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MacRumors
Feb 12, 2007, 02:15 AM
http://www.macrumors.com/images/macrumorsthreadlogo.gif (http://www.macrumors.com)

Boston.com (http://www.boston.com/news/globe/magazine/articles/2007/02/11/stained_glass ) reports on an upcoming Apple "flagship" store design due to be built in Boston at 815 Boylston Street later this year:
http://images.macrumors.com/article/bostonrendering.jpg
Mark Maloney, who stepped down as Boston Redevelopment Authority director last month, says: “This building is going to have a wow factor. People will come to see this bright, shiny jewel box within a traditional neighborhood.”
Meanwhile, ifoAppleStore (http://www.ifoapplestore.com/stores/melbourne_renderings.html) and AppleInsider (http://www.appleinsider.com/article.php?id=2483) have posted images from a proposal by Apple to build an Apple Store in Melbourne, Australia at 625 Chapel Street, South Yarra:
http://images.macrumors.com/article/australiastore.jpg
The Apple store appears to be a 3-story design similar to Shinsaibashi (Osaka, Japan), but with a fourth floor enclosed in glass. The design uses the classic stainless steel design with back-lit Apple logo.



Jon'sLightBulbs
Feb 12, 2007, 02:18 AM
I like the idea of a glass encased top floor. A solarium would be neat. Even better would be an atrium.

samh004
Feb 12, 2007, 02:23 AM
Both stores look great, and it's good to have Apple moving over to Australia at last, they could do with choosing a few other cities too though, like Sydney and Brisbane.

As for the Boston store impression, wow..!!

Xeem
Feb 12, 2007, 02:30 AM
Those proposals do look very impressive; I wish that the Apple Stores here in Minnesota looked like that!

siurpeeman
Feb 12, 2007, 02:30 AM
the boston store looks great. you can just peer into the whole store.

Spanna
Feb 12, 2007, 02:35 AM
What is the difference between an Apple store and the Apple centres we already have in Australia such as the one at Bondi Junction.

EricNau
Feb 12, 2007, 02:41 AM
These buildings definitely beat Microsoft's "Wow" factor.

damien341
Feb 12, 2007, 02:43 AM
What is the difference between an Apple store and the Apple centres we already have in Australia such as the one at Bondi Junction.

i think the "apple centre" you named is only a reseller store, isn't it?

nicksoper
Feb 12, 2007, 02:45 AM
Has to be said that the big bad Apple corp has big styles. I think the Apple Stores are one of the best concepts Apple came up with.

The whole, come in and use our macs, without any pressure to buy works so well for me. You don't get annoying assistants who don't know anything pestering you on the net, which works so well in real life too.

iMeowbot
Feb 12, 2007, 02:45 AM
Mark Maloney, who stepped down as Boston Redevelopment Authority director last month, says: ďThis building is going to have a wow factor. People will come to see this bright, shiny jewel box within a traditional neighborhood.Ē
This is the old Copy Cop across the street from the Pru, right? What's "traditional" about that? :confused:

youngestchild
Feb 12, 2007, 02:50 AM
there'll be one in sydney too...

http://ifostore.cachefly.net/sydney_plans/index.html

:p :D

Abstract
Feb 12, 2007, 03:03 AM
What is the difference between an Apple store and the Apple centres we already have in Australia such as the one at Bondi Junction.

Other than architecture....not much, actually. They're definitely better stocked than Mac1 and Nextbyte, and you can play with every computer and product Apple sells. Other than that, and the sheer size of the store itself, it's not THAT different, really. Some Nextbyte stores are quite good, although they won't have every single product to demo, not that I bother anyway.

I've only been to the Ginza store, which is supposed to be mega, and while it was definitely impressive, I'm not going to go out of my way to travel to an Apple Store every time I need a Mac product. Some resellers are quite good, have what I want to demo (usually a 15" MBP, 30" ACD, Mac Pro, 24" iMac, and that's it! :) ), and are geographically closer.

samh004
Feb 12, 2007, 03:12 AM
What is the difference between an Apple store and the Apple centres we already have in Australia such as the one at Bondi Junction.

I don't think it's owned by Apple... it's a third-party.

SoldOutMatinee
Feb 12, 2007, 03:17 AM
I'm not complaining or anything but I wish the Apple Store here in Vegas was a building of its own. (okay, so maybe I really am complaining) The design would be kick ass. Instead, the store is inside the Fashion Show Mall which is in the middle of The Strip. Oh well, I'll settle for what's here already, especially since most Apple fans don't even have one by them.

Di9it8
Feb 12, 2007, 03:21 AM
I'm not complaining or anything but I wish the Apple Store here in Vegas was a building of its own. (okay, so maybe I really am complaining) The design would be kick ass. Instead, the store is inside the Fashion Show Mall which is in the middle of The Strip. Oh well, I'll settle for what's here already, especially since most Apple fans don't even have one by them.

If they had a stand alone store in Vegas they would have to change the concept every couple of years!!
If you live in Vegas you know where Fashion Show is:D

Matt T
Feb 12, 2007, 03:48 AM
That Melbourne store looks fantastic - I hope it goes ahead.

andrewag
Feb 12, 2007, 03:52 AM
What about the Sydney store? The modifications to a building has been approved by the City of Sydney.

g-7
Feb 12, 2007, 03:56 AM
Yeah, cool. But I want one in Poland. :p

jonharris200
Feb 12, 2007, 04:00 AM
I like the visual of the Boston one - very bright and hopeful.

Not so sure about the Melbourne one - too heavy and industrial.

1020
Feb 12, 2007, 04:16 AM
The Boston store looks beautiful, but so out of place.

iW00t
Feb 12, 2007, 04:28 AM
Where is South Yarra? Is it in Melbourne city?

Scarlet Fever
Feb 12, 2007, 04:31 AM
sweet... but why wouldn't they just replace their Flinders street one with a big store? That one has a good location, but the shopfront is... well... a hole.

Where is South Yarra? Is it in Melbourne city?

kinda... to get there by train, go a station east to Richmond, then a station south, to South Yarra.

youngestchild
Feb 12, 2007, 04:31 AM
well the sydney store will be conveniently located between Haighs chocolates (on the opposite side of the street) and Red Eye Records (just around the corner)... I don't venture in to town much these days but those three things combine would be a might good reason.... :p

http://ifostore.cachefly.net/sydney_plans/building_photo.jpg

RPP
Feb 12, 2007, 04:52 AM
Saw this in the paper this morning, about the Melbourne store, I was pleased.

The difference is Next Byte stores don't look very pretty.

Abstract
Feb 12, 2007, 04:56 AM
well the sydney store will be conveniently located between Haighs chocolates (on the opposite side of the street) and Red Eye Records (just around the corner)... I don't venture in to town much these days but those three things combine would be a might good reason.... :p

http://ifostore.cachefly.net/sydney_plans/building_photo.jpg


Ah, so THAT's where it is. I was having trouble imagining where it was from the address alone. ;) Haighs Chocolate......of course I know where that is.

aLoC
Feb 12, 2007, 05:25 AM
The Cube Mac may not have been very successful, but I see the design has been recycled for the stores! :)

bigandy
Feb 12, 2007, 05:27 AM
These stores look great.

I can't wait to see how the Glasgow one's going to look now :)

fotografica
Feb 12, 2007, 05:58 AM
Both stores look great.I am glad they got B.R.A approval for the Boston store.Hopefully the old guard is loosening up :D

kretzy
Feb 12, 2007, 06:26 AM
Woohoo! About time too. :D

I think the location is perfect too, though I'm surprised they didn't choose a CBD location.

*leaves current job* :p

Stella
Feb 12, 2007, 06:30 AM
Very Apple - very nice!

SciTeach
Feb 12, 2007, 06:35 AM
The Boston store looks beautiful, but so out of place.

I have to agree. The Boston concept looks out of place and (yes, I'm going to get nailed with this comment) looks like a lighted parking garage among the other buildings. Maybe I'm a little traditional here but putting a modern building within a classic style of buildings doesn't seem right. Don't get me wrong, I'm all for Boston getting a store (I've been going to Rockingham Park for years (mall store)) and I like the overall new look of :apple: stores but not necessarily within an area that is known for a certain style of architecture.

mattydodgy
Feb 12, 2007, 06:41 AM
Truly magnificent designs. Once again, Apple have done it... :)

BenRoethig
Feb 12, 2007, 06:44 AM
The Melbourne store looks great. It fits in great with the glass and steal skyscrapers. The Boston, however, store looks completely out of place. A glass cube has no place in that historic setting. It would be nice to see if they could do something uniquely Apple while remaining with the turn of the century architecture. How about a stone facade with a big white Apple on top? Unfortunately it looks like broadening their horizons in any way is too much is ask with Steve in control.

iMeowbot
Feb 12, 2007, 06:58 AM
The Boston, however, store looks completely out of place. A glass cube has no place in that historic setting. It would be nice to see if they could do something uniquely Apple while remaining with the turn of the century architecture.
That closely cropped rendering is kind of deceptive. The view from the store entrance isn't especially quaint or historical, it's a vast expanse of concrete covering a major highway, with modern office towers, hotels and a yuppy mall on top.

akadmon
Feb 12, 2007, 07:02 AM
Yeah, cool. But I want one in Poland. :p

Why? It's not like an average Pole can afford a Mac on <$1000/mo. salary.
Apple might as well build a store in Bangladesh.

biggiesmalls
Feb 12, 2007, 07:10 AM
The one in Manhattan is pretty nice, and it's open 24 hours, to!

http://www.blogography.com/photos14/NYCAppleNight1.jpg

Detlev
Feb 12, 2007, 07:20 AM
This is the old Copy Cop across the street from the Pru, right? What's "traditional" about that? :confused:

The traditional refers to the neighborhood in the Back Bay. Putting a glass envelope in a four story brownstone neighborhood has stirred some controversy. You can find some history to the controversy by looking up the Hancock Tower and its development.

jhedges3
Feb 12, 2007, 07:25 AM
The two pages of the Boston.com article that I could read without going through their free registration are interesting.

The article points out that developers of the store from Appleís side had to work with city planners to ensure that the building would fit in with the surrounding neighborhood, Back Bay. In other words, they had to make it less modern since, for their purposes, totally modern cannot go with totally not modern. Somewhat modern is better at that.

Also, the roof will have some sort of vegetation that will keep it cool in the summer and warm in the winter. Good.

It also points out that Appleís retail stores work on a rather atypical marketing scheme. As you know, people donít just come in to look at a product, ask for its price, and buy it or not. Itís more like people come in to use free wireless, to play around with new iPods or new cameras or new anything, maybe talk so some people in black shirts about how their machine is busted, who end up shipping it off without doing much of anything.

The experience less about buying at that point in time and more about assimilation of branding so that youíll buy Apple when it comes time.

The one in Manhattan is pretty nice, and it's open 24 hours, to!

http://www.blogography.com/photos14/NYCAppleNight1.jpg

You mean one of the two Apple Stores in Manhattan is open all the time.

The Soho one is cooler anyway. That one up there is so much more full of tourists.

MattG
Feb 12, 2007, 07:50 AM
Beautiful...

I'd just be happy if the tiny Apple store opening up in the Waterside Shops (just a few miles from me) would open up already!!

Digitalclips
Feb 12, 2007, 07:51 AM
Very Apple - very nice!

Wow! You didn't say Gateway make better stores! I am impressed.
Maybe you are not a Troll after all ;)

jhedges3
Feb 12, 2007, 07:53 AM
Beautiful...

I'd just be happy if the tiny Apple store opening up in the Waterside Shops (just a few miles from me) would open up already!!

Where are the Waterside Shops? Like what city?

Digitalclips
Feb 12, 2007, 07:54 AM
That closely cropped rendering is kind of deceptive. The view from the store entrance isn't especially quaint or historical, it's a vast expanse of concrete covering a major highway, with modern office towers, hotels and a yuppy mall on top.

Not to mention the worst traffic issues in an City I know of ;)

Beautiful...

I'd just be happy if the tiny Apple store opening up in the Waterside Shops (just a few miles from me) would open up already!!

MattG - love your icon. But don't use it in Boston ok! lol

iowamensan
Feb 12, 2007, 08:00 AM
well the sydney store will be conveniently located between Haighs chocolates (on the opposite side of the street) and Red Eye Records (just around the corner)... I don't venture in to town much these days but those three things combine would be a might good reason.... :p

http://ifostore.cachefly.net/sydney_plans/building_photo.jpg

Holy Cow!! That looks like a giant LiteBrite! Just so they don't put something like that anywhere near Boston! I'm still trying to recover from 1-31-07.

MattG
Feb 12, 2007, 08:00 AM
Where are the Waterside Shops? Like what city?

Oops
Naples, FL
http://www.watersideshops.net/

iMeowbot
Feb 12, 2007, 08:20 AM
The traditional refers to the neighborhood in the Back Bay. Putting a glass envelope in a four story brownstone neighborhood has stirred some controversy. You can find some history to the controversy by looking up the Hancock Tower and its development.

The "neighborhood" where the Apple store is going was, historically, an industrial area, not residential. Where the Prudential Center now sits used to be an enormous rail yard. In 1912, the Copy Cop building housed Jackson Motor Cars and Century Tires. As built, it didn't even have the recessed entrance and awnings used by Copy Cop, it was plate glass (http://ids.lib.harvard.edu/ids/view/3135079) facing pedestrians, and what looks like a service pit on the sidewalk.

johnmcboston
Feb 12, 2007, 08:23 AM
It also points out that Appleís retail stores work on a rather atypical marketing scheme. As you know, people donít just come in to look at a product, ask for its price, and buy it or not. Itís more like people come in to use free wireless, to play around with new iPods or new cameras or new anything, maybe talk so some people in black shirts about how their machine is busted, who end up shipping it off without doing much of anything.

The experience less about buying at that point in time and more about assimilation of branding so that youíll buy Apple when it comes time.

Careful here. That works great for new customers, or when you shop for something new for yourself. For me as a consumer, the apple stores are a bit of a waste. (here come the flames).

When I'm at the maul with the apple store, I go through best buy all the time. I wanna sett what new things there might be, or what's on sale. They may even get an impulse buy out of me.

Then I go by the apple store. Now Macs are real cool and I'm apple all the way - but why go in the store? Nothing will ever be on sale - that's their policy. Even older games or software never go on sale. (never mind therre's no bargain bin - even micro center has a 'get rid of this stuff' bargain bin.)

And, usually there's nothing new. Any Apple hardware of software will have months of rumors and then a huge product announcement. If I just wander in the store on a random Saturday, I'm not going to find any 'oo, I never saw this before' item.

So unless I'm in the mood to play with something, or I have a specific purchase in mind, I'm probably not going to buy, there's no reason for me to go into the store. (Speaking of the sales-store part. The Genius bar, and the classes and such are completely different, and they're nice to have close by).

p0intblank
Feb 12, 2007, 08:30 AM
Wow! Both stores look amazing. I love the Apple Stores' designs. I would travel to Boston just to attend its grand opening store. :p

tny
Feb 12, 2007, 08:32 AM
The "neighborhood" where the Apple store is going was, historically, an industrial area, not residential. Where the Prudential Center now sits used to be an enormous rail yard. In 1912, the Copy Cop building housed Jackson Motor Cars and Century Tires. As built, it didn't even have the recessed entrance and awnings used by Copy Cop, it was plate glass (http://ids.lib.harvard.edu/ids/view/3135079) facing pedestrians.

With "historical," they're referring mostly to the neighborhood around Newbury Street, not so much Boylston Street itself (where the store is actually located) - except insofar as they're thinking of Trinity Church, the original wing of the BPL, and that other church whose name I can never remember at the corner of Dartmouth and Boylston (behind the Copley outbound entrance).

The Back Bay neighborhood associations want Boylston Street to look more like Newbury and Marlborough and Beacon Street, or at least Commonwealth Ave, than Huntington Ave. At any rate, I'd say that with the construction of the pencil sharpener on Exeter and Boylston and the new wing of the BPL, that whole concept went out the window (not even thinking of the new Hancock Tower, which is reflective for a reason - to "blend in" with Trinity Church: no, I'm not kidding - or the Pru).

Careful here. [snip] Then I go by the apple store. Now Macs are real cool and I'm apple all the way - but why go in the store? Nothing will ever be on sale - that's their policy. Even older games or software never go on sale. (never mind therre's no bargain bin - even micro center has a 'get rid of this stuff' bargain bin.)

Funny, I picked up an iPod charger in a bargain bin at the store in Burlington a few weeks ago, and I know I've seen "bargain bins" at Rockingham and North Shore.

Stella
Feb 12, 2007, 08:48 AM
Wow! You didn't say Gateway make better stores! I am impressed.
Maybe you are not a Troll after all ;)

ROTFL.

Up till now , my Monday morning has been complete crap.

But that comment brightened it up!
:D

gauriemma
Feb 12, 2007, 08:54 AM
"...a bright, shiny jewel box within a traditional neighborhood."

Of course. Because nothing enhances the beauty of traditional architecture like sticking a bright shiny jewel box smack dab in the middle of it...

iMeowbot
Feb 12, 2007, 08:56 AM
With "historical," they're referring mostly to the neighborhood around Newbury Street, not so much Boylston Street itself (where the store is actually located) - except insofar as they're thinking of Trinity Church, the original wing of the BPL, and that other church whose name I can never remember at the corner of Dartmouth and Boylston (behind the Copley outbound entrance).

Old South Church? But all that's on the other side of Exeter, not sitting on the edge of the Pike cut.

The Back Bay neighborhood associations want Boylston Street to look more like Newbury and Marlborough and Beacon Street, or at least Commonwealth Ave, than Huntington Ave.

This is where it all gets really silly, because they're about 110 years too late. Someone should have spoken up before the horse track was sold to the railroad :D [ed: nah, that was their Allston tangle, this parcel may have been trashed right up front -- and yep, the tracks were there before the fill went in!]

At any rate, I'd say that with the construction of the pencil sharpener on Exeter and Boylston and the new wing of the BPL, that whole concept went out the window (not even thinking of the new Hancock Tower, which is reflective for a reason - to "blend in" with Trinity Church: no, I'm not kidding -
It would have worked, if it was, oh, about a third as tall.
or the Pru).
That monstrosity does at least hide a big chunk of the Pike canyon, so it can be forgiven. :D

schatten
Feb 12, 2007, 08:57 AM
is it such a good idea to put a non-traditional-looking construction project in Boston? They might mistake it for a terrorist attack!

Zargot
Feb 12, 2007, 09:17 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnmcboston
Careful here. [snip] Then I go by the apple store. Now Macs are real cool and I'm apple all the way - but why go in the store? Nothing will ever be on sale - that's their policy. Even older games or software never go on sale. (never mind therre's no bargain bin - even micro center has a 'get rid of this stuff' bargain bin.)

Funny, I picked up an iPod charger in a bargain bin at the store in Burlington a few weeks ago, and I know I've seen "bargain bins" at Rockingham and North Shore.

They occasionally have clearance stuff at the Southlake store here in Texas; I picked up a 30 gig iPod in December for $100 off... It was a display model that had a minor scratch on the screen but completely usable. :D

johnmcboston
Feb 12, 2007, 09:26 AM
The Back Bay neighborhood associations want Boylston Street to look more like Newbury and Marlborough and Beacon Street, or at least Commonwealth Ave, than Huntington Ave. At any rate, I'd say that with the construction of the pencil sharpener on Exeter and Boylston and the new wing of the BPL, that whole concept went out the window (not even thinking of the new Hancock Tower, which is reflective for a reason - to "blend in" with Trinity Church: no, I'm not kidding - or the Pru).

To cube or not to cube? This location is a tough call for what is become the standard glass Apple store. If you head down boylston st they took one store and replace the brick facade with all glass, and it looks terruble and out of place. At least there this store is the area is a bit more open and inviting to new design.

But Apple can do what it wants. Hard to swallow the 'cube or nothing' concept when looking at the photo of their Regent store (http://images.apple.com/retail/images/home-photo-regent.jpg). Now that wow's me more than some of the other stores. A nice blending of old and new. Photo below same as the link - both from Apple's web site. They have bright and visible, but a facade that's more in keeping with an older style...

http://images.apple.com/retail/images/home-photo-regent.jpg

phillipjfry
Feb 12, 2007, 09:27 AM
I wish Apple would have built their store in Indianapolis as opposed to one of the high-priced areas of Indiana. Its a good hour drive to there and they would at least see a lot more business if they would have just built in our capital. I guess this is just jealousy speaking since our store looks NOTHING! like these will...:(

Sayhey
Feb 12, 2007, 09:32 AM
http://www.macrumors.com/images/macrumorsthreadlogo.gif (http://www.macrumors.com)

Boston.com (http://www.boston.com/news/globe/magazine/articles/2007/02/11/stained_glass ) reports on an upcoming Apple "flagship" store design due to be built in Boston at 815 Boylston Street later this year:

Meanwhile, ifoAppleStore (http://www.ifoapplestore.com/stores/melbourne_renderings.html) and AppleInsider (http://www.appleinsider.com/article.php?id=2483) have posted images from a proposal by Apple to build an Apple Store in Melbourne, Australia at 625 Chapel Street, South Yarra:


well the sydney store will be conveniently located between Haighs chocolates (on the opposite side of the street) and Red Eye Records (just around the corner)... I don't venture in to town much these days but those three things combine would be a might good reason.... :p

What about the Sydney store? The modifications to a building has been approved by the City of Sydney.

While I'm happy to wake to a new thread on Apple stores, it would be good to include the real up-to-date information. As has been pointed out already, the Sydney store is the Australian store that is furthest along, having been approved by the city, while the Melbourne store is still just in the preliminary stages. Also, the big news of flagships stores likely to be built this year should include at least a reference to the upcoming store (approved and staff recruiting well on its way - the latter is something the Boston store is yet to do) in Glasgow (http://forums.macrumors.com/showpost.php?p=2999583&postcount=291) at 147 Buchanan Street.

butaro
Feb 12, 2007, 10:15 AM
APPLE NEEDS TO BUILD MORE STORES IN CANADA!!

I mean come on, 3 stores in Toronto????? 1 in Laval(aka nowhere :P)
Where's Vancouver, wheres Montreal, Calgary and wheres Ottawa??????
Sure probably most of the world knows about Toronto but they could have spread out those 3 toronto stores to at least BC and MTL, i would love an Ottawa store though i mean come on its the Capital City!!!!!

(im from ottawa lol)

tny
Feb 12, 2007, 10:32 AM
Old South Church? But all that's on the other side of Exeter, not sitting on the edge of the Pike cut.


Maybe I'm forgetting where CopyCop used to be. I thought it was between Fairfield and Exeter, where the (visible part of the) Pike runs between Hereford and Mass Ave, near the Old ICA (which was an old Fire Station before that).

For those who aren't familiar with Boston geography, this particular part of Boston, the Back Bay, was built on fill over what used to be an estuary in the nineteenth century, so it's the only part of the downtown that approximates a grid: Arlington, Berkeley, Clarendon, Dartmouth, Exeter, Fairfield, Gloucester, Hereford in alphabetical order East to West from the Public Gardens to Mass Ave, crossing Beacon, Marlborough, Commonwealth, Newbury, Boylston North to South starting at the Charles River Basin. Referring to it as "traditional" would be a stretch outside North America: other than Boylston, the defining architectural feature of the neighborhood is late-nineteenth century brownstones. Boylston Street, though, is very much a shopping district, and the south side of the street has a couple of 50+ story towers and some 10-20+ story towers (in order of decreasing height, the I.M. Pei sheer-blue-glass John Hancock Tower, which does not harmonize with the neighborhood, despite the reflectivity, but is at least architecturally interesting, unlike its near neighbor, the hideous 1960's-style Prudential Center Tower that you can see in outfield shots from Fenway Park - the Ada Louise Huxtable quote about this building in the Wikipedia article is apt: "a textbook example of urban character assassination" - and the Berkeley Building/Old Hancock Tower)

zim
Feb 12, 2007, 10:40 AM
Finally, progress on the Boston Apple store. I was getting nervous that the officials were going to write them off. I welcome the change :) we need more of it!

iMeowbot
Feb 12, 2007, 10:53 AM
Maybe I'm forgetting where CopyCop used to be. I thought it was between Fairfield and Exeter, where the (visible part of the) Pike runs between Hereford and Mass Ave, near the Old ICA (which was an old Fire Station before that).
You're close. It's the next block down, between Gloucester St. and Fairfield St.

puckhead193
Feb 12, 2007, 11:11 AM
the boston store look awesome, I can't wait to attended :D

devilot
Feb 12, 2007, 11:27 AM
Opens "later this year?" That's so vague. If it's when my cousin is still at BU, it'd be a great excuse to go out and visit her... I've yet to attend a store opening. :o

rswelling
Feb 12, 2007, 11:33 AM
Check out THIS rendering of the new store in BOSTON! I think we might have a problem!

BOSTON APPLE STORE! (http://www.bitclone.com/wp/)

HAHAHAHA!

RS

twoodcc
Feb 12, 2007, 12:59 PM
these stores seem really nice :)

i wish there some like that around here. (even though i'm glad to have 3 in my state)

ug.mac
Feb 12, 2007, 01:14 PM
Where the hell is Apple store in Vancouver, B.C??!?!?:mad: :mad: :mad: :mad:

gugy
Feb 12, 2007, 01:57 PM
Apple stores taking over the world! very cool.

I look forward to Brazil to come soon.

jhedges3
Feb 12, 2007, 02:35 PM
Careful here. That works great for new customers, or when you shop for something new for yourself. For me as a consumer, the apple stores are a bit of a waste. (here come the flames).

When I'm at the maul with the apple store, I go through best buy all the time. I wanna sett what new things there might be, or what's on sale. They may even get an impulse buy out of me.

Then I go by the apple store. Now Macs are real cool and I'm apple all the way - but why go in the store? Nothing will ever be on sale - that's their policy. Even older games or software never go on sale. (never mind therre's no bargain bin - even micro center has a 'get rid of this stuff' bargain bin.)

And, usually there's nothing new. Any Apple hardware of software will have months of rumors and then a huge product announcement. If I just wander in the store on a random Saturday, I'm not going to find any 'oo, I never saw this before' item.

So unless I'm in the mood to play with something, or I have a specific purchase in mind, I'm probably not going to buy, there's no reason for me to go into the store. (Speaking of the sales-store part. The Genius bar, and the classes and such are completely different, and they're nice to have close by).

Your post confuses me. It seems to me that, for the most part, your experiences with the Apple store are consistent with those described in the Boston.com piece. In other words, you seem to be among the types of consumers that Apple is appealing to.

That being said, Iím not sure why you think that it only works great for new customers and that itís a bit of a waste for you. If waste is defined as you not buying anything from them, especially impulsively, then maybe. But I think thatís missing the whole point of what that article was saying. The idea is that itís not a waste if the experiences the store affords you impacts on you in other, perhaps more subtle, ways. Maybe it means youíre more likely to choose Apple, or to continue to do so, later. Maybe it means you think Apple is cool, because their stores are modern and functional. Maybe youíre happy to know that a Genius Bar is nearby.

I donít go into them much either. But mostly because I donít have the time and I prefer to use my own machines to, for example, check my mail. But it can be fun to get an impression of something. Like when my girlfriend wanted to buy a Mac Book it was useful to be able to go look at them with her. It really helped her feel better about getting one. And I think thatís part of the role of these stores.

powermac_daddy
Feb 12, 2007, 03:02 PM
I like the CAD rendering; other than that... release the MacBook Pro with 10.5 Now!

Don't panic
Feb 12, 2007, 03:11 PM
I can't wait to see how the Glasgow one's going to look now :)

the Glasgow's one will make you smile...

stainlessliquid
Feb 12, 2007, 04:16 PM
The community in that area of Boston is not going to like this at all and it was a very stupid move by Apple. This stuff happens here, where they destroy old buildings and build up some weird thing that sticks out like a sore thumb, everyone hates it and those places never last because they have almost no support from the people who live there. The most successful stores take strides to preserve the area so they dont piss people off, those places consistently have the most customers. Im surprised Apple doesnt know about that, its a very well known tactic among high class development firms.

wmmk
Feb 12, 2007, 06:04 PM
Aww crap! Now all the aussies will have access to more new xeon xserves for the mj bot! I'll never never be able to sneak in "repair permissions" posts before it swoops down at beats me by a nanosecond!:mad:

iAlan
Feb 12, 2007, 08:01 PM
The community in that area of Boston is not going to like this at all and it was a very stupid move by Apple. This stuff happens here, where they destroy old buildings and build up some weird thing that sticks out like a sore thumb, everyone hates it and those places never last because they have almost no support from the people who live there. The most successful stores take strides to preserve the area so they dont piss people off, those places consistently have the most customers. Im surprised Apple doesnt know about that, its a very well known tactic among high class development firms.

I luv the Apple Store designs, don't get me wrong, but Apple really needs to think about the impact their buildings have on the buildings around them -- a great example as mentioned elsewhere in this thread is the London Regent Street store which basically kept the original facade and rebuilt inside. And this is what all retailers along the street have done (I don't know if this is a requirement due to the buildings being 'listed' and therefore subject to certain requirements) and the SoHo store in the old post office (?) building is another example of keeping the old and incorporating the new.

fotografica
Feb 12, 2007, 08:35 PM
The Back Bay neighborhood associations want Boylston Street to look more like Newbury and Marlborough and Beacon Street.

Where on Newbury,Marlborough or Beacon St is there a 4+ story glass facade, open atrium storefront? It's fine by me as this isn't in the South End/Back Bay area. Between Copley Place,Shops at the Pru and the Hynes Convention Center the Apple Store will fit in just fine..

stainlessliquid
Feb 12, 2007, 08:48 PM
I like the design too, but I can gurantee that the shops around the Apple store are going to hate it and that most of the community is going to be very pissed with Apple's arrogance with a store like that. Tourists will love it, but tourists dont buy computers and ipods, the people who live there are going to be the customers and that design really alienates their neighborhood. I dont know why the city approved that in the first place. The Regent store is a perfect example of what they should do to an area like that, obviously Apple must be using someone else for the Boston store.

This crap is going to hit the local papers Im sure, and it wont be the kind of bad press that generates sales.

g-7
Feb 13, 2007, 04:34 AM
Why? It's not like an average Pole can afford a Mac on <$1000/mo. salary.
Apple might as well build a store in Bangladesh.

Mac are getting more and more popular here, you can see people using MacBooks in various places like hot-spots in malls or cafes. Macs are used at schools, graphic studios, TV stations (like TVN24, the biggest Polish news TV station, see http://www.apple.com/uk/pro/profiles/tvn/).

So maybe it's not that bad? ;) Don't know about Bangladesh though.

jhedges3
Feb 13, 2007, 08:20 AM
I like the design too, but I can gurantee that the shops around the Apple store are going to hate it and that most of the community is going to be very pissed with Apple's arrogance with a store like that. Tourists will love it, but tourists dont buy computers and ipods, the people who live there are going to be the customers and that design really alienates their neighborhood. I dont know why the city approved that in the first place. The Regent store is a perfect example of what they should do to an area like that, obviously Apple must be using someone else for the Boston store.

This crap is going to hit the local papers Im sure, and it wont be the kind of bad press that generates sales.

How is it that you like the design, but that you feel it’s part of Apple’s arrogance, that it alienates [people in] the neighborhood, and that it will generate bad press for Apple?

Why must a building look like the buildings that surround it? And why is that the case even when the incoming building is attractive and interesting, perhaps functional?

I’m thankful that there are people who do not think as you do, who have a narrow definition, who say that things should stay as they are. It’s as if you long for stasis only and that if change is permissible it’s only permissible if it’s drawn out over time, perhaps so nobody notices it.

And instead of allowing their to be a diversity of building esthetics, and instead of allowing the neighborhood to evolve (even if it’s one building at a time), you demand that the government step-in on your behalf to block development, to eschew newness, to enforce your model of the extent to which the buildings of a neighborhood must conform.

Should the neighborhood be the same, for the most part, from here on? Like in 2100 or 2200 or 2500 should its Victorian brownstones remain untouched, preserved, or perhaps only so slightly updated and modified?

By your logic Back Bay never would have been created in the first place. Those involved in creating it in the late 1800s should have said to themselves that the area is a tidal bay and must remain so. The government should have stepped in to enforce that viewpoint.

In fact, the neighborhood might be better off if steps were taken to return to that condition, which would start, obviously, with raising everything that’s already there. So much for an Apple Store.

johnmcboston
Feb 13, 2007, 09:19 AM
Where on Newbury,Marlborough or Beacon St is there a 4+ story glass facade, open atrium storefront? It's fine by me as this isn't in the South End/Back Bay area. Between Copley Place,Shops at the Pru and the Hynes Convention Center the Apple Store will fit in just fine..

There's a tacky lighting store on Boylston near the Rattlesnake that replaced their facade with glass. Quite boring to what Apple has planned. The planned Apple location is also close to two other new buildings (EMS building and planet hollywood building are new additions to that same short stretch).

And instead of allowing their to be a diversity of building esthetics, and instead of allowing the neighborhood to evolve (even if itís one building at a time), you demand that the government step-in on your behalf to block development, to eschew newness, to enforce your model of the extent to which the buildings of a neighborhood must conform.

There re two big issues that Boston has that other cities (like NYC) doesn't have.

First, it's really small. Most everything you hear about in boston is downtown/backbay/beaconhill, and you can walk end to end in less than an hour. It makes it a nice walkable city - but you very quickly run out of room to put things. In this whole central boston area there is about 10 square feet that isn't historic :) So when historic buildings & preservation are discussed, it's more about Boston's smallness, and the fact that the little 'historic' stuff we have is all we have. Your historic districts are only going to get smaller.

Second, is we had urban renewal. the city saw hundreds of historic buildings torn down in the name of progress, including one entire neighborhood. So we tend to be more sensitive about such things now. Included in this was 70's style of construction, which clashed dramatically with our historic nature, but it was 'progress' and 'new' and 'modern architecture'. Today pretty much every one of those buildings is considered an eyesore. So when the next guy comes in and says he has new and modern and cool in his back pocket, we start heating the tar and plucking the chickens. :)

NYC has it easy - there's room for everything somewhere, you have transit going everywhere, and you can walk most places. Boston doesn't have much space downtown to build, limited transit, and huge barriers like highways and industrial areas between neighborhoods that prevent natural expansion of 'downtown like' districts. So yes, we tend to be more cautious and critical when a lot of stuff is proposed. (And yes, just because we question everything doesn't make our decisions are correct. That's something only time will tell)

Nenita
Feb 13, 2007, 11:29 AM
I love :apple: Stores.... they are amazing!
now there will be 2 more in florida soon, one in Ft. Lauderdale, and one more near Naples Bonita somthing or other... i hope they are as great looking as this guys.

:apple: :cool: :apple:

jhedges3
Feb 14, 2007, 03:59 PM
There re two big issues that Boston has that other cities (like NYC) doesn't have.

First, it's really small. Most everything you hear about in boston is downtown/backbay/beaconhill, and you can walk end to end in less than an hour. It makes it a nice walkable city - but you very quickly run out of room to put things. In this whole central boston area there is about 10 square feet that isn't historic :) So when historic buildings & preservation are discussed, it's more about Boston's smallness, and the fact that the little 'historic' stuff we have is all we have. Your historic districts are only going to get smaller.

Second, is we had urban renewal. the city saw hundreds of historic buildings torn down in the name of progress, including one entire neighborhood. So we tend to be more sensitive about such things now. Included in this was 70's style of construction, which clashed dramatically with our historic nature, but it was 'progress' and 'new' and 'modern architecture'. Today pretty much every one of those buildings is considered an eyesore. So when the next guy comes in and says he has new and modern and cool in his back pocket, we start heating the tar and plucking the chickens. :)

NYC has it easy - there's room for everything somewhere, you have transit going everywhere, and you can walk most places. Boston doesn't have much space downtown to build, limited transit, and huge barriers like highways and industrial areas between neighborhoods that prevent natural expansion of 'downtown like' districts. So yes, we tend to be more cautious and critical when a lot of stuff is proposed. (And yes, just because we question everything doesn't make our decisions are correct. That's something only time will tell)

I don’t want to respond to everything you’ve alluded to and I appreciate many of your points. And in one sense once we start getting into the particulars things become, to some extent, dizzyingly complicated and difficult to compare.

I stand by the general view that I was expressing before, which was really a question. Why can it be assumed correct that the buildings of a neighborhood must have a high level of homogeneity with respect to their appearance? And why it is the role of the government to step in and enforce this homogeneity on behalf of some population or some person, majority or not?

I don’t agree that Boston has to deal with smallness, but New York City doesn’t. As you know, Manhattan is an island, which means it’s limited in the theoretical upper limit of its development, at least two dimensionally (roughly). It’s not clear to me that this is the single or even the primary factor with respect to building and neighborhood. Nor is it clear why it would, even in the most confined cases, necessitate strict homogeneity in terms of building appearance.

Your second paragraph. I don’t see that history necessarily has to do with it. If Apple, for example, is going to build something there they’re going to build something. Many of the demands of people are not that they build nothing at all, it’s that they do not build something that has an appearance that they, for whatever reason, dislike or find too radical or too different, etc.

Your third paragraph. New York had profound urban renewal as well. But without getting into New York’s history. I know that much of the old Boston was destroyed and replaced to whatever extent. And I know about Government Center. But I think that because there were some bad developments before doesn’t mean that they’re bad forever. And some bad developments don’t mean they’re all bad. Also, those developments should only rightly be compared to what it would be like if no such development never took place. Which is to say one should consider the pros and cons that the development brought as well as the pros and cons of what it would be like had those developments not occurred.

I also feel that starting in the 1960’s many people have adopted this reflexive stigma against making things modern and against newness, against development. That anti-development attitude is now so commonplace and so deep in the minds of people who live in cities that it’s easy to get away with its application in all cases. But there may be instances where it’s right to say that development or newness in look is bad, but there may be others where it’s completely wrong.

It seems hypocritical, in the least, to say that one of the foundations of these philosophies is a love of diversity and a desire to avert changes that will bring about banality and homogeneity, but then to demand a lack of progress and development that ensures that, to the extent possible, the level of diversity is never tampered with, that the buildings conform to a particular appearance of decades past.

Lara F
Feb 15, 2007, 05:13 AM
APPLE NEEDS TO BUILD MORE STORES IN CANADA!!

I mean come on, 3 stores in Toronto????? 1 in Laval(aka nowhere :P)
Where's Vancouver, wheres Montreal, Calgary and wheres Ottawa??????
Sure probably most of the world knows about Toronto but they could have spread out those 3 toronto stores to at least BC and MTL, i would love an Ottawa store though i mean come on its the Capital City!!!!!
(im from ottawa lol)

Laval's an island adjacent to the island of Montreal - I used to think it was totally out of the way, but it's really your typical suburban mall location. I do hope they'll end up opening downtown at some point though. And same with Philadelphia - I'm sick of Boston getting everything first! :P

Sayhey
Feb 18, 2007, 04:35 PM
Apple has posted a new page in its "Job Opportunities (http://www.apple.com/jobs/au/store/)" section of its website to begin staff recruitment for the George Street store in Sydney, Australia. It also appears the rumors about the Melbourne (http://www.ifoapplestore.com/2007/02/15/melbourne-not-yet-a-store/) store are way ahead of the actual progress of opening a store there.

Also posted in the "New Apple Retail Store in 2006 (http://forums.macrumors.com/showpost.php?p=3367437&postcount=377)" thread.

fireball jones
Feb 19, 2007, 07:57 AM
First, it's really small.

Second, is we had urban renewal.

It's not that small :rolleyes:

Okay, it's small when all the colleges are in town, but all summer long Boston is practically empty. Not to mention, 90% of stuff in Boston is outside Boston proper. How many Apple stores are within 10 miles of downtown now? Newton, Cambridge, Burlington. It'll be nice to have one right in the city, and that stretch, because of Amtrak/Newbury street, is out of state shoppers heaven.

And yeah, urban renewal. People complained about the Hancock building too!

joeshell383
May 14, 2008, 04:12 AM
The Boston store looks beautiful, but so out of place.

http://gizmodo.com/assets/resources/2008/05/boston_apple_store_gizmodo_2.jpg

Out of place is an understatement.

A commenter on Gizmodo wrote this, which I agree with:

Apple stores are architectural rape. They plug these stores into areas where they simply stick out like the proverbial sore thumb.

http://www.clearwired.com/images/loop/abqapplestore/IMG_0001.jpg

http://images.apple.com/retail/images/store_photos/photo_villagepointe.jpg

LiveForever
May 17, 2008, 07:07 AM
Sorry Disagree. To me they look cutting edge, avant garde, stunning and contrasting, everything apple represents.

I suspect the critic who wrote that has something against apple as they have big big enemies now.

I am not just being a "fan boy" whatever one of those is but I love the apple design and the stores architecture. Most comments Iv'e read seems to like them too.

They said the same thing of the Gherkin and London Eye in Londinium-you have to move ahead not live in he past

BenRoethig
May 17, 2008, 07:08 AM
Not when you put them into a district with buildings from the 1800s.

LiveForever
May 17, 2008, 07:24 AM
Sorry but I disagree. We have a lot of this in Sydney and I love it and my home country England has this juxtoposition of the old and new everywhere. London in the last 10 years has been given a new vibrancy by all the new cutting edge architecture. To me it represents confidence and it enhances the beauty of the old and the new. Its not as if Boston is a a heritage protected area. I agree its good to preserve old street scapes but this is in CBD of a major US city..

People hated the Gherkin and The Eye with a passion-how could they ruin the London Skyline and all that. Now its iconic and EVERY city has a rip off Eye.

Taste and design is a personal thing though.

needthephone
May 17, 2008, 08:27 AM
Apple should have chosen Thomas Heatherwick (http://www.thomasheatherwick.com/) to design a store for them.

He makes the current apple stores look ordinary to be honest.

Terence Conran appeared on the programme, having had the foresight to commission the art-student Heatherwick to design and build a gazebo for his back garden. Conran compared Heatherwick to Leonardo Da Vinci, which I thought was a bit over-the-top when he said it, early in the programme - but by the end it seemed a pretty accurate comparison.
Both Heatherwick and Leonardo are prodigious creators in a variety of media, ranging from purely artistic pieces to machinery and structures at once practical and beautiful. They are both makers as well as designers: Conran emphasized that Heatherwick was remarkable not only for designing an unusual gazebo, but for having the capability to actually build it; Heatherwick’s partner was interviewed in the programme, describing him as “an imaginer” and “a maker happen”; and watching the footage he is clearly at home on the building site as well as in his studio. In an interview with Icon magazine, Heatherwick commented “As a practitioner, one feels like a vessel of trying to implement thoughts that are accumulations of influences of many people. I know people who have brilliant ideas but they just don’t make things happen, they don’t do that bit. I almost feel it’s my duty to help implement them.”




http://www.wishfulthinking.co.uk/blog/2006/06/07/the-ingenious-thomas-heatherwick/

mongoos150
May 17, 2008, 09:51 AM
These stores look great.

I can't wait to see how the Glasgow one's going to look now :)
It looks beautiful from what I've seen - how far along is it? I'm studying abroad at GU next year, maybe I could get a job there :)

mongoos150
May 17, 2008, 09:55 AM
Sorry but I disagree. We have a lot of this in Sydney and I love it and my home country England has this juxtoposition of the old and new everywhere. London in the last 10 years has been given a new vibrancy by all the new cutting edge architecture.
Agree.

robbieduncan
May 17, 2008, 10:03 AM
They're building one in Glasgow? Nice! How far along is it? I'm studying abroad at GU next year. :)

Open. Ages ago.

Apple Store Glasgow (http://www.apple.com/uk/retail/buchananstreet/)

Ant1-Hero
May 17, 2008, 04:42 PM
Nice stores :D

cudo
May 17, 2008, 05:13 PM
Why? It's not like an average Pole can afford a Mac on <$1000/mo. salary.
Apple might as well build a store in Bangladesh.

it is not about being able to aford a Mac it is rather about apples wrong approach towards new markets. how can people be getting them if there is no single apple store in the country? there is a chain of ispots though . on the other hand lack of marketing and availiblity does not attraact new customers, does it ? to be honest , i don't thnik every American cannot get a Mac either.

as to the sallary and pricing we need to say that apple has always been expensive no metter the money you are making.

cing2x
May 18, 2008, 01:15 AM
Its not as if Boston is a a heritage protected area.


Actually much of Boston is heritage protected or rather, historically zoned. The South End and Back Bay (which is where the Boston Apple Store is located) has the highest concentration of Victorian brownstones in the United States. There are few changes that can be made to the exterior of these buildings without a variance. Of course, the Apple Store is across the street from the Prudential Center Mall and the soon to come Mandarin Oriental Hotel so I hardly think it contrasts that terribly with its immediate surroundings.

needthephone
May 18, 2008, 02:16 AM
This (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1gB9dN4nk-E&feature=related) will be the next concept to be copied world wide from London (like the London Eye giant ferris wheel)

Its by Thomas Heatherwick (http://www.designmuseum.org/design/page72507) and its a foot bridge which rolls up on itself.

Its so popular that they even make it work even if no boats are passing by as it's so popular with tourists.

Heatherwick has a design in new York too for the Longchamp store. (http://www.square-mag.co.uk/2006/11/27/thomas-heatherwick-longchamp-store-ny/) . This is relevant here as his brief meant he couldn't touch the exterior facade as it was heritage protected and could not be touched.

I would love him to do an apple store. He is very much a contemporary of Jonathan Ive (http://www.designmuseum.org/design/jonathan-ive) so what could they come up with together? (not saying that Jonathan Ive had anything to do with the apple stores though)

Back to the topic . personally I love the old with the ultra modern but in the end its up to the planners to accept or prevent development.

Apple submitted their proposals and it was probably watered down enough so its deemed acceptable by everyone even those who would have initially objected. For the New York Longchamp store the exterior absolutely couldn't be tampered with but for the Boston Apple store it could. So every situation is different and you can't blame apple. They wouldn't build a store in a location where they couldn't make a statement with the outside.

soulvision
May 20, 2009, 11:27 AM
Anyone know if the rumor is true about an Apple store in Brisbane Central? There have been a few rumors about this... here's a mock up design.

Apple Store - Brisbane Central.
http://i303.photobucket.com/albums/nn131/SoulVisionQ3/Applestorebrisbanemock.jpg

andyjam
May 27, 2009, 07:31 AM
There's the store open in the Gold Coast... Somewhere like Robina, I thing

Other than that, there's a store opening in Doncaster Victoria this weekend, which is the 6th store (I think), and it would make sense for the centre of Melbourne, Adelaide and Brisbane to come next.

I'm not too familiar with Brisbane, but I doubt that Apple would build a store in that sort of location. It wouldn't stand out enough. There won'e be too many levels of glass, like the Sydney store - they won't want to impose on their flagship Aussie store!!