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View Full Version : Need outside noise killing cans




LethalWolfe
Nov 20, 2006, 03:49 PM
Basically I'm looking for a pair of cans that will block out all (or as much as realistically possible) outside sound. The active "noise canceling" headphones I'm not big on as the ones I've tried have given me a sense of vertigo. My work environment is not ideal (we have two video editors per room and only a thin door between use and a noisy office) and I keep having to crank my headphones up and that's really pissing off my tinnitus. Flatter response the better, as I need to do basic mixing, and of course I don't want to break the bank, but I'm willing to drop a nice chunk of change as going deaf isn't something I want to do.


Lethal



davidjearly
Nov 20, 2006, 03:57 PM
Basically I'm looking for a pair of cans that will block out all (or as much as realistically possible) outside sound. The active "noise canceling" headphones I'm not big on as the ones I've tried have given me a sense of vertigo. My work environment is not ideal (we have two video editors per room and only a thin door between use and a noisy office) and I keep having to crank my headphones up and that's really pissing off my tinnitus. Flatter response the better, as I need to do basic mixing, and of course I don't want to break the bank, but I'm willing to drop a nice chunk of change as going deaf isn't something I want to do.


Lethal

I love the Seinheiser CX300. Fantastic for the price.

David

Sesshi
Nov 20, 2006, 04:01 PM
One option, although they have some problems in the way they present sound when compared to monitor cans / speakers is the Etymotic ER-6i or ER-4P. Both of these in-ear phones provide extremely high isolation with the foam plugs. It does mean that there's a running cost associated with them (the foam plugs for the cheaper ER-6i are pretty expensive, the 4P not so much) but the level of isolation you get is better than any noise-cancelling phone I've heard and a total contrast to cheap in-ear phones like the Sennheiser CX300.

The way it sounds gives a great sense of detail but the sound feels lifeless and tinny - so not good for monitoring because many phones many sound flat, but they don't sound this flat (and this is more like a bass cut / treble boost than flat). But if it's just for listening it might be the best answer for your problems.

Amazon Link (http://www.amazon.com/Etymotic-Research-ER4P-Portable-Earphones/dp/B0007WZLDC/sr=8-1/qid=1164060137/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/102-6640746-6142556?ie=UTF8&s=electronics)

zimv20
Nov 20, 2006, 04:03 PM
The active "noise canceling" headphones I'm not big on as the ones I've tried have given me a sense of vertigo.
yeah, they do the same thing to me. i thought i was the only one, my friends report no such maladies.

davidjearly
Nov 20, 2006, 04:38 PM
One option, although they have some problems in the way they present sound when compared to monitor cans / speakers is the Etymotic ER-6i or ER-4P. Both of these in-ear phones provide extremely high isolation with the foam plugs. It does mean that there's a running cost associated with them (the foam plugs for the cheaper ER-6i are pretty expensive, the 4P not so much) but the level of isolation you get is better than any noise-cancelling phone I've heard and a total contrast to cheap in-ear phones like the Sennheiser CX300.

The way it sounds gives a great sense of detail but the sound feels lifeless and tinny - so not good for monitoring because many phones many sound flat, but they don't sound this flat (and this is more like a bass cut / treble boost than flat). But if it's just for listening it might be the best answer for your problems.

Amazon Link (http://www.amazon.com/Etymotic-Research-ER4P-Portable-Earphones/dp/B0007WZLDC/sr=8-1/qid=1164060137/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/102-6640746-6142556?ie=UTF8&s=electronics)

The Seinheiser CX300 are not 'cheap' headphones in the sense of quality and are fantastic for the price.

Most people who have a problem with them don't take the time to actually find what size of earcap (various provided) is best for them. This can lead to the noise-cancelling being poor and/or a sense of too much bass being produced.

They are great headphones and there is not a huge difference between them and the cheaper Etymotic range.

Those are also great headphones however.

David

Sesshi
Nov 20, 2006, 05:10 PM
There's a whole world of difference in isolation between the foam tips of the Etymotics and the silicone tips of the CX300. The CX300 has a more balanced sound than the Etymotics (speakerwise you could say the CX300 falls into the flat-sounding category) but they're comparatively scratchy in the highs and (once again comparatively) lack any kind of real resolving capability.

The Sennheisers employ the same drivers as other cheap(er, if you like) in-ear phones like the Sony EX71, although they've tweaked the sound so that it's not as bass-centric. With the long warranty it's good value for casual use where isolation is a 'want' than 'must', but the quality of the sound is not anywhere near monitoring-grade. Although the Etymotics aren't ideal for it for the reason I mentioned above, they are more or less monitoring-grade in terms of the sound quality they can convey.

davidjearly
Nov 21, 2006, 02:55 AM
There's a whole world of difference in isolation between the foam tips of the Etymotics and the silicone tips of the CX300. The CX300 has a more balanced sound than the Etymotics (speakerwise you could say the CX300 falls into the flat-sounding category) but they're comparatively scratchy in the highs and (once again comparatively) lack any kind of real resolving capability.

The Sennheisers employ the same drivers as other cheap(er, if you like) in-ear phones like the Sony EX71, although they've tweaked the sound so that it's not as bass-centric. With the long warranty it's good value for casual use where isolation is a 'want' than 'must', but the quality of the sound is not anywhere near monitoring-grade. Although the Etymotics aren't ideal for it for the reason I mentioned above, they are more or less monitoring-grade in terms of the sound quality they can convey.

I guess we'll just have to disagree on this one. I have used the Sony's and can't say how much better the Sennheisers are in comparison.

I don't care how they achieved it with the Sennheisers (i.e. if it is not a hardware difference), but they are definately miles better than the Sony.

Sure, the Etymotics are great, better than the CX300 but they come at a price and do have their own downfalls.

David

Sesshi
Nov 21, 2006, 04:13 AM
I have not much interest in a debate of the merits. My main point is that with the foam tips the Etymotics keep out levels of noise that go beyond the best consumer noise-cancelling phones (which in turn go well beyond the capabilities of the CX300). It just so happens that at a pinch they can be used for monitoring, whereas the CX300 has no business being used in that manner.

LethalWolfe
Nov 22, 2006, 12:00 AM
How would the comfort level be wearing in-ear phones for extended periods of time (like 50+ hrs a week)? Are there any closed cans that are designed to keep out outside noise (besides the active noise canceling ones obviously)?


Lethal

Sesshi
Nov 22, 2006, 03:47 AM
There are phones like the Sennheiser HD280 which keeps out a reasonable amount of noise. But isolation isn't as good as the Etymotic / Shure / etc in-ears (although once again, it's better than the CX300). The HD280 goes around the ears instead of sitting on them so most find it reasonably comfortable. The Etymotics are 'bearable' I'd say and problems with them are usually down to poor hygiene on the tips or too frequent insertion / removal.

But comfort is a very personal thing with head/earphones as everyone is different so ultimately you'll have to give them a go to find out. Personally I would not recommend using ear or headphones for extended use like that.