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n8236
Sep 28, 2006, 02:00 AM
I have a simple understanding of C/C++/HTML, that's all. I mean very simple. I like to learn Flash and one day present stuff like those u see on automotive sites and other fancy ones. Where can I start? And what's the easiest route? Thanks :)



Kunimodi
Sep 28, 2006, 02:27 AM
I have a simple understanding of C/C++/HTML, that's all. I mean very simple. I like to learn Flash and one day present stuff like those u see on automotive sites and other fancy ones. Where can I start? And what's the easiest route? Thanks :)

I think there are three basic approaches to writing a Flash applet:

1. As a graphical designer/animator. This is the traditional way and is oriented around the scene timeline. It makes little or no use of ActionScript. With this approach, you make very full use of the Flash MX (etc) program itself, utilitizing the many helpful dialogs for transistions, tweens, etc.

2. As a programmer. Most or all animations and object changes are done through ActionScript. At the extreme end, the entire project is done as ActionScript as with MTASC (http://www.mtasc.org/) or through a library such as Ming (http://ming.sourceforge.net/). Advanced use includes connecting to a backend using sockets and XML data exchange (for purposes similar to those Generator provided).

3. As a hybrid programmer/graphical designer.

It sounds like your interest would be in taking the hybrid approach, but leaning strongly towards the graphics end as you want to accomplish high quality animation. This means learning some of the theoretical basics of animation, learning the specific techniques of animating in Flash (which many non-animators find unintuitive), getting good at vector illustration and learning enough ActionScript/ECMAScript to create interesting user interfaces.

To start, download the 30-day trial and try creating some simple art and buttons that change when you press them. Get comfortable with objects, scenes and the timeline and try the advanced features like movie imports. Then try to accomplish a specific project that interests you and is fairly small. Remember that you want to build a pattern of succeeding, so don't do something impossible. In a couple of months, you will be limited or propelled more by your artistic ability than your technical ability with Flash.

noelister
Sep 28, 2006, 09:33 AM
I think there are three basic approaches to writing a Flash applet:

1. As a graphical designer/animator. This is the traditional way and is oriented around the scene timeline. It makes little or no use of ActionScript. With this approach, you make very full use of the Flash MX (etc) program itself, utilitizing the many helpful dialogs for transistions, tweens, etc.

2. As a programmer. Most or all animations and object changes are done through ActionScript. At the extreme end, the entire project is done as ActionScript as with MTASC (http://www.mtasc.org/) or through a library such as Ming (http://ming.sourceforge.net/). Advanced use includes connecting to a backend using sockets and XML data exchange (for purposes similar to those Generator provided).

3. As a hybrid programmer/graphical designer.

It sounds like your interest would be in taking the hybrid approach, but leaning strongly towards the graphics end as you want to accomplish high quality animation. This means learning some of the theoretical basics of animation, learning the specific techniques of animating in Flash (which many non-animators find unintuitive), getting good at vector illustration and learning enough ActionScript/ECMAScript to create interesting user interfaces.
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Well said Kunimodi, Also there are many websites with great tutorials out there. However, it is also nice to have a good book on hand for reference. I recommend Flash 8 Bible.