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iKucing
Mar 1, 2006, 04:26 AM
hi, i'm new here :)

I'm thinking of getting a mac. i own a PC but when i was in college i use Macs for school work and often borrowed my roomate's powerbook :D so i'm pretty familiar with macs, though not really an expert. anyway...i like editing pictures and video, just for fun - not professionally, i love computer games, and i store a lot of music. but i'd mostly use computers for word datas and internet.

so my question is:
1. i'm thinking of getting the macbook pro but would macbook pro be too advanced for me because i won't use it for designs?
2. is it true mac's gonna launch iBooks with intel processor w/ built in isight?
3. are the new intel processor macs really faster?
4. Which do u think would suit me best? iBook intel or macbook pro or regular iBook or PowerBook?

thanks!



Spies
Mar 1, 2006, 04:41 AM
1. You've already used a powerbook, a macbook pro is comparible to that in some ways but it's faster. Only you know whats right for you.

2. Intel processor yes, isight, possibly.

3. Yes.

4. Depends entirely on budget, there will be about $600 between the base spec iBook (MacBook) and the MacBook Pro.

Chundles
Mar 1, 2006, 04:51 AM
hi, i'm new here :)

I'm thinking of getting a mac. i own a PC but when i was in college i use Macs for school work and often borrowed my roomate's powerbook :D so i'm pretty familiar with macs, though not really an expert. anyway...i like editing pictures and video, just for fun - not professionally, i love computer games, and i store a lot of music. but i'd mostly use computers for word datas and internet.

so my question is:
1. i'm thinking of getting the macbook pro but would macbook pro be too advanced for me because i won't use it for designs?
2. is it true mac's gonna launch iBooks with intel processor w/ built in isight?
3. are the new intel processor macs really faster?
4. Which do u think would suit me best? iBook intel or macbook pro or regular iBook or PowerBook?

thanks!

Greetings my feline friend.

The MacBook Pro would possibly be a bit of overkill, remember, Macs aren't only for designers - they do pretty much everything better than most PCs. For your needs however (data, word processing etc) the MBP would be very, very nice but you'd struggle to use all that power unless of course you ramp up the game playing, in which case you'd benefit greatly from the graphics power of the x1600.
I am a big fan of buying the absolute best computer you can afford so as to future-proof yourself as long as possible so yes, if you can afford it, go with the MacBook Pro.

Apple (the company is Apple, not "Mac." Mac is the type of computer that Apple makes) is most definitely releasing an Intel powered iBook replacement (my bet is it will be named "MacBook") sometime this year. It would make sense that they would release it around April to coincide with the US academic buying season. Nobody really knows if it will have a built-in iSight but I think it probably will. I think it will be a 13.3" wide screen with specs similar to the newly released Mac Minis. This may be a problem for you as they may have integrated graphics which may dull your gaming experience but would be more than capable for everything else.

Word of advice:

If your choice is between the absolute fastest machine with no extras and a slightly slower machine with extras, I'd go with the latter choice. My hierarchy for purchasing a Mac is:

Budget - try hard not to exceed it.
Portability - if not required, don't get it, you get more computer for the bucks with a desktop.
Hard Drive - get as big a hard drive as you think you need and then go with the one bigger than that, you always need space and internal is just cleaner.
Graphics - max it out if you can afford it, all bar the PowerMac have upgradeable graphics cards so get it maxed out when you buy it cause you can't do it afterwards.
Processor - go for the quickest once you've decided on the space you need and the graphics you need.
RAM - apart from the Mac mini all Macs have easily upgradeable RAM.

From the list above I would recommend a 1.83GHz MacBook Pro with a maxed out HDD and RAM over a 2.0GHz stock model. Also, I'd rather a 2.0GHz MacBook Pro with more HDD and RAM over a stock 2.16GHz model. I just think doing it this way gives you the most flexibility.

If you can wait till mid-April, do it and check out the specs/reports about the Intel iBook replacement. If not, MacBook Pro or iMac if you don't need the portability is where the value is.

I simply can't recommend buying a PPC based Mac anymore, not with the accelerated transition schedule. By the end of the year they will all be outdated, not unusable in any way but just behind the times.

The Intel-based Macs really are faster than their PPC based predecessors. Obviously not in all areas - emulated apps that are still compiled for PPC come to mind - but they really do scream where apps are compiled to make the most of the new chips.

There is currently about US$700 between the top-of-the-line iBook(US$1299) and the base spec MacBook Pro(US$1999), judging by the price hike of the new Mac mini I'd suggest that will shrink somewhat as the iBook replacement is likely to be slightly more expensive than the iBook it replaces.


Phew, long post.

Spies
Mar 1, 2006, 05:00 AM
Word of advice:

If your choice is between the absolute fastest machine with no extras and a slightly slower machine with extras, I'd go with the latter choice.Bar the RAM as that can be upgraded any time.

Chundles
Mar 1, 2006, 05:05 AM
Bar the RAM as that can be upgraded any time.

Well, not really, I'd take the cost of 3rd party RAM into the initial purchase price. I'd max the RAM out straight away to give proper Rosetta performance - current lab tests suggest that emulated apps can approach current G4 speeds with 1GB+ of RAM.

Oh man I'd have some fun buying a new Mac today, I love researching.

Spies
Mar 1, 2006, 05:08 AM
But then you've no scope for upgrade in the future? I know laptops are necessarily upgradable anyway but it'd be nice to have the option.

Chundles
Mar 1, 2006, 05:13 AM
But then you've no scope for upgrade in the future? I know laptops are necessarily upgradable anyway but it'd be nice to have the option.

No need to upgrade, it's maxxed out.

Spies
Mar 1, 2006, 05:26 AM
No need to upgrade, it's maxxed out.
I need to put it the other way.

Don't upgrade RAM, that way the money saved can go towards the next model up, you end up with a faster processor but less RAM, but this can always be upgraded at a later date whereas a CPU can't.