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MacBytes
Sep 13, 2006, 11:43 PM
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Category: Tunes
Link: Students spurn free music downloads (http://www.macbytes.com/link.php?sid=20060914004355)
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Posted on MacBytes.com (http://www.macbytes.com)
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benthewraith
Sep 13, 2006, 11:47 PM
And all this time they couldn't burn the music to a cd or use software to rip the DRM off of it? Not promoting it or anything, but just curious.

Mav451
Sep 13, 2006, 11:52 PM
@ UMD (Maryland), they shoved a service called CDigix down our throat. We didn't have a choice, and now it's incorporated into our tuition. Sad times.

This meant CDigix associates, some even disguising themselves as students, spamming UMD chat rooms, BBS boards, etc.

bousozoku
Sep 13, 2006, 11:53 PM
19 percent of the students surved owned Apple machines and 42 percent owned iPods. That sounds high for computers and low for iPods, but I suppose a few universities still require Macs.

EricNau
Sep 13, 2006, 11:54 PM
According to this article, 19% of college students own Apple computers and over 40% own iPods. :D

EDIT: bousozoku beat me to it! :(

Bibulous
Sep 13, 2006, 11:54 PM
Students don't spurn free anything.













At least not at state schools.

WildCowboy
Sep 13, 2006, 11:56 PM
Students don't spurn free anything.

They'll spurn it if there are strings attached, particularly if there's a string-free alternative, even if the alternative isn't quite legal.

x86isslow
Sep 14, 2006, 12:38 AM
The morons who run our student government just wasted some money getting us "Ruckus".:mad:

bousozoku
Sep 14, 2006, 12:39 AM
Students don't spurn free anything.

At least not at state schools.

I wonder if PennState students were included in their research, since I thought that they were one of the first Napster-bound schools.

Chundles
Sep 14, 2006, 12:47 AM
To be honest, I think the marketing people have this around the wrong way. They seem to think that students and young people would prefer to have advertising and not pay for something.

I sure as hell hate advertising, I'd rather pay a nominal fee a la iTunes just to keep the advertisers at bay.

bigbossbmb
Sep 14, 2006, 12:48 AM
19 percent of the students surved owned Apple machines and 42 percent owned iPods. That sounds high for computers and low for iPods, but I suppose a few universities still require Macs.


At my school, UC Santa Cruz, I'd say that is about right. Maybe a little low on the iPod number though...could be closer to 50%

Chaszmyr
Sep 14, 2006, 08:38 AM
I don't know about others, but I don't use iTunes to buy music because it's legal, I use iTunes to buy music because it is easy, convenient, and fast.

ZoomZoomZoom
Sep 14, 2006, 08:59 AM
I wonder if PennState students were included in their research, since I thought that they were one of the first Napster-bound schools.

I'm at Penn State - I don't use Napster as I'm on mac (yet it's in my tuition! yay!). I know a few friends that use Napster, but many are not satisfied. My roommate was ranting about some of his tracks expiring or something. Didn't quite catch what he was saying, but he wasn't happy with Napster. A lot of people just 'fileshare', although it seems as if people have problems connecting to P2P networks outside of Limewire.

yg17
Sep 14, 2006, 09:43 AM
@ UMD (Maryland), they shoved a service called CDigix down our throat. We didn't have a choice, and now it's incorporated into our tuition. Sad times.

This meant CDigix associates, some even disguising themselves as students, spamming UMD chat rooms, BBS boards, etc.


Same at UMR (Missouri). It used to be optional, but then they decided to make it free (aka hide the charges in our tuition) for all students. I don't use it, since it's Windows only. Very few Windows users use it. I tried it once, while at work, when I forgot to bring my iPod with me. The selection is meh, the interface is absolute *****, and frankly, I don't see myself logging into it ever again.

vand0576
Sep 14, 2006, 11:22 AM
I am a University of Minnesota student, and have known that they offer Ruckus absolutely free since I was a sophomore. I never once used it because of the DRM-protection. But since FairUse4WM (http://www.engadget.com/tag/fairuse4wm/) came into this world, I have been using my free access to Ruckus to download songs for "free" after stripping them with the FairUse4WM software. It's awesome. A lot easier than hassling with torrents.

Silencio
Sep 14, 2006, 11:28 AM
At my school, UC Santa Cruz, I'd say that is about right. Maybe a little low on the iPod number though...could be closer to 50%

My nephew started at UC Santa Cruz last year (College ELEVEN!?! Back in my day they were still peeling the shrinkwrap off College Eight!), and I jacked into the in-dorm Ethernet network (another nicety they didn't have back in the paleolithic era). Judging from all the shared playlists, darned near everyone in the place was using iTunes.

thedude110
Sep 14, 2006, 04:31 PM
Fact is, as this article argues, people want to own their music, not rent it. Blows my mind that any company or organization thinks that asking customers to buy the same non-consumeable product over and over can be an effective, long term business model ...

Silencio
Sep 14, 2006, 09:12 PM
Fact is, as this article argues, people want to own their music, not rent it. Blows my mind that any company or organization thinks that asking customers to buy the same non-consumeable product over and over can be an effective, long term business model ...

And yet Microsoft is heavily banking on rental music with their new Zune Store. No matter how many times you bash them over the head with a brick, some people never learn. :rolleyes:

solvs
Sep 15, 2006, 01:35 AM
19 percent of the students surved owned Apple machines and 42 percent owned iPods. That sounds high for computers and low for iPods, but I suppose a few universities still require Macs.
I see more college kids with Macs, especially those who want to do graphics or audio/video. If Macs have a 5% marketshare, I sometimes think that means somewhere more like 10% currently in use, not counting businesses and cash registers. And I suppose the iPod thing is counting all students. Not just those who use mp3 players. Not everyone has one of those. ;)

Mav451
Sep 15, 2006, 05:39 PM
I see more college kids with Macs, especially those who want to do graphics or audio/video. If Macs have a 5% marketshare, I sometimes think that means somewhere more like 10% currently in use, not counting businesses and cash registers. And I suppose the iPod thing is counting all students. Not just those who use mp3 players. Not everyone has one of those. ;)

Out of all the mp3 players I see on campus...I'd say >90% are iPods. Who wants to be seen using a Creative mp3 player?

yg17
Sep 18, 2006, 06:09 PM
OK, so I figured out why students aren't using CDigix. It's not lack of compatibility with iPods, or the availability of DRM-free MP3s elsewhere, it's that CDigix just plain sucks.

Again, I forgot my iPod, and am bored to tears at work, so I logged into CDigix to get some music. First of all, you HAVE to use IE. CDigix is basically one giant ActiveX control. So with that said, you know it will be a nightmare. I had a rather large download queue built up, but opened Windows Media Player to listen to what already finished downloading. First file I tried to play, I had to enter my username and password. No big deal, I guess I had to authorize my computer like you do in iTunes. So it plays. Next file...username and password! 3rd file? No username or password, but no music, because WMP, and the CDigix "software" just decided to crash. And with it crashing went my download queue.

Getting the music is bad enough. The interface on the site is slow, sluggish and piss poor overall. I wanted to download "What's the story morning glory" by Oasis. So I type in Oasis in the search field. It gives me all songs by the band Oasis. Fine, I wanted Be Here Now and The Masterplan as well. So, how do I download a full album? Double click the song in the search result, which will cause the song to play in the browser. From the little mini-player in the browser, I can click on the Album name, which will take me to a new page, where I can finally click a button to download the damn thing. You have to begin playing the song to easily download an album. Not a big deal, unless you already have music playing and don't want 2 songs playing at once.

And just now, I was about to submit that post, but decided first, I wanted to listen to Morning Glory. So, I play the first song, and now, it won't even take my username and password for the damn thing. But then WMP tries to play the next track in the box, same old ****. Basically, I got stuck in a loop of endless password dialogs and now songs that won't play.


Remind me to never forget my iPod at home again.

Mav451
Sep 18, 2006, 07:05 PM
Remind me to never forget my iPod at home again.

Let your CDigix "experience" be a lesson, :)

yg17
Sep 18, 2006, 07:08 PM
Let your CDigix "experience" be a lesson, :)


Haha, it will.

I ditched WMP alltogether and installed Winamp, which at least lets me play everything. If I can suffer with the crappy CDigix website, then this is fine.

bousozoku
Sep 18, 2006, 07:24 PM
Fact is, as this article argues, people want to own their music, not rent it. Blows my mind that any company or organization thinks that asking customers to buy the same non-consumeable product over and over can be an effective, long term business model ...

How does Blockbuster stay in business?

AvSRoCkCO1067
Sep 18, 2006, 07:27 PM
How does Blockbuster stay in business?

I think music and video are two seperate entities - as such, they should be approached independently (although, to be fair to you, I'm not sure if the guy you quoted was referring to all non-consumable products or just music...)

thedude110
Sep 18, 2006, 08:27 PM
How does Blockbuster stay in business?

Fair point -- probably shouldn't have said "any." :p Of course Blockbuster stays in business by asking consumers to buy "different" non-consumeable products (movies) over and over, whereas these college contracts ask a student to purchase a song (or a library), lose it after four years, and then purchase that same song (or much of that same library) a second time.

Also, the language deck (in American English) has traditionally been pretty stacked against music rental -- people "go to" movies, but "own" records, tapes CDs, etc.