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View Full Version : Is Bootcamp a bad idea?




sam10685
Apr 5, 2006, 12:22 PM
this boot camp thing might seem like a good idea now (u'll get to play PC games and it'll be easier to transfer data between home and work/school), but it's just going to make the mac computer as susceptible to spyware and viruses and stuff like that...



emw
Apr 5, 2006, 12:27 PM
Technically speaking, it's still just the XP OS that is susceptible to viruses, etc. I would think that a properly partitioned installation, as well as normal security procedures on the XP box, will be sufficient.

I imagine that most people running Boot Camp will be educated users, not people who have no idea what they're doing.

calebjohnston
Apr 5, 2006, 12:30 PM
Just don't use Windows to do anything that might be considered "sketchy". Avoid strange websites, etc. If you must, do it on OS X.

sam10685
Apr 5, 2006, 12:37 PM
I imagine that most people running Boot Camp will be educated users, not people who have no idea what they're doing.

i see what ur saying here... but i have to say-- i completely dissagree with u on this one. i think lots of people that use boot camp will be un-educated computer users that don't want to deal with change to a different OS user interface but also made the switch to mac because they are tired of dealing with windows problems. i think they will believe that since they are on a mac, that they'll still be just as protected.

Just don't use Windows to do anything that might be considered "sketchy". Avoid strange websites, etc. If you must, do it on OS X.

on windows, u can't avoid strange websites without shelling out more money for a pop-up blocker and/or a spyware protection program.

xparaparafreakx
Apr 5, 2006, 01:27 PM
XP on mac is a great thing. I can't wait til May when I show XP on macbookpro to those *itchs that have their graduation presents.

IJ Reilly
Apr 5, 2006, 01:35 PM
I imagine that most people running Boot Camp will be educated users, not people who have no idea what they're doing.

Unlike most users of XP? ;)

keithbennis
Apr 5, 2006, 01:37 PM
Bad idea.

emw
Apr 5, 2006, 01:41 PM
i see what ur saying here... but i have to say-- i completely dissagree with u on this one. i think lots of people that use boot camp will be un-educated computer users that don't want to deal with change to a different OS user interface but also made the switch to mac because they are tired of dealing with windows problems. i think they will believe that since they are on a mac, that they'll still be just as protected.You honestly believe that the majority of users will be those that are sick of problems on Windows, go out, buy a Mac, install Boot Camp, buy a copy of Windows, install it, and subsequently run it as though it's just another Windows machine? I'd bet that these people won't even know what the hell "Boot Camp" is except for the obvious military link.

If they're truly so naive as to believe Windows on a Mac is going to be inherently safer than Windows on a Dell or some other manufacturer's box, then I say they get what they deserve. They're morons.

Having Boot Camp is a fantastic tool for those of us who want to occasionally run Windows applications (at full speed, rather than VPC emulation or something) or test Windows development or games or something else that requires occasional use of an XP environment without investing in an entire system.

princealfie
Apr 5, 2006, 01:44 PM
I have mixed feeling about the whole thing. Think only games and SAS...

Le Big Mac
Apr 5, 2006, 01:49 PM
You honestly believe that the majority of users will be those that are sick of problems on Windows, go out, buy a Mac, install Boot Camp, buy a copy of Windows, install it, and subsequently run it as though it's just another Windows machine? I'd bet that these people won't even know what the hell "Boot Camp" is except for the obvious military link.

If they're truly so naive as to believe Windows on a Mac is going to be inherently safer than Windows on a Dell or some other manufacturer's box, then I say they get what they deserve. They're morons.

Having Boot Camp is a fantastic tool for those of us who want to occasionally run Windows applications (at full speed, rather than VPC emulation or something) or test Windows development or games or something else that requires occasional use of an XP environment without investing in an entire system.

I think there will be some, and it will be useful for marketing purposes to Apple. Like the Mac Mini--bring your own keyboard, monitor, and windows/windows software. If done right, though, everyone will realize why bother with the windows stuff.

mkrishnan
Apr 5, 2006, 01:51 PM
Just don't use Windows to do anything that might be considered "sketchy". Avoid strange websites, etc. If you must, do it on OS X.

:D Just like the David Chapelle Sketch (http://www.jokaroo.com/funnyvideos/chappellemacskit.html). :D

deeter123
Apr 5, 2006, 02:19 PM
It's bad in the fact that I may never leave my house again. I've already effectively stopped watching TV excpet for M*A*S*H and adult swim, because, well, I'd rather be using my computer. Since I've fasted on games for a year and a half, or so since I switched to mac, I may just overindulge... a little. Rome: Total War HERE I COME!!! Counter Strike! Call of Duty!! (couldn't run that very well on a mac mini).... this could be bad... very bad.

I guess I should point out I just got a MBP, so you all don't think I'm doing this with my old mac mini.

baleensavage
Apr 5, 2006, 02:22 PM
I personally am very hesitant about seeing this as a good thing. My biggest concern is that any software developers who were on the fence about offering their software on a Mac will now just say, they can run windows so why bother with the mac version. AND Apple better have a good deal going with Microsoft, because if this causes Microsoft to kill Office for Mac, that could very well kill Mac OS. One thing's for sure, there never will be an AutoCAD or other comparable software for Mac OS and games on Mac OS will probably also go the way of the dodo.

As for the whole security thing, Apple better have some type of security setup in Leopard, because, while a Windows virus shouldn't technically be able to directly mess with files on an hfs volume, a Windows virus could be written that will reformat the partition that contains Mac OS.

Maybe 10.5 is actually Vista in disguise, yikes, now that's a scary thought.

Demon Hunter
Apr 5, 2006, 02:28 PM
I don't like it. It will work, but right now it's uncomfortable.

Maybe a little scary.

What next?

EDIT: I'm not sure I really care, it was inevitable. At least Apple has an official position now, and the hackers can find something else to do.

baleensavage
Apr 5, 2006, 02:33 PM
What next?
Exactly what I am wondering, first Intel, now Windows, what is next. The possibilites are really scary.

BTW I love you signature. I too wish they'd make Hypercard 3. Hypercard was such a cool app.

sam10685
Apr 5, 2006, 03:47 PM
You honestly believe that the majority of users will be those that are sick of problems on Windows, go out, buy a Mac, install Boot Camp, buy a copy of Windows, install it, and subsequently run it as though it's just another Windows machine? I'd bet that these people won't even know what the hell "Boot Camp" is except for the obvious military link.

If they're truly so naive as to believe Windows on a Mac is going to be inherently safer than Windows on a Dell or some other manufacturer's box, then I say they get what they deserve. They're morons.

Having Boot Camp is a fantastic tool for those of us who want to occasionally run Windows applications (at full speed, rather than VPC emulation or something) or test Windows development or games or something else that requires occasional use of an XP environment without investing in an entire system.

i do however agree with u on these statements... i think some people will go through all the trouble of getting a mac just to run windows. not many though. and ur right... they are DUMB if they do that. boot camp is probably a great marketing thing for Apple but it still seems stupid... most people, (like me), switch to Mac because they are sick and tired of windows.

CanadaRAM
Apr 5, 2006, 03:52 PM
i do however agree with u on these statements... i think some people will go through all the trouble of getting a mac just to run windows. not many though. and ur right... they are DUMB if they do that. boot camp is probably a great marketing thing for Apple but it still seems stupid... most people, (like me), switch to Mac because they are sick and tired of windows.
Well, y'all have the choice, you know...

crazycat
Apr 5, 2006, 03:52 PM
I am very happy with bootcamp, it enables people who needs to use windows to do so and people who do not need windows have the option not to use it. There are some websites that i need to upload files to that requires Internet Explorer 6, sometimes i would like to do something that i cant on a mac now idont need a PC.

helicine
Apr 5, 2006, 03:53 PM
on windows, u can't avoid strange websites without shelling out more money for a pop-up blocker and/or a spyware protection program.

that is completely false - Firefox is free, so are Spybot S&D, AdAware SE (personal edition) and if you really need it Windows Defender (formerly MS AntiSpyware / Giant AntiSpyware)

moreso, using a little common sense keeps you from "strange" websites. if you go looking for porn or warez (esp w/ MSIE), then you find yourself more susceptible.

boot camp is great for me, being a mac user at heart but working doing windows support & administration, this will keep me from having to grab a PC laptop for the few things that I can't do w/ remote desktop

mkrishnan
Apr 5, 2006, 04:31 PM
that is completely false - Firefox is free, so are Spybot S&D, AdAware SE (personal edition) and if you really need it Windows Defender

You scarcely even need the latter three, if you use FF, common sense, and a firewall (which is now a standard part of XP/SP2, right?), anyway. :)

mjstew33
Apr 5, 2006, 04:47 PM
No, not really.

Apple is just giving you options, you don't have to do it.

the_insider
Apr 5, 2006, 05:54 PM
:mad:

i was running bootcamp smoothly, following the directions religiously... it told me to install XP on exclusivly on the C: partion, and nowhere else. So I did, it begain formatting the drive, and installing the setup files. Then, it automatically restarted to boot up windows and begin the setup. But instead of just booting up in windows, it started up again, asking me what partion to install to.....AGAIN. So i did this about twice, and gave up trying. So I shut down the computer, and held down the mouse button in eject the cd. I once again shut down the imac, and proceeded to turn it on again, to find a windows screen informing me that there is nothing to boot from. I begain to freak out, and i restarted the computer, this time holding down the option key, to switch back to osx, but all that was availiable was the cd drive. I had to reformat my HD, and reinstall OSX. This sucks,:mad:

Gm7Cadd9
Apr 5, 2006, 06:14 PM
I would like to consider myself pretty tech savvy, but I just had the SAME issue was the _insider... twice now, no bootable volumes had to re-install OS X, and then update BACK to 10.4.6.... which took quite a while, then the second time around I read the instructions VERY carefully and wasted another 2 hours doing the same thing, I am now reinstalling OS X as we speak, what are we doing wrong??!? help?


-Roy

jtfolden
Apr 5, 2006, 06:26 PM
I personally am very hesitant about seeing this as a good thing. My biggest concern is that any software developers who were on the fence about offering their software on a Mac will now just say, they can run windows so why bother with the mac version.



I completely agree and don't think this won't happen in many instances. This is exactly what killed native app support for IBM's OS/2 a good 10-14 years ago. It ran Windows apps so well that developers just told many customers to run their Windows versions. Apple had better be very careful how easy they make this.

Dreamail
Apr 5, 2006, 06:49 PM
I personally am very hesitant about seeing this as a good thing.
There has been a lot of talk about virtualisation made possible with Intel's upcoming chipsets. The idea is to run several OSs at the same time, without having to reboot.

Perhaps this is a very tricky feature to get right and hence Boot Camp was released now simply to get a number of free beta testers for this feature before the official OS X 10.5 release. Sure Boot Camp doesn't do virtualisation yet, but even with virtualisation a full copy of Windows must be installed somewhere. Boot Camp covers that part of the process.

A while ago Apple filed a patent which allowed a user to specify which OS is the primary OS. With virtualisation it is possible that Mac OS X could be specified as the primary OS, yet still able to run Windows apps as well, inside OS X.

And there are also rumors of a revived 'Yellow Box', i.e. the Mac OS X APIs for Windows. Or in other words a user would be able to specify Windows as the primary OS and still be able to run Mac OS X applications inside Windows.

Could it be that Apple will allow either way in OS X 10.5? Run both OS X or Windows apps from either inside OS X or Windows? In effect pushing applications into the limelight rather than the OS?

Could Apple be so desperate that after so many years stuck with 3-4% market share they simply say 'what the heck, let's try this'?

Maybe Steve Jobs is bold enough to officially bury the OS, be it Mac OS X or Windows, making applications key again. Could this be the dawn of a new era in computing?
Maybe we cling too much to a specific OS?

ifjake
Apr 5, 2006, 07:02 PM
Apple has to have a few very compelling reasons for developers to continue making apps for Mac OS X. At first I thought people would jump on CoreImage and other niceties that Apple introduced in Tiger, but it seems that only Apple software has really taken advantage of it. I think it's great that you can officially and easily dual boot on an Apple machine, I'm just afraid of the possibility someday that when you boot up Mac OS, the only software you'll find there is made by Apple. I'll be curious to see what the developer's conference this summer brings. I would like to be able to stay in Mac OS as much as possible, leaving Windows for only that one or two apps (and the occational game).