along the back which makes the unit much more textbook-friendly.

The 17" PowerBook looks to be brutal in terms of portability. Have you seen the launch commercial with "Mini Me" holding it on his lap? Even if you're more than 3 feet tall, you don't want to try to balance that thing on your lap in a crowded lecture theatre. I have the feeling you'd leave it on your desk more often than not, which negates the purpose of a laptop. Further, the massive footprint and side-located ports would be a nightmare to use on a dorm-sized desk if you need to have any books or paper documents with you.

My suggestion? Get the mid-sized PowerBook. It is (or soon will be) as powerful and feature-laden as the 17", but without the extra bulk. Go for the 12" if portability is your biggest concern, especially if you decide to use your iMac.
The 12" would, in that case, be more like a satellite to the iMac. I personally think that because the PowerBooks are powerful enough to stand on their own, they really should, which is why the 15.2" has the best balance of power, screen real-estate, and portability for a student. A 1ghz or faster PowerBook these days is fast enough to be used on its own with no desktop support.

janey
Jan 19, 2003, 06:18 PM
get either a 15" TiPB (when steve decides that it needs an upgrade) or get the 17" AlPB if you really need one right now. You won't regret it. :D

mnkeybsness
Jan 19, 2003, 06:30 PM
a lot of people find having a laptop extremely not useful for taking anywhere...most laptops around here just sit on desks in the dorms with a chain lock attached to them...the ones that aren't locked are stolen.

everyone once in a great while it would be nice to take a laptop to class to take notes...but only rarely.

i find my powermac sitting at my desk to be the best place for a computer

MacFan25
Jan 19, 2003, 06:36 PM
If I were you, I would get either the 12" or 15" Powerbook. The 15" would be nice. It would be a nice-sized screen for movie editing and the internet. But, I think that I would probalby go for the 12". It would be very portable.

Just my 2 cents.:D

possible switch
Jan 19, 2003, 06:43 PM
I'm currently a college sophomore using a Dell Inspiron notebook. I bought a notebook thinking I'd take it places, but in reality, it has left my desk only to go home on breaks. I have never seen a student here use a laptop in class to take notes either. I'd recommend going the old paper/pencil route in regard to note taking. A computer won't give you any sort of advantage in my opinion. I actually wish I hadn't bought the laptop, and I'm hoping and praying that Apple will update the iMacs in the next week or so.

Over Achiever
Jan 19, 2003, 06:47 PM
Unfortunately I have to agree with mnkeybsness with the fact that laptops unfortunately are chained to dorm desks and such. I haven't seen many student's use laptops to take notes...although since I'm on my way out, the trend may be changing. I am the only one using a computer in class, and usually its not for taking notes, but finishing homework for another class. :( But yeah...if you want to take notes in class i must recommend the 12" powerbook...it's a lot smaller.

And depending on how many books you want to carry with you all day, you'll enjoy the 12" pb. You'll also enjoy the portablity it provides.

Personally, I'm being a hypocrite by not taking my own advice by getting a 17" powerbook, but then again, I've been used to heavy backpacks: 6-7 lb PC laptop + 4-5 books + accessories = bad back. And this is my last semester in college, and I don't have a good desktop, so the 17" will do it all for me.

Whatever you choose make sure you enjoy your purchase and don't regret it. ;)

jkojima
Jan 19, 2003, 06:58 PM
It depends on the area of study. I'm a business student, and everybody uses their laptops in class. Especially in the first year or two, and especially if you have internet access at your desk so you can chat it up via IM. Laptops are especially wonderful for any sort of group work because you can go anywhere and work collaboratively.

In contrast, I pulled out my PowerBook in a crowded history lecture once and instantly felt like I became some sort of horrible social pariah for the looks I was getting. So the culture of your program will largely define whether you'll use it in class or not.

The best part of a laptop vs. desktop is even if you don't move it from your desk the entire year, when it comes time to move or head home for a holiday, you can just throw the laptop into a bag and sling it over your shoulder. If you like the ergonomics of a desktop, you can always get an external monitor, keyboard, and mouse.

My 2 cents.

thekaiser
Jan 19, 2003, 07:04 PM
What is your intended major? This could be a fairly important factor in getting a laptop at all. I am a junior electrical engineering and mathematics major, and I have a laptop. It has not left my desk in three years! This is why: 1)Try keeping up with math symbols and electrical circuits with a laptop...pencil and paper is king here, 2)there is a lot of software and hardware that just has to be used in the labs...period, 3)I tend to write few papers and work in groups at the library, and using a laptop would rarely if ever be helpful. These are just my opinions and of course what is good for me may not be for you. I am dumping my laptop as soon as the imac is updated. I cannot wait. However, whatever you choose you will most likely not be let down. Good luck.

mattevil
Jan 19, 2003, 07:27 PM
im a freshman with a 1ghz dp power mac with 1024mb of ram

Angelus
Jan 19, 2003, 07:54 PM
I'm a 1st year med student and im using a 667 g4 powerbook with 512MB RAM. It suits me fine.The only problem is that i dont actually get written work of any kind so im just using it for photo editing,browsing playing games etc.

Angelus
Jan 19, 2003, 07:55 PM
I'm a 1st year med student and im using a 667 g4 powerbook with 512MB RAM. It suits me fine.The only problem is that i dont actually get written work of any kind so im just using it for photo editing,browsing playing games etc.Therefore i would agree in saying that your requirements depend on the course you are doing

Angelus
Jan 19, 2003, 07:57 PM
Sorry for the double post :(

macktheknife
Jan 19, 2003, 08:40 PM
Stick with one laptop or one desktop--you won't have the time to continually transfer files between the two of them. As they say about college life: There are only three things you can do in college: study, party, and sleep. Unfortunately, you can really only do two of them. You don't want to add "synchronizing your computers" to that list. ;)

Anyhow, I suggest you go with the laptop: portability is a real plus if you plan to work outside of your dorm room. Unless you have a single or are really anti-social, you won't get anything productive done in your dorm room.

As for the choice of laptop, that will depend on your needs. The 17-inch PB is way to big to be used in class, and will probably be a hassle to lug around. I personally have a 15-inch PB, and I think it's pretty portable: it doesn't weigh that much and it's powerful enough for tasks on the road (i.e. programming, word-processing, even some spreadsheet crunching). If you don't care too much for power or screen size and place a big premium on mobility, get the 12-inch TiBook or iBook.

law guy
Jan 19, 2003, 08:47 PM
I found that I used paper and pen in undergrad and that it was the norm (back in the mid-90s. Or the "What's the Internet / Netscape Era"). In law school, I was a pen and paper guy in a sea of win-tel notebooks (recall that scene from legally blond - the sea of IBM thinkpads? Yeah - just like that). At that point I bought a heavy Toshiba 12 inch screen P133 and found it made all of the difference in the world - I could type as fast as the lecture happened - and skip around. At the end of the semester, I could produce study outlines more easily. Critical when there is only one grade per class.

Looking back, it might have been nice to have a laptop in undergrad as a history major (music/french minor - but not so helpful there. I had a Mac II Si in undergrad that was great for using with Coda. Of course I wanted a Quadra so bad when they came out!) If you're going into History, Political Sci., Economics or some other major where lectures are the order of the day - It seems a laptop would be a nice tool to have.

It also depends on the school though. My undergrad just had standalone desks or those fixed lecure hall seats and some long tables. Law school had long fixed long tables most of the time with outlets under the table in front of every chair - in other words - designed for laptops.

G4scott
Jan 19, 2003, 09:03 PM
There are different conditions that could determine which fits best, the desktop, or the laptop. If you're taking classes that require you to use computer labs to do your class work, then I'd say go with the desktop, since you don't need to carry around a laptop...

If you're using it to take notes, and aren't required to use a certain lab, then go with the laptop...

I'm only a highschool senior, but having my iBook in some classes can be a life saver. As far as the 12"-15"-17" dilema, just ask yourself these questions:

Can I live with a small screen?

Does portability matter that much?

Is cost a factor?

If you answered yes to all three, go with the 12" PowerBook. If you answered yes to 1-2 out of 3, go with the 15", and if you answered no to all three, go for the 17" PowerBook. I personally love my 12" iBook. The screen doesn't bother me at all, the battery life is great when taking notes and surfing the web, and it's small enough that it fits easily into my backpack.

In college, though, I imagine it'll be chained to a desk when I'm not using it, and I'll keep it in my backpack when I have to carry it around and am not using it, but to me, portability counts. I prefer using my own computer to check my e-mail, and do stuff like that. Right now, I have online homework in my Physics class from the University of Texas online homework system. (I know I'll be using the same system in college :cool: ) I can download the problems as a PDF, and save them on my computer, instead of printing them out. Then, I just open them, open up my physics notebook, and work out the problems on paper with my TI-89. When I'm done, I go online, whether it be a wireless network, or plugged into via ethernet, and input my answers. While it can be done on a desktop computer, and I can print out the work, doing it with the laptop is much easier for me. Besides, I can't stand being cramped up at my own desk, which is full of papers and junk. I can easily work on my bed with my iBook no problem.

For college, I plan to get a 12" PowerBook. It seems to fit my needs the best, and offers the best bang for my buck... Besides, I'm going into computer science in college, and they use mainly unix boxes, so I imagine if I'm not using them, I'll be using my laptop. It would be easier to transfer files from a lab computer to a laptop, in my opinion, since you don't have to worry about one computer being on, and what ever else can happen to them. I also might end up getting a cheap desktop PC (build it myself for less than $300!) running linux or unix, just for my major, but since OS X runs on UNIX, I don't think I'll have any problems...

The choice is up to you, but be sure to consider all these things when decididing what to get.

uhlawboi80
Jan 19, 2003, 09:14 PM
welll...i would say unless portability is REALLY important to you go with the 15.2 TiBook. im a law student and i find that i can use it for taking notes and it isnt unportable at all but its also my main computer so its nice when i get home to have the screen real estate.

that and while im taking notes in class its nice to have room for some iChat boxes as i type my notes....you gotta be able to use the wireless network to comment on stupid questions and such :D

eyeluvmyimac
Jan 19, 2003, 09:47 PM
thanks a lot for all the input guys, it's helping a lot!

as far as a major goes, I'm looking towards either Computer Engineering or Industrial Engineering. The 17" is def. out of the question in my opinion, and I guess I'll just use the laptop solo (whichever model I end up choosing.)

I never knew so few people took notes with laptops in class, I thought it was "the norm," but according to all your replies it sounds to be the opp. I was REALLY looking forward to being able to type my notes as opposed to writing (at least twice the speed) but I'll probably do it anyways.

Thanks again!

macktheknife
Jan 19, 2003, 09:54 PM
Originally posted by eyeluvmyimac
thanks a lot for all the input guys, it's helping a lot!

as far as a major goes, I'm looking towards either Computer Engineering or Industrial Engineering. The 17" is def. out of the question in my opinion, and I guess I'll just use the laptop solo (whichever model I end up choosing.)

I never knew so few people took notes with laptops in class, I thought it was "the norm," but according to all your replies it sounds to be the opp. I was REALLY looking forward to being able to type my notes as opposed to writing (at least twice the speed) but I'll probably do it anyways.

Thanks again!

Yeah, I think while taking notes is nice in certain cases, it might attract some unwanted attention. Besides the gawkers who are going to marvel at your TiBook/iBook ( :D ), showing it off more than necessary will also attract the attention of theives. While many laptops are stolen by non-students, a disappointing and alarming number of thieves are fellow students.

BTW, if you plan on majoring in computer science, an Apple laptop is a good choice. OS X is equipped with Project Builder to compile your Java, Perl, C, C++, etc. code. You can also download some Unix and Linux software and run them almost seemlessly on your Mac. The only type of programming you can't do is, of course, Microsoft's .Net. :rolleyes:

ZeroKoolNess1
Jan 19, 2003, 10:10 PM
I love having my Powerbook in college. I am currently a Freshman at Northwestern University in Evanston, Ill. It is great, it seemlessly integrated into the network with no problems. I also work for Kellogg School of Management in KIS [Kellogg Information Systems] and my mac works great there also.

With a lot of people telling you that they don't their computers to class to take notes i guess my opinion would differ than this "norm" they have established for you. In some of my classes so far i have see a large amount of computers in the classes. In my history course, about 100 to 125 used their computers to take notes (class was about 350-450 in size). And in my Poli Sci course last quarter almost all of the 300 students had computers in the lecture.

Oh by the way, in most of my classes the students owned mac, powerbooks to be exact, and for all the so-called attention you will recieve is just bs. People, well at least not at my univesity, don't pay attention to computers in classes.

I own a Powerbook g4, 1gig ram, airport.

HasanDaddy
Jan 20, 2003, 12:30 AM
if I could chime in -

I'm a college student/filmmaker/writer.............and I own a Ti 1 ghz as well as an iBook 800 (my backup)

I use my computers ALL DAY - I take them to class for notes, I burn DVD's and CD's, I edit video, write papers.....etc etc

Here is what I have to say regarding college use, and any kind of use, for a laptop:

1. if you are picky about screen size, then go with at least the 15" Ti.........12" is too small for everyday use (in my opinion)

2. iBooks and G3's can run AOL, Safari, AppleWorks and most other smaller applications just fine..........if you are a film student who is going to use Final Cut Pro or iMovie, or an art student that's going to using iPhoto and Photoshop, or even a writer that will be using Final Draft or Microsoft Word A LOT, then you HAVE TO GET A G4.........the G3 is simply becoming outdated FAST!!!

3. The 12" will be VERY portable........so if you are going to stick with your iMac, then I think the combination of a 12" and an iMac would be cool......and I say this mainly because my iBook is much more portable and durable than my 15" Ti

4. if you are getting rid of the iMac, then go with a 15" or 17"

5. The 17" honestly isn't TOO BIG........it only weighs a pound more than the 15"........on the other hand, if you are planning on taking it to class, then the 15" or 12" will fit nicely on any desk....

MY ULTIMATE RECOMMENDATIONs -----

1. Keep your iMac and grab a laptop thats going to be VERY portable ---- the 12" G4..........you already have a desktop, with a good screen, so take advantage of that and GO LIGHT with your portable

2. WAIT!!! Wait to buy. Its obvious that the 17" will have dual processors, maybe even by this summer..........and the 15" is going to be heavily upgraded very soon.......if you can hold off on the portable, and you need a GOOD laptop, then wait at least until this summer to see what updates are introduced for these laptops

FINAL WORDS----

I have an iBook for a backup mainly because I cannot afford to be without a computer............with that said, I think having two computers (a laptop and desktop) is very desirable.....so keep your setup and go with a 12".........you're gonna enjoy the benefits of DESKTOP POWER at home.......and you'll enjoy the ULTIMATE benefits of a VERY portable and durable laptop on the road ;)

uhlawboi80
Jan 20, 2003, 01:01 AM
i still asy 15" TiPB...but its really not that uncommon to see people taking notes on a computer. we all have laptops at the law center. This is 1) so the lazy asses who charge us about 350$ a semester in computer fees really only maintain a wireless network and our outlook server 2) for note taking and test taking (trust me, writing out 18hours of essay tests is hard on the hand) and 3) because so much of our research is online these days that we bounce around the library while useing westlaw/LN.

of course...they force most of the students to get these horrible little 14" dells. *shrug* but almost everyone uses them daily

Nipsy
Jan 20, 2003, 04:02 AM
If you're gonna be studying programming or a computer science related field, I would recommend several machines, so that you can run compiles on one while writing on the other, and cover as many OS bases as possible.

If not, I would get the ONE which best fills your needs.

Nipsy
Jan 20, 2003, 04:09 AM
Originally posted by possible switch
I'm currently a college sophomore using a Dell Inspiron notebook. I bought a notebook thinking I'd take it places, but in reality, it has left my desk only to go home on breaks. I have never seen a student here use a laptop in class to take notes either. I'd recommend going the old paper/pencil route in regard to note taking. A computer won't give you any sort of advantage in my opinion. I actually wish I hadn't bought the laptop, and I'm hoping and praying that Apple will update the iMacs in the next week or so.



Well, I was in college years ago, but I took all my notes on a PB180c, and later a 2400.

There are distinct advantages, if you do it religiously:
You can search your notes to help answer you questions quickly. I took notes in File Maker, but now indexing and searching doesn't require a database.
In computer sciences, you can show the example error to your prof/ta in realtime. This makes debugging simple.
You can collaborate/share notes with Copy/Paste/Email. This was hugely important to me as I did not attend 8AM classes on moral grounds.

Again, it requires religious dedication, and only the 12" Pbook or iBook are practical for taking EVERYWHERE, but it vastly improves the efficiency/workflow for those with the diligence. Also, you had better be able to touch type.

CrackedButter
Jan 20, 2003, 05:45 AM
I use at the moment a 14" Wintel Laptop. I use it for taking notes in class but 3 out of 4 courses i take are computer orientated. However i study Media Studies and with that i do most of my note taking with it.

People will gawk because its different and something new, but thats natural. However that depends on the age of your class mates. In media studies they are all 16/17 years of age (i'm 22 so i am the oldest there besides the teacher) and its always the highlight of the lesson when i bring it out then i get pestered. However in my tech courses they don't mind, i might get educated questions as well about it but also the people i share class with are older students.

Anyway i'm selling this to a friend and i'm getting the 12" ibook. I want it for the mobility and the long battery life than anything else.

Hope this little insight into my situation helps.

Skandranon
Jan 20, 2003, 07:47 AM
I've got a brand new 15" SuperDrive PowerBook that I purchase four weeks before MWSF that I'm thinking about selling so that I can swap up to the 17" AlBook. If you're interested in a beautiful machine for a decent price, let me know (drop me a Private Message). I don't trust eBay so I'm looking to sell this thing to someone in the Mac community.

Take it light.
Skan

hesdeadjim
Jan 20, 2003, 11:20 AM
I'm a 3rd year student with a Ti800. I couldn't imagine my life without it. I use for everything and take it to class everyday. I can do my research for my thesis at both the lab and at home. The only thing is, I wouldn't have used it if it hadn't moved off campus and the school hadn't put in a wireless internet. That situation waranted a laptop with me, because I needed quick access to all my information. Anyway, that's just my 2 cents.

eyeluvmyimac
Jan 20, 2003, 12:26 PM
Originally posted by Nipsy


Well, I was in college years ago, but I took all my notes on a PB180c, and later a 2400.

There are distinct advantages, if you do it religiously:
You can search your notes to help answer you questions quickly. I took notes in File Maker, but now indexing and searching doesn't require a database.
In computer sciences, you can show the example error to your prof/ta in realtime. This makes debugging simple.
You can collaborate/share notes with Copy/Paste/Email. This was hugely important to me as I did not attend 8AM classes on moral grounds.

Again, it requires religious dedication, and only the 12" Pbook or iBook are practical for taking EVERYWHERE, but it vastly improves the efficiency/workflow for those with the diligence. Also, you had better be able to touch type.

Does anyone have any good ideas for a note-taking program? Word is too big, slow, akward, and textedit jsut wouldn't do it for me, not enough features etc.

unc32
Jan 20, 2003, 04:51 PM
I had a laptop but then sold it for a iMac. It simply sat on my desk...it never moved. I could see how it would be useful, not for notetaking, but wireless access on campus...especially the library. As for taking notes in class on the computer...that is a waste of time. If it is a history class then maybe, but what about pictures, equations, that sort of stuff. What about when the teacher goes back to the beginning or skips a part, that sort of stuff. You don't want to be fussing...more importantly, you learn better by actually writing and using your hands. The process of converting your handwriten notes to computer or whatever will actually help you learn them...just like Bart Simpson.

WinterMute
Jan 20, 2003, 05:52 PM
Originally posted by eyeluvmyimac


Does anyone have any good ideas for a note-taking program? Word is too big, slow, akward, and textedit jsut wouldn't do it for me, not enough features etc.

Whats wrong with AppleWorks? Just a thought...:)

eyeluvmyimac
Jan 20, 2003, 05:56 PM
to be honest, ive never used appleworks, well not enough to form an opinion on it. i just assumed it was just like word with a few less features and such....would it work well with recalling previous notes, saving new notes, formatting quickly, etc etc?

Wano
Jan 20, 2003, 06:32 PM
I would sell the iMac then buy the 17"PB, cause that will be nice for video editing...but then again that might be a little big to drag to class, so maybe wait for the 15"PB to be upgraded.

HasanDaddy
Jan 20, 2003, 07:54 PM
Apple Works is good and its definitely not as slow as word is

Personally though, I like taking notes on Word because of the way that it formats outlines automatically