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ronni3
Mar 5, 2007, 11:14 AM
I will be starting my next trimester in school, but this time I will be going for my BS. I finished my AS in Electronics, and have decided to pursue a different career path.

What would be the best way to know for certain whether or not this is the ideal type of work for me? I have always like opening computers up and seeing how they worked, and I always liked working with my hands, but I have always also found it interesting how programmers are able to get there hands on code and manipulate it to adjust, tinker, modify, and make it into there own, plus I see it as being very challenging, but does one have to be creative in order to do this type of work?



LtRammstein
Mar 5, 2007, 01:09 PM
I recommend going into a major similar to mine, Computer Engineering. At first it focuses on software programming then moves to manipulating chips with emphasis on digital designs (logic gates, synchronous designs, flip-flops, etc...).

Worth looking into!

Steve

BigPrince
Mar 5, 2007, 01:12 PM
For me this question is like asking "What is the meaning of life."

I am learning programming and I am still having a hell of a time with it.

Fearless Leader
Mar 5, 2007, 07:07 PM
Take somthing you like and merge it with programming. For me this was easy, I got a begging c++ game programming book and went through it fast. I going over again and probably another time to hammer this stuff into my head.

mags631
Mar 6, 2007, 09:30 AM
Computer Science is more than just programming, but that is probably not a surprise to you given your background. I would recommend taking a non-programming CS class to get a feel for the other side before jumping in head first. A lot of classroom time will be spent on non-programming topics and activities.

Also consider Programs that blend Computer Science with one or more disciplines. These will probably have names specific to your university, but may look like: Computational Linguistics (CS + Linguisitics), Computer Engineering (CS + EE), etc.

It's my skewed perspective that in the US you may need to be prepared to focus on non-programming aspects of CS to maximize your earning potential and job security. So, where you can take additional classes around the management of software projects, you may be able to positively differentiate yourself from other candidates or protect your job!

ronni3
Mar 6, 2007, 10:01 AM
Computer Science is more than just programming, but that is probably not a surprise to you given your background. I would recommend taking a non-programming CS class to get a feel for the other side before jumping in head first. A lot of classroom time will be spent on non-programming topics and activities.

Also consider Programs that blend Computer Science with one or more disciplines. These will probably have names specific to your university, but may look like: Computational Linguistics (CS + Linguisitics), Computer Engineering (CS + EE), etc.

It's my skewed perspective that in the US you may need to be prepared to focus on non-programming aspects of CS to maximize your earning potential and job security. So, where you can take additional classes around the management of software projects, you may be able to positively differentiate yourself from other candidates or protect your job!

I recommend going into a major similar to mine, Computer Engineering. At first it focuses on software programming then moves to manipulating chips with emphasis on digital designs (logic gates, synchronous designs, flip-flops, etc...).

Worth looking into!

Steve

This is what I was thinking was my best option. Since I already have a hardware background, AS in Electronics & Computer Technology AKA Electronics Technician 1, I think mixing it with a BS in Computer Engineering would be beneficial for me.

colocolo
Mar 6, 2007, 10:30 AM
Computer Science is more than just programming, but that is probably not a surprise to you given your background. I would recommend taking a non-programming CS class to get a feel for the other side before jumping in head first. A lot of classroom time will be spent on non-programming topics and activities.

Also consider Programs that blend Computer Science with one or more disciplines. These will probably have names specific to your university, but may look like: Computational Linguistics (CS + Linguisitics), Computer Engineering (CS + EE), etc.

It's my skewed perspective that in the US you may need to be prepared to focus on non-programming aspects of CS to maximize your earning potential and job security. So, where you can take additional classes around the management of software projects, you may be able to positively differentiate yourself from other candidates or protect your job!

This man speaks the truth. Computer Science ,or Civil (Industrial) Engineer with major on Computer Science (best attempt at translating it :) ), takes on a lot more than programming. Programming is kind of a by product of learning about software management and engineering, and understanding the roots of the hardware. Quite entertaining, and you can most certainly become a programmer with ease after that, but it is not the main focus.

LtRammstein
Mar 6, 2007, 10:45 AM
It seems you figured out what you are looking for, so here's what my first 2 years of education consisted about...

Freshman year:
Java Object-Oriented Programming
C++ Programming
Circuit Analysis 1
Physics 1
Statics

Sophomore year:
C++ 2 Programming (emphasis on timing functions and sorting with binary trees)
Circuit Analysis 2 (emphasis on signal processing)
Digital System Design
Dynamics
Physics 2
Computer Organization and Design (Learning how a simple machine works with basic instructions)

Not to bad of a course listing! After this year I'll be getting into more of a theoretical aspect of circuitry and programming.

Steve

ronni3
Mar 6, 2007, 11:35 AM
It seems you figured out what you are looking for, so here's what my first 2 years of education consisted about...

Freshman year:
Java Object-Oriented Programming
C++ Programming
Circuit Analysis 1
Physics 1
Statics

Sophomore year:
C++ 2 Programming (emphasis on timing functions and sorting with binary trees)
Circuit Analysis 2 (emphasis on signal processing)
Digital System Design
Dynamics
Physics 2
Computer Organization and Design (Learning how a simple machine works with basic instructions)

Not to bad of a course listing! After this year I'll be getting into more of a theoretical aspect of circuitry and programming.

Steve

I'm beyond the circuitry portion, so I expect to only have to complete the programming portion plus additional general education courses.

After I complete this degree I would like to continue taking a few classes so I can learn more along the lines of databases, ASP & .Net and then maybe down the line, some Flash.

ChrisA
Mar 6, 2007, 01:00 PM
I will be starting my next trimester in school, but this time I will be going for my BS. I finished my AS in Electronics, and have decided to pursue a different career path.

What would be the best way to know for certain whether or not this is the ideal type of work for me? I have always like opening computers up and seeing how they worked, and I always liked working with my hands, but I have always also found it interesting how programmers are able to get there hands on code and manipulate it to adjust, tinker, modify, and make it into there own, plus I see it as being very challenging, but does one have to be creative in order to do this type of work?

Programming can be used in MANY areas. Banking, Games, EE and embedded systems. That microwave oven has software inside to read the keypad, control the LED dispaly and turn the oven on and off. Same with the Xerox machine, loads of software inside that. I've worked on military message processing systems, radars and now rocket telemetry. This is very different from what people do in say the entertainment industry to make those animated feature films. So it's a huge area.

How to get started? You are in school o it's easy. Take the classes. If you do well and it is easy for you take more classes. but you need more. like a writer, you need to know about what you write so you also should study accounting, engineering o film making or whatever. Nothing beat formal education at the university level.

The other thing is to just do it. All you need is any kind of a computer. Just think of some simple small project. Keyword is "small". get that to work. repeat as required.

Soulstorm
Mar 6, 2007, 02:39 PM
Yes, programming requires imagination and being creative. But the things you can do are certainly worth taking the challenge to develop these certain areas of your brain.

For some people, programming is just not their thing. They can understand it, but they can't program. They can't figure out how to break a problem into many small ones, and how to unite each problem's solution in order to have their program up and running.

If you are interested in programming, I suggest you try it out. I think it's worth the shot, considering how addictive it is after you get involved with it. I have never seen a profession with people ready to give up their sleep for days just to figure out how to write an application.

scan
Mar 7, 2007, 08:59 PM
Interest and passion.

SMM
Mar 7, 2007, 09:07 PM
If you have a great deal of creativity, and think about macro applications, then you need good database skills and 4GL as well.

Nuc
Mar 7, 2007, 10:30 PM
I have a question. Are there any websites that show how to do numerical analysis in Obj-C? I know that there is one for C and Fortran (Numerical Recipes). I was just wondering how different it would to program this in Obj-C than say Fortran.

Thanks,

Nuc