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3777
Feb 1, 2003, 08:49 AM
If anyone's watching.............

mymemory
Feb 1, 2003, 09:05 AM
I'm in shock and sad, frustrated and hurted as many of you may feel now. Who knows what happened up there in the re-entry.

The US is receiving big hits lately, so the rest of the people around the world that have dreams and do not feel boundaries between nations any more.

My most sincere condolences to the family of the tripulation of the Space Shuttle Columbia and to those involve in the space shuttle program.

Shrek
Feb 1, 2003, 09:11 AM
OMG!!! OM Freakin' G!!! THIS IS TERRIBLE!!! :mad: :mad: :mad:

BTW, here is a link: Click Here (http://www.cnn.com/2003/TECH/space/02/01/shuttle.columbia/index.html)

UPDATE: CNN has launched a full-coverage website on the Columbia Shuttle Disaster. Click Here (http://www.cnn.com/shuttle/).

al256
Feb 1, 2003, 09:16 AM
I know... :(

G4scott
Feb 1, 2003, 09:21 AM
Ouch...

That's really not good...

My elementary school was named after Christa McAuliffe, the first teacher astronaut. Our mascot was the 'Challengers'

Over Achiever
Feb 1, 2003, 09:23 AM
After trying to recover from my shock...

I'm still in shock.

The video of the pieces falling to earth...that was a very, very sad sight. My prayers go out to the families of all seven astronauts on board.

Over Achiever
Feb 1, 2003, 09:25 AM
Anyone see the video of the pieces...a very, very sad sight.

kansaigaijin
Feb 1, 2003, 09:29 AM
ya pretty bad. I have seen it go by twice, once in the day time and once at night. It really rips along (12,500mph) Just saw the footage on japanese TV, pretty shocking.

there must be crew on the ISS, they must be feeling pretty lonely right now.

and only a few days after the anniversary of the challenger disaster. and just noticed that the shuttle does not feature so big on Apples page.

3777
Feb 1, 2003, 09:30 AM
Originally posted by G4scott
Ouch...

That's really not good...

My elementary school was named after Christa McAuliffe, the first teacher astronaut. Our mascot was the 'Challengers'

My family is good friends with the McAuliffs. Father instructed pilots with her brother in law in Pansacola in 1985.

clubmedia
Feb 1, 2003, 09:34 AM
yeah that is a shame...

clubmedia
Feb 1, 2003, 09:37 AM
sad... sad... sad...

peterjhill
Feb 1, 2003, 09:51 AM
I watched the Challenger explode in 1986, and now this. We have been lucky since then, but neverless it is very tragic and shocking. The space shuttle is such a symbol of hope and when something like this happens, it shakes us out of our dreams into a horrible reality.

irmongoose
Feb 1, 2003, 09:55 AM
Guess that's gonna limit NASA doing anything big for a while... ugh...

7 people dead. Not good.

:(




irmongoose

Rower_CPU
Feb 1, 2003, 09:57 AM
Originally posted by peterjhill
I watched the Challenger explode in 1986, and now this. We have been lucky since then, but neverless it is very tragic and shocking. The space shuttle is such a symbol of hope and when something like this happens, it shakes us out of our dreams into a horrible reality.

I was in Hawaii when the Challenger incident took place, which made it especially poignant, since one of the astronauts was a school teacher from my island.

My heart goes out to the families of those who lost their lives today. :(

kansaigaijin
Feb 1, 2003, 10:02 AM
by way of New Hampshire?

christa McCauliffe R.I.P.

kiwi_the_iwik
Feb 1, 2003, 10:03 AM
Like Peter, I saw Challenger explode in 1986. To hear this terrible news brings back those horrible feelings I felt back then.

A truly tragic day - I'm devastated...

:(

MacBandit
Feb 1, 2003, 10:15 AM
I too saw the Challenger explode. It really is amazing that events like this do not happen more often. Traveling into orbit in back is one of the most dangerous things that man can do but so far our precautions have done us very well. I am very saddened by the loss of the Columbia, there are so many feelings welling up reminding me of Challenger I just don't know exactly what to say. Why does such a minor even affect me so much? It's go to be the hopes and dreams that the shuttle program carries with it.

mcrain
Feb 1, 2003, 10:24 AM
This is absolutely terrible. What other terrible things are going to happen?

pyrotoaster
Feb 1, 2003, 10:25 AM
I've been watching Today all morning, and I'm shocked. This is the first time a space shuttle has been lost on re-entry. I can't help but be worried about the future of NASA.

Just as a side note, Apple has removed the new Powermac and 20" Display from their homepage. You might recall that the display featured a picture of a space shuttle taking off (the 20" at the Powermac page still features the image).

MacBandit
Feb 1, 2003, 10:29 AM
Originally posted by pyrotoaster
I've been watching Today all morning, and I'm shocked. This is the first time a space shuttle has been lost on re-entry. I can't help but be worried about the future of NASA.

Just as a side note, Apple has removed the new Powermac and 20" Display from their homepage. You might recall that the display featured a picture of a space shuttle taking off (the 20" at the Powermac page still features the image).

My personal feeling is instead of cutting back NASA should run make some memorial missions in remembrance of the Columbia and it's crew.

I expect Apple will publish something in remembrance today.

peterjhill
Feb 1, 2003, 10:44 AM
With only 3 shuttles remaining, I think it is time for the US to think about what it wants to do. The vehicles are getting up there in age. It is time to think again of the future, while remembering the past.

lmalave
Feb 1, 2003, 10:47 AM
Anyone else notice that the first debris found was in a Texas town called...Palestine!
As you know the first Israeli astronaut was on the shuttle. Man, I'm not religious but that really creeped me out.

Mr. Anderson
Feb 1, 2003, 10:51 AM
Damn, this is going to have huge impact on the space program and pretty much sink the international space station. I wonder if they'll send up another shuttle to get the crew or the Russians will send their escape pod.

This is really a sad day.

And considering the violence of reentry, you really have to think what sort of life span these shuttles have. Was this a freak accident or was it preventable? Time to update the fleet to V 2.0 and get a whole new type. Maybe the space plane will be getting new funding.

D

rice_web
Feb 1, 2003, 11:02 AM
Or maybe it will get its funding cut.

Most people just don't care for space travel, with the hopes of life on Mars all but gone. This accident could shut NASA down.

job
Feb 1, 2003, 11:05 AM
my god...

it's a national tragedy. it could not have happened at a worst time.

only three left. maybe it's time to give nasa some more funding.

job
Feb 1, 2003, 11:07 AM
Originally posted by rice_web
This accident could shut NASA down.

i'm not so sure about that.

nasa is a symbol of america, something every american can be proud of.

the images of the american flag on the moon and the images brought back from the shuttle flights are embedded in the national conciousness.

let's hope nasa comes back stronger, like a phoenix rising from the ashes.

Stelliform
Feb 1, 2003, 11:12 AM
It is a very sad situation. I am a big fan of NASA and its advancement of Human knowledge. These seven astronauts knew the danger, and still chose to risk their lives to make ours better.

My prayers go out to the families of those seven astronauts.

dubbelhund
Feb 1, 2003, 11:13 AM
it's a sign....

kiwi_the_iwik
Feb 1, 2003, 11:14 AM
Check this out - from www.space.com

News story prior to the accident:

http://www.space.com/missionlaunches/sts107_update_030131.html



Columbia's Marathon Mission Reaches for the Finish Line

"We had no problems, the vehicle performed flawlessly today, as it has the entire mission," Cain said.

One concern discussed Thursday involved the fragile heat protection tiles that cover much of the shuttle's surface and protects the vehicle and crew from the high temperatures created during re-entry.

Video of the Jan. 16 launch from Florida shows what is likely a piece of insulating foam falling away from Columbia's external tank and striking the spaceplane's left wing near its leading edge, possibly damaging some tiles.

Cain said engineers have studied the situation and are not worried.

"We took a very thorough look at the situation with the tile on the left wing and we have no concerns, whatsoever," Cain said. "Therefore we haven't changed anything with respect to our trajectory design."



It certainly looks like some of the tiles came off during launch...

dubbelhund
Feb 1, 2003, 11:15 AM
it's a sign...

job
Feb 1, 2003, 11:16 AM
Originally posted by dubbelhund
it's a sign...


errrrrr.....

ok...i guess.

scem0
Feb 1, 2003, 11:29 AM
That's not cool. It is really unfortunate. I would never be an astronaut ;(.

peterjhill
Feb 1, 2003, 11:31 AM
wow, that space.com article really makes you think about what might have happened. You'd think that it would be fairly trivial to check out the damage. They could have used a camera mounted on the space stations robot arm to check it out.

As for nasa going out of business, it is very unlikely. The space station is more than usable now, and their is tons of research possiblities available for it. It is time to step ahead. It also might be time for some commercial use of space. Bill Gates has enough money to build a space shuttle, I doubt he would. He is much smarter than that. He would want to do it right, and that would mean a new design.

Dont Hurt Me
Feb 1, 2003, 11:33 AM
Originally posted by hitman


i'm not so sure about that.

nasa is a symbol of america, something every american can be proud of.

the images of the american flag on the moon and the images brought back from the shuttle flights are embedded in the national conciousness.

let's hope nasa comes back stronger, like a phoenix rising from the ashes. I agree with hitman and his statement also i think it is time to replace the shuttles with newer and better technologies, after all that stuff was designed and built in the 70's.This will hurt nasa but i think also it will open up eyes that space travel is anything but routine and it is time to move forward with better less complicated designs.My thoughts and prayers to the families on this tragic day and america has you in its minds and hearts.

mymemory
Feb 1, 2003, 11:34 AM
The space program will go on no matter what, just because if the goverment cancel it the moral of the country will fall to worse because it will siply tell "we are no capable".

The next step I think is to really consider the new Space Shuttle design. Even if the problem was based on the earlier report of the falling of the isolation stuff, it means you can not take any chances with the actual technology, just non. If a bird sh*tt on the space shuttle that would be enough reason to delay it and repair it... just too many things can go wrong.

The Space Shuttle is not a car that can run with a failure on the chasis. May be the engineers had the oposite impression if the reason was that one. I'm sure they may feel like hell right now even the investigation proves they are inocent.

Any way, for you to have a reference, if you feel like crap today becuase of the Space Shuttle, that is the way I feel every day because of the situation my country is.

Doctor Q
Feb 1, 2003, 11:37 AM
This is tragic. How sad.

Yet I know that, no matter what the odds, there will be people willing to take the risk to be an astronaut. The next launch was scheduled for the first of March and will no doubt be delayed while they investigate this disaster.

job
Feb 1, 2003, 11:46 AM
there's going to be a nasa news conference at 1PM ET.

lmalave
Feb 1, 2003, 11:50 AM
Originally posted by dukestreet
Damn, this is going to have huge impact on the space program and pretty much sink the international space station. I wonder if they'll send up another shuttle to get the crew or the Russians will send their escape pod.

This is really a sad day.

And considering the violence of reentry, you really have to think what sort of life span these shuttles have. Was this a freak accident or was it preventable? Time to update the fleet to V 2.0 and get a whole new type. Maybe the space plane will be getting new funding.

D

I have a friend who studied aerospace engineering and he told me that the space shuttle was engineered to have a critical failure on average about 2% of the time. And guess what? The Challenger was destroyed on about the 50th mission. I wonder how many missions had been flown since the Challenger...

The fact is, with current technology we just cannot make this 100% safe. The materials are too volatile, the temperatures too hot, etc. Most of the cost already goes into safety engineering. If the shuttles were engineered for lower tolerances they would actually cost lower overall, albeit at the cost of more deaths.

I bring this up because my friend told me this information during an amusing anecdote: the professor asked the class of aerospace students how many student would be willing to go on a flight if they though there was a 10% chance of blowing up. Most of the class raised their hand. Then he went up - 15%, 20%, 25%, 30%. Almost half the class was willing to go on a flight that would explode one out of three times!!!! Crazy :eek:

3777
Feb 1, 2003, 11:50 AM
Looks like a piece of heat shield fell off during the launch. They also are reporting they just found their bodies in Jasper, Texas.

eyelikeart
Feb 1, 2003, 11:53 AM
I cannot believe this...

many of us have seen this happen twice in our lifetimes... :(

I remember in 1986...I was in...3rd...4th grade? We're all sitting in our classroom, and two girls come rushing in screaming "the space shuttle blew up!!" :(

pyrotoaster
Feb 1, 2003, 12:00 PM
Apple has replaced the Space Shuttle image on the 20" Display with a City-Scape.

iGav
Feb 1, 2003, 12:08 PM
:(

iAlan
Feb 1, 2003, 12:10 PM
Condolences to the family and friends of the brave astronauts who have lost their lives.

One of the astronauts was an Israel pilot, the first Israel pilot in space.

It was 17 years ago on January 28 when the Challenger exploded.

Very very tragic.

Dont Hurt Me
Feb 1, 2003, 12:14 PM
Originally posted by lmalave


I have a friend who studied aerospace engineering and he told me that the space shuttle was engineered to have a critical failure on average about 2% of the time. And guess what? The Challenger was destroyed on about the 50th mission. I wonder how many missions had been flown since the Challenger...

The fact is, with current technology we just cannot make this 100% safe. The materials are too volatile, the temperatures too hot, etc. Most of the cost already goes into safety engineering. If the shuttles were engineered for lower tolerances they would actually cost lower overall, albeit at the cost of more deaths.

I bring this up because my friend told me this information during an amusing anecdote: the professor asked the class of aerospace students how many student would be willing to go on a flight if they though there was a 10% chance of blowing up. Most of the class raised their hand. Then he went up - 15%, 20%, 25%, 30%. Almost half the class was willing to go on a flight that would explode one out of three times!!!! Crazy :eek: the shuttle is not made with current technologies it was made with 70's technologies!you are right about the 2% and i think that could be brought down to under 1 with what we have today! Its time for a newer- cheaper-safer way to space and they have been working on a replacement for the shuttle maybe now they will push harder to get it in place. Still the shuttle has done things no other spacecraft has even come close or is on the same page yet it is time to move on.Lets all support Nasa!

vniow
Feb 1, 2003, 12:14 PM
http://img.ranchoweb.com/images/veronica/damn.gif

eyelikeart
Feb 1, 2003, 12:18 PM
Originally posted by iAlan
One of the astronauts was an Israel pilot, the first Israel pilot in space.

It was 17 years ago on January 28 when the Challenger exploded.

yeah I know...I remember a couple weeks ago how excited a friend of mine was over the first Israeli astronaut in space... :(

17 years ago...wow...seems like it was yesterday...

Stelliform
Feb 1, 2003, 12:22 PM
"The future doesn't belong to the fainthearted; it belongs to the brave. The Challenger crew was pulling us into the future, and we'll continue to follow them..."

From President Reagan's Speech on The Challenger Disaster
January 28, 1986

I feel that the same can be said for these astronauts.

3777
Feb 1, 2003, 12:48 PM
Originally posted by eyelikeart
I cannot believe this...

many of us have seen this happen twice in our lifetimes... :(

I remember in 1986...I was in...3rd...4th grade? We're all sitting in our classroom, and two girls come rushing in screaming "the space shuttle blew up!!" :(


We had Christine McAuliff's brother in law over our house to celebrate a week before the launch. We were living in Pensacola, I was 12 at the time.

wdlove
Feb 1, 2003, 01:07 PM
My prayers go out to the 7 crew members and their families, tragic. Hope they find the cause soon. We need to honor these brave 5 men and 2 women for their outstanding service to their country! :(

chibianh
Feb 1, 2003, 01:10 PM
Would newer technologies help? I think it would, but I also thing that engineering isn't what it used to be. For example, the Voyager probes and the Pioneer probes.. still going strong and still transmitting. How many probes have we lost recently? Anyway, I agree that these space shuttles are old, but the fact that the lasted this long is amazing. I doubt we could build anything like now and have it last 20 years.

G4scott
Feb 1, 2003, 01:37 PM
I believe the future of NASA is strong. Bush said in his speech to the nation that space flight will go on. As terrible as today's events are, I think it will enspire and encourage NASA to make some major changes. The current orbiters are very inefficient and a bit dated, using tons of fuel, and equipment and technologies from the 70's. Even though Columbia was recently renovated, it was still a pretty old spacecraft.

This incident might lead NASA to focus more on new technologies and spacecraft that are more efficient, and safer.

Space flight is dangerous. Astronauts know of the many dangers that they face, but they don't think about them. They focus on getting their jobs done. They are probably the bravest people known to mankind, strapping themselves to a rocket, and hurtling themselves into space at unimaginable speeds. The seven astronauts that died today died for a noble cause; the exploration of new frontiers and the unknown.

RBMaraman
Feb 1, 2003, 01:37 PM
I can't believe this is happening. I'm in total shock over the whole situation.

What a terrible week for NASA. January 27 was the anniversary of the Apollo explosion that killed 3. Then the 28th was the anniversary of the Challenger explosion. Now this.

Being from Indiana, I wanted to remind people that Gus Grissom (one of the men killed in the Apollo explosion) was from Mitchell Indiana, about 1 hour from where I live. Last summer, some friends and I visited the Gus Grissom Memorial in Mitchell. This quote appears on the monument:

"The conquest of space is worth the risk of human life" - Gus Grissom

If you haven't seen the movie "The Right Stuff", I suggest you go out and rent it. You'll really learn a lot about the space race.

My prayers are with the families....

chewbaccapits
Feb 1, 2003, 01:58 PM
I agree it brings back a sad memories of 86..or 85..I forget...but I was in sixth grade when the challenger disaster occured....Sad day in America today.....My prayers to the family.

Doctor Q
Feb 1, 2003, 01:59 PM
The shuttle technology is aging but we can't abandon it yet. Given the necessary funding, NASA could be developing the next generation of space transportation. But in the meantime we've got an ongoing program. Don't forget there are three astronauts in the space station. What a shock this disaster must have been for them.

macfan
Feb 1, 2003, 02:14 PM
A sad situation. How tragic for the families and their friends.

Some mentioned earlier about the robot arm being used to check out the damage. Unlike most missions, there was no robot arm on this mission.

I would love to see the space shuttle be retired and replaced by a cheaper, more advanced alternative. Given the current economic climate, however, I don't know that the money is there for it.

Thanatoast
Feb 1, 2003, 02:38 PM
the money could be there. it's all a matter of priorities. i think a reinvigorated space program is a worthy cause.

Durandal7
Feb 1, 2003, 02:39 PM
The shuttles need to be replaced. In my opinion the Columbia should have been decomissioned in 1991. There is hope for funding since Bush has already signed over a healthy amount to NASA for the Prometheus project.

NASA is by no means dead.

pimentoLoaf
Feb 1, 2003, 02:49 PM
NASA news conference highlight:

The left wing showed all sorts of heat increases before communication was lost.

DarkNovaMatter
Feb 1, 2003, 02:51 PM
Ugh, this isn't going to be good. I hope they find out what did happen, this is so tragic from what I was hearing before they were about to return. NASA in some book or report said that if they lost another shuttle that they would have to make another 1-2 shuttles or go with a new design. Simply the idea given was that if we ever got down to 2 shuttles that we couldn't keep the 2 remaining shuttles in running condition and do it as quick as their launch schedual would require- the 3 were already under a stressed schedual. This is a verry unsettling day......

GeneR
Feb 1, 2003, 02:57 PM
I believe we all feel about the same about this tragedy.

Perhaps today will be another day of mourning for most of us for the rest of our lives. But I believe we all understand that the commitment that these brave souls made to push the envelope needs to be honored and remembered. And we need to honor our own commitment to excellence and perseverence and to the dream of space travel.

There's a saying mentioned in the Bible which comes to mind. I don't mean to preach but these words help me in these times, so I'd like to share it with you. When Joshua first took up the mantle left by Moses, he is instructed by God: "Have I not commanded you? Be strong and courageous. Do not be terrified; do not be discouraged, for the LORD your God will be with you wherever you go."

I think it's time to hold onto our convictions and to be strong in the face of adversity. I believe we deserve to do this, if for no other reason to be true to ourselves and to honor their memories.

The space program should not be cut back. It should not be hindered. Other nations are still developing their programs and we have been the leader thus far. Why falter? We need to press forward.

Take care, everyone.

:)

Shrek
Feb 1, 2003, 03:03 PM
UPDATE: CNN has launched a full-coverage website on the Columbia Shuttle Disaster. Click Here (http://www.cnn.com/shuttle/).

wdlove
Feb 1, 2003, 03:07 PM
I am proud to see the support of people for the crew of Space Shuttle Columbia and our NASA Program.

Netscape Poll: Poll: In light of the tragedy, the space program should: Continue despite the risks. 86% Continue with only unmanned missions. 7% Be abandoned, itís too dangerous. 6%

unreg
Feb 1, 2003, 03:12 PM
This is the 6th or 7th space flight disaster that resulted in death of the crew in my lifetime. Maybe this will galvanize the country and world to expand space flight.
My sympathies to the family and friends of the crew.

zarathustra
Feb 1, 2003, 03:42 PM
I was waking up at around 7:55 this morning when I heard repeatedly loud tremors - sounded like a truck without an exhaust. I thought to myself, great, the neighbor has decided to take out his truck. I was ticked off that he woke me up, although i had to decided to go to work. I went downstairs to pour some orange juice and turned on the TV for background noise when I saw the explosion on local TV being repeated (WFAA, NBC - Dallas). that's when it dawned on me - the noise was the shuttle. I sat there in disbelief. To say the least, my morning was ruined. Then they started showing the debris on the ground all around - Nacogdoches, Tyler, Palestine.

When I finally got on the road, the highway traffic bulletins read:

"To report space shuttle debris call police or NASA hotline."

It was surreal. And it's a beautiful day today in Texas, sunshine and 70 degrees. One apartments complex caught fire around 8:00 in Plano, north of Dallas, and now they are investigating whether that was caused by debris. I am speechless and numb.

Think whatever you wnat of Bush as a president, but you have to admit that he has seen more adversity happen to the USA under his presidency than any modern day president.

If I hear or see anything locally I will keep you guys posted. I am going to go take pictures of the road bulletins; I don't think I'll see anything like that again.

Images of fragments from Nacogdoches. (http://titan.sfasu.edu/~z_websternb/)

wdlove
Feb 1, 2003, 04:36 PM
We've had these 3 tragedies that ended in death, but remember the Apollo XIII tragedy that ended in a tremendous success. Our Astronauts truly have, "The Right Stuff." I can't even imagine what the families our going through rigtht now, but I do know that the Lord is with them. "For he gives us no more than we can handle."

cr2sh
Feb 1, 2003, 04:55 PM
Originally posted by pyrotoaster
You might recall that the display featured a picture of a space shuttle taking off (the 20" at the Powermac page still features the image).

Just noticed thismyself.. its a sad day for America.

janey
Feb 1, 2003, 05:05 PM
great...now columbia...

for some reason every single time i wake up some tragedy happens.
woke up as soon as the first plane crashed into the twin towers on 9/11,
now columbia when it was over california.

this is so sad...

Maclicious
Feb 1, 2003, 05:11 PM
The nation grieves. The loss of the Columbia and the lives of those on board will not be in vain. The space program will forge ahead, in their name, and in the name of all who have lost their lives in the ongoing magnificent endeavor to reach beyond Earth's confines, to explore, and to understand.

lmalave
Feb 1, 2003, 05:21 PM
Originally posted by zarathustra
To say the least, my morning was ruined. Then they started showing the debris on the ground all around - Nacogdoches, Tyler, Palestine.


Dude, it totally creeps me out that Columbia blew up over a town named Palestine on the mission that was carrying the first Israeli astronaut. Not that I think it's anything more than an incredible coincidence, but you have to admit, it IS creepy :eek:

MyLeftNut
Feb 1, 2003, 05:31 PM
Looking at the Apple website...I thought...oohhh, thats nice, they put a beautiful pic of Sydney there...why is the shuttle gone? Then I check the boards and what!!!!! I dont believe it...this is twice now? I remember Challenger and now Columbia.....my sincerest condolences to the families and the space program. Of all the things that are great about America the space program for me is number one...it espouses not only some of the best characteristics of your nation but also the what the world could become through cooperation and advancement of humanity....

If I was an American I would be sad but also very angry that I have a president that spends literally billions upon billions of dollars on weapons and yet NASA struggles to get its fair share of the budget every year when its agenda, I would argue, is of the highest moral order....


Hopefully something will change because of this. I know the Aussie kids who helped with the spider research on columbia will be mortified by the news...

Dazzler
Feb 1, 2003, 07:18 PM
My sympathies to the families and friends of those aboard - a terrible, terrible day for the world.

Gene Roddenberry said it best with "...to boldly go where no one has gone before."

I take comfort in knowing that the Columbia 7 knew the risks, accepted them and ultimately died as heroes in their pursuant of their beliefs.

iJed
Feb 1, 2003, 08:35 PM
This is shocking and tragic news. I still find it hard to believe that the orbiter was actually destroyed. This is terrible news for not only America but for science the world over. This could set back space exploration back by a decade. Hopefully NASA will extra funding to replace the aging shuttle fleet sooner rather than later.

Metatron
Feb 1, 2003, 08:38 PM
I got up early that morning to watch Columbia come over that morning. The flight path would take it directly over the top of my house. I was outside with the door open, and had CNN turned up loud so that I could hear the news. Then I saw it.

I have been a diehard NASA fan since childhood. Always watching and getting reports on NASA and the shuttle missions and studing about the space race and so on. I was so exited. Rarely does very interesting things happen in my town, so to see the Shuttle fly over head is an interesting sight indeed. I live in Palestine, Texas. If anyone was watching the news, then you know that the first report of the Space Shuttle exploding came from here. It came perfectly from the west, and directly over my head, I saw distecnt objects leaving the orbiter, what I later confirm as pieces breakin up in front of me. The pieces glowed blue, green, and a bright white. I at first was very impressed, but I knew something was not right. It did not take long for someone to finally get CNN's number and report the explosion.

It wasn't until 3 minutes later that I knew for certain that the Shuttle would never land. I waited outside......for the sonic boom, and it came, long after, what remanied of the shuttle had flown overhead. Then the explosion.......the amount of noise, and increadible, followed immediatly with the house shaken and the ground horrible vibrating. The force of the blast was incredable, it had happened 40 miles up.

The rumble lasted for a solid 2 minutes. My younger brother, who was asleep, was woke to the sound of the explosion and the vibration fo the house. I have a very large surrond sound system in my house. He thought at first that I was screeming the music through my sub, but the vibration quickly put to rest those thoughts.

Then the reports on CNN confirm what I knew.....Columbia was gone. I keep thinking how I watched the Shuttle breakup directly overhead, and how 7 people instantly lost thier lives. It has made me very distrot, and I feel for the families.

I have seen all the video of the shuttle flying overhead, and all of it was shot from a far side view. I wish....God I wish, I had got out my video camera, it would have been the most accurate, incrediable shot that NASA would recieve.

God Bless the souls of the 7. And may we continue on.

job
Feb 1, 2003, 09:05 PM
Human remains found.

http://www.chron.com/cs/CDA/story.hts/space/1761217

job
Feb 1, 2003, 09:08 PM
iraqis call it "god's vengeance"

http://www.reuters.com/newsArticle.jhtml;jsessionid=BJKKZDZVFUFBACRBAELCFEY?type=worldNews&storyID=2152926

Doctor Q
Feb 1, 2003, 09:08 PM
I was puzzled why they keep saying there are 3 shuttles left now that we've lost Challenger and Columbia, because I remembered there were shuttles named Atlantis, Discovery, Endeavor, and Enterprise. So I looked it up. The answer is that shuttle Enterprise was used only for 1977 landing tests and flew only within the atmosphere. The real shuttle missions began in 1981, with Columbia flying the first five missions.

cr2sh
Feb 1, 2003, 10:18 PM
from the link...


Iraqis Call Shuttle Disaster God's Vengeance
Sat February 1, 2003 03:24 PM ET
BAGHDAD (Reuters) - Immediate popular reaction in Baghdad on Saturday to the loss of the U.S. space shuttle Columbia and its seven-member crew -- including the first Israeli in space -- was that it was God's retribution.

"We are happy that it broke up," government employee Abdul Jabbar al-Quraishi said.

"God wants to show that his might is greater than the Americans. They have encroached on our country. God is avenging us," he said.


They are happy they died... wow, that's just disgusting. Whoever says that there's 'no proof' that Iraq is aiding the Taliban... there it is. They wish us nothing but death.

G4scott
Feb 2, 2003, 01:06 AM
Originally posted by hitman
iraqis call it "god's vengeance"

http://www.reuters.com/newsArticle.jhtml;jsessionid=BJKKZDZVFUFBACRBAELCFEY?type=worldNews&storyID=2152926

I just knew some ******** son of a b*tch mother raping bastard would say something like that. Not you, hitman, but the stupid freakin iraqui's... We already know that al queida and the taliban have no regard for human life, along with other terrorists and religious extremists, but when the government of a country is happy because of the death of 6 Americans and 1 Israeli, that's just sick. That's why we took the taliban out of afghanistan. The iraqi government is sounding more and more like a terrorist cell every day. In fact, they probably are...

When a country like iraq basically laughs at the US, when we're on the verge of war with every thing we've got aimed at them, they're just asking to get their @$$es kicked...

peterjhill
Feb 2, 2003, 06:10 AM
Originally posted by G4scott
We already know that al queida and the taliban have no regard for human life, along with other terrorists and religious extremists

Hey, my parents are religious extremists (Church of Christ) and they have a regard for human life. People can have extreme religious views, and not be "crazy"
Sadaam is, I believe, an Athiest. G4scott, I totally respect you, but your lumping alot of people together with your comment. I am sure that you meant well by your post, this is not a flame, I am just being a bit oversensitive.

Sol
Feb 2, 2003, 11:02 AM
So what would God be saying to you with this? The first eye-witness reports came from Palestine which is a surprise because most of us did not know that there is one in America too. When accidents happen you read into them what you chose. Personally I think God is a creative force, not a destructive one. People are most likely to blame for this loss of life.

iShater
Feb 2, 2003, 12:00 PM
Originally posted by G4scott


I just knew some ******** son of a b*tch mother raping bastard would say something like that. Not you, hitman, but the stupid freakin iraqui's... We already know that al queida and the taliban have no regard for human life, along with other terrorists and religious extremists, but when the government of a country is happy because of the death of 6 Americans and 1 Israeli, that's just sick. That's why we took the taliban out of afghanistan. The iraqi government is sounding more and more like a terrorist cell every day. In fact, they probably are...

When a country like iraq basically laughs at the US, when we're on the verge of war with every thing we've got aimed at them, they're just asking to get their @$$es kicked...

A government worker said that, not the Iraqi government or a representative of the Iraqi government.

job
Feb 2, 2003, 12:50 PM
Originally posted by iShater
A government worker said that, not the Iraqi government or a representative of the Iraqi government.

Still, it is vaugly reminiscent of the Palestinians cheering in the streets when the towers went down.

Oh, btw Sol, I knew there was a Palestine in Texas. In fact, I've been there before.

GeneR
Feb 2, 2003, 02:49 PM
Originally posted by Sol
So what would God be saying to you with this? The first eye-witness reports came from Palestine which is a surprise because most of us did not know that there is one in America too. When accidents happen you read into them what you chose. Personally I think God is a creative force, not a destructive one. People are most likely to blame for this loss of life.

I also believe that God is a creative force and not a destructive force.

I also believe that God is more than just a creative force but a greater soul than I could imagine (whose presence may be seen as a force).

Personally, I believe in God and in Christ. I also believe that there is a bigger picture than what we are looking at, which we may not understand right now, but which may reveal itself in time.

Anyway, that's what I believe. I hope I didn't offend anyone by sharing. :D

iShater
Feb 3, 2003, 01:35 PM
Originally posted by hitman


Still, it is vaugly reminiscent of the Palestinians cheering in the streets when the towers went down.

Oh, btw Sol, I knew there was a Palestine in Texas. In fact, I've been there before.

Actually most of the videos shown of them celebrating was old footage from "libraries". You can't take what a handful of people do as an indication of an entire people, regardless of the reason they celebrated (i.e. political, emotional, no clue what really happend, etc.)

wdlove
Feb 3, 2003, 04:30 PM
Originally posted by GeneR


I also believe that God is a creative force and not a destructive force.

I also believe that God is more than just a creative force but a greater soul than I could imagine (whose presence may be seen as a force).

Personally, I believe in God and in Christ. I also believe that there is a bigger picture than what we are looking at, which we may not understand right now, but which may reveal itself in time.

Anyway, that's what I believe. I hope I didn't offend anyone by sharing. :D

Thank you for sharing. :) I also believe in God & Jesus Christ. Not even the son knows, but the Father alone. Christ came to make the word flesh. Not until our death or Christ's second coming will we have a full understanding.

Doctor Q
Feb 3, 2003, 05:42 PM
The shuttle's heat tiles are certainly a leading suspect since the failure happened at the point of maximum temperature (3000 degrees Fahrenheit). They say that they routinely examine the tiles after each mission and remove any that need replacing. So the tiles can withstand the pressure and temperature of atmosphere reentry but the maintenance guy can take one off and put a new one in. Just how are they attached/detached?

Chisholm
Feb 3, 2003, 07:32 PM
Originally posted by Doctor Q
The shuttle's heat tiles are certainly a leading suspect since the failure happened at the point of maximum temperature (3000 degrees Fahrenheit). They say that they routinely examine the tiles after each mission and remove any that need replacing. So the tiles can withstand the pressure and temperature of atmosphere reentry but the maintenance guy can take one off and put a new one in. Just how are they attached/detached?

Through a special chemical process involving cherry koolaid and some secret stuff. :p

I read the tiles are each made especially for where they are placed and there are 32,000 of the little buggers. Repair in space would be impossible. I think the chemical process for applying them would be affected by zero gravity.

Wouldn't you think there would be a more sophisticated way to protect the shuttle? Like with those pot holders you can buy on tv made of "space age material."

Man, I hate to admit it, but I cried myself to sleep Saturday night. One of my uncles is a retired aerospace engineer from NASA in Huntsville, AL. He helped design stuff for the first 3 shuttles. And I went to my mom's house and found my Columbia/747 model still in the box. Creapy man.

oh well, thanks for listening.

cheers
john

MacBandit
Feb 4, 2003, 12:37 AM
Originally posted by Chisholm


Through a special chemical process involving cherry koolaid and some secret stuff. :p

I read the tiles are each made especially for where they are placed and there are 32,000 of the little buggers. Repair in space would be impossible. I think the chemical process for applying them would be affected by zero gravity.

Wouldn't you think there would be a more sophisticated way to protect the shuttle? Like with those pot holders you can buy on tv made of "space age material."

Man, I hate to admit it, but I cried myself to sleep Saturday night. One of my uncles is a retired aerospace engineer from NASA in Huntsville, AL. He helped design stuff for the first 3 shuttles. And I went to my mom's house and found my Columbia/747 model still in the box. Creapy man.

oh well, thanks for listening.

cheers
john

I have the exact same model still in the box unassembled. It was a very sad day.

mymemory
Feb 4, 2003, 12:28 PM
Originally posted by Doctor Q
The shuttle's heat tiles are certainly a leading suspect since the failure happened at the point of maximum temperature (3000 degrees Fahrenheit). They say that they routinely examine the tiles after each mission and remove any that need replacing. So the tiles can withstand the pressure and temperature of atmosphere reentry but the maintenance guy can take one off and put a new one in. Just how are they attached/detached?

As far as I know they change all the tiles every mission.

wdlove
Feb 4, 2003, 02:05 PM
I watched the "Memorial For Columbia Crew" live from Johnson Space Center, Houton, TX. A sad & teary time. The comic relief came with remarks fom the Chief Astronaut, told anecdotes about each of the crew on Columbia.

MacBandit
Feb 5, 2003, 12:48 AM
Originally posted by mymemory


As far as I know they change all the tiles every mission.

They only replace ones that don't meet spec. The examine every tile after every mission with a laser scanner.

peterjhill
Feb 5, 2003, 05:21 AM
I have been pretty obsessed with the shuttle lately, lets see, I have downloaded a bunch of columbia pictures (particularly sts-1 pics) and have them rotating on my desktop. I just bought the excellent book, "Space Shuttle: The First 20 Years -- The Astronauts' Experiences in Their Own Words" from Amazon. I found the postcard of the Enterprise and my tickets from my tour of Kennedy SC from July of 1979. I actually got to ride a bus along the shuttle runway as part of the tour. It is also cool to see the old launch pads and Saturn V rocket parts. Plus the crawlers and the VAB.

My wife is going away for a week to SanFran on vacation, she says that when she comes back, she does not want to find me sculpting an orbiter out of mashed potatoes on the kitchen table when she returns.

MacBandit
Feb 5, 2003, 10:32 AM
Originally posted by peterjhill
I have been pretty obsessed with the shuttle lately, lets see, I have downloaded a bunch of columbia pictures (particularly sts-1 pics) and have them rotating on my desktop. I just bought the excellent book, "Space Shuttle: The First 20 Years -- The Astronauts' Experiences in Their Own Words" from Amazon. I found the postcard of the Enterprise and my tickets from my tour of Kennedy SC from July of 1979. I actually got to ride a bus along the shuttle runway as part of the tour. It is also cool to see the old launch pads and Saturn V rocket parts. Plus the crawlers and the VAB.

My wife is going away for a week to SanFran on vacation, she says that when she comes back, she does not want to find me sculpting an orbiter out of mashed potatoes on the kitchen table when she returns.

I took a tour of Cape Canaveral here a few years ago and I must say being next to a crawler is truley awesome. You have no idea how huge they are unless you see on in person. Everthing at NASA is bigger then your imagination. They even have an Apollo Moon rocket on it's side contained in a very big museum with each section slightly separated for demonstration purposes.

Doctor Q
Feb 6, 2003, 12:46 AM
I've had a similar experience at the Cape. In contrast, I also saw a Gemini capsule at the Johnson Space Center outside of Houston. Talk about claustrophia! Last December when I got to sit in the driver's seat of a Rose Parade float for a few seconds (I was helping decorate the float) I had the same "get me out of here" feeling as when I saw that little capsule. The shuttles are obviously still dangerous, but at least the astronauts travel in relative style thesedays.

MacBandit
Feb 6, 2003, 01:17 AM
Originally posted by Doctor Q
I've had a similar experience at the Cape. In contrast, I also saw a Gemini capsule at the Johnson Space Center outside of Houston. Talk about claustrophia! Last December when I got to sit in the driver's seat of a Rose Parade float for a few seconds (I was helping decorate the float) I had the same "get me out of here" feeling as when I saw that little capsule. The shuttles are obviously still dangerous, but at least the astronauts travel in relative style thesedays.

I've sat in capsules at a couple locations. There seems to be mock ups at any large science museum you visit. Also the Boeing Museum in Seattle has an original Apollo capsule and moon rover.