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Blue Velvet
May 10, 2006, 04:23 PM
...this two-pronged approach has given Apple a huge lead over competitors; so far the company has sold over 40 million iPods and more than a billion songs on iTunes. But the iPod's days at the top may be numbered.



http://www.smartmoney.com/10things/index.cfm?story=june2006


.



dejo
May 10, 2006, 04:28 PM
10. "Once you go iPod, you're locked in for life."
One of the reasons Apple has been able to dominate the digital music player market until now is that while the iPod can play songs from a variety of sources, music bought online at the iTunes store can be used only on an iPod. That's because the company developed its own format for songs, called Protected AAC, instead of using the widely compatible MP3. Crotty points out that while basic AAC is an open format, the digital rights management software Apple lays over it called, ahem, "Fair Play" renders it incompatible with other players. No other company is legally allowed to make a device that can play songs in Apple's format.

Yeah, because all the other online music stores are selling tunes in MP3 format...NOT!

iSaint
May 10, 2006, 04:36 PM
Nothing I didn't already know.... :rolleyes:

FoxyKaye
May 10, 2006, 04:58 PM
Seems like a lot of hype on top of a set of facts that could apply to almost any portable music player, pair of sneakers, or cell phone. Yeah, Apple's proprietary DRM and paranoia sucks, but hey, that's why FairPlay and JHymn exist. For that matter, any version of iTunes will play AAC on either a PC or Mac, and you can down-convert non-protected AAC to MP3.

As for the rest:

* Customer service is a priviledge, not a right. Well, they're closer to right than wrong on this one, though if the rate at which new iPods were being re-issued the last time I was at a "Genius Bar" is any indication, all I really need to do to get my iPod replaced is demonstrate general incompetence in its operation.

* If you drop me, I'm toast. Anyone here ever dropped their Walkman or portable CD player? Last time I did this with one of these two items, they shattered into pieces. I also managed to drop and break a demo Creative Zen player at Best Buy. Electronics, if dropped, will break.

* My battery life is pathetic. Yeah, and rechargable batteries across the board suffer from this.

* I'm destroying your hearing. What? I didn't catch that? Can you say it again? Please, what a bunch of nonsense - this is true for all portable music players. I'm personally still waiting for that class action suit against Sony for destroying my hearing with a Walkman back in the 1980s.

* I'm out of date before I'm out of the box. As are all consumer electronics.

* I've sparked a crime wave. Please - the same could be said about Nike, Addidas, and half a dozen other clothing and electronics manufacturers. People want other people's stuff, and sometimes they'll mug you for it. What's the news here?

* We'll nickel and dime you any chance we get. So does Verizon. So does AT&T. So does Dell. So does Sony. So does Enron. So does ExxonMobil. It's called capitalism.

I'm sorry, journalistic stupidity for the sake of posting content just pisses me off.

Felldownthewell
May 10, 2006, 05:31 PM
I love how the article blames things like DRMs, HDD fragility, and hearing loss entirely on Apple and the Ipod...

11. Ipod May Become Target of Undue Criticism...

bigandy
May 10, 2006, 06:48 PM
and of course, the alternative... give MICROSOFT money.

yeah, right. they can all go collectively shove that where the sun doesn't shine.

journalism, my left ass cheek.

TEG
May 10, 2006, 09:20 PM
Here was my response to the article I sent them...
--------------------
Of each of the 10 points, every one of them, is either misrepresented, or is true for all MP3 Players/Electronic Devices.

10) Protected AAC is sold by Apple. Protected WMA is sold by other companies. AAC is playable on Macs and PCs, WMA is playable only on PCs.

9) The reason for removing the extra accessories that used to be included were the extra costs of the new iPods. By removing the extra accessories, they could continue to charge the same amount. Also, very few people used the included accessories, so people complained about having to pay for something they didn't use.

8) The crime wave is a stupid argument. This is true for Nike, Adidas, Sony, and Puma. Someone wants something, they are doing something to try to get it.

7) Nearly all electronics are obsolete before you open them. This however is not true for the iPod. They have a 6-12 month product cycle, as do all Apple products.

6) The Walkman is the original source of people loosing their hearing. As is Boom-boxes, car stereos, high bass, and parties. iPod is not alone in the blame.

5) Battery life. Again, true of everything that runs on batteries. Even the iPods battery is replaceable, or you can trade your iPod in for one with a fresh battery for $60 at any Apple Store.

4) Although it is not obvious, it is very easy to copy the music from the iPod back to the computer. It is stored in nothing more complicated than a hidden folder. You can change a simple setting in Windows to view it, or you can download a free utility to view the folder. Also there are many freeware and shareware apps online that will download the music with no hassle.

3) The full size iPods are quite resilient when it comes to accidental dropping. The nano and shuffle use flash memory and therefore don't have the problem of hard drive damage. Also, other electronics when dropped will shatter into thousands of pieces, the iPod stays in one piece.

2) The 90-day phone support is only used by people who have done something they shouldn't have done to their iPod. If after 90 days you have a hardware problem, and they need to repair or replace the iPod the phone call will be free. Plus the $59 for the extended warranty is a bargain compared to other MP3 players.

1) While the point is somewhat valid, no other Music Store makes money, and the iPod price ranges from $60 to $400. It works on nearly every system, something that is not true for any other store. Apple IS the open standard, plus AAC is an industry standard, WMA is a proprietary format that Microsoft charges huge royalties for people to use, and be able to play.

I truly hope that in the future, you and your writers actually do some reasearch before publishing such lies in an article.

Cheers,
Thomas Gill
Editor in Chief
"The Technician" - Kettering University
----------------
TEG

Pistol Pete
May 10, 2006, 09:33 PM
* I'm destroying your hearing. What? I didn't catch that? Can you say it again? Please, what a bunch of nonsense - this is true for all portable music players. I'm personally still waiting for that class action suit against Sony for destroying my hearing with a Walkman back in the 1980s.


you are joking right?

EricNau
May 10, 2006, 09:35 PM
I hate articles like this. They are full of a bunch of rubbish and people believe them.

Blue Velvet
May 10, 2006, 11:29 PM
I hate articles like this. They are full of a bunch of rubbish and people believe them.

Actually, a lot of it is true... don't be a fan-boy.

Felldownthewell
May 10, 2006, 11:32 PM
Actually, a lot of it is true... don't be a fan-boy.

Yes, a lot of it is true, but not only for ipods. This is more of a list of MP3 player problems in general, and I think that it is unfairly targeting ipods.


I just read that again and I realized that I was arguing for the rights of a consumer electronic. Maybe I should get more sleep.

CaptainCaveMann
May 11, 2006, 12:30 AM
Seems like a lot of hype on top of a set of facts that could apply to almost any portable music player, pair of sneakers, or cell phone. Yeah, Apple's proprietary DRM and paranoia sucks, but hey, that's why FairPlay and JHymn exist. For that matter, any version of iTunes will play AAC on either a PC or Mac, and you can down-convert non-protected AAC to MP3.

As for the rest:

* Customer service is a priviledge, not a right. Well, they're closer to right than wrong on this one, though if the rate at which new iPods were being re-issued the last time I was at a "Genius Bar" is any indication, all I really need to do to get my iPod replaced is demonstrate general incompetence in its operation.

* If you drop me, I'm toast. Anyone here ever dropped their Walkman or portable CD player? Last time I did this with one of these two items, they shattered into pieces. I also managed to drop and break a demo Creative Zen player at Best Buy. Electronics, if dropped, will break.

* My battery life is pathetic. Yeah, and rechargable batteries across the board suffer from this.

* I'm destroying your hearing. What? I didn't catch that? Can you say it again? Please, what a bunch of nonsense - this is true for all portable music players. I'm personally still waiting for that class action suit against Sony for destroying my hearing with a Walkman back in the 1980s.

* I'm out of date before I'm out of the box. As are all consumer electronics.

* I've sparked a crime wave. Please - the same could be said about Nike, Addidas, and half a dozen other clothing and electronics manufacturers. People want other people's stuff, and sometimes they'll mug you for it. What's the news here?

* We'll nickel and dime you any chance we get. So does Verizon. So does AT&T. So does Dell. So does Sony. So does Enron. So does ExxonMobil. It's called capitalism.

I'm sorry, journalistic stupidity for the sake of posting content just pisses me off.

Well said.. ::walks back into cave::

EricNau
May 11, 2006, 01:30 AM
Actually, a lot of it is true... don't be a fan-boy.
OK, yes it may be "true," but like Felldownthewell said, it's not true that these are problems that are unique to iPods. Plus, the article is extremely biased (and like any biased article, it cannot be trusted).

LastLine
May 11, 2006, 03:05 AM
10. "Once you go iPod, you're locked in for life."
One of the reasons Apple has been able to dominate the digital music player market until now is that while the iPod can play songs from a variety of sources, music bought online at the iTunes store can be used only on an iPod. That's because the company developed its own format for songs, called Protected AAC, instead of using the widely compatible MP3. Crotty points out that while basic AAC is an open format, the digital rights management software Apple lays over it called, ahem, "Fair Play" renders it incompatible with other players. No other company is legally allowed to make a device that can play songs in Apple's format.
Nonsense really this, there are means and ways to change the AAC files to MP3 that can be used on another player if you really want to. Dubious legality, but easy done.

virividox
May 11, 2006, 09:13 AM
the writter probably doesnt have an ipod :)

Sharewaredemon
May 11, 2006, 09:21 AM
TEG please post the reply you get if you get one about your email you sent to the author of this article.

I'm curious to see what he says.

ToastMaster
May 11, 2006, 08:49 PM
Meh. I've seen dozens of articles like this. It just seems that people can't stand Apple's unprecedented success in the music department, so they'll try and tear them down whenever they can.

donga
May 12, 2006, 01:11 AM
someone's gotta stop drinking the haterade

virividox
May 12, 2006, 01:14 AM
never saw an artilce that said 1 million things windows xp doesnt tell you