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wizzerandchips
Sep 28, 2006, 02:30 AM
I fancy a g4 cube,i have a macbook but fancy one just for the fun of it, also think its pretty cool, But can I load the latest osx on to it???. And why was it not as popular as it should have been.



mad jew
Sep 28, 2006, 02:32 AM
Some thought it was quite expensive, which might be why it was unpopular. Also, it kinda came at the wrong time for Apple. Having said that, it should still run Tiger reasonably well, but make sure you deck it out with quite a bit of RAM. :)

Lollypop
Sep 28, 2006, 07:02 AM
I would also love to have a cube... its limited to a 120gig hdd, and fast G4's, you can also flash a PC video card and bring a cube op to core graphics specs.. personally I think that Leopard should also run on a Cube. :D

skunk
Sep 28, 2006, 07:06 AM
My Cube runs Tiger very well, albeit without the Core Graphics stuff. Mind you, it's upgraded to 1.2GHz/1.25GB RAM/120GB Seagate. I'll probably upgrade it for Leopard, though.

notjustjay
Sep 28, 2006, 07:35 AM
I have an un-upgraded Cube, I think it's running 400 MHz and might even still only have 128 megs of RAM, but it is running Tiger and pretty decently too.

It's actually for sale, but it has a small problem which feels as if the power cable connection is loose -- bump it the wrong way and the whole machine loses power. If that doesn't bother you, make me an offer ;)

Mord
Sep 28, 2006, 08:09 AM
dual 1.7GHz radeon 9700 1.5GB 500GB cube for the win.

cubes>*

Lollypop
Sep 28, 2006, 08:17 AM
dual 1.7GHz radeon 9700 1.5GB 500GB cube for the win.

cubes>*

What manufacturer did you use to get to radeon 9700??? And the 500GB?? :eek:

Mord
Sep 28, 2006, 08:50 AM
original ATI pc card flashed, and a seagate 500GB drive, you just need to install an app which lets you use the whole drive.

sushi
Sep 28, 2006, 08:53 AM
And why was it not as popular as it should have been.
Cost was one issue.

Expandability another.

What I got from my Japanese friends at the time, is that while the Cube looked cool, by the time you connected all the wires for power, internet, keyboard, mouse, speakers and such, it was a cluttered setup.

Also, they did not like the access to the expansion bus. You had to tip the Cube to get to it.

IJ Reilly
Sep 28, 2006, 03:34 PM
Cost was one issue.

Expandability another.

What I got from my Japanese friends at the time, is that while the Cube looked cool, by the time you connected all the wires for power, internet, keyboard, mouse, speakers and such, it was a cluttered setup.

Also, they did not like the access to the expansion bus. You had to tip the Cube to get to it.

Well, there is no "expansion bus" on the Cube, but you do need to tip the Cube to plug in USB or Firewire devices, but this should not be necessary very often. I've heard the wires criticism before, but frankly I've never understood it. As designed, the Cube has less wires than most desktop computers. Certainly no more. I'm not sure I understand what people were expecting.

The expansion criticism is also a bit of a mystery. An iMac is even less expandable, but hardly anyone sees this as a problem. And the mini?

As for why it was discontinued, a quick examination and core removal tells the tale I think. The manufacturing costs must have been a major hurt. Engineering-wise, it was way beyond anything anyone had attempted.

kondspi
Sep 28, 2006, 05:30 PM
I have an un-upgraded Cube, I think it's running 400 MHz and might even still only have 128 megs of RAM, but it is running Tiger and pretty decently too.

It's actually for sale, but it has a small problem which feels as if the power cable connection is loose -- bump it the wrong way and the whole machine loses power. If that doesn't bother you, make me an offer ;)

Cool. I'm not the computer-bumping type, so it appeals. How's a hundred bucks?

sushi
Sep 28, 2006, 07:16 PM
Well, there is no "expansion bus" on the Cube, but you do need to tip the Cube to plug in USB or Firewire devices, but this should not be necessary very often. I've heard the wires criticism before, but frankly I've never understood it. As designed, the Cube has less wires than most desktop computers. Certainly no more. I'm not sure I understand what people were expecting.
My bad. I should have said the ports and connectors (power, ADC, VGA, USB, FW, Ethernet and modem port) were on the underside.

For the Japanese, the esthetics are important. Wires clutter things up. Additionally, it was a pain to access the connectors and the computer needed to be turned off to access them.

skunk
Sep 28, 2006, 07:20 PM
For the Japanese, the esthetics are important. Wires clutter things up. Additionally, it was a pain to access the connectors and the computer needed to be turned off to access them.I just tip mine forward without turning it off.

wizzerandchips
Sep 29, 2006, 01:33 AM
looked on ebay and they seem to be very resonablely priced, and you can up grade them i see. Might just have to get one, if only to look at the asthestic's of it.

Xeem
Sep 29, 2006, 01:52 AM
Cost was one issue.

Expandability another.

What I got from my Japanese friends at the time, is that while the Cube looked cool, by the time you connected all the wires for power, internet, keyboard, mouse, speakers and such, it was a cluttered setup.


Although tipping the Cube was always a pain, it wasn't really a cluttered setup. In fact, with the USB speakers, Apple Pro Keyboard and mouse, and matching ADC monitor, it was the least visually-cluttered setup I've ever had other than my all-in-ones (SE/30 back in the day, and an iMac G3 500 w/ DVD drive that I got a couple months ago for $5).

sushi
Sep 29, 2006, 06:24 AM
Although tipping the Cube was always a pain, it wasn't really a cluttered setup. In fact, with the USB speakers, Apple Pro Keyboard and mouse, and matching ADC monitor, it was the least visually-cluttered setup I've ever had other than my all-in-ones (SE/30 back in the day, and an iMac G3 500 w/ DVD drive that I got a couple months ago for $5).
The Cube did look cool. No doubt about it. But for some reason it didn't sell very well. My guess would be some of the reasons that were mentioned before. Probably some other reasons as well.

I think that Apple has done well with the current iMac design. Very simple setup with minimal cables. Seems to be popular here.

Markleshark
Sep 29, 2006, 06:35 AM
original ATI pc card flashed, and a seagate 500GB drive, you just need to install an app which lets you use the whole drive.

What app would that be? Would you be able to use it on the Digital Audio PowerMac G4? Coz 120Gig max isnt that much anymore and ATA controller cards compatible with the PMG4 are a fortune.

Edit - Sorry for the slight Thread Hijack...

Mord
Sep 29, 2006, 06:39 AM
http://eshop.macsales.com/item/Intech%20USA/SPEEDHCCD/

Markleshark
Sep 29, 2006, 06:41 AM
Thank you very much :)

IJ Reilly
Sep 29, 2006, 10:32 AM
The Cube did look cool.

Still does. ;)

The Cube's biggest problem was the price, not much less than a PowerMac G4, which was judged to be a steep premium for style. Apple has since more successfully pushed the limits of charging for style, even more superficially, with the black MacBook. Now they can get away with it, which is fascinating.

The Cube also had a few issues which Apple wasn't quick enough to resolve: the "cracks" in the lucite case and the touch button.

mklos
Sep 29, 2006, 08:39 PM
I have a 450 MHz G4 Cube with 1 GB of RAM and an 80 GB HDD, with an NVIDIA GeForce 2 MX Graphics Card. Its running Mac OS X.4.7 right now and runs great. Its actually kinda snappy for only a 450 MHz computer.

Eventually I'd like to add a SuperDrive for it (yes, they do make one for it!), and a 1.8 GHz G4 CPU.

skunk
Sep 30, 2006, 05:02 AM
Eventually I'd like to add a SuperDrive for it (yes, they do make one for it!), and a 1.8 GHz G4 CPU.I fitted an MCE Superdrive to mine. Works well.

Eniregnat
Sep 30, 2006, 07:47 PM
Couldn't one stick the guts of a mini in a Cube?

It's physically smaller. If one gutted a cube and did a little reenginering, including adding short distance m-f cables for the outputs, it should be possible. One could even get the optical drive to properly eject.

Just an idea.

mad jew
Sep 30, 2006, 10:56 PM
I think I've seen it done somewhere on the 'net but I can't remember where. It's certainly possible and from what I remember, not incredibly difficult. :cool:

IJ Reilly
Sep 30, 2006, 11:11 PM
You could stick the guts of a mini in any number of larger cases, but what would be the point? One of the remarkable things about the Cube is the way it was engineered. Without its unique innards, the Cube just a piece of lucite with an Apple logo on the front.

plinkoman
Sep 30, 2006, 11:16 PM
You could stick the guts of a mini in any number of larger cases, but what would be the point? One of the remarkable things about the Cube is the way it was engineered. Without its unique innards, the Cube just a piece of lucite with an Apple logo on the front.

right, but it's a beautiful design, yet so weak (a stock one anyways) by todays standards; what's wrong with putting a mini in there to get the best of both worlds? The same beautiful cube design, with some pretty good power to back it up.

Though if I had the money to do something like that, I'd put a mini in a NES. That's just too cool.

khisayruou
Sep 30, 2006, 11:30 PM
Couldn't one stick the guts of a mini in a Cube?

It's physically smaller. If one gutted a cube and did a little reenginering, including adding short distance m-f cables for the outputs, it should be possible. One could even get the optical drive to properly eject.

Just an idea.

Yup, its been done already. Its more than just a little reengineering though... especially to get the touch sensitive button that the original cube had. Its easy just to stick a mini in but to get it almost like the original cube is a little harder. The superdrive has to rerouted and of course a 3.5 hard drive has to be stuck in there since there is lots of extra space! :D

IJ Reilly
Sep 30, 2006, 11:31 PM
right, but it's a beautiful design, yet so weak (a stock one anyways) by todays standards; what's wrong with putting a mini in there to get the best of both worlds? The same beautiful cube design, with some pretty good power to back it up.

Though if I had the money to do something like that, I'd put a mini in a NES. That's just too cool.

Again, the engineering is part of the thing, an integral part of the cool factor. If you just like the way the case looks, buy a non-functioning Cube and put it on the shelf, is my advice.

A Cube can be upgraded, you know.

plinkoman
Sep 30, 2006, 11:35 PM
Again, the engineering is part of the thing, an integral part of the cool factor. If you just like the way the case looks, buy a non-functioning Cube and put it on the shelf, is my advice.

A Cube can be upgraded, you know.

well, I guess we just have a difference of opinion. The engineering is impressive, but thats not what I notice when I look at a cube; I see the design, and the prospect of putting modern computer innards inside of it is a tribute to is great design.

(and yes, obviously I know a cube can be upgraded, hence me saying "a stock one anyways")

MBHockey
Sep 30, 2006, 11:43 PM
When you guys upgrade the processor, do you have to add fans to it?

Does anyone have a link to what the heat sink in the cube looks like?

I'm very interested...and it seems pertinent as i'm taking heat transfer in college.

IJ Reilly
Sep 30, 2006, 11:45 PM
well, I guess we just have a difference of opinion. The engineering is impressive, but thats not what I notice when I look at a cube; I see the design, and the prospect of putting modern computer innards inside of it is a tribute to is great design.

(and yes, obviously I know a cube can be upgraded, hence me saying "a stock one anyways")

Right, I realize you know, I'm just making a point about what I think is the sensitive and sensible way to keep a Cube functional without turning it into some weird hybrid Frankenstein sort of thing. My upgraded Cube is in its sixth year of everyday use; can't ask for more than that from a computer.

notjustjay
Sep 30, 2006, 11:47 PM
Though if I had the money to do something like that, I'd put a mini in a NES. That's just too cool.

Ooh!

I have an NES that I bought at a garage sale for like $3. That would be a most fascinating idea...

khisayruou
Oct 1, 2006, 12:12 AM
When you guys upgrade the processor, do you have to add fans to it?

Does anyone have a link to what the heat sink in the cube looks like?

I'm very interested...and it seems pertinent as i'm taking heat transfer in college.

Don't know about adding fans, but the cube does get hella hot.
Here are some pics I had of the heatsink, its the black piece in the middle.

skunk
Oct 1, 2006, 04:15 AM
When you guys upgrade the processor, do you have to add fans to it?The upgrade kits designed for the Cube mostly come with a fan included, mostly.

MBHockey
Oct 1, 2006, 10:49 AM
Don't know about adding fans, but the cube does get hella hot.
Here are some pics I had of the heatsink, its the black piece in the middle.


Thanks :)

PodHead
Nov 25, 2006, 02:37 AM
I've been thinking of using a Cube or a mini as a media centre. Has anyone here tried this yet? That would be an interesting convo piece smack dab in the middle of a nice home theatre.:D

mklos
Nov 25, 2006, 08:09 AM
A Mac Mini would be better suited for that IMO. The G4 Cube doesn't even come with a sound card in it unless you buy one with the external USB one that originally came with it too work with the Apple Pro Speakers. And then you're basically stuck with using the headphones jack only as external sound.

A Mac Mini already comes with an IR remote, DL-DVDRW, and optical/analog audio line in/out. By the time you upgrade the Cube to make it worth while, you could have just gotten a Mac Mini thats still twice as fast as any Cube with a G4 upgrade card in it. Plus you have other goodies in the Mini like bluetooth, 802.11g AirPort Extreme instead of 802.11b AirPort, Gigabit Ethernet, etc... All of which aren't in a G4 Cube and can't be installed either without a USB dongle of some sort which will just make you pull your hair out.


Just to answer other people's questions, I have my G4 Cube running Tiger and the developer release of Leopard. Both run great on it. Mine is a 450 MHz G4, 80 GB HD, 1GB RAM, NVIDIA GeForce 2 MX Graphics Card, and DVDROM. I plan on putting in a SuperDrive, and a 1.8 GHz G4 Upgrade card from Sonnet.

IJ Reilly
Nov 25, 2006, 12:53 PM
Just a clarification, the Cube does have a "sound card" (that is, an audio chipset). What it lacks is an audio-out jack on the motherboard, which is a different issue. The Cube's USB speakers, assuming you've got them, do have a audio-out jack, though. Still, I agree the mini would be a more suitable choice unless you get the Cube very cheaply and like to tinker.

mklos
Nov 25, 2006, 03:21 PM
Actually I believe the sound card is external, no internal. No audio showed up at all on my Cube in OS X System Profiler until I plugged in the USB Apple Pro Speakers that came with it. This is what I was talking about in my first post.

IJ Reilly
Nov 25, 2006, 06:21 PM
You're not seeing any speakers until you plug them in, but that doesn't mean the Cube doesn't generate audio. I'm not sure why no chipset shows up in System Profiler under Hardware/Audio (speakers plugged in or no), but I do know that any USB speakers will work on the Cube, not just the ones that came with it. The little inline box is an amplifier, not a sound card.

Lord Blackadder
Nov 25, 2006, 07:10 PM
I just saw that "Mini in a Cube" (http://www.123macmini.com/macminicube/) mod a few days ago - I have to admit I like the basic concept, but I'm pretty picky about not taking a saw to my Macs.

I think there were three major reasons for the Cube's failure -

- It was expensive to buy

- It was expensive to make

- It was an answer looking for a question, in a way. PowerMac buyers were put off by it's lack of expandibility, and iMac buyers found it too expensive.

Personally, I think the Cube is one of Apple's coolest machines. It was well ahead of its time and still looks fresh today. It is actually reasonably expandable too - the video card, CPU, RAM, hard drive and optical drive are all upgradable. The only things you need to really watch out for when upgrading the CPU/GPU are heat and power consumption. However, the aftermarket has all the parts you need to take care of those issues.

I'm actually looking to pick up a Cube myself. Prices are starting to come down to a quite reasonable level.

PodHead
Nov 26, 2006, 04:54 PM
A Mac Mini would be better suited for that IMO. The G4 Cube doesn't even come with a sound card in it unless you buy one with the external USB one that originally came with it too work with the Apple Pro Speakers. And then you're basically stuck with using the headphones jack only as external sound.

A Mac Mini already comes with an IR remote, DL-DVDRW, and optical/analog audio line in/out. By the time you upgrade the Cube to make it worth while, you could have just gotten a Mac Mini thats still twice as fast as any Cube with a G4 upgrade card in it. Plus you have other goodies in the Mini like bluetooth, 802.11g AirPort Extreme instead of 802.11b AirPort, Gigabit Ethernet, etc... All of which aren't in a G4 Cube and can't be installed either without a USB dongle of some sort which will just make you pull your hair out.


Just to answer other people's questions, I have my G4 Cube running Tiger and the developer release of Leopard. Both run great on it. Mine is a 450 MHz G4, 80 GB HD, 1GB RAM, NVIDIA GeForce 2 MX Graphics Card, and DVDROM. I plan on putting in a SuperDrive, and a 1.8 GHz G4 Upgrade card from Sonnet.
Great point, the Cube would look cooler from a purely aesthetic stand point. Wouldn't you agree:p

mklos
Nov 26, 2006, 08:16 PM
Yeah the Cube would look better, but its more work than its worth to try and put Mac Mini guts into Cube, or upgrade the Cube.

I own a G4 Cube myself and it love it, but for what the OP wanted to do, the MacMini would be far better.

Duffman
Nov 27, 2006, 02:42 AM
Can the Cube be current? Sure. Mine is. There are a lot of people out there that still have a Cube.

Currently, I'm working with

-OS X 10.4.8
-Powerlogix Dual 1.7GhZ 7447A
-320GB Seagate HD
-SuperDrive
-1.5GB memory
-Geforce 5200FX w/256mb onboard
-Airport Card
-Bluetooth Dongle
-(1) base fan and (1) video card fan
-Creative Xfi XMod USB audio

Dude up there takes the win with the 9800, but I am assuming that would be with a Powerlogix upgraded cube case. No way a 9800 will fit in the stock Cube case. Cost for cost, it could be reasonable to estimate it at the cost of a higher end imac, I suppose. But the upgrades can be done in small bits, making it easier to deal with. While there are no expansion ports and only one 3.5'' bay (if you take out the optical drive, fitting another HD would be possible), there are 2 FireWire ports that work great. I've got a couple of external drives that I use, and FireWire is also bootable. The upgrades themselves vary in difficulty, from quite simple to rather involved, depending on what you are doing. A new HD and installing the ATA hi-cap extender kernal extension is not difficult, but moving the VRM to fit crazy video cards in there is a big project. Swapping the processors out took some time, but if you follow the process and instructions carefully, its not bad.

I think at this point, its probably still relevant as a computer, and I fully expect to use mine with Leopard and later, and will make further upgrades if they become available. Its a fun project, but it can be pricey. I initially started this as a side project, but the Cube quickly became my main machine. It's quite reliable, provided that you keep it cool and don't push too many limits that shouldnt be pushed. There are solutions out there for making the Cube more or less "current" by today's standards, (excluding USB 1.1, that cannot be changed) you may just have to look around. Currently, the max processors available are 1.8GhZ Singles or 1.7GhZ duals, but the dual 1.7s are quite hard to find as they stopped producing them. I am hoping for something over 2GhZ, but I dont know if that is possible or even safe!

I would recommend checking out www.cubeowner.com
A total site for anything you need to know about your cube. Super cool people, too. Enjoy your Cube!

Duffman
Nov 27, 2006, 08:21 AM
When you guys upgrade the processor, do you have to add fans to it?

Does anyone have a link to what the heat sink in the cube looks like?

I'm very interested...and it seems pertinent as i'm taking heat transfer in college.

Here are some shots from when I added fans to the base and one to a Radeon 7500 that I used to have in there, and a shot of the backside (processor side) of the heat sink. The flat black area is where the processor rests against. Hope this helps!:D

IJ Reilly
Nov 27, 2006, 10:07 AM
I'm running my Cube with a Radeon 7500 and no fan on the GPU. It's been fine for over a year, but I don't game on it so the GPU isn't being pushed hard. This was a fairly easy upgrade. The processor upgrade was a bit scary, but it was a complete success.

However, I would not recommend attempting any of these upgrades while drinking a beer. ;)

Lord Blackadder
Nov 27, 2006, 10:55 AM
I've had a Radeon 7500 in my PowerMac G4, and despite lots of 3D gaming it never got hot. Even in a Cube I doubt it would ever cause issues unless you overclocked it. Still, heat is the Cube's greatest enemy so it pays to be cautious.

skunk
Nov 27, 2006, 11:15 AM
I'm running my Cube with a Radeon 7500 and no fan on the GPU. It's been fine for over a year, but I don't game on it so the GPU isn't being pushed hard. This was a fairly easy upgrade. The processor upgrade was a bit scary, but it was a complete success.

However, I would not recommend attempting any of these upgrades while drinking a beer. ;)I took the fan off my Radeon 2 about a year ago, too. Runs quiet as anything, but I've got a very quiet base fan installed for the processor.

IJ Reilly
Nov 27, 2006, 11:25 AM
I took the fan off my Radeon 2 about a year ago, too. Runs quiet as anything, but I've got a very quiet base fan installed for the processor.

I know, I've lusted after one of those ultra-quiet (thermistor-controlled?) base fans but I'm having a hard time bringing myself to desconstruct the Cube again to install it.

Duffman
Nov 27, 2006, 07:05 PM
I'm running my Cube with a Radeon 7500 and no fan on the GPU. It's been fine for over a year, but I don't game on it so the GPU isn't being pushed hard. This was a fairly easy upgrade. The processor upgrade was a bit scary, but it was a complete success.

However, I would not recommend attempting any of these upgrades while drinking a beer. ;)

Yes, I too should probably add that I do not recommend attempting upgrades while drinking beer. (Even though I did.):D

The CPU upgrade is a bit full-on, I totally agree. But if you follow the steps exactly, you can do it in one shot. I decided to fan my 7500 because I am running 2 19'' LCDs off it, so it does get rather hot. But with 2 fans in there, I dont usually see temps over 32-34. That usually only occurs when pushing it with video encoding, photoshop, etc.

Lord Blackadder
Nov 27, 2006, 08:02 PM
But with 2 fans in there, I dont usually see temps over 32-34. That usually only occurs when pushing it with video encoding, photoshop, etc.

That's nice and cool...after a 3D gaming session (and with the ambient temperature at 58F/14C), the GeForce 6800GT in my G4 tower will hit about 67C. During the summer (with the ambient temperature at 80F) I've had it trigger the alarm at 85C. :eek:

It still has its stock cooler though, I could probably drop the temps by 10C with an aftermarket cooler.

Duffman
Nov 27, 2006, 09:50 PM
That's nice and cool...after a 3D gaming session (and with the ambient temperature at 58F/14C), the GeForce 6800GT in my G4 tower will hit about 67C. During the summer (with the ambient temperature at 80F) I've had it trigger the alarm at 85C. :eek:

It still has its stock cooler though, I could probably drop the temps by 10C with an aftermarket cooler.

Yikes! That's meltdown territory! Evacuate the people and call in HazMat and the fire department! I think the most I've ever seen out of my Cube was upper 40's, and that was when the A/C was busted in my place last summer. I have heard of Cubes getting into the upper 80s and even 90's, and once that happens, there is not much left but an RMA'd 7447 Card from Powerlogix. I believe this was actually the reason that they stopped selling the Dual 1.7 upgrades.

I recently acquired a Quicksilver from a mate and I'm waiting for a 9800 to arrive, and I'm a bit concerned about what kind of temps that will put out. The Quicksilver is pretty well loaded up with 3 HD's all spinning at 7200RPM, a 1.8GhZ upgrade, and maxed ram...I need to hit that with a thermometer as soon as I get that card in there. Are the GeForce 6800GT cards notorious for that kind of heat?

livingfortoday
Nov 27, 2006, 09:57 PM
I have heard of Cubes getting into the upper 80s and even 90's, and once that happens, there is not much left but an RMA'd 7447 Card from Powerlogix. I believe this was actually the reason that they stopped selling the Dual 1.7 upgrades.

Yeah, when I had a Dual-1.5Ghz in my Cube, it was hitting the 80's even with a pretty strong base fan. I ended up running it out of the case, with two fans blowing on the CPU + heatsink, and I'd still hit the 70's when using the CPU at 100%. Had to RMA two processors, and just sold off the third one I got!

IJ Reilly
Nov 27, 2006, 10:38 PM
Yes, I too should probably add that I do not recommend attempting upgrades while drinking beer. (Even though I did.):D

I was hoping the beer can was in the photos just for scale...

Lord Blackadder
Nov 27, 2006, 10:56 PM
I recently acquired a Quicksilver from a mate and I'm waiting for a 9800 to arrive, and I'm a bit concerned about what kind of temps that will put out. The Quicksilver is pretty well loaded up with 3 HD's all spinning at 7200RPM, a 1.8GhZ upgrade, and maxed ram...I need to hit that with a thermometer as soon as I get that card in there. Are the GeForce 6800GT cards notorious for that kind of heat?

The 6800 series are hot-running cards, but are also known to tolerate high temps to a certain degree. Depending on the ambient temperature, my 6800GT idles at 60-70C, with the fan always running at 100%. Safe, but on the hot end of safe. part of the issue is the thermally-challenged G4 case and lack of fan control - in a well-cooled case (like G5) it would probably idle in the 50s.

It's a flashed XFX 6800GS card soft-modded into a 6800GT. I've been running it since January in my Digital Audio G4 tower that also contains an OWC 1.4GHz (1.33GHz factory overclocked 7455) CPU. Despite the high temps, I've never had any artifacts, even that time it hit 85C. If you search PC forums you'll see that overclockers routinely take 6800s beyond 70C under load without issues - but it pays to keep an eye on temps. I do.

I don't have any experience with 7447 CPUs, but in my experience 7451 (my original 2x533MHz CPUs) and 7455 CPUs run much cooler than my GeForce (just by touching them - my 1.4GHz CPU's temp sensor doesn't work for some reason).

The 9800 is a hot card too, but I doubt it will bother the machine - anyway it should run cooler than my 6800GT! :eek:

I just bought a Radeon X850 PRO that I'm going to flash...I'm curious to see if it runs cooler in my G4...I like the GeForce 'cause it's dual DVI, but if the Radeon is much cooler I'll put up with VGA.

Duffman
Nov 28, 2006, 12:07 AM
Yeah, when I had a Dual-1.5Ghz in my Cube, it was hitting the 80's even with a pretty strong base fan. I ended up running it out of the case, with two fans blowing on the CPU + heatsink, and I'd still hit the 70's when using the CPU at 100%. Had to RMA two processors, and just sold off the third one I got!

What a waste, huh? The duals for the Cube are totally hit or miss. I've never really had any problems with mine, but there seem to be an awful lot of people that have. Getting into the 80's (especially in such a small enclosure) is just insane. At that point, I think it's merely a matter of time before the processor goes. Apparently the Dual 1.6 cards are rather cool, or at least I have heard. I've got a good base fan in there right now, and I think I have heatsinked every thing in the Cube that can be heatsinked (Ram, Video card, various transistors that get hot, etc.) so that seems to keep the temps under control...or I am just not reading them right :eek: (Scary thought!!!) But I keep an eye on the SMART temps in the menu bar and I have a thermometer actually fed down through the top grill and the heat sink, and both are relatively similar in temperature, so I guess that gives me a fair degree of accuracy. (I hope!)

Duffman
Nov 28, 2006, 12:08 AM
I was hoping the beer can was in the photos just for scale...

Regrettably, no...wait, sure, why not. For scale. :D

IJ Reilly
Nov 28, 2006, 12:32 AM
Regrettably, no...wait, sure, why not. For scale. :D

After a couple of them you feel a lot larger?

Duffman
Nov 28, 2006, 12:44 AM
The 6800 series are hot-running cards, but are also known to tolerate high temps to a certain degree. Depending on the ambient temperature, my 6800GT idles at 60-70C, with the fan always running at 100%. Safe, but on the hot end of safe. part of the issue is the thermally-challenged G4 case and lack of fan control - in a well-cooled case (like G5) it would probably idle in the 50s.

It's a flashed XFX 6800GS card soft-modded into a 6800GT. I've been running it since January in my Digital Audio G4 tower that also contains an OWC 1.4GHz (1.33GHz factory overclocked 7455) CPU. Despite the high temps, I've never had any artifacts, even that time it hit 85C. If you search PC forums you'll see that overclockers routinely take 6800s beyond 70C under load without issues - but it pays to keep an eye on temps. I do.

I don't have any experience with 7447 CPUs, but in my experience 7451 (my original 2x533MHz CPUs) and 7455 CPUs run much cooler than my GeForce (just by touching them - my 1.4GHz CPU's temp sensor doesn't work for some reason).

The 9800 is a hot card too, but I doubt it will bother the machine - anyway it should run cooler than my 6800GT! :eek:

I just bought a Radeon X850 PRO that I'm going to flash...I'm curious to see if it runs cooler in my G4...I like the GeForce 'cause it's dual DVI, but if the Radeon is much cooler I'll put up with VGA.

Geez that's pretty hot! It seems a bit unnatural, but I guess that if the card is meant to run hot, then no worries, huh. The flashing and overclocking business kind of scares me, so I tend to stay away from it. I would like to learn a bit more about it, but I don't really even know where to start. It seems a bit ballsy, too...I've heard that flashing it incorrectly can toast the card! :eek: There are a lot of Cubers who have flash cards in a constant attempt to max out the video, including people that have somehow managed to stuff 9600/9800s and high end GeForce cards into the Cube (with a Powerlogix enclosure).

Good to know that the 9800 will do alright in the Quicksilver. I love the G4 case, but much like the Cube, it really is an oven. I've considered cutting a portion out of the side of the case for a fan, but that may be another project for another time. I've got another HD that I want to throw in there, but I am afraid that 4 Hard drives + a PCI HD controller card, USB 2.0 card, CPU upgrade, Superdrive, and a Radeon 9800 may tax the Power source too much.

Duffman
Nov 28, 2006, 12:45 AM
After a couple of them you feel a lot larger?

Great taste, less filling!:)

Lord Blackadder
Nov 28, 2006, 08:36 AM
Geez that's pretty hot! It seems a bit unnatural, but I guess that if the card is meant to run hot, then no worries, huh. The flashing and overclocking business kind of scares me, so I tend to stay away from it. I would like to learn a bit more about it, but I don't really even know where to start. It seems a bit ballsy, too...I've heard that flashing it incorrectly can toast the card! :eek:

I don't overclock my cards either - frankly I don't think it's worth the risk. As for flashing risks, it's unlikely that you'll burn a card trying to flash it (although it can be done). The biggest danger is that you'll flash the card improperly and the ROM will be corrupt, meaning the card will be invisible to any computer and you'd have to solder on a new ROM to get it functioning.

There are a lot of Cubers who have flash cards in a constant attempt to max out the video, including people that have somehow managed to stuff 9600/9800s and high end GeForce cards into the Cube (with a Powerlogix enclosure).

Good to know that the 9800 will do alright in the Quicksilver. I love the G4 case, but much like the Cube, it really is an oven. I've considered cutting a portion out of the side of the case for a fan, but that may be another project for another time. I've got another HD that I want to throw in there, but I am afraid that 4 Hard drives + a PCI HD controller card, USB 2.0 card, CPU upgrade, Superdrive, and a Radeon 9800 may tax the Power source too much.

The best card for the cube is probably the GeForce 6200 series. It runs cool and is much more powerful than the 5200/5500. Unfortunately the modded ROM is not publicly available - but I think you can get one of the Strangedogs forum guys to mod one for you.

I have 3 hard drives, a SATA card, a USB 2.0 card, new SuperDrive, 1GB RAM, OC'd CPU and the GeForce all in my case running off the original power supply. So far I've not had any problems, so I wouldn't be worried, just keep an eye on temps and unusual behavior (like frequent crashing).

Take a look at this (http://www.s155158671.websitehome.co.uk/index.html) site, the guy's a strangedogs (video card flashing forum) member and has done a lot of cooling and flashing mods to G4s.

Beer and Mac upgrades - sounds good to me!