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View Full Version : Buying an ipod; Conversion ?'s




bballguy998
Nov 3, 2006, 05:42 PM
My creative labs mp3 player wont work anymore, I have a warranty on it and will probably be going to best buy this weekend to replace it. The closest thing I can buy without downgrading would be the 30 GB ipod video. I have a windows machine (not my choice).

Problem:

90% of my music is non protected WMA files at 128kbps. The rest are MP3's which I know will work. For the most part, if I have to, I can re rip most of my music. (it would take a long time, my music collections around 10 GB's, its not something I prefer to do) Questions:

1. How can I convert these WMA files to AAC or MP3 without losing much or no sound quality, and at what kbps should I convert them to? Ive heard so many different people argue about whether you lose sound quality or not, I dont know what to believe.

2. If i use itunes to do it, will I lose the song tags(info) of my music?

3. If so, is there a way to avoid losing the song info?

4. Is there a way to convert DRM protected WMA files?

thanks



nitynate
Nov 3, 2006, 05:45 PM
iTunes automatically copies and converts your WMA for you when you import your library and keeps the song info for you.

It takes a while depending on the speed of your computer. (leave it over night for 10+ gigs)

And no, I don't think protected files work, if someone can correct me?

fivetoadsloth
Nov 3, 2006, 07:11 PM
iTunes will automotically go and get all the wma files and convert them. It takes a whilw as nitynate said but sure faster than rerippping the cds. Good luck with the 'Pod. I dont notice any drop at all in ound quality but i only get a wma about once a month from a file or something a freind made and i dont pay much attention to it, nor do i have rthe origianl so i dont know.

mleary
Nov 3, 2006, 07:15 PM
FYI, if you let itunes convert your WMA files you will lose sound quality, especially since you are starting at relatively low bit rate. This is not specific to itunes either it happens whenever you convert a lossy format to another lossy format.