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View Full Version : Is JDeveloper any good for a beginner ?




fab5freddy
Feb 2, 2007, 07:44 AM
Does anyone have experience with JDeveloper compared to Eclipse or Jbuilder ? which is the best for a beginner ? FF



ryan
Feb 2, 2007, 09:17 AM
As someone new to Java you should not be using an IDE until you can install the JDK, setup classpaths, run 'java' and 'javac' from the commandline, navigate the JavaDocs and manage packages manually, i.e. through a command line. Yes, this will result in a higher initial learning curve, but will pay off greatly in the future. If your want to use a simple text editor like TextWrangler, JEdit, etc., for syntax highlighting that's fine, but by using anything more like JBuilder, Eclipse, IntelliJ, NetBeans, etc. you'll be doing yourself a huge disservice if you really want to learn the language and not a tool

aLoC
Feb 2, 2007, 09:19 AM
I have plenty of experience with JDeveloper. However for a beginner I recommend using a plain text editor and compiling everything on the command line. That way when you eventually do start using an IDE you have a clear mental separation between the essential and the inessential.

Edit: ryan beat me to it :)

ryan
Feb 2, 2007, 09:24 AM
Edit: ryan beat me to it :)

Just barely. :)

jeremy.king
Feb 2, 2007, 10:26 AM
I too advocate starting with command line and text editors, but if you must use an IDE, try Netbeans BlueJ (http://www.bluej.org/netbeans/) - it doesn't get in the way like the others mentioned.

lazydog
Feb 2, 2007, 01:29 PM
My thoughts are that you should install the Apple developer tools. It's been a while since I did it but I think there will either be a disk image in the Developer directory on your hard disc or if not somewhere on your installation CD. Failing that you can download the developer tools from the Apple site. The reason I'm suggesting this is so you can be sure that you will have the correct Java installation for the Mac. If you do this you can then fire up X-Code (which will be installed as part of the developer tools), select New Projectů Java tool, hit the build and run button and if all is well you should have the infamous 'Hello World' program running.

If you are serious about learning to program in Java then I think it is important to learn to compile and run programs from the command line for the reasons other posters have given. However I'm not entirely convinced that doing it that way right from the start is essential. Using an IDE will have some advantages, eg being able to single step through your program. Depending on you existing programming abilities etc, using the command line might be a bit of an information overload or way to simple and boring!

good luck

b e n

jeremy.king
Feb 2, 2007, 01:38 PM
The reason I'm suggesting this is so you can be sure that you will have the correct Java installation for the Mac.

You don't need the Developer tools for the "correct" Java installation, just download the version you want from ADC. In fact, I don't think the Developer tools even installs a JDK.

http://developer.apple.com/java/download/

*crosses fingers for Java 6 on Tiger*

ryan
Feb 2, 2007, 02:20 PM
In fact, I don't think the Developer tools even installs a JDK.

You're correct, it doesn't.

*crosses fingers for Java 6 on Tiger*

I have mine crossed, too. :)

fab5freddy
Feb 7, 2007, 07:57 AM
What do you mean by ' cross fingers for Java 6' ?

toddburch
Feb 7, 2007, 08:10 AM
Freddy, he means that he is hoping that the new release of Java, "JDK 6", will be available to run on Tiger.

When you "cross your fingers", you are showing a sign that you wish something to happen.

Todd

pMay
Apr 6, 2007, 09:51 AM
I would use Eclipse.