PDA

View Full Version : Desktops Are So Twentieth Century


MacBytes
Dec 9, 2006, 03:00 PM
http://www.macbytes.com/images/bytessig.gif (http://www.macbytes.com)

Category: Opinion/Interviews
Link: Desktops Are So Twentieth Century (http://www.macbytes.com/link.php?sid=20061209160002)
Description:: none

Posted on MacBytes.com (http://www.macbytes.com)
Approved by Mudbug

gothiquegirrl
Dec 9, 2006, 03:21 PM
It's an interesting article..

I have to say that when I do finally buy an Intel mac.. It will be a IMac.. That's gonna be my work horse computer that I spend my most time on. My valued possession.

Then I'll go buy a low end 800 dollar PC notebook to carry around wih me . Why? Well cause I won't cry if it gets broken! LOL

I have to say i'd be DEVESTATED if I had a MBP and dropped it.. or spilled somethin on it.. or ect.. I can't say the same about a PC notebook.

Ang

Dont Hurt Me
Dec 9, 2006, 03:25 PM
Desktops are better for many reasons, The fact that the younger crowd is going after portables doesnt mean the desktop is obsolete nor 20th century. Bias this article is, and though laptops are selling more, desktop is king of computing,and slaughters any portable machine or console. Because the new generation doesnt get that doesnt mean the desktop is dead. Though as a Grandpa & Gamer perhaps Im bias.

Buschmaster
Dec 9, 2006, 03:43 PM
I'd love to have an iMac, simple fact of the matter is, my MacBook comes in handy very often outside of my dormroom. But if I were to buy another computer, it would be an iMac.

Dane D.
Dec 9, 2006, 03:48 PM
The writer is so bias I couldn't stand it. I have a PowerBook Ti667 at work, wouldn't want it at home. I have used a 12" iBook, feels like a toy and isn't very powerful. Desktops are king when it comes to computing power and expandabilty. I couldn't use a portable for my work - Graphic production artist, I couldn't stand trying to game on a portable. That line about being trendy, who the f#%k cares, reminds me of that old Andre Agassi Canon Rebel camera commercial where he says something like 'image is everything.' That is the problem with people younger than 40; it is what can you do with it that counts. So sick of that generation and their lack of understanding of how the world works. Let them drop their precious portables or have it stolen, then we'll see who is trendy. I'll be using my desktop laughing at them because that all-important portable is broken.

gothiquegirrl
Dec 9, 2006, 03:53 PM
I prefer the Desktop as far as hardcore use. However, I can see how a book would be useful for my own life.

I'm 27 so I'm in the middle of that young/old debate.

I'm young enough to wish i had something with me all the time... Old enough to want to be able to read the screen. :D

Ang

psychofreak
Dec 9, 2006, 04:11 PM
I'd love to have an iMac, simple fact of the matter is, my MacBook comes in handy very often outside of my dormroom. But if I were to buy another computer, it would be an iMac.

Have you seen the thread about the guy who uses his iMac at school?
He even cycles there with it!

Eraserhead
Dec 9, 2006, 04:56 PM
Desktop certainly have their place, I like my Macbook as I can carry it around, and it is a lot faster than my iMac G5 desktop, however if I could sync my two Mac's easily (Apple I'm looking at you) I think I'd use the desktop more.

I think if I was gaming then I'd definitely want a desktop, as you can't really game well on a laptop.

NoCleverSNForMe
Dec 9, 2006, 05:05 PM
however if I could sync my two Mac's easily (Apple I'm looking at you) I think I'd use the desktop more.


Use your .Mac account to sync across multiple Macs.

BenRoethig
Dec 9, 2006, 05:13 PM
The reports of the desktop's demise are greatly exaggerated. I love my iBook and it does most of my general computing tasks, but there are things that it or any other portable just cannot do as well as a desktop. By the time you get into a laptop that can somewhat equal a desktop, you're spending way too much money and it really isn't all that portable.

Dont Hurt Me
Dec 9, 2006, 05:36 PM
I like a bigger and better displays and a real keyboard I can move around, keyboards kind of bite on portables. Plus sooner or later you going to drop that thing,bump it or whatever. Plus desktops are easy to upgrade and add to. Plus you can have a nice display and allways get a new computer or vice a versa.

Eraserhead
Dec 9, 2006, 05:56 PM
Use your .Mac account to sync across multiple Macs.

a) I'm not spending £50 a year on .Mac,

b) it doesn't autosync documents and music, I could sync the calendar and address book with iSync via my phone, I want it to work like the iPod sync except over the network.

Earendil
Dec 9, 2006, 09:10 PM
Okay kids, you aren't getting it, the desktop is dying compared to the laptop. Why? It's very very simple. It doesn't matter if a desktop is 10x more powerful than a laptop, todays laptops are powerful enough for 99.9% of users. It has enough RAM or the average user, it has enough HD space for the average user.

Power users, or those using them for work, will use desktops because they need the power. But there is little reason to get a desktop if you don't need the power.

And if you can't see, get a display, I have a 20" Wide attached to my Powerbook, I can see fine...

However I'm a 22 y.o. CS major, so perhaps I'm in the younger go-everywhere-with-my-computer generation ;-)

~Tyler

D0ct0rteeth
Dec 9, 2006, 09:31 PM
Preach it, my brother.

unless your a hard core gamer - I wouldnt recommend anyone buy a dektop.



Okay kids, you aren't getting it, the desktop is dying compared to the laptop. Why? It's very very simple. It doesn't matter if a desktop is 10x more powerful than a laptop, todays laptops are powerful enough for 99.9% of users. It has enough RAM or the average user, it has enough HD space for the average user.

Power users, or those using them for work, will use desktops because they need the power. But there is little reason to get a desktop if you don't need the power.

And if you can't see, get a display, I have a 20" Wide attached to my Powerbook, I can see fine...

However I'm a 22 y.o. CS major, so perhaps I'm in the younger go-everywhere-with-my-computer generation ;-)

~Tyler

Dont Hurt Me
Dec 9, 2006, 09:42 PM
Preach it, my brother.

unless your a hard core gamer - I wouldnt recommend anyone buy a dektop.

Dont forget the Tv:p

thedude110
Dec 9, 2006, 09:47 PM
Okay kids, you aren't getting it, the desktop is dying compared to the laptop.

Losing marketshare, and likely to lose more marketshare, yes. Dying, probably not. Desktops aren't going away -- if anything, the next ten to fifteen years will likely see an expansion in the number of machines per household. Just as we see families with multiple TVs we're likely to see more and more families with multiple computers, and I have serious doubts that all of those computers will be laptops. Even in a tablet/pda/mobile device revolution -- even in the wired home or wired world where said mobile device controls that world -- there's going to have to be a powerful server at the heart of each home network (and a server isn't a desktop precisely, but it's no laptop, either).

I might buy the argument that the tower is "dying" in favor of the all-in-one, but there's still a large niche market for expandability and I don't see that going away any time soon, either.

Earendil
Dec 9, 2006, 11:02 PM
Losing marketshare, and likely to lose more marketshare, yes. Dying, probably not. Desktops aren't going away -- if anything, the next ten to fifteen years will likely see an expansion in the number of machines per household. Just as we see families with multiple TVs we're likely to see more and more families with multiple computers, and I have serious doubts that all of those computers will be laptops. Even in a tablet/pda/mobile device revolution -- even in the wired home or wired world where said mobile device controls that world -- there's going to have to be a powerful server at the heart of each home network (and a server isn't a desktop precisely, but it's no laptop, either).

I might buy the argument that the tower is "dying" in favor of the all-in-one, but there's still a large niche market for expandability and I don't see that going away any time soon, either.

Which, is exactly what I said. Dying compared to the laptop. Even in the situation of a home server, which I completely buy, you only need one.

Desktops ruled for a very long time. But in a decade or two I would not be surprised to see desktops only accounting for 10% of computers sold*.

My immediate family currently owns and operates full time 5 laptops and 1 desktop. If you count the machines my father and I are given for work, you can stack up two more laptops.

~Tyler

*I'll note that I'm thinking of the consumer here. Businesses that don't want their employees walking off with computers have no reason to buy them laptops.

mduser63
Dec 9, 2006, 11:40 PM
My iMac is my main computer, although my PowerBook also gets used a lot. I can't really see myself not having both a desktop and a laptop. I really prefer working on a desktop, but obviously for portability, I need a laptop.

Bias this article is

The writer is so bias I couldn't stand it.

OK, I'm not singling you guys out, because you're not the only ones doing it, but this is something that has really been bugging me on the boards lately. Saying a writer or article is "bias" is just not correct. The proper sentences would be:

"Biased this article is." (or the non-Yoda-like "This article is biased.")
and
"The writer is so biased I couldn't stand it."

If you read the dictionary entry for "bias" you'll see that bias is a noun that means "prejudice in favor of or against one thing, person, or group compared with another, usually in a way considered to be unfair". It's not correct to say that a writer is predujice. You'd say that a writer is predujiced. It's the same thing with the word bias.

That's my pedantic rant for this forum for the year. ;)

iSaint
Dec 10, 2006, 09:03 AM
It's an interesting article..

I have to say that when I do finally buy an Intel mac.. It will be a IMac.. That's gonna be my work horse computer that I spend my most time on. My valued possession.

Then I'll go buy a low end 800 dollar PC notebook to carry around wih me . Why? Well cause I won't cry if it gets broken! LOL

I have to say i'd be DEVESTATED if I had a MBP and dropped it.. or spilled somethin on it.. or ect.. I can't say the same about a PC notebook.

Ang

Just checked out your artwork, very cool! I like...! Are you in school now?

psycoswimmer
Dec 10, 2006, 09:32 AM
I'd buy a MB in a heart-beat if it had a graphics card for some light gaming. (Does CoD2 run okay on the MB?) However, it doesn't, and I really don't see it in the future, so I'm getting an iMac. I could get a MBP, but it's expensive similarly compared to an iMac, and and 15" it's not that portable.

SPUY767
Dec 10, 2006, 09:49 AM
Desktops are so 20th century??? I have a laptop, sure, it's a Toshiba, cost $700.00. I wouldn't have a Mac laptop because I'd be afraid that something would happen to it. However, if I need to do any really meaty work I wouldn't trade My MP for anything in the world. The guy who wrote this article might be mildly retarded, very distracted by shiny objects.

SkyBell
Dec 10, 2006, 10:13 AM
Well, Im 13 here, and I have to cast my vote for desktop. For a few reasons.

1. Laptops aren't Not powerful enough
2. I have two windows 'tops, and they are too dang flimsy!
3. -the most important reason- I'm the kind of girl who remembers to bring her $5 hairbrushes back from vacation, but forgets her $1500 laptop. (actually happened once- except it was an iPod.)

I don't need power on the go, which is why I have a Windows 98SE laptop, so I can get onto the net when I'm away.

Sorry young people, but I'm siding with the oldies (kidding;) ) on this one

SMM
Dec 10, 2006, 10:46 AM
I have both and for difference reasons. The laptop is mainly for portability. My PM's and MP are for raw power. They both excel at what their form factor was designed to provide. I did not read the article. No sense in providing any respect for such a silly premise.

devilot
Dec 10, 2006, 11:05 AM
unless your a hard core gamer - I wouldnt recommend anyone buy a dektop.Er... what about comfort? I find using desktops to be so much more comfortable than using laptops.

Compile 'em all
Dec 10, 2006, 11:14 AM
Er... what about comfort? I find using desktops to be so much more comfortable than using laptops.

You mean, as in having to sit in front of a desk as opposed to anywhere? :p

devilot
Dec 10, 2006, 11:17 AM
You mean, as in having to sit in front of a desk as opposed to anywhere? :pOr... as in having a better chance of better ergonomics all around. I see plenty of laptop users at desks, and if they don't use a separate keyboard/ mice they have awful posture.

Don't get me wrong, if you check my profile you'll see I use both a desktop and portable. But for me, portable is sort of a "just in case," I have always and probably always will prefer desktops to portables.

calculus
Dec 10, 2006, 11:20 AM
Er... what about comfort? I find using desktops to be so much more comfortable than using laptops.

I would certainly agree with that. I also wonder if more laptops are being sold because they have a shorter lifespan - they are much more likely to get dropped, lost or stolen.

Blue Velvet
Dec 10, 2006, 12:03 PM
unless your a hard core gamer - I wouldnt recommend anyone buy a dektop.


Yeah, fine. Let's run the studio on itty-bitty MacBooks. They'll be just fine for churning out production-level artwork with tight deadlines. I hear they're so upgradable as well.

There'll always be a market for desktops; not all Macs are bought for the home. ;)

SPUY767
Dec 10, 2006, 01:12 PM
I would certainly agree with that. I also wonder if more laptops are being sold because they have a shorter lifespan - they are much more likely to get dropped, lost or stolen.

No kidding. Someone tried to steal my laptop when I was getting my mail at 2 AM after flying into town. I pulled a gun on the guy, and the laptop is only a Toshiba. Lord only knows what I would have done if it was a MBP. At any rate, beyond portability, it will always be a desktop for me. I like to get things done when I want them done, not when my computer feels like finishing them.

OdduWon
Dec 10, 2006, 01:15 PM
i see alot of people buyimg portables now a days, but it's because they don't need the ppower. my architecture buddy got one of the last 15"PB juiced and it worked fine for all his needs. until he started using maya and rino. the spinning beachball of doom even stopped spinning :eek: when he tried to run these programs. So he calls me yesterday and says he need a mac pro. I say you lucky dog. I will get a santarosa portable because it is probbably as fast as my twin turbo 2.7 PMG5. It's funny how students minds work. alot of kids ask me what they should get for a lappy and tell them MPB of course. but then they say it cost too much or (insert mac myth here). they say all i have is $800 and i need a computer that won't crash all the time. Good luck. anyone in the know will buy a juicy lappy because if you don't you just get a slow heavy headache.:p

Corran Horn
Dec 10, 2006, 01:19 PM
Well I'm 20, and I currently use a PC laptop. My next computer will be a MBP. It's a great computer and I can use it to take notes in class, work on projects for my graphic design class, and everything in between. I'm a Media Communications Major, so I'll probably have FCP on it to tweak projects. But I'm much rather have an iMac or a Mac Pro to do the heavy work of FCP or Photoshop.

There is another way to look at this debate. Price. Desktops are significantly cheaper than a laptop that would be that could meet the desktop's specs.

That said, the trend is moving toward laptops. HDs are getting smaller in size but larger in capacity, Processors getting smaller, yet gaining the capacity to do more And battery technology is allowing longer battery life at a smaller size. All the while being cheaper to produce and distribute.

I'm amazed at the upcoming technology. And I'm glad that I'll be out of college soon and hopefully in a place where I can afford to purchase that technology.

My final answer: I'll always have a laptop. Most of the younger generation are into convenience; we shop online, pay bills online, don't use USPS but rather email, etc. But I will probably have a desktop too. Something that can function as a server, and hold all my big files/programs.

-Corran Horn

Cybergypsy
Dec 10, 2006, 01:51 PM
Funny i had a macbook and just bought a old imac.....and its soooo fast, then using my macbook with airport,,,,,,

840quadra
Dec 10, 2006, 02:11 PM
My Macbook C2D is faster at most everything when compared to my Powermac G5 Dual 2.0.

Granted the modern equivalent (Mac Pro) will blow my macbook out of the water, it still says allot about the power and performance of new Portables.

I like both schools of thought personally! I like having my G5 at home with lots of expandability, storage, and still great power to do Final Cut, Aperture, and Photoshop work. I also like the Macbook for being able to do these same things on the road when I cannot access my G5!

To me it is like having the nice larger car that you use on weekends, family trips, or for times you need space, and have the subcompact that you can take to work, or daily tasks!

Earendil
Dec 10, 2006, 03:42 PM
Er... what about comfort? I find using desktops to be so much more comfortable than using laptops.

Anything having to do with looks, feel, and ergonomics can be solved the exact same way it is on a desktop...with a keyboard, mouse, and monitor. At home I use my powerbook a lot, so it has an Apple keyboard, Kensington turbo mouse, and a Dell monitor attached to it. I hardly ever look at my lap, though the screen real-estate is there if I need it.

And again, I'll state it: The defense of the desktop as not falling out compared to the laptop just because "Well I use it for graphics design, so... ha!" is not a defense. You yourself are a dying breed compared to the number of consumers wanting to check their email. Professions are taking on a smaller and smaller percentage of the computer users as a whole.

If anyone would like to make a defense of the desktop that doesn't include how a small minority need them, then I think the author is correct. The trend is towards laptops, and I believe it will continue towards laptops for a long time to come.

zap2
Dec 10, 2006, 04:59 PM
[QUOTE=Cassie;3136631]Well, Im 13 here, and I have to cast my vote for desktop. For a few reasons.

1. Laptops aren't Not powerful enough
/QUOTE]


What is a 13 year old doing that a laptop can't do? Gaming? Because other then that I can't see many apps not running on a laptop. I mean my Mac Mini is pretty darn fast, and the MacBook is faster, so I think a MacBook would be fine(as long as its not gaming)

I have a laptop and desktop, the reason I bought desktop was because it was cheaper which left me with $$ for a bigger screen. My laptop is nice, its not very fast,its a G4. It work for my basic emai, pages and FF is all I do on it.

stcanard
Dec 10, 2006, 11:01 PM
Yeah, fine. Let's run the studio on itty-bitty MacBooks. They'll be just fine for churning out production-level artwork with tight deadlines. I hear they're so upgradable as well.

There'll always be a market for desktops; not all Macs are bought for the home. ;)

Honestly, I would expect that a group of high powered servers that can be shared, plus portable laptops for convenience would be better for that?

From my viewpoint, pooled processor resources using technologies like XGrid, with laptops moving in and out of the network adding power when they are there, are a more cost efficient future for companies than putting the power on each individual desktop.

But then again, I know that my life spending 90% of my work time on servers in another country that I've never actually seen is still somewhat unusual. But it will be coming in the future for more and more people...

Blue Velvet
Dec 11, 2006, 01:11 AM
Honestly, I would expect that a group of high powered servers that can be shared, plus portable laptops for convenience would be better for that?


Since many of these apps aren't even multi-processor-aware (hello Illustrator), I wouldn't expect to be spreading a processor load over a network in a hurry, let alone having the tools and resources to maintain such a setup. In my experience, many small studios don't employ networking gurus to keep their Macs running but usually fly by the seat of their pants with the designers picking up the lightweight stuff with maintenance contracts for the heavy lifting.

There's no way in hell that portable laptops would be convenient in a conventional studio set-up... we need as much accurate display space as possible with fast internal scratch drives and fast processors, tons of RAM on a gigabit network with a good server. That's all.

And as for being a dying breed, pro users will always be there. There are more of us on this forum and out there than you might get the impression of from hanging around message boards. I'll eventually be getting a MBP for home to replace the dual 1.4, but that's entirely due to a space-saving decision; I have a very small flat.

Earendil
Dec 11, 2006, 01:57 AM
Since many of these apps aren't even multi-processor-aware (hello Illustrator), I wouldn't expect to be spreading a processor load over a network in a hurry, let alone having the tools and resources to maintain such a setup. In my experience, many small studios don't employ networking gurus to keep their Macs running but usually fly by the seat of their pants with the designers picking up the lightweight stuff with maintenance contracts for the heavy lifting.

Yes, but that is now and than. In the future it could be quite easy to pick up a couple heavy duty servers and a bunch of thin clients for most work. Even if you are in graphics and demand large screen real-esate, it may make more sense for the monitors to be attached to a thin client with shared network resources. Economically it makes sense, if the technology is in place. And inevitably, it will be in place.

There's no way in hell that portable laptops would be convenient in a conventional studio set-up... we need as much accurate display space as possible with fast internal scratch drives and fast processors, tons of RAM on a gigabit network with a good server. That's all.

What about a half dozen 40" multi touch displays all connected view XGrid to another half dozen servers at your fingertips, and the software to take advantage of it all?

And as for being a dying breed, pro users will always be there. There are more of us on this forum and out there than you might get the impression of from hanging around message boards. I'll eventually be getting a MBP for home to replace the dual 1.4, but that's entirely due to a space-saving decision; I have a very small flat.

Humm... I believe you are referencing me with the pro users being a dying breed. This whole using of "compared to" us confusing people.
Apples taste better compared to oranges != oranges taste bad. No, it only means that Apples taste better. Oranges may still taste great.
Pro users are becoming a smaller number compared to the average user. But all that means is that the growth of the average user is far surpassing that of the growth of the tech/pro field in relationship to all computer users.

And again, Desktops could see double sales figures year over year. But their numbers would still be shrinking in relationship to laptops if laptops started selling 10x year over year.

I'm a CompSci major, currently working in robotics. My hobbies include Photography. I like to think that I'm half way in touch with the tech/pro users. I do not make my comments with the air of "you pro users". I can see my own uses for a desktop, I can also see my uses for a laptop. For most of the average users I know, my friends included, a portable would suit their needs JUST fine. In fact, it would save me from having to tell them where to plug the monitor in :rolleyes:

~Tyler

gothiquegirrl
Dec 11, 2006, 02:28 AM
Just checked out your artwork, very cool! I like...! Are you in school now?


School? Nope! Never been to School ( I assume college?). I got the hell outta High School... had a few Great Danes ( lol) and got married.. Not actually in that order!

Seriously.. I'm totally self taught with everything I do. Well I have an awesomely talented Family who also passed on some excellent skills. Like my Granny :)

Ang

Mord
Dec 11, 2006, 05:47 AM
This is old news, loads of people buy desktops to feel like a pro when a laptop would provide an overall better more convenient experience, personally I've kept both, I have a cube I leave on all the time to leave to do stuff and come back to, to download/upload 24/7 if I'm doing allot of FTP stuff or to work on if I'm doing some serious graphics work where a notebook HD working with big images/files will really bog down at the moment I'm not doing any of those things, the only reason I'm using my desktop is because my macbook charger blew up.

Unless your in a serious minority one which admittedly I'm not even in at the moment a desktop is not the greatest idea.

Compile 'em all
Dec 11, 2006, 06:36 AM
I personally think that the Desktop will eventually die and will be replaced with portables, handhelds and thin-clients. It is not far away from imagination to expect more-core processors on laptops in the next 5+ years. They will pack so much power that cover all your computing needs. Want to sit on a desk? Plug it into your docking station and there is your desktop.

Dont Hurt Me
Dec 11, 2006, 06:40 AM
The computer is morphing for sure, some people need a mobile system some dont. I just bought a new desktop and I love it. Has a better display then any portable,better keyboard,more options and the mobile factor is even a factor for me. This article is kind of stupid trying to say the desktop is dead is like saying the pencil is dead.

Diatribe
Dec 11, 2006, 07:34 AM
Both have their advantages and disadvantages. I for one love my MBP when I am travelling around and since that happens every 2-3 weeks now this is absolutely necessary.
However, at home I am torn. I like both sitting on my couch/bed with my MBP as the big screen/HD capacity a desktop would offer.

IF Apple would offer a decent syching solution I'd probably have both.
Until then I'll use my MBP with a networked HD over my Airport network to compensate for the lack of HD space.

stcanard
Dec 11, 2006, 11:02 AM
There's no way in hell that portable laptops would be convenient in a conventional studio set-up... we need as much accurate display space as possible with fast internal scratch drives and fast processors, tons of RAM on a gigabit network with a good server. That's all.

Fast processors, drives, networks, can all be taken care of by a server (with a correctly designed app -- if Illustrator is not SMP aware, considering how long pro macs have been multi-processor, that's just horrifying)

But -- you're right. There is no way any of that can replace or adjust for pure screen real estate, and if you're going to have a monitor sitting on the desk, you might as well have something permanently attached to it.

But I do still stand by the opinion that desktops are going to become more of a specialty item, for pros that need them, rather than the dominant form factor.