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davisjw
Aug 26, 2006, 08:57 PM
Hey,

Taking my first programming course in Java and got the textbook today (Java How to Program). The problem is the course is sadly targeted towards the Windows community and I really don't want to get a Windows computer so I can work on my projects at home. The book came with a CD that includes the software we'll need which are: BlueJ, jGRASP, jEdit, JCreator LE, NetBeans IDE, MySQL, MySQL Connector/ J, Apache Tomcat and JDK. About half of them are Linux usable which I can always download Linux I suppose but are there any alternatives to these so I can just use OSX and my teacher would still accept them or am I screwed? The examples are all based around those programs just as a side note. Thanks very much for your time!!



bobber205
Aug 26, 2006, 09:04 PM
BlueJ is for mac too and it's highly recommend. And it's not too hard (read: I can do it) to complie with Terminal.

Jump in!

jsw
Aug 26, 2006, 09:08 PM
I write Java code professionally on a Mac. There is no obstacle to creating any of the code you'll need. Apache (HTTP Server, Tomcat, etc.) is all open source and available for OS X (in fact, the HTTP server is already on your Mac) and so are many of the other apps you mentioned. Eclipse (http://www.eclipse.org/) is an excellent free development environment - you don't need to use Terminal.

Basically, the only issues you'll have will be if the course provides project files for IDEs you can't run, but all of the Java files and apps you'll need to create can be created on the Mac.

Given that one of the main strengths of Java is its platform independence, and given the strength of Eclipse, I find it appalling that the course would be Windows (or any specific platform) centric.

VanMac
Aug 26, 2006, 09:09 PM
Hey.

You dont need any windows specific software to learn Java, or do your course.

DL the latest JDK and docs from sun:
http://java.sun.com

For an IDE, you can use Eclipse (most developers in the industry use this)
www.eclipse.org

Also, most OpenSource databases(MySQL, etc) have a version for OSX

Enjoy your coding. Java is a great language to learn(will certainly help land you a job in your future).

davisjw
Aug 26, 2006, 09:42 PM
Thanks all for your replies! So to break up the programs to see what will and wont work with OSX and what an alternative is to those that don't work:

BlueJ- Mac usable (though didn't see it on their site, might of missed something)

jGrasp

jEdit

JCreator LE

NetBeans IDE- use Eclipse?

MySQL- Mac

MySQL Connector/ J- Mac?

Apache Tomcat- Mac usable

JDK- Mac

Stupid question but what is the HTTP, what is that the replacements of on the list? Sorry really just a beginner in terms of programming Java (or most languages to be truthful)

How about the others without any next to it? Sorry for the newbie questions just a wandering computer user looking to delve into programming... :)

Thanks for your time and help!!! I'll bring my iBook into class proudly!!!! PS Will me using other programs have any effect when I turn in my projects?

VanMac
Aug 26, 2006, 09:50 PM
Hey.

Your first 4 tools in your list are just Java IDE / Editors.

You should be able to use any IDE or Editer to complete your projects and assignments. You will be graded likely on your Java source code, so it should not matter what editor you use.

HTTP stands for Hyper Text Transfrer Protocol.

Dont get too caught up in the tools. Start using the language, writing some simple programs, and playing around with things. Enjoy it.

davisjw
Aug 26, 2006, 09:57 PM
Sweet alright so really there's no worries most excellant!! Thanks for everyone's help! I guess I was just looking in the wrong places!!

davisjw
Aug 26, 2006, 10:13 PM
Ok well for some reason it wont let me edit my past post but call me dumb- i can't find a way to download Tomcat.. It says Windows and Unix.. Any help please? I guess I'm not done bugging you all yet!

Edit: Call me dumber because the JDK I only see using almost every other operating system but OS... What am I missing here because obviously it's something right under my nose.. *sigh*

jsw
Aug 26, 2006, 10:17 PM
Ok well for some reason it wont let me edit my past post but call me dumb- i can't find a way to download Tomcat.. It says Windows and Unix.. Any help please? I guess I'm not done bugging you all yet!
Get the UNIX version - it'll build on your Mac just fine.

See here (http://mamamusings.net/archives/2004/04/28/installing_tomcat_5_on_os_x.php) for more instructions (it's a bit old but, I think, still valid). :)

prostuff1
Aug 26, 2006, 10:18 PM
Like the others have said using your mac for java programming should not be a problem.

I had my first java course in spring quarter at OSU and technically they did not "support" mac's but they were smart enough to use an IDE that can be had on all platforms. We used eclipse to do all of our programms. I almost always did my work form my laptop then went to the lab to submit it. Work really well.

davisjw
Aug 26, 2006, 10:33 PM
Thanks a bunch for those quick replies! I'll attempt to download the Tomcat tomorrow when I'm more awake.. Is there any alternatives to Tomcat that'll be better for the Mac?

Any thing on the JDK problem? prostuff1 what were you using? Thanks all!!!!

x704
Aug 26, 2006, 11:07 PM
I think the JDK is updated in your software update program. I downloaded netbeans 4.1 and did not have to download anything else because the JDK is included on my mac. I believe the current JDK version is 1.5.

bousozoku
Aug 26, 2006, 11:35 PM
I think the JDK is updated in your software update program. I downloaded netbeans 4.1 and did not have to download anything else because the JDK is included on my mac. I believe the current JDK version is 1.5.

Actually, there should be three different JDKs and JVMs on a Mac running Tiger: 1.3.x, 1.4.x, and 1.5.x. 1.6.x is close to being available.

NetBeans is a great environment, especially when you need to create GUI items. Why download version 4.1 instead of 5.0?

I use NetBeans, jGrasp, and a few other tools. I've never found one set of tools or one IDE to handle everything well--at least, not for Java.

davisjw
Aug 27, 2006, 01:07 AM
Where are they? I see some Java tools under the Xcode application, what are those?

Eraserhead
Aug 27, 2006, 06:43 AM
Where are they? I see some Java tools under the Xcode application, what are those?

First you will need a free developer account (http://developer.apple.com/membership/) on Apple.com, then log into the account, and click on downloads, then on Java on the right hand side and download the latest version of Java for developers. (currently, Java SE 6.0 Release 1 Developer Preview 5)

I will link to the download page for all the programs you need and their Mac versions.

BlueJ (http://www.bluej.org/download/download.html)

jGrasp (http://spider.eng.auburn.edu/user-cgi/grasp/grasp.pl?;dl=download_jgrasp.html)

jEdit (http://www.jedit.org/index.php?page=download)

JCreator is Windows Only :(

Netbeans (http://www.netbeans.info/downloads/download.php?type=5.0)

MySQL Information (http://developer.apple.com/internet/opensource/osdb.html)

Java, Tomcat and MySQL Information (http://developer.apple.com/internet/java/tomcat1.html)

I'm not too sure about setting up Mysql as I've never used it, ask your lecturers if needed... As others have mentioned they prefer Eclipse (http://www.eclipse.org/downloads/) (and I agree) to Netbeans but if they do the course in Netbeans use that.

I suspect they are giving you all the programs at the top as they want you to choose which IDE you like best, they only give Windows applications as it's harder to set-up Java for windows and it's the most common platform.

Generally you don't do Java in Xcode as Xcode doesn't produce Javadoc (http://java.sun.com/j2se/javadoc/writingdoccomments/) documentation (very important), has more annoying auto-complete, and is harder to create targets for.

davisjw
Aug 27, 2006, 11:25 AM
Wow eraserhead that was awesome thank you so much! Solved pretty much all my problems! Only thing left to do is get MySQL to work on the Mac.. Oh the trials of being a Mac user :-)

x704
Aug 27, 2006, 09:42 PM
Actually, there should be three different JDKs and JVMs on a Mac running Tiger: 1.3.x, 1.4.x, and 1.5.x. 1.6.x is close to being available.

NetBeans is a great environment, especially when you need to create GUI items. Why download version 4.1 instead of 5.0?

I use NetBeans, jGrasp, and a few other tools. I've never found one set of tools or one IDE to handle everything well--at least, not for Java.


The reason I have 4.1 is because that is what is avaliable at the time of downloading. On my windows machine I have 3.something on it. On both of them I have not bothered to update mainly because I do not have a high speed internet connection. I also don't like the forum editor for netbeans becasue it is too much like visualBASIC and I don't like VB.

If I had a high speed internet connection I would probably be able to help you more on the web side of programming/database/setup becasue I would be hosting my own website, but not yet.

davisjw
Aug 27, 2006, 10:06 PM
Well the information you posted was great thank you! Think I'm all setup now, I have downloaded the following *let me know if I've missed something*

BlueJ 2.1.3
Eclipse
Java SE 6 Release 1
Jave SE 6 Release 1 Documentation
jEdit
jgraspmac184.pkg.tar (not actually sure what that is/ was for *sent all my stuff to my new Java folder) and when I click on it, it says can't open because the original item can not be found...*
NetBeans
SUNWappserver

Haven't opened most of them up yet, is there anything I need to know prior to playing around with it?

Thank you all again for you help!

bousozoku
Aug 27, 2006, 10:48 PM
...I also don't like the forum editor for netbeans becasue it is too much like visualBASIC and I don't like VB.
...

It's also like Borland Delphi, C++Builder, and JBuilder, if that helps. ;)


...
jgraspmac184.pkg.tar (not actually sure what that is/ was for *sent all my stuff to my new Java folder) and when I click on it, it says can't open because the original item can not be found...*
...

If you have Stuffit Expander installed, you need to open jgraspmac184.pkg.tar one more level. Then, you can double-click jgraspmac184.pkg and it will help install itself into the folder you choose--I suggest /Developer/Applications.

davisjw
Aug 28, 2006, 12:04 AM
Got it straight now thanks! Just downloaded it again :-)

almightyshoe
Aug 28, 2006, 01:43 AM
I'm taking Java at the University also, and all we need is Eclipse, which took me about 3 days to get working.

Eraserhead
Aug 28, 2006, 06:30 AM
I'm taking Java at the University also, and all we need is Eclipse, which took me about 3 days to get working.
You are all lucky at my Uni the only software they suggested was NEdit on Unix, you were given no IDEs at all, (though my Uni still has only got Java 1.2 installed :rolleyes: )

coconn06
Aug 28, 2006, 10:45 AM
Wow eraserhead that was awesome thank you so much! Solved pretty much all my problems! Only thing left to do is get MySQL to work on the Mac.. Oh the trials of being a Mac user :-)

Marc Liyanage's site (http://www.entropy.ch/software/MacOSx/mysql/) has a great tutorial for installing and setting up MySQL (and PHP, etc.) on Mac OS X...I highly recommend it.

bobber205
Aug 28, 2006, 03:39 PM
Don't go to that site.

Get MAMP. All you have to do is specify the home directory for the server so to speak, and press launch server!

There's even a widget!:eek:

NewbieNerd
Aug 28, 2006, 05:46 PM
I just started working about 2 months ago, and I use Eclipse on my iMac at work. I have tried Netbeans simply because it looks so much sexier in Mac OS X, but Eclipse has just seemed to work better for me. In a few weeks/months I may be doing some GUI design, in which case Netbeans is supposed to be very nice.

For a simple Java program, I like to use http://drjava.org. It is very simple. It just allows you to compile and run right within the program. No terminal/CLI stuff, which is good for starting. No autocompletion, none of the crap you have to go through in IDEs just to program (setting up a new Project, blah blah). Keep it simple when beginning.

davisjw
Aug 28, 2006, 09:48 PM
bobber205- she asked for mySQL specifically.. would it matter if i used the one you say to?

newbienerd- can i use this? i'm just curious because i don't know how i'll be turning in my assignments.. i guess i should ask her..

bobber205
Aug 28, 2006, 11:28 PM
bobber205- she asked for mySQL specifically.. would it matter if i used the one you say to?

newbienerd- can i use this? i'm just curious because i don't know how i'll be turning in my assignments.. i guess i should ask her..

No it wouldn't. Go right ahead and use MAMP. It's great. Saves alot of headache (this is especially true from just coming trying to install PHP on a linux distro! :eek: )

NewbieNerd
Aug 29, 2006, 08:29 AM
newbienerd- can i use this? i'm just curious because i don't know how i'll be turning in my assignments.. i guess i should ask her..

Definitely ask, I am almost 100% sure your professor just wants java source code (the .java files you write). Using some advanced program like Eclipse will just put them into package folders (which you won't be using yet) and perhaps other Eclipse-specific junk that has nothing to do with your code.

You can think of DrJava as nothing but a text editor with a compile button, a run button, and a mini-commandline at the bottom for interacting with your program (seeing stuff it outputs, typing stuff in if your program wants it, etc). Other than that, just completely view it as you would TextEdit, but with only .java files.

bousozoku
Aug 29, 2006, 12:10 PM
Definitely ask, I am almost 100% sure your professor just wants java source code (the .java files you write). Using some advanced program like Eclipse will just put them into package folders (which you won't be using yet) and perhaps other Eclipse-specific junk that has nothing to do with your code.

You can think of DrJava as nothing but a text editor with a compile button, a run button, and a mini-commandline at the bottom for interacting with your program (seeing stuff it outputs, typing stuff in if your program wants it, etc). Other than that, just completely view it as you would TextEdit, but with only .java files.

It sounds like jGrasp is much more convenient and powerful than DrJava since jGrasp can automate builds and even build the .jar files, plus it works with Objective-C, C++, Ada, and HTML. Eclipse does a lot but it requires a lot.

davisjw
Aug 29, 2006, 01:30 PM
Yea she said jGrasp is a good starter.. Came up to her after class and asked her about using a Mac and she had a real big problem with it but said it will be alright she'll just have to do some extra steps.. Said not to send and packages or anything like that, just basic source code.. Better then a no! I'll proudly pull out my iBook next class during the lab in a Windows owned area! Oh she also said that if I wanted to continue in the major or minor I'd have to buy a windows since all the classes are windows specific..
Thanks for the tip on MAMP!

bousozoku
Aug 29, 2006, 02:08 PM
Yea she said jGrasp is a good starter.. Came up to her after class and asked her about using a Mac and she had a real big problem with it but said it will be alright she'll just have to do some extra steps.. Said not to send and packages or anything like that, just basic source code.. Better then a no! I'll proudly pull out my iBook next class during the lab in a Windows owned area! Oh she also said that if I wanted to continue in the major or minor I'd have to buy a windows since all the classes are windows specific..
Thanks for the tip on MAMP!

I've moved my Java projects from the Windows version of jGrasp to the Mac version and back without problem.

bobber205
Aug 29, 2006, 04:08 PM
Your teacher is an idiot outright.

Ignore her. There are few things that can't be done in OS X that XP needs to be used for.

If you have the money or maybe down the road, get a macbook. Even a used one and put XP on it.

bousozoku
Aug 29, 2006, 04:29 PM
Your teacher is an idiot outright.

Ignore her. There are few things that can't be done in OS X that XP needs to be used for.

If you have the money or maybe down the road, get a macbook. Even a used one and put XP on it.

Why is the teacher an idiot? According to what I've read, she's not said that Mac OS X can't do what XP can.

I think you're confusing that some classes are Windows-based and that's typical. Many schools do GUI programming with Windows. It's a marketable skill. Choices of classes are not likely up to her anyway.

savar
Aug 30, 2006, 08:17 AM
Why is the teacher an idiot? According to what I've read, she's not said that Mac OS X can't do what XP can.

I think you're confusing that some classes are Windows-based and that's typical. Many schools do GUI programming with Windows. It's a marketable skill. Choices of classes are not likely up to her anyway.

I hate to say this, but college is not trade school. You're not going to learn how to skin VisualBasic applications. You're there to learn...period. A computer science course should teach a theory of ... I dunno ... the science of computing? Laying out buttons and drop-down menus isn't teaching anything. A smart person can figure that out in a few hours of their own time.

In the 21st century, MacOS is built on top of a Unix operating system. Unix is a great OS for learning how to develop. Why a teacher would insist on using only Windows for a class that is in the major is totally beyond me. Windows should be the exception, not the requirement. And in order to make things as fair as possible, teachers should be focusing on teaching concepts that are platform-agnostic.

In my current job I write highly-parallel applications that are designed to process several terabytes of data in a linearly-scalable fashion. The application framework we use to do this (Ab Initio) is not taught in any schools. My company gave me several weeks of training. School could never have prepared me for this particular niche framework, but they did prepare me with knoweldge of algorithms, data structures, and computational theory. I use this knoweldge every day at a fundamental level -- it's like the oil in the machine, without which even the biggest, fanciest engine in the world won't run.

This is an introductory course, right? Why don't they focus on introducing the students to the fundamentals of the science which they will be studying for the next four years? The side effect would be a platform-agnostic course, which I believe all the lower-level courses should be. The only reason I can see to lock students into a particular platform is that you need certain software that is highly specialized and only available on one platform.

The teacher's response to this student's inquiry also concerns me. What extra work does she have to do if a student sends in a file from a Mac instead of Windows? Change the line-endings? I fear that she probably doesn't even know what line-endings are, and will probably chew this poor guy out the first time she tries to compile his source code. And then she will tell him to sell his Mac and buy a PC. Considering the army of Unix/Linux programmers out there, it just boggles my mind that the very first course in a CS curriculum can alienate them totally right off the bat.

<this concludes side 1. please turn the tape over to side 2>

bousozoku
Aug 30, 2006, 08:37 AM
I hate to say this, but college is not trade school. You're not going to learn how to skin VisualBasic applications. You're there to learn...period. A computer science course should teach a theory of ... I dunno ... the science of computing? Laying out buttons and drop-down menus isn't teaching anything. A smart person can figure that out in a few hours of their own time.

In the 21st century, MacOS is built on top of a Unix operating system. Unix is a great OS for learning how to develop. Why a teacher would insist on using only Windows for a class that is in the major is totally beyond me. Windows should be the exception, not the requirement. And in order to make things as fair as possible, teachers should be focusing on teaching concepts that are platform-agnostic.

In my current job I write highly-parallel applications that are designed to process several terabytes of data in a linearly-scalable fashion. The application framework we use to do this (Ab Initio) is not taught in any schools. My company gave me several weeks of training. School could never have prepared me for this particular niche framework, but they did prepare me with knoweldge of algorithms, data structures, and computational theory. I use this knoweldge every day at a fundamental level -- it's like the oil in the machine, without which even the biggest, fanciest engine in the world won't run.

This is an introductory course, right? Why don't they focus on introducing the students to the fundamentals of the science which they will be studying for the next four years? The side effect would be a platform-agnostic course, which I believe all the lower-level courses should be. The only reason I can see to lock students into a particular platform is that you need certain software that is highly specialized and only available on one platform.

The teacher's response to this student's inquiry also concerns me. What extra work does she have to do if a student sends in a file from a Mac instead of Windows? Change the line-endings? I fear that she probably doesn't even know what line-endings are, and will probably chew this poor guy out the first time she tries to compile his source code. And then she will tell him to sell his Mac and buy a PC. Considering the army of Unix/Linux programmers out there, it just boggles my mind that the very first course in a CS curriculum can alienate them totally right off the bat.

<this concludes side 1. please turn the tape over to side 2>

I've yet to see an introductory course in Computer Science that doesn't require some sort of programming. Hard choices apply. They choose a language and they typically choose a platform that is available at the school. It's usually chosen by someone else other than an instructor and instructors are chosen who can fill the requirements. They chose Windows and Java for this one, apparently. The instructor can handle those requirements supposedly. It's not necessary for her to have UNIX or Mac experience, also apparently. It is necessary for her to fulfill the requirements of the course.

It's nice to say that it's not trade school but a large number of programmers graduate from a Computer Science course and stumble through building visual interfaces for software. Software is full of pathetically bad interfaces because smart people didn't know what they were doing and just figured it out. Mac OS X itself has reasonably good design people and programmers to do the rest. Windows and open source software is much less reliable.

It's good that you've found a job that is more directly compatible with your training. Your experience isn't unique but not everyone gets into such a position.

savar
Aug 30, 2006, 11:54 AM
I've yet to see an introductory course in Computer Science that doesn't require some sort of programming. Hard choices apply. They choose a language and they typically choose a platform that is available at the school. It's usually chosen by someone else other than an instructor and instructors are chosen who can fill the requirements. They chose Windows and Java for this one, apparently. The instructor can handle those requirements supposedly. It's not necessary for her to have UNIX or Mac experience, also apparently. It is necessary for her to fulfill the requirements of the course.

It's nice to say that it's not trade school but a large number of programmers graduate from a Computer Science course and stumble through building visual interfaces for software. Software is full of pathetically bad interfaces because smart people didn't know what they were doing and just figured it out. Mac OS X itself has reasonably good design people and programmers to do the rest. Windows and open source software is much less reliable.

It's good that you've found a job that is more directly compatible with your training. Your experience isn't unique but not everyone gets into such a position.

I wasn't implying that there shouldn't be programming in an entry-level course. Quite the opposite, I think you have to program to learn the concepts. Most people who are good developers are also learn-by-doing types of people. I was just saying that locking into a specific platform is bad, and by platform I mean hardware/OS. While Java may or may not be a good language to introduce the fundamentals of computer science, at least it supports the ability for students to work on any of a variety of platforms. (So does C, C++, ML, Python, etc. etc.)

You're quite right that the teacher doesn't always get complete -- or any -- control of the curriculum. But at my school at least, the curriculum was controlled by nobody other than the Department head (who is always a faculty member) and perhaps other members of the faculty. This is a person who is able to shape the entire curriculum, so it makes sense that they impose guidelines on how specific courses should be taught. But this person should also see the bigger picture and focus on continuity through the classes and a progression from fundamentals towards more specialized subjects.

I agree that visual interfaces are often poor, probably for the exact reason you state. But like you say, interfaces should be designed by interface designers -- people who understand the fundamental science of computer interfaces. I think it's a great idea for schools to offer a course like that, as long as it is actually teaching ideas about interfaces and not just a particular tool for building interfaces. Think about it -- which one is real learning and which one is just training?

You misunderstood what I said about my own situation. I did not have any training in this framework that I now use daily. I was trained to use the tool by my company in the first couple weeks on the job, in much the same way that somebody is trained how to submit timesheets. I never took a class on this framework in college, just like I never took a class on how to make timesheets. But like I said before, the fundamental concepts that I learned in school are absolutely crucial prerequisites for learning this framework. Without an understanding of the basics of computer architecture, for instance, I would be totally lost.

I guess what I'm saying is that this comes down to a difference betwen learning and training. College is for learning, not training. You can be trained on the job if necessary. In fact, if you're just coming out of college most businesses expect that you will need training. Keep the training in college to a minimum; i.e. this is how you compile a source file, this is how you run an executable, etc. If you do it right, you get the added benefit of being platform-agnostic.

At my school we spent approximately 30 minutes covering this type of stuff on the first day only...anybody who needed further training was extended an invitation to lab groups or office hours to learn how to do this stuff.

ChrisBrightwell
Aug 30, 2006, 12:09 PM
Being an entry-level class, I doubt you'll need more than an editor/IDE. I use Eclipse on Mac and PC.

Talk to your instructor to determine what you *need* before you go about cluttering your machine w/ servers and software that you don't need.

davisjw
Aug 30, 2006, 01:39 PM
Well my instructor told me she "guesses" I can use a Mac and by the way she was talking was either very unfamiliar with Macs or all together clueless. She pretty much looked to me to explain whether I can use a Mac to program.

We also took about a class (an hour and 15 minutes) going over briefly how a computer works and how Java works and if we didn't get it from that class we should drop the class and take a beginning computer course which is taught to foriegn students who have no clue about computers.

What concerns me the most is the fact that the teachers from my experiences know only their niche class and nothing of anything else. I.e. she knows Java on a Windows but is clueless about working with Java on anything else. She asked me what I would use instead of the programs that are included in the book and seemed quite surprised to learn I could use most of those programs.

I know I'll get a hard time for using a Mac and she tried to preassure me out of my beloved Mac by saying I "couldn't" use it in future classes. It's a pitty.. After this class the next programming deals with GUI and HTML and then the advanced dabs into C++ and by then you take classes more on the path you're shooting for. Basically I need to sell the Mac (because as a student I can't really afford two laptops) and get a Windows or get a dual boot... What a pain- maybe I need a new major where I wont be surpressed something like advertising where my Mac is most welcomed (and actually in our adveritsing program you MUST have a Mac running 1.2ghz haha).

And if it means anything to anyone I got to Virginia Commonwealth University. Hope this makes sense, I'm late for my Chinese class and wrote this quickly! Don't laugh with the Chinese it's where all the money is in a few years, China and the internet!!!!

bousozoku
Aug 30, 2006, 02:52 PM
...
What concerns me the most is the fact that the teachers from my experiences know only their niche class and nothing of anything else. I.e. she knows Java on a Windows but is clueless about working with Java on anything else. She asked me what I would use instead of the programs that are included in the book and seemed quite surprised to learn I could use most of those programs.
...
And if it means anything to anyone I got to Virginia Commonwealth University. Hope this makes sense, I'm late for my Chinese class and wrote this quickly! Don't laugh with the Chinese it's where all the money is in a few years, China and the internet!!!!

I took an introductory class in Java and was surprised to find an instructor who wasn't proficient in English, who was working as the programming boss at a hospital, who professed Java's run anywhere abilitiy, and yet had no clue about anything but Windows. Thankfully, I didn't have to rely on him for instruction. He also had the lovely idea that we should comment every line and mentioned that he had been scolded for too much documentation but continued to err.

Funny that a school of VCU's standing would hire anyone similar.

Chinese is better when done on a Mac. I suppose you won't learn to read or write for a while, but the machine is quite capable.

davisjw
Sep 7, 2006, 12:43 AM
Hello it's me again! Figured it was easier to just keep this afloat and not create a new forum!
I'm using Eclipse because I can write. compile and run my program all at once so it works great so far! My only complaint and it's a weird one is that when I type say (" it automatically does ") for me which is great but as I'm learning Java it would be for my benefit to write it all out without shortcuts. Does anyone know how to turn this off?

I tried using jEdit to write the code and then compile it with Netbeans but I couldn't figure it out so that's why I'm using Eclipse does anyone think differently? I'm a n00b (yea I just did that) and have no clue how to write the code in an editor and then use whatever to compile and run the program and as far as I know Eclipse does it all for you... Tried looking it up but to no avail :-(

Thanks all for your help again! I'm sure it wont be the last haha!!!!!

bousozoku
Sep 7, 2006, 01:02 AM
jGrasp is probably the simplest of the environments. It does everything from setting up projects to editing and compiling to building the .jar files and it handles Objective-C, Ada, C, and C++.

I mostly use NetBeans for building dialog boxes but you can manage the whole project with it. There should be a few tutorials on it.

jas312
Sep 7, 2006, 02:58 AM
Have a look at the following articles...

The Mac as a Java Development and Execution Platform:o
http://www.theserverside.com/news/thread.tss?thread_id=41330

Java Tools on Mac OS-X
http://www.theserverside.com/discussions/thread.tss?thread_id=31164

For many professional non-Win32 programmers, the OS X is actually the preferred platform.

And good luck with the Chinese language. I develop web applications for customers in China, btw. Being multi-lingual is definitely an advantage.

jeremy.king
Sep 8, 2006, 01:22 PM
I'm a n00b (yea I just did that) and have no clue how to write the code in an editor and then use whatever to compile and run the program and as far as I know Eclipse does it all for you... Tried looking it up but to no avail :-(



Is your prof/teacher teaching the javac and java commands? If so, these are the SAME in OS X except you would use Terminal instead of a DOS/Command window. If not, well...I'll reserve comment.

pip11
Sep 8, 2006, 03:15 PM
I almost can't believe that the CS program at a university of that size could be so Windows-centric. Unix is usually the common OS for CS professors and students, simply because it has been around for so long, and because everything can do Unix. Windows has cygwin, OS X is Unix, and there are also several free clones/variants (Linux, *BSDs). The courses that you list sound pretty universal--java is great on a mac, as well as HTML. C++ could be a problem if you are doing Windows-specific GUI programs though. And if that happens, just trade in your laptop for a MacBook, and run it all.