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MacRumors
Dec 15, 2006, 10:58 AM
http://www.macrumors.com/images/macrumorsthreadlogo.gif (http://www.macrumors.com)

The final software bundle for the MacHeist scavenger hunt (http://www.macrumors.com/pages/2006/11/20061110232237.shtml) was announced earlier this week and is on sale until Sunday night. So, this weekend is the last chance to take advantage of this sale.

The final Mac software bundle ($49) (http://macheist.com/) includes the following Mac applications: Delicious Library (http://www.delicious-monster.com/), ShapeShifter (http://www.fotomagico.com/>Foto Magico[/url], [url="http://unsanity.com/), DEVONThink Personal (http://devon-technologies.com/products/devonthink/), Disco (http://discoapp.com/), RapidWeaver (http://realmacsoftware.com/rapidweaver/), iClip 4 (http://www.inventive.us/iClip4/), a Pangea game (http://www.pangeasoft.net/index2.html), Newsfire (http://newsfirex.com/) and Textmate (http://macromates.com/). The total value of the applications purchased individually comes to $307.74.

The promotion has generated a significant amount of controversy amongst Mac developers.

Against: Gus Mueller (http://www.gusmueller.com/blog/archives/2006/12/week_of_the_independent_mac_developer.html), Rouge Amoeba (http://www.rogueamoeba.com/utm/posts/Article/Whose-Week-2006-12-12-12-00.html)
Pro: Will Shipley (http://arstechnica.com/journals/apple.ars/2006/12/13/6275), Oliver Breidenbach (http://www.oreillynet.com/mac/blog/2006/12/taking_the_heist.html?CMP=OTC-13IV03560550&ATT=Taking+the+Heist)

The debate essentially boils down to the perceived value in giving away applications at significantly discounted prices and the shifting of revenue to the Macheist team. As linked above, however, the developers participating in the promotion, however, appear pleased with the results at this early stage.

Update: Originally Textmate was to be locked until $100,000 in charity was raised, but it appears they have unlocked it early.



arn
Dec 15, 2006, 11:01 AM
for reference sake, it appears the applications are full licenses with the exception of Textmate which provides 1.x updates only, but with 2.0 Leopard update coming with a discount.

arn

flopticalcube
Dec 15, 2006, 11:05 AM
Looks like Textmate has been unlocked early!

mark88
Dec 15, 2006, 11:07 AM
I bet my left nut that Will Shipley would not have put Delicious Library 2 in the bundle. It's good for him because his puts in DL1 which has been out ages and sold thousands already. DL2 is out soon and he knows he can make money from upgrades. So let's be clear about that.

I feel kinda sorry for developers who have apps competing against those in the bundle. I really don't see how bargain basement software is good for Mac Software in the longterm at all.

Keep giving people these incredible deals, just don't complain later on when you struggle to sell your software at full price.

decksnap
Dec 15, 2006, 11:12 AM
Financial analysis by John Gruber on how exploitive the pricing scheme is.

http://daringfireball.net/2006/12/iniquities_of_the_selfish

theheadguy
Dec 15, 2006, 11:14 AM
Why is everyone getting so upset of this? Many Mac users are not "die-hard" like us and probably wouldn't spend a penny on any of these programs... This is in many ways a win-win.

treblah
Dec 15, 2006, 11:17 AM
Financial analysis by John Gruber on how exploitive the pricing scheme is.

http://daringfireball.net/2006/12/iniquities_of_the_selfish

Remind me how a developer can be exploited if they opt in to the program. :confused: :rolleyes:

nagromme
Dec 15, 2006, 11:17 AM
Maybe it does make more money for MacHeist than it makes for any one developer, but at least developers joined in voluntarily--they weren't forced to.

And I don't know that it devalues anything: it's a SHORT term deal. A holiday sale. Which, like other sales, can have the long-term benefit of raising awareness of certain products. It can also sell products to people who would never have paid full price: better to make some money rather than none, from a buyer who doesn't need/want your product as much as other buyers.

I didn't buy the bundle, but it (and the rest of MacHeist) caused me to learn about apps I might be interested in (or might recommend) later. And I would guess that a lot of people bought the bundle who would never have bought those apps at full price.

I can't speak about the financial details, or whether developers SHOULD have joined in or not, but in general, it seems like a positive thing--putting the spotlight on Mac software and indie developers.

Plus, this sale is the culmination of the whole heist/game thing--it doesn't just stand alone. (People earned additional discounts that way, and the spotlight was put on even more apps--which were given away in non-upgradable but non-demo form.)

decksnap
Dec 15, 2006, 11:19 AM
Remind me how a developer can be exploited if they opt in to the program. :confused: :rolleyes:

exploitive of the industry.

Butters
Dec 15, 2006, 11:19 AM
TextMate is indeed unlocked :D My purchase was now officially well worth £25

arn
Dec 15, 2006, 11:24 AM
exploitive of the industry.

Well, people seem to assume that the Macheist people provided no service and therefore should not have been paid so much (Based on the assumptions on the articles).

But, there is value to promotion. And inherent risk involved... in that if they had not cleared the amount they promised then they would actually have lost money. There was certainly no guarantee they would have sold enough to cover expenses.

arn

decksnap
Dec 15, 2006, 11:27 AM
Well, people seem to assume that the Macheist people provided no service and therefore should not have been paid so much (Based on the assumptions on the articles).

But, there is value to promotion. And inherent risk involved... in that if they had not cleared the amount they promised then they would actually have lost money. There was certainly no guarantee they would have sold enough to cover expenses.

arn

True. Just posting the link so people can get a better understanding of the scheme they've set up. That said, the amount they stand to make is stupidly disproportionate.

mdntcallr
Dec 15, 2006, 11:27 AM
Personally, I think MacHeist was a waste of time for anyone but a high school or College kid.

If a company wants to do a real promotion to drive attention to the software, there are other ways to do it.

I dunno why people really care about this at all.

or why publishers actually have anything to lose. this stuff is mostly shareware type software.

it's not like they were giving away Aperture, Office or an Aspyr type game.

bousozoku
Dec 15, 2006, 11:33 AM
Why is everyone getting so upset of this? Many Mac users are not "die-hard" like us and probably wouldn't spend a penny on any of these programs... This is in many ways a win-win.

That's what I've been saying. You see one or two you like and you get all of them. You might just find that you like the rest of them and want to pay to upgrade them sometime in the future.

People are getting something but not as much as they would have alone, though more than they might have when people just delete the application from their machine.

Flowbee
Dec 15, 2006, 11:37 AM
Looks like it's been a pretty successful promotion overall. It's certainly brought a lot of attention the the bundled apps, and the controversy is only helping. It'll be interesting to read the participating dev's comments on how successful it was for them when the whole thing's over.

mmmcheese
Dec 15, 2006, 11:43 AM
Rouge Amoeba? haha...oh well, at least they got the spelling of the hard words right.

Rod76
Dec 15, 2006, 11:48 AM
It's pretty simple in my case, I'd never even consider most of the software offered at its retail price. This discount is giving devs my money whereas they would normally not have gotten my business.

This is the same reason I now use MacZot and MacUpdate deals to buy software. I'm a big supporter of the Mac shareware scene and I'm glad devs are now making these exceptions. I just hope they don't all decide to update their apps and charge me upgrade fees the week, day, and hour Leopard is released.

This is a great business model, and I hope it continues. I now get to use programs that for so long were just things on my want/wish list.

cherrypop
Dec 15, 2006, 11:54 AM
They named this "promotion" MacHeist for a reason.

No one wins except MacHeist themselves, and perhaps the customers (depending how you look at the situation).

Sure, the charities get some cash, that's good. But the developers get just 3% of the gross by some estimates.

randomlinh
Dec 15, 2006, 11:55 AM
I bet my left nut that Will Shipley would not have put Delicious Library 2 in the bundle. It's good for him because his puts in DL1 which has been out ages and sold thousands already. DL2 is out soon and he knows he can make money from upgrades. So let's be clear about that.

I feel kinda sorry for developers who have apps competing against those in the bundle. I really don't see how bargain basement software is good for Mac Software in the longterm at all.

Keep giving people these incredible deals, just don't complain later on when you struggle to sell your software at full price.

In his interview, he pretty much says exactly that. This was a way to get a userbase... and get them on an upgrade path. I see no problem with it if whoever buys it sees value in it. Otherwise, don't buy.

I wanted textmate, and figured at least a piece of this is going to charity, so why not?

Besides, everyone who joined did so on their own free will

flopticalcube
Dec 15, 2006, 12:00 PM
They named this "promotion" MacHeist for a reason.

No one wins except MacHeist themselves, and perhaps the customers (depending how you look at the situation).

Sure, the charities get some cash, that's good. But the developers get just 3% of the gross by some estimates.

But how much would the developers make without the promotion? Probably nearer zilch in most cases. Nothing stopping other developers getting together and making their own promotion. Sour grapes all round really. :p

SciTeach
Dec 15, 2006, 12:13 PM
I'm curious to know if anyone has gotten the bundle and how they like the apps. I appreciate indie development but I'll be honest and I only get the ones that are useful to me. The deal sounds good.

tk421
Dec 15, 2006, 12:16 PM
They named this "promotion" MacHeist for a reason.

No one wins except MacHeist themselves, and perhaps the customers (depending how you look at the situation).

Sure, the charities get some cash, that's good. But the developers get just 3% of the gross by some estimates.

Even if it is only 3%, 3% is better than 0%.

I would never buy any of these programs at the price they are normally. Not a chance. But I bought the entire package because I thought it was a good deal. And it cost the developers nothing to participate. There's no tangible merchandise or costs associated with that.

Kingsly
Dec 15, 2006, 12:23 PM
So... how much would the bundle have cost had I taken the time to participate in the heists? :confused:

Doctor Q
Dec 15, 2006, 12:31 PM
I'm curious to know if anyone has gotten the bundle and how they like the apps.There are some comments about that in the Will you buy the MacHeist bundle? thread.

Hattig
Dec 15, 2006, 12:37 PM
I wouldn't have purchased any of them.

Now I will get all 10.

Maybe I will like a couple enough that I will get updates in the future.

Nobody has lost out from me here, as I wouldn't have got them. Indeed now they've all got maybe $1 to $3 each from me, so that's a net gain.

I imagine it is the same for a significant proportion of the other purchasers.

yield
Dec 15, 2006, 12:39 PM
I just purchased mine... .when do you receive the textmate serial? I still haven't received mine.

Is it still unlocked?

Bibulous
Dec 15, 2006, 12:40 PM
So... how much would the bundle have cost had I taken the time to participate in the heists? :confused:

$39, a $10 discount.

I used a site called WikiHeist, they basically posted the solutions so you could finish each Heist in less then 5 minutes.

jholzner
Dec 15, 2006, 12:41 PM
Remind me how a developer can be exploited if they opt in to the program. :confused: :rolleyes:

I was going to post the same thing. I have been reading Grubers take on the matter and I guess I see his point a little but no one forced these developers to include their apps. If they didnt like the deal they were getting they could just not sign the deal!

madmaxmedia
Dec 15, 2006, 12:47 PM
1. They're not evil, they're a business. And I don't think anyone has accused them of not being upfront in their dealings with devs. If the deal they were offering was SO bad, no one would've taken it.

2. Their marketing message may or may not be a little inappropriate- that whole "We really care!" thing. If there's a lot of negative fallout, then they'll take that into consideration next time if they're smart. The open discussion helps everyone.

3. At the end of the day it's not about exploitation, it's simply about devs making a business decison. There are definitely pro's and con's. I do think Jon Gruber at Daring Fireball probably summed it up best in this regard:

"A gimmick like MacZot can help lift your app out of obscurity — but you don’t need a gimmick to get out of obscurity. If your app is good enough, it will break out of obscurity on its own, sooner or later, without your having to give away hundreds or thousands of deeply discounted or free licenses. And participating in MacZot won’t help your app break into the mainstream, because normal people don’t follow MacZot."
http://daringfireball.net/2006/11/pinprick

That being said, maybe for MacHeist 2 or whatever they'll come up with some new advertising methods to try to reach the greater mainstream population of Mac users.

Kingsly
Dec 15, 2006, 12:50 PM
I used a site called WikiHeist, they basically posted the solutions so you could finish each Heist in less then 5 minutes.
**bangs head against wall repeatedly**

:o

SiliconAddict
Dec 15, 2006, 12:58 PM
Umm is everyone also missing one key fact about this bundle? That 25% is going to the charity of your choice. Or at least one of the charities in the list.

flopticalcube
Dec 15, 2006, 12:59 PM
I'm curious to know if anyone has gotten the bundle and how they like the apps. I appreciate indie development but I'll be honest and I only get the ones that are useful to me. The deal sounds good.

Delicious Library. Fun but not particularly useful. Value to me $5
FotoMagico. Great presentation maker. Value to me $0 (I don't make presentations)
ShapeShifter. Again fun but not useful. Value to me $0
DEVONthink. Document organizer, necessary for me. Value to me $39
Disco. Toast is toast.... Value to me $10
RapidWeaver. For the children. Value to me $20
iClip. Kind of useful, I guess. Value to me $5
Pangea Enigmo 2. Great puzzle game for my eldest. Value to me $10
Newsfire. YA BABY! Value to me $19
Textmate. Voonderbar! Value to me $10 (Crappy upgrade)

So I got $118 (worth to me) of software for $49.

Who lost out:
DEVONthink (I was going to get it anyway)
Newsfire
Perhaps Rapidweaver

Who broke even(ish)
Disco
Pangea
Textmate
iClip

Who won my business because of MacHeist
Delicious
FotoMagico
Shapeshifter

FriarTuck
Dec 15, 2006, 01:06 PM
I wanted to buy Fotomagico but couldn't justify the $79 regular price.

So getting just Fotomagico for $49 was a great deal for me.

Everything else is just gravy. And if I find another couple of apps in there that work well, chances are I will be a bit more likely to buy stuff from small developers in the future.

I call it a win-win.

fixyourthinking
Dec 15, 2006, 01:10 PM
Remind me how a developer can be exploited if they opt in to the program. :confused: :rolleyes:

Exactly ... I think Gruber was off base on this particular issue. It's also very interesting to see him bash a Philip Ryu idea ... after just being made a guest blogger judge by Ryu in the MyDreamApp contest.

phytonix
Dec 15, 2006, 01:51 PM
if it is true that those developers got, let's say $10K flat rate for given MacHeist to sell their programs.

Then yes, MacHeist is really Heist.
Not only to developers but also to people who bought a bunch of programs they don't really need.

flopticalcube
Dec 15, 2006, 01:54 PM
No. It's business. No developers were forced into this sale. No buyers were forced to make a purchase.

phytonix
Dec 15, 2006, 02:05 PM
No. It's business. No developers were forced into this sale. No buyers were forced to make a purchase.

Yes it is businesss. And we all know marketing is evil.

bousozoku
Dec 15, 2006, 02:20 PM
I just purchased mine... .when do you receive the textmate serial? I still haven't received mine.

Is it still unlocked?

Perhaps, you should have read the information before you bought. Some of the serial numbers will be sent to you within 72 hours of your purchase and the TextMate and NewsFire serial numbers were to be sent within a week of their meeting the goals.

Doctor Q
Dec 15, 2006, 02:33 PM
No. It's business. No developers were forced into this sale. No buyers were forced to make a purchase.Even if the software vendors aren't making a good percentage of the income from these MacHeist sales, they are gaining customers (like me) they wouldn't otherwise have, and they will get the full income from any upgrades we/I buy later.

amfr
Dec 15, 2006, 02:53 PM
I, for one, would have bought 0 of these apps (though I would have drooled over some) but seeing them all together for $35 (I finished four heists and split with a friend) was too much for me.
As for being unfair the the developers, almost all the developers have either blogged or posted somewhere that they felt that they were getting a great deal, none of them has said that they regretted their descision.
Also, 25% is donated to charity (I gave mine to the wwf) which makes the deal even better as I consider myself as having given $8.75 to charity and having bought 10 great apps for $26.25.

Macintosh Sauce
Dec 15, 2006, 03:02 PM
Some of the people being so negative about this fail to realise that Mac indie developers need to get the word out more. This is a great way of doing it, plus the buyer is helping a great cause in the process. It's all about promotion of the apps people...

cherrypop
Dec 15, 2006, 03:08 PM
But how much would the developers make without the promotion? Probably nearer zilch in most cases.

Depends on how you look at it.

If they sat on their asses, then, yes, they might not have made any money. But that's not the point.

Developers can create promotions, too. Their hands aren't tied. And if they did, you can bet that they'd be left with a lot more than 3% after the expenses were paid.

I'm not calling anyone out, really, I just don't like what I've heard regarding MacHeist's side of the deal. Put it this way, as software users, you won't be getting good deals like this forever if developers are only walking away with $0.03 on the dollar. It's that simple.

I've posted previously as to how I think developers could and should participate in promotions like these. There are things that can be done that makes it easier for developers to get exposure while protecting their product and at the same time giving something to the consumer at a price they wouldn't otherwise enjoy. I'll elaborate or provide the link if anyone's interested.

jelloshotsrule
Dec 15, 2006, 03:34 PM
i don't know where to fall on this. it's up to each developer as a business decision, so i don't fault any on either side of things.

one of the developers, while writing in support of it, made a comment that caught my eye though... something about how "it's like piracy, a bunch of people that wouldn't have paid for my software anyway will be getting it to try."

in my view, big mistake to equate it and even sort of rationalize piracy... but that's my take

in addition, while i enjoyed the idea of the various 'heists' (though i'm not smart enough to figure them out myself), when they closed the heists quickly, and then started selling stuff, i realized that it was just a scam to sell stuff. it's one thing to cover costs or even make some profit off an idea, but it seemed like a bit of subversion to set it up as something fun, and then smack you with this selling scheme.

calculus
Dec 15, 2006, 04:18 PM
The point is surely that the developers got some 'no risk' cash for doing nothing (extra). They also get themselves known a bit more and will pick up some extra sales through word of mouth (if the products are any good). I don't see anything to complain about.

amfr
Dec 15, 2006, 05:00 PM
Heres thee take of the developer of shapeshifter (one of the apps in the bundle)
http://www.unsanity.org/archives/mac_os_x/professional_courtesy_whither_w.php

Gelfin
Dec 15, 2006, 08:19 PM
Gus didn't think the deal was in his interests. Good for him not taking it.

Jason thought the deal was in his interests. Good for him too.

The rest is nobody's business but the people who decided for themselves.

Those people some folks are calling "their community" are also in many cases their competitors. Particularly in Gus' case, DEVONthink Personal competes with VoodooPad for some purposes. Gus' blanket criticisms of the promotion as bad for "the community" have a slightly different flavor when you think about it that way.

If Gus is right, DEVON have bought themselves more trouble in support costs than they'll benefit from the promotion and he can sit back and enjoy the benefits of stable, sustainable growth while his competitor struggles under the burden of an ill-advised business decision. It could work out very well for Gus. On the off chance he's not right, his competitor has gained it looks like somewhere in the neighborhood of ten thousand new customers who may not consider VoodooPad now because they've already got DEVONthink meeting their document organization needs.

For context, I'm a happy, paying VoodooPad Pro user. I really don't want to pick on Gus particularly, but he's got a vested interest here where Gruber is just foaming at the mouth. I really don't see anyone complaining about Gus offering a "Lite" version of VoodooPad for flat nothing. Doesn't this "devalue the community" and make people expect software for less than it takes to produce it? Why not? For cherrypop, who noted that "developers can create promotions, too," well, yes. That's exactly what VoodooPad Lite is, and it's probably one of the reasons Gus didn't feel like he needed to participate in the promotion. He's technically taking a bath on every copy of his blood, sweat and tears given away to people who never end up buying a paid version. How would it sound if some rep from DEVON popped up and complained that Flying Meat should stop giving away software for free "for the good of the community?"

Bottom line, your business choices are your own business. If someone else's choices buy them trouble, then it's their trouble and they earned it. One man's mistake can be another man's fortune in business, and those who assume any particular decision is one or the other run the risk of looking fairly foolish when the numbers are in.

phytonix
Dec 15, 2006, 08:20 PM
I admit many people win in this situation. But whether it is fair that MacHeist people get so much money is another issue.

And personally I feel it is pathetic to feel happy just because you made money. When people could have something better, they might be content already for a little bit sugar. And that's how capitalist got rich. And that's why marketing is somehow evil.

Finally, if I am any one of the developers who participated in this, I would have not joined. Instead, I will start my own "MacHeist" by contacting some other developers. In this way, although I "steal" the idea from MacHeist, but nobody could exploit developers. And other benefits could still exist.

arn
Dec 15, 2006, 08:38 PM
Finally, if I am any one of the developers who participated in this, I would have not joined. Instead, I will start my own "MacHeist" by contacting some other developers. In this way, although I "steal" the idea from MacHeist, but nobody could exploit developers. And other benefits could still exist.

Fair enough... but again, I think this is easier said than done.

arn

iW00t
Dec 15, 2006, 11:31 PM
if it is true that those developers got, let's say $10K flat rate for given MacHeist to sell their programs.

Then yes, MacHeist is really Heist.
Not only to developers but also to people who bought a bunch of programs they don't really need.

Actually the figure is closer to the ballpark of 5K, with the exception of Delicious Library and Textmate which supposedly got 12K or so.

Westside guy
Dec 15, 2006, 11:56 PM
It's funny - I can see both sides, and when I read the four developers' takes on this I agreed with all of them. :D They do all have valid points.

I ended up buying the bundle. The only app there that I'd thought about buying before was FotoMagico, and I'd already decided I was going to hold off for a while. Very few other purchasers seem to have much interest in that app; and conversely I had little interest in ever buying the apps those guys said they wanted. But now I plan to try using Delicious Library, which I'd really never seriously considered before. Will I upgrade to version 2? Who knows? But there's a non-zero chance now. I don't need RapidWeaver, but my daughter may find it useful - and if she likes it there's a future upgrade purchaser right there. Shapeshifter isn't interesting at all to me, so they've got a buck or two of my money that they'd never see otherwise - and I can guarantee there won't be any associated support costs to them. :p

People have short memories, but I really hope someone will revisit this a year from now and see how all the developers feel about it once they've had the chance to look back.

x86isslow
Dec 16, 2006, 02:00 AM
Personally, I think MacHeist was a waste of time for anyone but a high school or College kid.

If a company wants to do a real promotion to drive attention to the software, there are other ways to do it.


Do you ever wonder why ads for Tonka trucks don't just have adults in them? Real promotions take the age of the people they're selling towards into consideration.

It may seem like a waste of time to you, and that's fine, but most college students don't have lots of money to buy software. Most college students are also caught up in a culture of piracy, due to the RIAA-i2Hub war et al. By offering this type of promotion to college students, they are introducing the concept of being honest to a group of kids who have no conception of it.

Think of it this way- Apple made iTunes Store big with a huge free-songs-with-a-Pepsi campaign. Now those people are acclimated to the idea of buying music on iTS.
=-=-=

Personally, I'm thankful I have a job. I'd hate to ever be in a position where I am pirating other people's work, but I know there are a ton of my fellow college students for whom that is not possible.

Flowbee
Dec 16, 2006, 02:27 AM
Looks like they hit the "$100,000 for charity" mark tonight. Unlocking TextMate earlier today finally persuaded me to buy. I'm really liking DEVONthink. I had never even heard of it before MacHeist.

Bonte
Dec 16, 2006, 08:09 AM
I'm just a buying customer and i love the Heist program, there were 4-5 apps that i would have bought if they were 5-9 dollars each but this sounded like a good overall deal and went for it. In all honesty i have to say the Pangea game was the decision maker.

I truly believe $5,- is a good and fair price for 90% of the current shareware and indie applications for the Mac, we just need a strong centralized marketplace like iTunes to offer the products. I know only Apple can make this work so i hope they'll broaden their view to other digital content, the iPod games are a good first step so i'm optimistic. Isn't it strange that everybody wants to sell iPod games for $5 but asks $20 for the mac version of the same game?

If Apple wants to take this next step then i also think its inevitable that osX will be opened up for general PC hardware, no question about that. :-)

Chosenbydestiny
Dec 16, 2006, 08:21 AM
Hmm, we do have a weekend to try them out before we decide the bundle is really for us. Appeal aside, it all comes down to how much the individual needs these features.

Hattig
Dec 16, 2006, 09:13 AM
Looks like they'll raise over $125,000 for charity by the time the promotion is over.

That means they'll have taken in revenue of around $500,000!

They paid around $70k for the right to distribute the applications for a week. Then there's other costs on top. However it looks like they have pocketed over $250k for their promotion work.

Can't help but think the developers would have liked a flat fee + 1-2% of revenue over the plain flat fee. But as has been pointed out, they were free to accept or not accept the offer given. Still, it's given the developers a nice bonus for Christmas!

Bonte
Dec 16, 2006, 10:29 AM
Now the devs know more and can demand more the next time around or a fair percentage, MacHeist did a good job.

Evangelion
Dec 16, 2006, 03:43 PM
So, what is the issue here exactly? Some developers are complaining that their apps are being bundled with other apps and sold for quite a low price. What exactly is the problem here? I assume that the developer still get the money they are supposed to be getting. Or did MacHeist tell them that "So, you are selling your software for 99 bucks? Well, we will sell it as a part of a bundle that costs 49 bucks. Of course, since the price is so low, we can only give you few bucks for the software. Don't like it? Well, there's nothing you can do about it".

Since MacHeist can't do that (if they could, I could start selling copies of Aperture for 10 bucks, and give Apple 2 bucks while keeping rest to myself), what is the problem here? Could anyone englighten me?

And if some developer does not like the scheme, surely they are not forced to take part in it?

Bonte
Dec 16, 2006, 03:53 PM
They agreed to sell there app for a fixed amount between 5 and 15.000 dollar (so we beleve) for 1 week of sales and an unlimited number of copy's. Some of the devs that didn't join are ranting that MacHeist got to much profit out of it especially considering MacHeist advertised this as "week of the indie developer" or something. I do have to say that these blogs reminded me to buy the bundle, otherwise i would have forgotten it. :D

Doctor Q
Dec 16, 2006, 06:19 PM
Could anyone englighten me?Most opinions I've seen are on the favorable side - it's just a business deal that the parties involved agreed to. The complaint some have voiced is that MacHeist is promoting the package with an implication that they are doing it for "the benefit of the little guy" (independent software vendors) when they simply made a business deal that was likely to, and has, benefited them at least as much as the vendors. Not a huge controversy, just a point that some have made and wanted to discuss.

Hattig
Dec 16, 2006, 06:58 PM
I must admit I have spent a couple of hours playing the Enigmo 2 game tonight, so that's an unexpected bonus given there's a whole lot more levels to go. It's a bit like the old classic "Bill's Tomato Game', except it is in space (irrelevant apart from the gravity reversers and 3D). The camera is a bit sensitive to control though.

kalisphoenix
Dec 17, 2006, 05:11 PM
Anything bringing in more DEVONthink users is great. I wouldn't worry about their support costs, because the forums over there are really pretty groovy (especially Bill DeVille, who is a genius).

I don't see them as getting screwed by this because they only licensed DEVONthink Personal, not Pro. And Personal is nothing compared to Pro, imho.

bousozoku
Dec 17, 2006, 05:58 PM
Anything bringing in more DEVONthink users is great. I wouldn't worry about their support costs, because the forums over there are really pretty groovy (especially Bill DeVille, who is a genius).

I don't see them as getting screwed by this because they only licensed DEVONthink Personal, not Pro. And Personal is nothing compared to Pro, imho.

I'm still not sure what to think of the software. It seems like the electronic equivalent of a junk drawer. You have all sorts of things in it you seldom use but need to know where they are.

Flowbee
Dec 17, 2006, 06:51 PM
Looks like it'll end up near 200,000 for charity... Pretty impressive. Over 15,000 bundles sold with 4 hours to go. I've already sent NewsFire another $10 for the lifetime upgrades license, so at least one developer has made a couple of extra dollars.:)

GFLPraxis
Dec 18, 2006, 01:00 AM
Argh! I was busy all weekend, and I tried to buy it Sunday night, but they ended it early for some reason. :(

x86isslow
Dec 18, 2006, 02:23 AM
Looks like it'll end up near 200,000 for charity... Pretty impressive. Over 15,000 bundles sold with 4 hours to go. I've already sent NewsFire another $10 for the lifetime upgrades license, so at least one developer has made a couple of extra dollars.:)

Hey, yah, I did that too. Lifetime upgrades = one less thing I have to think about.

jeremy.king
Dec 18, 2006, 11:29 AM
I bought it, I thought it was a good deal.

And to think, even at 3% as some have estimated - Every developer is now $20K+ richer and have a nice pool of 16,821 mac users to advertise via word of mouth!