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osxnewbe
Feb 28, 2006, 02:34 PM
I am a OS X newbie after using Windows for almost 15 years. One thing I am having trouble figuring out is how to cut & paste files and folders similar to what can be done in a Windows environment (i.e. cut using Ctrl-X, paste using Ctrl-v).

An example is if I want to move files from my hard drive to a flashdrive...is there way to cut and paste (i.e. move) the files? My current method is to just drag the files the new destination (which copies them) and then drag the files from the old location to the trash bin....

When I look at the 'edit' menu in Finder, the 'cut' and 'paste' options are grayed out which makes me think they are unavailable...

Thanks in advance

OS X Newbe



calebjohnston
Feb 28, 2006, 02:49 PM
OS X is all about keyboard shortcuts.

To cut... cmd+x
To copy... cmd+c
To paste... cmd+v

(After selecting the file)

cmd (Command) is the button with the apple on it.

robbieduncan
Feb 28, 2006, 02:50 PM
You cannot cut and paste a file. It simply does not work this way. If you want to move a file then move it. Cut and paste is not move. What happens if you forget to paste? Lost file.

MajereXYU
Feb 28, 2006, 03:05 PM
As robbieduncan said, you can't cut a file in OSX, presumably to prevent file losses...

What you can do is drag the desired file to the location you want to MOVE it to and before "dropping" it (releasing the mouse button), just press and hold either command or control (can't remember which and I'm at work so can't test). Doing so, the green "+" graphic should disappear. That means you will move instead of copy.

Hope that helps.

osxnewbe
Feb 28, 2006, 03:27 PM
Thanks! Holding down the 'cmd' button when dragging the files makes sense.

I knew is was going to be something easy....I just had not stumbled upon it....

OS X Newbe

munkle
Feb 28, 2006, 03:41 PM
It's the option button rather than the cmd button :)

Edit: Just to clarify, using the option button will create a copy of the dragged file/folder. The original will still be intact.

dylan
Feb 28, 2006, 03:42 PM
command+drag = move
option+drag=copy
option=command+drag=make alias(shortcut)

dylan
Feb 28, 2006, 03:43 PM
It's the option button rather than the cmd button :)

Are you sure? Option is copy on my machine.

munkle
Feb 28, 2006, 03:52 PM
Just to keep it simple.

osxnewbe, if you want to copy files to your flash drive just drag the files to the flash drive icon. A mini green plus sign will appear, signifying that you are copying the files to the flash drive. There is no need to option or cmd click.

mkrishnan
Feb 28, 2006, 03:55 PM
Are you sure? Option is copy on my machine.

I think that's what he said, too. It's the option key for all of us. ;)

dylan
Feb 28, 2006, 10:53 PM
As robbieduncan said, you can't cut a file in OSX, presumably to prevent file losses...

What you can do is drag the desired file to the location you want to MOVE it to and before "dropping" it (releasing the mouse button), just press and hold either command or control (can't remember which and I'm at work so can't test). Doing so, the green "+" graphic should disappear. That means you will move instead of copy.

Hope that helps.

I thought he was referring to this... Was he not?

Orlando Furioso
Feb 28, 2006, 11:31 PM
1) command+drag = move
2) option+drag=copy
3) option=command+drag=make alias(shortcut)

Just to clarify a few things...

File management within the same drive/partition:
1) The act of drag-drop alone will move the file. There is no need to use "command+drag"
2) If you want to duplicate the file. Then option+drag is what you want (as others have pointed out, a green circle with a "+" will be displayed under the curser).

File management across two different drives/partitions:
1) Drag-drop alone will duplicate the file onto the second drive by default. Option+drag not necessary.
2) If you wish to move the file (leaving no copy on the original drive), then command+drag comes into play. The green-circle with the "+" icon will disappear from beneath the cursor.

Both cases:
3) Making aliases is the same for each. alt+command+drag

DataHead
Mar 25, 2007, 01:09 PM
Ok, if you want to install your own keyboard shortcuts for cut/paste functionality until Apple decides to make it official do this:

Install OnMyCommand from free.abracode.com/cmworkshop.
(By copying the program file to Applications.)
Install OMCEdit from inside the OnMyCommand package (by copying the program file to Applications).
Install Shortcuts from free.abracode.com/cmworkshop.
Go to free.abracode.com/cmworkshop -> Online archive of user submitted commands -> view "File" commands by category -> 212 Cut Item(s) -> Open (Firefox gives a inappropriate error window.) Then save that text file somewhere.
Do the same with 213 Paste Item(s).
Run OMCEdit and File -> Import those two commands.
You can now ctrl click -> Cut and Paste Item(s) Finder items.
Now quit OMCEdit and run Shortcuts.
On the Setup tab start the ShortcutObserver and add it to your login startup.
On the Assign Hot Keys tab under File select Cut Item(s) and assign it Shift Command X.
Under Folder select Paste Item(s) and assign it Shift Command V (or whatever you want that doesn't conflict with other shortcuts).

Quit Shortcuts and give it a try!

Many thanks to Abracode, Knut Lorenzen and Fredrik Andersson!

Kevin Serwick

Frisco
Mar 25, 2007, 02:34 PM
FileCutter (http://www.macupdate.com/info.php/id/21769)

cpthk
Dec 27, 2009, 03:04 AM
You cannot cut and paste a file. It simply does not work this way. If you want to move a file then move it. Cut and paste is not move. What happens if you forget to paste? Lost file.

As robbieduncan said, you can't cut a file in OSX, presumably to prevent file losses...

What you can do is drag the desired file to the location you want to MOVE it to and before "dropping" it (releasing the mouse button), just press and hold either command or control (can't remember which and I'm at work so can't test). Doing so, the green "+" graphic should disappear. That means you will move instead of copy.

Hope that helps.

I dont understand why you guys said cut and paste could lost file. In windows, you cut and didn't paste will not result lost files. The cut operation is really started when you paste it. When you do cut, it only tells windows which to be cut later, not really cut it immediately until you paste it. And the cut and paste background procedure really is copy and delete the one cut for you. Because you do cancel in the middle of the operation, the file is still there. I have been using windows more than 10 years, and never seen lost file due to cut and paste.

Tumbleweed666
Dec 27, 2009, 03:14 AM
I dont understand why you guys said cut and paste could lost file. In windows, you cut and didn't paste will not result lost files. The cut operation is really started when you paste it. When you do cut, it only tells windows which to be cut later, not really cut it immediately until you paste it. And the cut and paste background procedure really is copy and delete the one cut for you. Because you do cancel in the middle of the operation, the file is still there. I have been using windows more than 10 years, and never seen lost file due to cut and paste.

You are correct, there seems to be a blind spot amongst Apple fans here as to this shortcoming. Cut & paste files/folders works well in Windows and there is no 'lost files' danger with it (well I have never experienced in 20 years of using PCs anyway).
Msft stole enough stuff from Apple, why they cant steal one simple and useful feature back is a mystery. I believe this (http://cocoatech.com/) finder replacement implements it so its not as if its impossible to do on OSX.

Gregg2
Dec 27, 2009, 02:50 PM
The salient point here is that OSX is different from Windows. There will be several things that a Windows user is used to that simply don't function the same way on a Mac. The OP seems to be aware of this, and that's the first step on the adjustment path. The Windows users who insist on making their new Macs work "the same way Windows does" will never be satisfied.

ICEBreaker
Jan 31, 2010, 09:34 AM
The salient point here is that OSX is different from Windows. There will be several things that a Windows user is used to that simply don't function the same way on a Mac. The OP seems to be aware of this, and that's the first step on the adjustment path. The Windows users who insist on making their new Macs work "the same way Windows does" will never be satisfied.

This is a common misconception amongst a minority of Apple users. They feel that Windows users want to change Mac OS into Windows. Now that wouldn't make sense would it? Windows users WANT to learn how to use a Mac, otherwise we would not have made the switch (it ain't cheap). However, with knowledge of how other OSes work (such as Windows and Linux) we can sometimes spot areas that does not seem very logical but have been ignored by long time Apple users. Suggestions are made to improve the Mac OS is such a way that makes using it easy and enjoyable, and most importantly, WITHOUT disrupting the habits of existing Mac users.

This is an excellent example. Honestly, the CUT FILE function is extremely useful for many people. Implementation of this "feature" would in no way be an issue for Mac users who are more comfortable with their own methods. Sometimes, I think Apple programmers try so hard to be different (from Windows) for the sake of being different. I'd be very happy to do things the Mac way, if it is simpler and better. But there is no shame is acknowledging that other OSes have worthy features too.

I just thought I should make it clear that Windows users are not here to insist that Macs have Windows features. Only in cases where it makes sense to do so. Stop thinking of this as a Windows vs Mac issue, but a "how to improve the Mac" issue and discuss it objectively.

Tumbleweed666
Jan 31, 2010, 11:28 AM
The salient point here is that OSX is different from Windows.

Why not campaign for cut&paste in documents to be removed as thats in Windows as well ?

Cut/paste files and folders on Windows is often superior for useability to drag drop on OSX , and it wouldnt turn OSX into Windows, it would just make it better than it is, if it was offered as an option (not replacing it obviously). You can do both in Windows, only one in OSX, how does that help OSX be better? Seems you just want it different, not better !

-aggie-
Jan 31, 2010, 11:35 AM
That not the salient point, its the idiotic point. Why not campaign for cut&paste in documents to be removed as thats in Windows as well ?

Cut/paste files and folders on Windows is often superior for useability to drag drop on OSX , and it wouldnt turn OSX into Windows, it would just make it better than it is, if it was offered as an option (not replacing it obviously). You can do both in Windows, only one in OSX, how does that help OSX be better? Seems you just want it different, not better !

No, I think he just thinks anything Apple does is the right way.

Anyway, that was one of the first features that irritated me about the Mac OS. To do the same thing on a Mac, you have to copy, then paste, and then go back and delete (unless you can easily drag the file). I also don't like how Mac's handle emptying one or more files in Trash (i.e., they don't. You have to empty the entire trash, unless you have a script to use Terminal, which I do). Of course, the same kind of argument are given for why we don't need that feature too.

Gregg2
Jan 31, 2010, 01:15 PM
All three of you are wrong about what I think, but, that's ok.

And, I've seen many posts from switchers who explicitly say they want the Mac OS to work the same way as Windows. Perhaps they are in the minority, but they exist.

dcorban
Jan 31, 2010, 02:08 PM
You cannot cut and paste a file. It simply does not work this way. If you want to move a file then move it. Cut and paste is not move. What happens if you forget to paste? Lost file.

Anyone who has ever used this feature in Windows know what this is not true. You never lose a file if you fail to paste it. The file is marked as "cut" but not removed until you paste.

All three of you are wrong about what I think, but, that's ok.

And, I've seen many posts from switchers who explicitly say they want the Mac OS to work the same way as Windows. Perhaps they are in the minority, but they exist.

I personally know three people who have switched from PC to Mac. Every single one of them, myself included, wondered how to do this most simple Windows function. It is a very useful feature, especially given the Mac "single window" method of browsing Finder. It gets a little tiring when you have to open multiple windows just to drag when it could be done in one window with the keyboard.

robbieduncan
Jan 31, 2010, 02:12 PM
Anyone who has ever used this feature in Windows know what this is not true. You never lose a file if you fail to paste it. The file is marked as "cut" but not removed until you paste.

Which is the logical inconstancy with the feature. As if you cut some text in a Word document (using the same keyboard shortcut) it's cut immediately. So Apple don't do it as consistency makes it easier for people to model what's happening in their heads.

Tumbleweed666
Jan 31, 2010, 02:39 PM
Which is the logical inconstancy with the feature. As if you cut some text in a Word document (using the same keyboard shortcut) it's cut immediately. So Apple don't do it as consistency makes it easier for people to model what's happening in their heads.

I dont know anyone who ever had a problem "modelling" what happens with it in the two very different circumstances. Maybe some pedantic Mac users cant cope with it? And I certainly know its easy enough to accidentally drop a file being dragged and wonder where the h*ll it went.

Anyway, the point is, its not either/ or, provide both & let users choose.

All three of you are wrong about what I think, but, that's ok.
We've only got your words to go on , which if I recall correctly are to the effect folks just want it to be the same as Windows. But none of the responders here want it to be the same because its like Windows, we want it the same because its an improvement. BUt anyway, what would be your reason for not implementing a useful feature that you wouldnt have to use if you didnt want to?

And, I've seen many posts from switchers who explicitly say they want the Mac OS to work the same way as Windows. Perhaps they are in the minority, but they exist.

Thats not whats at issue in this discussion, its that here's one feature that Windows does better, so copy it. Not because its the same as Windows, because its better than current.

Gregg2
Jan 31, 2010, 06:59 PM
BUt anyway, what would be your reason for not implementing a useful feature that you wouldnt have to use if you didnt want to?
I never said that was my position. You drew your own conclusion there. My point is that the Mac OS doesn't have that feature, that's all. I've seen others argue that Apple should not make that a feature, but I certainly haven't taken that position here, or anywhere else for that matter.

Thats not whats at issue in this discussion, its that here's one feature that Windows does better, so copy it. Not because its the same as Windows, because its better than current.
That was just my response to someone else's comment.

Jolly Jimmy
Jan 31, 2010, 07:57 PM
Personally I'd love a cut and paste feature for files and folders, because very often when navigating through folders while holding something, suddenly a folder will refuse to spring open and I have to start all over. And no scrolling with the trackpad or mousewheel while holding a file or folder slows finder navigation down even more.

khairul
Feb 4, 2010, 09:55 PM
I thought I was dumb for googling this question. But this thread has been ongoing for four years. Well >_>

-aggie-
Feb 5, 2010, 06:36 PM
For those that want to be able to cut and paste, there are workarounds. After I saw this thread initially several weeks ago, I decided to make an exhaustive search to see if anyone had come up with anything. Anyway, there was a software solution that allowed a plugin to be used, but that was ended with Snow Leopard. I've come up with two ways:

First, and the one that's more of a pain, since it involves using the keyboard when pasting: Go here (http://www.abracode.com/free/cmworkshop/) to get two programs, Shortcuts and OnMyCommand (OMC). Open OMCEdit, which is part of the OMC package.

You're going to need two scripts, one for cut and the other for paste.

For cut, the code is:
echo "__OBJ_PATH__" >/tmp/cut_${USER}

For paste:
cat /tmp/cut_${USER} | xargs -J % mv -f % __OBJ_PATH__ ; rm -f /tmp/cut_${USER}

These scripts were written By Fredrik Andersson (fan@gaffophone.com), 2003-11-05. I suppose he must be a developer for OMC.

Go to OMCEdit and make a new plist. Add the cut script to General>Command and save somewhere safe. Name it Cut Item(s), or whatever you want in Command Name (sorry forgot to mention that and didn't feel like rewriting). Do the same as above for paste, but call it Paste Item(s).

Now go back to OMCEdit, File>Import Commands and import Cut Items(s) so it will be added to the sample command "Hello World" on the left pane. Under General>Location make it Top Level and click Enabled if it's not already. You can unclick "Hello World," if you wish or even delete it, so it doesn't show up when you do the cut/paste operation. Do the same as above for Paste Item(s).

Quit OMCEdit and open Shortcut32 (Shortcuts, the 64 bit version doesn't seem to work for Finder operations, probably because it's not 64 bit). You need to assign a hot key to open the Paste operation, since the code wasn't written to have focus when not clicking on a folder. Assign a hotkey to Folder (I did file also, but it's probably not needed). I used shift-command-X and assigned the Paste Item(s) command to it. Go under Setup and click start, add, and add for the 3 items.

With that when you right click on a file (or files) you can choose to cut, and then paste them anywhere with the keyboard shortcut. FYI, you can also not have to use the shortcut, if you right click paste on a folder.

So, that one works anywhere.

Second, and the method that only uses a mouse (the one I like better), but can only be used in Finder, involves using AppleScript:

(*
Cut Files in Finder.scpt
Version 0.3

Author: Jayson Kempinger < evilglowingapple (at) gmail (dot) com >
Date: 19 April 2006

This script is released under the GNU Public License v2
The code for the error block for converting selected Finder items to POSIX paths (via aliases) used (mostly unmodified) from FileVault-proof Finder selection to alias list 1.2 at http://scriptbuilders.net/files/filevaultprooffinderselectiontoaliaslist1.2.html

Disclaimer. Read before using this script!!!
*********************************************
This script carries no warranty, expressed or implied. The user assumes all risks, known or unknown, direct or indirect, which involve this software in any way.
This script uses the UNIX command 'mv' to move files in an attempt to add a cut files feature to Finder. This command is quite powerful and unforgiving if invoked incorrectly. As the script is fairly new and hasn't been fully tested, there is no guarantee that the script will select the correct files to move, and no guarantee the script won't accidently move your files to an unknown place, or worse, delete them. From my preliminary testing the script has worked successfully, but I hold no responsibility if the script fails to act as intended.
If you do encounter any problems with this script, feel free to send me a bug report at my e-mail address listed above. Send me any information you have about what happened as well as any Applescript error messages. I may be able to improve the script for future versions. Also please send me suggestions for how to make this script better (or feel free implement them yourself and e-mail me the code).

Instructions:
*************
Assign this script to run via a keystroke/mouse action/etc. I recommend using Quicksilver's triggers to assign it to a key combination such as Command + Option + X. You can also save this script as an application and run it from a convenient spot (Finder toolbar, Dock, etc).
The 'cut' operation consists of two steps:
1. Select some files, run the script to set the list of files to be moved
2. Open a Finder window in another location, run the script again to move the files previously selected to the location of this window (if files are selected here they will be set to the list of files to be moved and non of the previously selected files will be moved; they will just be ignored)
*)

--set this property to true to only copy the files (good for testing)
property debug : false
--set here only so that it can be available globally
property state_file : ""

on run
--get state of script (select files || move files to target)
do shell script "mkdir -p /tmp/`id -u`/"
set state_file to do shell script "echo /tmp/`id -u`/cut_script_state"
try
do shell script "test -e " & state_file
on error
select_files()
return 0
end try

move_files()
return 0
end run

--get source files
on select_files()
tell application "Finder"
activate
--gets list of selected items from Finder
set selected to selection
--unselect items to show that something was done (analog to greying out items in Windows)
set selection to {}
end tell
--can't find a way to convert the entire list to aliases, so have to do it iteratively
--set file_list to selected as alias
set file_list to ""
repeat with n in every item in selected
try
set path_n to get the POSIX path of (n as alias)
on error errormsg
--code for error block used (mostly unmodified) from FileVault-proof Finder selection to alias list 1.2 at http://scriptbuilders.net/files/filevaultprooffinderselectiontoaliaslist1.2.html

-- if error, the item is FileVault-protected and the Finder can't coerce it into an alias
-- the error message is parsed into a list containing the item's path components


-- first, all quote characters inside the item's path components' names in the error message
-- are replaced by an unused marker string
-- the marker string will later be used to reinsert these quote characters
set markerString to "xyzabazyx" -- any palindrome string of only alfanumericals will do
repeat while errormsg contains markerString
set markerString to markerString & markerString
end repeat
set oldTIDs to AppleScript's text item delimiters
set AppleScript's text item delimiters to {"\\\""}
set theLst to text items of errormsg
set AppleScript's text item delimiters to {markerString}
set messageWithoutQuotes to theLst as string

-- next, the string is parsed at the quote characters outside the item's path components' names
set AppleScript's text item delimiters to {"\""}
set theLst to text items of messageWithoutQuotes

-- the item's path components are filtered and rearranged into the item's path

set idCounter to 1
repeat with i in (items 2 thru -4 of theLst)
if idCounter is 1 then
set idCounter to 0
try
set pathString to i & ":" & pathString
on error
set pathString to i
end try
else
set idCounter to 1
end if
end repeat

-- finally, all quote characters inside the item's path components' names are reinserted by
-- replacing the marker string
set AppleScript's text item delimiters to {markerString}
set theLst to text items of pathString
set AppleScript's text item delimiters to {"\""}
set pathString to theLst as string
set AppleScript's text item delimiters to oldTIDs


-- the item's path string is coerced into its alias without the Finder

try
set path_n to get POSIX path of (pathString as alias)
on error
set path_n to get POSIX path of ((pathString & ":") as alias)
end try
end try
--trim off trailing '/' if there (can appear if using FileVault fix above)
if last character of path_n is "/" then set path_n to characters 1 through ((length of path_n) - 1) of path_n as string
--need to escape any spaces so mv command doesn't fail with files with spaces in them
set path_n to quoted form of path_n
set file_list to file_list & path_n & " "
end repeat
--write files to tmp file if there are any files
if not file_list is "" then
do shell script "echo \"" & file_list & "\" > " & state_file
end if

return 0
end select_files

--files have been selected, now move them to selected folder
on move_files()
--target path is front window
tell application "Finder"
activate
set target_folder to (the target of the front window) as alias
set selected to selection
end tell
--check if files are selected, if so, call select_files to redo file selection
if selected is not {} then
display dialog "reselecting files"
select_files()
else
--nothing selected, let's paste
set target_folder to get POSIX path of target_folder
set target_folder to quoted form of target_folder
--load file names back into array
set file_list to do shell script "cat " & state_file
--move files to target dir
try
if debug then
--note, there will be no progress of the copy
do shell script "cp -R " & file_list & " " & target_folder
else
do shell script "mv " & file_list & " " & target_folder
end if
on error errormsg
--if same folder as source will show here. Prompt user to select another folder and don't clean up
set temp to do shell script "echo \"" & errormsg & "\" | grep -c \"are identical (not copied).\""
if temp is "1" then
--prompt to select another directory
display dialog "Cannot move files to the same directory, please select another folder and run this script again." buttons {"OK"} default button 1
return 1
else
--something else went wrong, show error and delete state_file
cleanup()
display dialog "Error encountered while attempting to move file:" & return & errormsg buttons {"OK"} default button 1
return errormsg
end if
end try
cleanup()
end if

return 0
end move_files

--delete temp file
on cleanup()
return do shell script "rm -f " & state_file
end cleanup

Thanks to Jayson Kempinger < evilglowingapple (at) gmail (dot) com for this.

Just paste that in the AppleScript editor, save it as an application with whatever file name you want, and then drag it to the right of QuickLook and Action in the Finder window. With that you can then click on any files in Finder, click the app, they'll be cut (but still there like Windows cut), and then you can go to another window in Finder, click the app again, and the file(s) will be pasted.

so, there you go. Hate it or love it.

-aggie-

Gregg2
Feb 5, 2010, 07:08 PM
From the February issue...

Spring-loaded folders - already discussed in this thread

Spring-loaded Dock and Sidebar items - quite similar

Aliases on the Desktop - for frequently used folders

Copy and Go - Select the item and do Copy (cmd-c) then press cmd-shift-g while in the Finder. This brings a Go To The Folder window to the front. Type in the path you want to open, and click OK. That folder opens, and you can move the item into it.

Recent Folders - Lame. A wing and a prayer. The target folder might not be one of the 10 listed.

I don't find their "Copy and Go" instructions very clear at the end. Haven't tried it.

remix33
Mar 7, 2010, 05:01 PM
Here is a solution I came trying to get the most seamless workflow as possible using the keyboard (which is basically what is already provided under Linux or Windows... sigh.).

It simulates the File Cut and Paste by using the clipboard:
1) Cut copies the path of the selected file to the clipboard as a POSIX path
2) Paste moves the file which name is in the clipboard to the current directory

Advantages:
- Can be assigned shortcuts (cmd-shift-X for cut, cmd-shift-V for paste) to obtain pure keyboard copy/paste
- Uses applescript's API to Finder: exactly the same behaviour as if you drag-n-drop the file, with Cancel ability. There is no UNIX mv or intermediate directory where you could lose your file.
- Simple design: the file to move is known by its filename in the clipboard. Can be used to transfer easily the filepath to/from any terminal or script editor.
- Change your mind: using applescript also provides Cancel ability in the Finder "Edit" menu. Moreover the new path of the file is copied to the clipboard, which allows you to move it again if you change your mind.

Still needs some polish
- Only one file can be cut/pasted at one time (the approach of barhar (http://macosx.com/forums/howto-faqs/271436-move-selected-files-new-folder.html) could be used for handling multiple files)
- No error handling: for instance, if the target file already exists, the script hangs, but does not provide explicit information neither propose to rename.
- Uses some shell commands to get the basename of the file. Anybody knows if there is an equivalent in applescript ?

Thanks to Magilum for pointing out the applescript move function (http://macosx.com/forums/howto-faqs/271436-move-selected-files-new-folder.html)

In Automator, create a new "Service", then "Execute an Applescript", and paste the following code in the box:

Script "Copy filename to clipboard"
on run {input, parameters}
tell application "Finder"
set sel to the selection as text
set the clipboard to POSIX path of sel
end tell
return input
end run
Declared in Automator as a Service "File or Folder" for "Finder.App".
Assigned a shortcut in System Preferences: cmd-shift-X

Script "Cut-Paste file into current directory from clipboard"
on run {input, parameters}

set theFileP to the clipboard as text
set theFile to POSIX file theFileP
set onlyFileP to do shell script "basename '" & theFileP & "'"

tell application "Finder" to set the theFolder to (folder of the front window) as text
set theFolderP to POSIX path of theFolder

-- move file theFile to theFolder
set the clipboard to theFolderP & "" & onlyFileP
tell application "Finder" to move theFile to theFolder

-- display dialog (the clipboard)

return input
end run
Declared in Automator as a Service "No input" for "Finder.App".
Assigned a shortcut in System Preferences: cmd-shift-V

Kenitech
Mar 27, 2010, 01:47 PM
Download Path Finder:
http://www.cocoatech.com

It's Finder on steroids. There's a thing called a "Drop Stack" that lets you drag file(s) to it, browse elsewhere and drag them out. It seems to be a pretty good compromise to this whole problem. Although I still find it silly that a product like this even NEEDS to exist when these are pretty basic functions that Mac should've just built into their OS in the first place. I mean, out of the box I have Garage Band which is far more complex than cutting and pasting a file!!

I've been a windows user since Windows 3.1. I recently bought a MacBook and I use both platforms at work and home. This has got to be one of the most annoying limitations of Mac file utility. "Loss of data" is the silliest excuse I've seen on these boards. Today's computers should be smart enough to handle something like this.

forcefieldkid
Mar 27, 2010, 01:51 PM
Although I still find it silly that a product like this even NEEDS to exist when these are pretty basic functions that Mac should've just built into their OS in the first place. I mean, out of the box I have Garage Band which is far more complex than cutting and pasting a file!!

I've been a windows user since Windows 3.1. I recently bought a MacBook and I use both platforms at work and home. This has got to be one of the most annoying limitations of Mac file utility. "Loss of data" is the silliest excuse I've seen on these boards. Today's computers should be smart enough to handle something like this.

As you can see from the fact you're reviving a dead thread, it's only the occasional person who cares. I've never wanted nor needed this option, and I'd guess the large majority of OSX users couldn't care less either.

niella
Mar 27, 2010, 02:18 PM
I'm pretty sure you're wrong forcefieldkid. I switched from Linux last year and I ended up buying Path Finder. I find Finder to be archaic and unintuitive when compared to the other applications that I first got introduced to.

I also think that not being able to change the LH Finder pane font size is something else that needs attention.

In my opinion file cut/paste is quite a basic requirement - and the fact that so many of us perceive Cmd-X as the intuitive approach proves that something is amiss.

forcefieldkid
Mar 27, 2010, 02:30 PM
I'm pretty sure you're wrong forcefieldkid. I switched from Linux last year and I ended up buying Path Finder. I find Finder to be archaic and unintuitive when compared to the other applications that I first got introduced to.

I also think that not being able to change the LH Finder pane font size is something else that needs attention.

In my opinion file cut/paste is quite a basic requirement - and the fact that so many of us perceive Cmd-X as the intuitive approach proves that something is amiss.

The pane font size is a different issue, and though it doesn't bother me I can see why that would be needed/wanted by some.

I don't mind being proved wrong in the Cut+Paste thing, like I said Ive never wanted it, so if its added its no big thing to me. But surely if it was such a huge deal, it would be all over the forums on here and not once every couple of months or so in one thread in a small section of the site?

niella
Mar 30, 2010, 05:15 AM
Perhaps people cannot be bothered to send out a message "hey, I cannot cut and paste!" :)

The colleague next to me just bought and used a Mac for the first time last week and is actually complaining about the exact same thing.

Niel

ICEBreaker
Apr 2, 2010, 02:04 AM
As you can see from the fact you're reviving a dead thread, it's only the occasional person who cares. I've never wanted nor needed this option, and I'd guess the large majority of OSX users couldn't care less either.

The majority of die hard Mac OS users don't care less. However, the only reason why Apple is doing so well these last 10 years is because many Windows users migrated over to Macs. And I can assure you that the vast majority of Windows users finds this to be a major annoyance. I have converted many friends and colleagues over to the Mac, and this is a common question that gets asked. We are all willing to learn Mac's way of doing things, but as far as this issue is concerned, there is a clear deficiency and it's my personal wish that Apple (and its fans) recognised this.

miles01110
Apr 2, 2010, 07:22 AM
The majority of die hard Mac OS users don't care less. However, the only reason why Apple is doing so well these last 10 years is because many Windows users migrated over to Macs. And I can assure you that the vast majority of Windows users finds this to be a major annoyance.

Good for them. As I and others have said repeatedly in other threads, you can either deal with it, buy a program like Pathfinder to add this functionality, or go back to Windows. It's a moot point- you either take steps to resolve this percieved deficiency or you don't. Complaining about it isn't going to change anything.

We are all willing to learn Mac's way of doing things, but as far as this issue is concerned, there is a clear deficiency and it's my personal wish that Apple (and its fans) recognised this.

We recognize that in your opinion lack of copy/paste is a shortcoming, we just don't agree with it.

jsalzer
Apr 2, 2010, 09:13 AM
As someone who uses both platforms daily (but greatly prefers his Mac), I can understand the frustration that someone with Windows-only experience would face when making the switch and finding a "standard" feature gone. And, I'm OK with Apple adding the feature...

But, anyone who says that cutting and pasting a file is intuitive is wrong. It's not intuitive at all - it's learned. And, with repetition, a learned thing becomes natural and people forget that it wasn't originally intuitive. And Apple prefers intuitive. In the real world (outside of a computer), there is no equivalent to cutting an entire file, let alone pasting an entire file. You would just move the file from one hanging file folder or drawer to another.

Not to mention the introduction of the logical inconsistency already mentioned that "sometimes cut means it's cut, and sometimes cut means that it's targetted to be cut when I paste."

So, while I personally have no desire for Apple to implement the cutting and pasting of a file, I'd be OK with them doing so IFF the functions had different and more appropriate labels, such as "Pick Up" instead of "Cut" and "Drop" instead of "Paste". And, this shouldn't be tough to do. If a user selects text (such as a part of the name of the file), the Edit menu can contain the standard options of Copy, Cut, and Paste. If a user selects a file, those options in the Edit menu change to Copy, Pick Up, and Drop.

Would that compromise alleviate concerns on all sides of the issue?

Gregg2
Apr 3, 2010, 09:12 AM
We recognize that in your opinion lack of copy/paste is a shortcoming, we just don't agree with it.

+1

don't need it, wouldn't use it

illy123
Apr 3, 2010, 12:49 PM
That is one of my pet peeves with OSX - what makes it even worse is that they don't have the option to snap windows to the side so that you can easily move files whilst holding down the command key.

It requires me opening a new finder window with Cmd+N, then dragging it to the right, resizing it, possible resizing the original window, and then moving it the new folder.

Though it is easier if you want to move it to a directory like downloads or movies or pictures as you don't need a second finder for that.

Gregg2
Apr 3, 2010, 08:14 PM
That is one of my pet peeves with OSX - what makes it even worse is that they don't have the option to snap windows to the side so that you can easily move files whilst holding down the command key.

There's an app for that. Wish I remembered the name of it, but maybe you can find it if you search for it.

forcefieldkid
Apr 4, 2010, 04:00 AM
It requires me opening a new finder window with Cmd+N, then dragging it to the right, resizing it, possible resizing the original window, and then moving it the new folder.

If the new window you open is in an awkward position, maybe most of it is overlapping the original, when you drag the file into it, it pops
to the front though, allowing you to drop it in a full window.

I believe the snapping windows is also new in Windows 7 right? At least they're using it in their commercials, I don't use it enough to know for sure. Mac OS is the older OS at the moment, and I'd imagine little tricks like this, and probably a lot more (heh) will be in the works for 10.7.

illy123
Apr 4, 2010, 04:32 AM
If the new window you open is in an awkward position, maybe most of it is overlapping the original, when you drag the file into it, it pops
to the front though, allowing you to drop it in a full window.

I believe the snapping windows is also new in Windows 7 right? At least they're using it in their commercials, I don't use it enough to know for sure. Mac OS is the older OS at the moment, and I'd imagine little tricks like this, and probably a lot more (heh) will be in the works for 10.7.

Hopefully :p

Resizing the window is more for navigation though - but it is not a big thing. The benefits of OSX outweigh the costs. OSX's user interface is pretty much as old as Vistas (as SL didn't change the interface) so it's really incredible at how good it still is.

Yep, window snapping is the 'new' thing for W7.

ICEBreaker
Apr 8, 2010, 11:23 AM
It's a moot point- you either take steps to resolve this percieved deficiency or you don't. Complaining about it isn't going to change anything.

We recognize that in your opinion lack of copy/paste is a shortcoming, we just don't agree with it.

The steps I am taking is to voice my opinion along with others, on the off chance that Apple will do something to rectify what we deem as a deficiency.

You don't have to agree with me. You are free to say you don't need it to counter the opinion and that's fine. No one is forcing you to support the proposed feature. But I do need you to shut up and let me have my say. Is that clear?

Gregg2
Apr 8, 2010, 12:27 PM
That is one of my pet peeves with OSX ... that they don't have the option to snap windows to the side so that you can easily move files whilst holding down the command key.

Found 'em. Maybe not exactly the way you state it, but two apps that will do it, I think:
http://www.irradiatedsoftware.com/

illy123
Apr 8, 2010, 01:18 PM
Found 'em. Maybe not exactly the way you state it, but two apps that will do it, I think:
http://www.irradiatedsoftware.com/

Thanks :D That's great

ferrouswheel
Apr 15, 2010, 06:21 AM
Just got to add my voice to the chorus. Apple needs to shape up and fix their file browser, this is just one of many deficiencies and a pretty basic gap in functionality at that.

On Linux, whatever windowing environment or file browser you use, cut and paste is just fundamental. Same in Windows, same in shells and command lines. Moving a file is just something one does. In fact, it sometimes requires less effort to move a file than copy it because it can often just update file system references instead of copying any data!

I actually sometimes still use Windows... just so that I can move and organise my file systems. It's essentially impossible using the drag and drop of Finder.

There is no safety net with drag and drop, if you accidentally release the mouse button you could lose your files in amongst files in another directory.

I came to OSX expecting it to be as amazing as the fan boys claimed. I was open to learning new ways of doing things, but this is just one example where there is no better way... instead there's just a more tedious and annoying way.

Tumbleweed666
Apr 15, 2010, 10:06 AM
In the real world (outside of a computer), there is no equivalent to cutting an entire file, let alone pasting an entire file. You would just move the file from one hanging file folder or drawer to another.




And in the real world, that wouldn't leave your original folder in the original hanging file folder as well, should that be in a different cabinet.
Analogy FAIL :D

miles01110
Apr 15, 2010, 10:08 AM
There is no safety net with drag and drop, if you accidentally release the mouse button you could lose your files in amongst files in another directory.


Command+Z undoes the previous action, fyi.

jsalzer
Apr 15, 2010, 10:56 AM
And in the real world, that wouldn't leave your original folder in the original hanging file folder as well, should that be in a different cabinet.
Analogy FAIL :D

Hehe. Took me a bit to figure out that you were talking about the different cabinet being an external drive. You are correct that the default behavior there fails the analogy, but the "file" analogy has held up pretty well over the 25 years. It's not the analogy that fails - it's that one behavior that fails.

However - dragging to an external drive might be more appropriately equivalent to giving a file to someone else to file in another office. (It is, after all, much more likely to have duplicate files across offices than within the same office. So think of each drive is its own office.) The default would be to give that person a copy of your file - not your original file. As we all know how dangerous it is, in the real world, to not keep your own paper trail. So, the Mac ensures that you'd have to make a conscious decision to "give up" having a copy in your own office by holding down the command key.

In any case, it's still more intuitive than "cut" and "paste". Speaking of which, rather than finding the behavior that (somewhat) falls outside of the analogy, what did you think about my compromise of having the functionality, but having the words "cut" and "paste" replaced with "pick up" and "drop"?

;)

And, on a side note - why is it that most Windows programs and the file system still do not have "Duplicate" commands in the Edit menu? I was on my Windows machine this morning and realized how silly it was to copy and paste a file in the same folder to make a duplicate of it.

Hmmmmmm...

Gregg2
Apr 15, 2010, 01:25 PM
There is no safety net with drag and drop, if you accidentally release the mouse button you could lose your files in amongst files in another directory.


I've done that often, using Windows, rarely using Mac OS.

ICEBreaker
Apr 18, 2010, 01:11 PM
In fact, it sometimes requires less effort to move a file than copy it because it can often just update file system references instead of copying any data!


Totally agree with you. Under NTFS, this kind of action will really cause a lot of fragmentation. Luckily the Mac FS doesn't have much fragmentation issues.


I actually sometimes still use Windows... just so that I can move and organise my file systems. It's essentially impossible using the drag and drop of Finder.


Actually, I kind of like using Finder to organise my files. Finder is crap when it comes to quickly moving one file from one place to another (as stated many times in this thread). However, if one were to do lots of file management, then Finder is better than Explorer. What you need to do however is to open TWO Finder panels in order to drag and drop properly. I love using the Columns View of Finder to navigate through the folders, better than using the Tree Structure of Explorer. And Quick View is essential - it's so convenient!


There is no safety net with drag and drop, if you accidentally release the mouse button you could lose your files in amongst files in another directory.


What I do in that case is to UNDO the action with CMD+Z. Unfortunately, Mac OS has another irritating deficiency whereby it can only undo ONE action, as oppose to Windows and Linux which can undo a whole series of actions. There are many times when I only realise I have lost files in the "drag and drop" action after I have already done something else, and cannot undo back to the point where I made the mistake. I am sure there will be people who will try their best to defend this deficiency too.

magickangaroo
Apr 23, 2010, 03:27 AM
You and everyone else in the "whaa whaa Apple should do this" camp choose to come here ("here" as in "a site not affiliated with Apple") and vent your frustrations. The proper channel for giving feedback to Apple is via their feedback page (http://www.apple.com/feedback/).

Statements like this

...just confirm that you don't really get it.

What, so you think that people haven't suggested this to apple? You don't want people to discuss apple related issues on an apple related forum? Stop thinking so binary, its not an either or situation. Do you not think that apple engineers may pay attention to what is said on this and other sites?

I think the killer thing here that nobody seems to have said is that if the feature was implemented, what would be the problem? If you wouldn't use it, good for you, but why don't users get the choice? Surely the fact there are apps out there for $40 bucks a pop, illustrate that there is a large enough market for this?

Originally people were banging on about lost files, but despite using *nix for years and windows before then, this never happened. What are you on about? If the open source community can work it out, and the idiots at microsoft can, why cant the guys at the golden temple of jobs?

/Mgk

Kristenn
Apr 23, 2010, 03:51 AM
I don't care if some bozo cuts a folder or file in Finder and forgets to paste!!
I still say it is annoying to have to open multiple Finder windows to drag & drop a file where I want it to be. And Copy & Paste just means I need to go back and delete the other file I copied after pasting it into the new area.

Okay so maybe I'm being a little bit picky... but cut and paste would be nice. I use it in text all the time. However, I have gotten used to just multiple Finder windows. Its different then Windows and since I didn't grow up with Windows I'm actually used to it. My previous part of the post was kind of a joke rant even though I don't think it would be horrible to have cut and paste in the finder. LOL

Anyway yeah... what everyone else said.

ICEBreaker
Apr 24, 2010, 01:15 AM
I think the killer thing here that nobody seems to have said is that if the feature was implemented, what would be the problem? If you wouldn't use it, good for you, but why don't users get the choice? Surely the fact there are apps out there for $40 bucks a pop, illustrate that there is a large enough market for this?

Agreed, and I did mention this numerous times in lots of other threads. Those against the suggestions are not upset about the implementation of a feature that they won't use and one which won't affect them. They are upset that new Apple users (i.e. Windows and Linux users) want new features. It's an inability to accept positive criticisms and suggestions and the overall haughty attitude and narrow mindedness that is causing the arguments.

We are not here to force people to use copy and paste features, but they are here to force us to accept the lack of copy and paste. Quite ridiculous, really.

jsalzer
Apr 24, 2010, 10:43 AM
We are not here to force people to use copy and paste features, but they are here to force us to accept the lack of copy and paste. Quite ridiculous, really.

You know the funny part - I think that several of us in this discussion (including myself) haven't even realized that Copy and Paste Item are already allowed in Snow Leopard. The menu even changes to say, "Copy 3 Items" if you select 3 files to copy. When did that get introduced? I just ran into it. That changes the discussion, doesn't it? Apparently, Apple has crossed the line with one foot (copy item) and not the other (cut item). So, the new question becomes, is there a reason to allow one and not the other?

Those against the suggestions are not upset about the implementation of a feature that they won't use and one which won't affect them. They are upset that new Apple users (i.e. Windows and Linux users) want new features. It's an inability to accept positive criticisms and suggestions and the overall haughty attitude and narrow mindedness that is causing the arguments...Quite ridiculous, really.

Come on, now. As with any issue, you can't lump together everyone who stands on one side of an issue as having the same or even equally valid reasons. Sure, there are definitely people who will argue against any suggestion to implement a feature found in Windows and Linux. And, if they have no reason other than that, you can blow them off as being unable to accept positive criticism.

However, you can't just point to those folks as representative of everyone who does not want Apple to implement a specific task implementation and blow off everyone's arguments. Some are perfectly valid and worthy of being considered in search of a healthy compromise.

My personal reason for opposing this implementation (already discussed) involves avoiding, whenever possible, anything that requires a user to know that "that's how we do things on a computer" so that the computer is intuitive for someone just starting out on it (be it a child or an adult).

Apple has somewhat addressed this by having the wording in the menu items change to "Copy 3 Items" and "Paste Items", rather than a simple "Copy" and "Paste". It's a positive step toward meeting the needs of both those with your desires and those with my concerns. Though I still think that the wording needs to be tweaked to:

1) Say "Copy Item" instead of just "Copy" when only one file or folder is selected.
2) Replace "Paste" with something more accurate, such as "Place Item", "Set Down Item", or even "Put Item Here".
3) Allow the "Cut" functionality, but with wording such as "Pick Up Item".

:)

annk
Apr 24, 2010, 11:39 AM
Since the OP's question has been answered and the thread got OT, I have now closed it.