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linkinpark
Sep 3, 2006, 11:05 PM
Ok this is my first logo ive ever made it was made in flash and im not even sure if that is the right program to use. So if you help me make it better that would be great. Im only twelve so im not a master of flash or photoshop. I do however own studio 8 and adobe creative suite 2.

PS: Logo is not for me



linkinpark
Sep 3, 2006, 11:46 PM
I made of changes to my logo so still feel free to critisise

vectormasked
Sep 4, 2006, 01:20 AM
Well, here's my opinion as a graphic designer.

I don't see so much the point of having a sun in the logo, but it can still work a bit if you play a bit more with the look of the sun. It can work if the excercise was done outdoors.

Now, what's not good at all is the font you chose there which is "Comic Sans"
In design it is almost a crime to use this ugly font. it is very unproffesional and ugly of course.

For someone who is 12 years old, this is pretty good.
Play a bit more with it. Try not to have so many different elements in the logo as it can affect the effectiveness of the logo and its messege.
Overall, you're doing a good job. :)

tominated
Sep 4, 2006, 03:58 AM
how did you get the money for studio 8 and cs2. I'm 13 and there is no way in hell i could afford it, or my mum and/or dad buying it for me.

linkinpark
Sep 4, 2006, 07:07 AM
Well, here's my opinion as a graphic designer.

I don't see so much the point of having a sun in the logo, but it can still work a bit if you play a bit more with the look of the sun. It can work if the excercise was done outdoors.

Now, what's not good at all is the font you chose there which is "Comic Sans"
In design it is almost a crime to use this ugly font. it is very unproffesional and ugly of course.

For someone who is 12 years old, this is pretty good.
Play a bit more with it. Try not to have so many different elements in the logo as it can affect the effectiveness of the logo and its messege.
Overall, you're doing a good job. :)

The company is done almost all outdoors. I gonna go c what font to use for it instead of comic sans

linkinpark
Sep 4, 2006, 07:08 AM
how did you get the money for studio 8 and cs2. I'm 13 and there is no way in hell i could afford it, or my mum and/or dad buying it for me.

I know a friend who got it for me( pretty kool i know).

linkinpark
Sep 4, 2006, 07:21 AM
what do you think about this:

Macnoviz
Sep 4, 2006, 09:19 AM
I know a friend who got it for me( pretty kool i know).

Not really cool, actually, I wouldn't brag about using hacked software

mjstew33
Sep 4, 2006, 09:21 AM
what do you think about this:
it should still say my pace, MINE doesn't make sense.

edit: and also, I'd move the sun down a little. centered maybe?

dornoforpyros
Sep 4, 2006, 09:45 AM
the "or" is really way to small. I know it's suppose to say "your pace or mine" but with the or so small it just looks like "your pace mine"

linkinpark
Sep 4, 2006, 09:59 AM
Not really cool, actually, I wouldn't brag about using hacked software

not hacked his parents are rich(his parents bought them for him and he didnt want them so he sold them to me for $300 each for a total of $600)

linkinpark
Sep 4, 2006, 10:02 AM
how about this:

Lau
Sep 4, 2006, 10:09 AM
how about this:

Why not put the sun under the "Your pace" like so:

56612

I think it reads better this way.

JoshH
Sep 4, 2006, 10:12 AM
Why not put the sun under the "Your pace" like so:

56612

I think it reads better this way.

I too was going to suggest this...

You could also remove the word "or" from the sun and then place your runner into the sun. You could then place the sun/runner combination top center or top right. That would give you one graphic element instead of two...

Snark
Sep 4, 2006, 11:27 AM
Ok this is my first logo ive ever made it was made in flash and im not even sure if that is the right program to use. So if you help me make it better that would be great. Im only twelve so im not a master of flash or photoshop. I do however own studio 8 and adobe creative suite 2.

PS: Logo is not for me

lp, here are a few things you'll want to think about when working on a logo.

- A good logo (And there are a lot of *bad* logos out there) should be kind of a shorthand statement about the business it represents. It should give some sense of how the business wants to represent itself to its customers. Do they want to be seen as fun? Energetic? Healthy? Or maybe they want to be seen as serious or highly professional. You're trying to give as much of a sense of this as you can in the logo, while making it distinctive, so it won't get confused with logos from similar companies.

- Logos should be (relatively) simple. You're doing pretty good on this point. For all the work a good logo needs to do, it still needs to be simple enough to be "consumed" quickly visually, and be easy to remember.

- Think about how your logo is going to be used by your customer. A well designed logo should work well on a six foot high banner, on a letterhead, and as small as on a business card. It should work well both in color and in black and white and greyscale.

- Think about how cost efficiently your logo is going to be to reproduce; again you're doing well so far. It's tempting to throw a ton of colors or gradients or other special effects at a logo. But if you're designing a logo for a small company or budget conscious company, you won't be doing them any favors by designing a logo that's going to cost them a ton of money every time they go to have it printed. If you're not sure how to judge this, just take a sample of your logo to a local printer, and ask them what would be involved in getting your logo printed.

- Logos are best designed in a vector design program, like Illustrator, using what are called "spot colors".

Vector artwork is made up of lines and shapes that the program sends to an output device as mathematical equations. The big advantage to this is that it allows your artwork to be scaled as big or small as you like with almost no loss of quality (Assuming you're printing to a good, high resolution printer). This versatility can be really valuable for something that can be used in as many ways as a logo can. Vector artwork also tends to give you more flexibility in editing and reworking your logo if you need to do so later on.

These things can be achieved using a "bitmap" artwork program (bitmap oriented programs define your artwork on a pixel by pixel basis), like Photoshop, to a certain degree, but you have to be much more careful and think further ahead in how your artwork is going to be used. You also need to give more thought into how you are using color as Photoshop is not primarily focused around using "spot colors", though it can be done.

- Spot color vs. process color. Spot colors are inks that are premixed using a standard formula so that the color is very, very consistent from one print run to the next. This is very important in creating a corporate identity, which is what a logo is part of, because, ideally, you want your customers to be able to instantly recognize you logo. Having it always print in the exact same color is a big help in this.

There are a number of different "systems" that define spot colors, but in the U.S. the most popular by far is called the Pantone Matching System, though sometimes they're just called "PMS colors". You can buy books with small samples of all the Pantone colors or you can also just buy individual little "chips" that will have a sample of a given color on it.

The alternative to using spot color is using "process colors". These are colors that are defined using the four basic colors used in printing, cyan, magenta, yellow and black. This is sometimes referred to as CMYK; "K" being used to represent black, so that there is no confusion that you may be referring to the color blue.

Printing using process colors is done all the time, but for projects like logos, it's not the most cost efficient way to go, because when you are printing, a printing plate must be created for the printing press for every color being used; the more plates, the greater the cost. So if you are creating a logo with only two colors, you can save a good chunk of change if you use two spot colors, using only two plates.

Creating logos and corporate identities can be a speciality unto itself and there's lots of information out there on the subject. Here's a good place to see some logos with brief explanations of the thinking behind them; Will-Harris House. (http://www.will-harris.com/design/logos.htm) Another good source on topics like logo design and just design in general is Before & After magazine; (http://www.bamagazine.com/) in fact their current front page is touches on logo design.

You've made a good start. Keep at it. :)

Snark

tuartboy
Sep 4, 2006, 11:35 AM
Listen to Snark. He knows his stuff.

Although I think you ripped that verbatim from my old typesetting manuals from Uni!

Macnoviz
Sep 4, 2006, 12:25 PM
not hacked his parents are rich(his parents bought them for him and he didnt want them so he sold them to me for $300 each for a total of $600)

Oh, sorry, my bad:o

vectormasked
Sep 4, 2006, 01:53 PM
lp, here are a few things you'll want to think about when working on a logo.

- A good logo (And there are a lot of *bad* logos out there) should be kind of a shorthand statement about the business it represents. It should give some sense of how the business wants to represent itself to its customers. Do they want to be seen as fun? Energetic? Healthy? Or maybe they want to be seen as serious or highly professional. You're trying to give as much of a sense of this as you can in the logo, while making it distinctive, so it won't get confused with logos from similar companies.

- Logos should be (relatively) simple. You're doing pretty good on this point. For all the work a good logo needs to do, it still needs to be simple enough to be "consumed" quickly visually, and be easy to remember.

- Think about how your logo is going to be used by your customer. A well designed logo should work well on a six foot high banner, on a letterhead, and as small as on a business card. It should work well both in color and in black and white and greyscale.

- Think about how cost efficiently your logo is going to be to reproduce; again you're doing well so far. It's tempting to throw a ton of colors or gradients or other special effects at a logo. But if you're designing a logo for a small company or budget conscious company, you won't be doing them any favors by designing a logo that's going to cost them a ton of money every time they go to have it printed. If you're not sure how to judge this, just take a sample of your logo to a local printer, and ask them what would be involved in getting your logo printed.

- Logos are best designed in a vector design program, like Illustrator, using what are called "spot colors".

Vector artwork is made up of lines and shapes that the program sends to an output device as mathematical equations. The big advantage to this is that it allows your artwork to be scaled as big or small as you like with almost no loss of quality (Assuming you're printing to a good, high resolution printer). This versatility can be really valuable for something that can be used in as many ways as a logo can. Vector artwork also tends to give you more flexibility in editing and reworking your logo if you need to do so later on.

These things can be achieved using a "bitmap" artwork program (bitmap oriented programs define your artwork on a pixel by pixel basis), like Photoshop, to a certain degree, but you have to be much more careful and think further ahead in how your artwork is going to be used. You also need to give more thought into how you are using color as Photoshop is not primarily focused around using "spot colors", though it can be done.

- Spot color vs. process color. Spot colors are inks that are premixed using a standard formula so that the color is very, very consistent from one print run to the next. This is very important in creating a corporate identity, which is what a logo is part of, because, ideally, you want your customers to be able to instantly recognize you logo. Having it always print in the exact same color is a big help in this.

There are a number of different "systems" that define spot colors, but in the U.S. the most popular by far is called the Pantone Matching System, though sometimes they're just called "PMS colors". You can buy books with small samples of all the Pantone colors or you can also just buy individual little "chips" that will have a sample of a given color on it.

The alternative to using spot color is using "process colors". These are colors that are defined using the four basic colors used in printing, cyan, magenta, yellow and black. This is sometimes referred to as CMYK; "K" being used to represent black, so that there is no confusion that you may be referring to the color blue.

Printing using process colors is done all the time, but for projects like logos, it's not the most cost efficient way to go, because when you are printing, a printing plate must be created for the printing press for every color being used; the more plates, the greater the cost. So if you are creating a logo with only two colors, you can save a good chunk of change if you use two spot colors, using only two plates.

Creating logos and corporate identities can be a speciality unto itself and there's lots of information out there on the subject. Here's a good place to see some logos with brief explanations of the thinking behind them; Will-Harris House. (http://www.will-harris.com/design/logos.htm) Another good source on topics like logo design and just design in general is Before & After magazine; (http://www.bamagazine.com/) in fact their current front page is touches on logo design.

You've made a good start. Keep at it. :)

Snark


It all sounds very pretty, but the kid is only 12 years old!!

displaced
Sep 4, 2006, 01:55 PM
It all sounds very pretty, but the kid is only 12 years old!!

True, but it was a good read. I'd have found it interesting at 12 :) And in amongst all the high-falutin' design-speak is some good advice that applies even for the simplest logos.

iGary
Sep 4, 2006, 01:56 PM
It all sounds very pretty, but the kid is only 12 years old!!

I thought you had to be 13 to use the site... :eek: ;)

shecky
Sep 4, 2006, 01:58 PM
12/13 is not to young to make crappy design. it should not be to young to make good design, either.

UberMac
Sep 4, 2006, 01:59 PM
I thought you had to be 13 to use the site... :eek: ;)

You do :) Wouldn't go bragging about it kids - people get banned for it! :eek:

Uber

EDIT: Yes, I am calling people kids even though I'm only 17...:)

Snark
Sep 4, 2006, 03:16 PM
It all sounds very pretty, but the kid is only 12 years old!!

He (or she) sounds like a pretty smart kid.

Smart enough to come here and ask for advice. Smart enough to ask for and take criticism. Heck, smart enough to know Studio from Creative Suite. I've met plenty of adults who call themselves designers that wouldn't even go two for three in that list. :D

Nothing in my post is rocket science. I'd guess he'll take some of it onboard, maybe look some of it up, and the rest may make sense as he moves on, learns and spreads his wings a little more; if that's what he's interested in doing.

Kids twelve and up are getting their hands good and dirty in apps like Photoshop and Final Cut these days. Twelve is the new sixteen now days. ;)

Snark

linkinpark
Sep 4, 2006, 04:36 PM
just because im twelve doesnt mean I dont understand anything I understood all of it and im about to go check out the sites so thanks for the help.

linkinpark
Sep 4, 2006, 05:05 PM
Definetly reads better thanks

displaced
Sep 4, 2006, 05:08 PM
Definitely better than your first attempt!

I must admit, I'd be tempted to smack a big-ass question mark on the end. But I'm a short-sighted aesthetically-challenged fool, so it's probably not a good idea! :D

faustfire
Sep 4, 2006, 07:01 PM
Definetly reads better thanks

Looking good, looks better than some of the logos that the "head" designer at my work comes up with.:p

linkinpark
Sep 4, 2006, 09:27 PM
I am just curious would a logo like this cost much? If any?

TheAnswer
Sep 5, 2006, 01:15 AM
I am just curious would a logo like this cost much? If any?

I think most logo work goes on a set scale, but I don't know what the price would be. I think it depends on how much collateral or auxillary materials you are designing (packaging, etc). No matter what, you've still got some years before you can charge for a logo (unless it's for that rich kid's parents, then go for it! j/k).

I was gonna also suggest in addition to the advice above, go to the library and check out some books on logos and see how all of the advice given above has been applied (or could be better applied or applied differently)...this will give you a real feel for what it is all about.

Good luck

MacBoobsPro
Sep 5, 2006, 10:51 AM
I think most logo work goes on a set scale, but I don't know what the price would be. I think it depends on how much collateral or auxillary materials you are designing (packaging, etc). No matter what, you've still got some years before you can charge for a logo (unless it's for that rich kid's parents, then go for it! j/k).

I was gonna also suggest in addition to the advice above, go to the library and check out some books on logos and see how all of the advice given above has been applied (or could be better applied or applied differently)...this will give you a real feel for what it is all about.

Good luck

Check out Amazon for some good design books. Type in logo design, corporate identity or something similar and it should bring some good stuff. Might be a bit pricey though with you being.. ahem... 13 and all. :D

The one thing I will say about your logo is I am pleased you have avoided the temptation to use photoshop filters etc. You know beveled edges and lens flare etc. If you dont know what im talking about GOOD dont go finding out. It will make you a better designer. Also an easy way to make a 'better' logo is always design a logo using just black. Then add colour when you are finished. Thats my little tip anyhoo... most will agree but there will be others that dont. :)

camomac
Sep 5, 2006, 02:28 PM
I thought you had to be 13 to use the site... :eek: ;)
i guess it is, seems he was banned...

billyboy
Sep 6, 2006, 07:02 PM
i guess it is, seems he was banned...
He will be famous one day - not quite as famous as a dead artist but...