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View Full Version : Can we do NASM on macbook??? so confused




NsK
Jan 29, 2007, 07:03 PM
I'm taking this Hardware system class comp228......at school we have to use the terminal and a program called DDD to do the programming part of the assignment...i'm wondering if its possible to do this at home on my macbook...I know there is a terminal but I try it and there is no NASM function on it...I need to be able to to load the NASM command and run DDD for my assignment...anyway is it possible to do NASM on macbook???



minus the ben
Jan 29, 2007, 08:17 PM
erm...


[Mon Jan 29@20:15:55 benjamin@gob ~ ] nasm -h
usage: nasm [-@ response file] [-o outfile] [-f format] [-l listfile]
[options...] [--] filename
or nasm -r for version info (obsolete)
or nasm -v for version info (preferred)

-t assemble in SciTech TASM compatible mode
-g generate debug information in selected format.
-e preprocess only (writes output to stdout by default)
-a don't preprocess (assemble only)
-M generate Makefile dependencies on stdout

-E<file> redirect error messages to file
-s redirect error messages to stdout

-F format select a debugging format

-I<path> adds a pathname to the include file path
-O<digit> optimize branch offsets (-O0 disables, default)
-P<file> pre-includes a file
-D<macro>[=<value>] pre-defines a macro
-U<macro> undefines a macro
-X<format> specifies error reporting format (gnu or vc)
-w+foo enables warnings about foo; -w-foo disables them
where foo can be:
macro-params macro calls with wrong no. of params (default off)
macro-selfref cyclic macro self-references (default off)
orphan-labels labels alone on lines without trailing `:' (default off)
number-overflow numeric constants greater than 0xFFFFFFFF (default on)
gnu-elf-extensions using 8- or 16-bit relocation in ELF, a GNU extension (default off)

response files should contain command line parameters, one per line.

For a list of valid output formats, use -hf.
For a list of debug formats, use -f <form> -y.

bobber205
Jan 29, 2007, 09:22 PM
That means yes. :D

kalisphoenix
Jan 29, 2007, 09:52 PM
Maybe he was trying it in all-caps :p

NsK
Jan 29, 2007, 10:00 PM
do we need to install something to have the nasm commands in the terminal???

because I open terminal and type nasm -h .....it says -bash: nasm: command not found

Maybe he was trying it in all-caps :p

and no...I wasn't typing in caps lol

bousozoku
Jan 29, 2007, 10:27 PM
do we need to install something to have the nasm commands in the terminal???

because I open terminal and type nasm -h .....it says -bash: nasm: command not found



and no...I wasn't typing in caps lol

You might install the Developer tools package.

It used to be available in a folder called Installers within the Applications folder.

NsK
Jan 29, 2007, 10:35 PM
I don't see that folder....I didn't format or anything since I got my macbook c2d....maybe I can find it on the install cds.......do I have to install xcode or something???

and btw, does the macbook comes with a DDD debugger or something....

minus the ben
Jan 29, 2007, 10:59 PM
they should be on your install dvd(s)

bronxbomber92
Jan 30, 2007, 07:50 AM
I don't see that folder....I didn't format or anything since I got my macbook c2d....maybe I can find it on the install cds.......do I have to install xcode or something???

and btw, does the macbook comes with a DDD debugger or something....
You can either get Xcode by downloading it once becoming a ADC member (free) or they should be on your install discs.. As for DDD, Xcode has Grapical frontend for GDB, so that should suit your needs.

mkrishnan
Jan 30, 2007, 08:30 AM
It's often on the second install DVD, I think.

bobber205
Jan 30, 2007, 08:19 PM
It's often on the second install DVD, I think.

My macbook's disks: I thought that too and it wasn't. It's hidden on the first still. The second DVD has nothing that wasn't "hidden".