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View Full Version : Buying an iPod? You may want to wait


MacBytes
Jan 5, 2007, 09:42 PM
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Category: News and Press Releases
Link: Buying an iPod? You may want to wait (http://www.macbytes.com/link.php?sid=20070105224236)
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Posted on MacBytes.com (http://www.macbytes.com)
Approved by Mudbug

montex
Jan 6, 2007, 01:07 AM
Microsoft is likely to respond by releasing lower-priced Zune models, says NPD analyst Ross Rubin. "The Zune is the most serious challenge Apple has faced to date," he says.

Ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha!

Best joke I've heard all day! :p

dllavaneras
Jan 6, 2007, 01:11 AM
Yeah, Zunes are already below (http://forums.macrumors.com/showthread.php?t=265666) iPods :rolleyes:

phungy
Jan 6, 2007, 01:14 AM
Yeah, Zunes are already below (http://forums.macrumors.com/showthread.php?t=265666) iPods :rolleyes:

Pwnd. Haha. :D

NOV
Jan 6, 2007, 01:47 AM
Moral of this story:
never buy anything but always hold out for the next big thing...:confused:

acircularmotive
Jan 6, 2007, 08:29 AM
Moral of this story:
never buy anything but always hold out for the next big thing...:confused:

And when the next big thing has come round, don't buy it, wait for the next, next big thing... ;)

BoyBach
Jan 6, 2007, 08:35 AM
Great start to the article:

A year ago, the most state-of-the-art video game system in wide release was the PlayStation 2.

What about the Xbox 360?

mkrishnan
Jan 6, 2007, 08:50 AM
This is kind of a moronic article... :rolleyes: All the discussion of which products to buy and which not to buy barely considers what you'll be using it for or why you need it.

And then...

A year ago, the most state-of-the-art video game system in wide release was the PlayStation 2.

Most big, flat-panel TVs cost more than $3,000.

Six-megapixel digital cameras were high-end.

And no one was sure that Microsoft would ever get around to releasing another version of Windows.

This is just silliness... it's all so misguided. Everyone knew that the next gen consoles were coming. The TVs that cost >$3000 a year ago are still quite expensive today -- the ones that are affordable now have dropped in price, but not that precipitously -- my $600 32" 720P LCD wouldn't have been available at that price a year ago, but it would only have cost $200-300 more. Anyone who considers megapixels the defining characteristic in selecting cameras is an imbecile. And... as much as we made fun of the Longhorn project, did anyone really expect MS to curl up and die?

natejohnstone@g
Jan 6, 2007, 03:37 PM
Yea, that is totally ridiculous. One year ago the first test vision of Windows Vista was ALREADY available, what's this "no one was sure if...would release another version of Windows" crap? I think this guy missed 2006 and is talking about 2 years ago :)

Willis
Jan 7, 2007, 02:57 AM
This girl hasnt got a clue what shes talking about

The show's 140,000 attendees will see firsthand the effects of Moore's Law, an industry rule of thumb that says electronics roughly double their performance every two years

Im pretty sure Moores law refers to processors... not all technology.

Cedd
Jan 7, 2007, 03:03 AM
Qoute:

"More than 2,700 companies are expected to unveil their latest and greatest beginning Sunday at the giant Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, which is expected to draw more than 2,700 exhibitors."

I thought that was just sloppy writing.

In relation to 6mp cameras being the high end a year ago that is just not true. I bought a Nikon D50 over a year ago which has 6mp. This was not "high end" at the time, as the D50 was very much a prosumer model. I knew that but also knew that it suited my purposes and still does, despite the continued release of new models. Surely that is the only way to approach technology - if you need it and it suits you then buy now and don't worry about the next big thing.

Willis
Jan 7, 2007, 03:07 AM
In relation to 6mp cameras being the high end a year ago that is just not true. I bought a Nikon D50 over a year ago which has 6mp. This was not "high end" at the time, as the D50 was very much a prosumer model. I knew that but also knew that it suited my purposes and still does, despite the continued release of new models. Surely that is the only way to approach technology - if you need it and it suits you then buy now and don't worry about the next big thing.

Exactly... we got a Canon EOS 350D early last year even though the technology was about a year old to start with. I personally think the 350D is still an excellent camera today and for the next couple of years.